Turkey sees currency driven inflation beginning to fade as the Lira rallies

A feature of the modern era is the way that we are presented crises but they then fall off the radar screen. An example of this has been Turkey which hit the media heights but has now faded away. Let us update ourselves via the view of Commerzbank on last months central bank meeting.

The Turkish central bank (CBT) left its benchmark interest rate unchanged at today’s meeting. In our view, this was a major policy mistake. CBT commented that it maintains a tight policy stance. But, when the benchmark rate is 24% and inflation is also 24%, how is this stance “tight”? The decision shows that CBT has not morphed into an active inflation-targeting central bank as some government officials have claimed. Rather CBT is simply taking the path of least resistance – since the market is forgiving at the moment, why ruffle political feathers by continuing to hike rates? Given this CB attitude, prepare for more lira volatility down the line.”  ( via FXStreet )

There is a large amount to cover here and let us start with the idea that a major mistake was made. Also that this from the CBRT is wrong.

The tight stance in monetary policy will be maintained decisively until the inflation outlook displays a significant improvement…….Accordingly, the Committee has decided to maintain the tight monetary policy stance and keep the policy rate (one week repo auction rate) constant at 24 percent.

There are many ways of measuring such a concept but an interest-rate of 24% on its own in these times makes you think, especially if we recall that it had been raised by 6.25% at the previous meeting. How many countries even have interest-rates of 6.25% right now? The real issue here to my mind is that Commerzbank  lost perspective with this by looking at inflation at the moment rather than looking ahead. If we take the view of the CBRT from back then the outlook was this.

In this respect, inflation is projected to be 23.5 percent at end-2018, and then fall to 15.2 percent at end-2019 and 9.3 percent at end-2020 before stabilizing around 5 percent in the medium term. Forecasts are based on a monetary policy framework that envisages that the tight monetary policy stance will be maintained for an extended period.

On this basis if we look ahead to when we might expect the interest-rate rise to be fully effective we should start with the end-2019 figure of 15.2%. Against that outlook then a real interest-rate of 9% is for these times eye-wateringly tight. Of course caution is required as central banks are hardly the best forecasters, But I am reminded of the template I set out on the third of May for such a situation.

However some of the moves can make things worse as for example knee-jerk interest-rate rises. Imagine you had a variable-rate mortgage in Buenos Aires! You crunch your domestic economy when the target is the overseas one.

My warning was given when interest-rates in Argentina were 30.25%, by the end of that day they were 3% higher and now the LELIQ rate is 68.1%. Sadly they are living out my warning.

Inflation now

Let us bring this up to date from the Hurriyet Daily News.

Turkish annual inflation surged to 25 percent in October, official data showed on Nov. 5, hitting its highest in 15 years……..Month-on-month, consumer prices jumped 2.67 percent, the Turkish Statistical Institute (TÜİK) data showed, higher than the 2 percent forecast in a Reuters poll. Core inflation surged 24.34 annually. October  inflation was driven by a 12.74 percent month-on-month surge in clothing and shoe prices and a 4.15 percent rise in housing prices, the data showed.

On a yearly basis, the biggest price hike was in furnishing and household equipment in October with 37.92 percent.

Initially Commerzbank may think it was right but this is only a small nudge higher in annual terms as the monthly increase more than halves. We also get a reminder that this is inflation which is essentially exchange-rate driven by the way that the core inflation rate is so similar to the headline. This is joined by which sectors are influenced by imports showing it is a bad time to overhaul your wardrobe or redecorate your home. Speaking of homes there will be central bankers reading this thinking that the rise in house prices is a triumph. The wealth effects! The wealth effects! Back in your box please.

The Turkish Lira

There have been changes here as we look to see what influence it will have on inflation trends. Here is @UmarFarooq_

Turkish is regaining some of its loses, looks set to return to pre-sanction days of August. Went from 6.3 to 5.3 versus dollar in one month. Still a ways to go compared to one year ago, when it was 3.8

Some of the move has been in relation to political changes but from our point of view that only matters if they intervene again. The fact is that a lot of inflationary pressure has faded in the move from the peak of 7.21 against the US Dollar at the height of the crisis to 5.34 as I type this.

So whilst there is still inflationary pressure in the system it has faded quite a lot and if you believe World Economics things are still out of line.

The Turkish Lira has an FX rate of 5.7 but a PPP value of 2.72 against the USD. ( PPP is Purchasing Power Parity)

Of course with inflation so high PPP may need a bit of an update.

Comment

The exchange-rate is the (F)X-Factor here but the inflation trend is now turning although due to base effects the headline may not respond for a couple of months or so. In some ways like so many things these days events have sped up and it has been like a crisis on speed. Here is the latest official trade data via Google Translate.

Our foreign trade deficit decreased by 92.8% to 529 million dollars in October compared to the same period of the previous year……..October, our exports increased by 13.1% compared to the same month of the previous year and reached 15 billion 732 million  dollars. Our exports increased to the highest level of all time and 
broke the record of the Republican history. 
In October, our imports decreased by 23.5 percent to 16 billion 261 million dollars.

There is an intriguing hint that the Ottoman export performance may have been quite something but we learn several things. Turkey seems to have a very price competitive economy as we see both exports and imports responding in size and in short order. We also have a large slow down and indeed recessionary hint from the size of the fall in imports. Next we admire their ability to have the October figures available on the 1st of November. Also if we look at the year so far you might be surprised at one of the names below.

In January-October period, exports to Germany increased 8.7% to $ 13.5 billion, while exports to the UK increased 17.5% to $ 9.3 billion.

Also Turkey seems to have avoided the automotive slow down which today has spread to Ford suppliers in Valencia.

Thus looking ahead the inflationary episode is now fading as ironically another consequence of the lower exchange-rate which is trade looks to be moving into surplus. For once the real economy is moving as quickly as the financial one. However one aspect that we do not know yet is the size of the slow down or recession partly because a sign of it – lower imports – flatters GDP via trade and often more quickly than the other numbers we receive show the actual cause of it. If you want a Commerzbank style Turkish economy imagine all of the above with another interest-rate increase……

 

 

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8 thoughts on “Turkey sees currency driven inflation beginning to fade as the Lira rallies

  1. Hello Shaun,

    So to me it seems that despite decades of our CB saying that low inflation is good and now they want to go hot turkey on having an annual inflation of 25 percent too?

    thats crazy – ok I know why our CB would like Turkish inflation – too much debt but inflation hits the poor and middle incomes , as always the rich can pay themselves more !

    Forbin

    • Hi Forbin

      They want price rises for anything that is not in the inflation numbers which is why we have seen asset prices boom. Of course some do gain but everyone else has to pay an expensive price if they join in. House prices are the obvious example but it can be true of bond prices are for example those looking at annuities do not get much bang for their buck these days because bonds are so expensive.

      Also these days the old relationships between inflation and wages are broken.

  2. Remember that Turkey has the only flat screen TV plant left in the greater European area ( yes it is Asia Minor but we still count it ). The current Finlux brand is made there but they also do OEM for a lot of other companies. Turkey also produces a lot of clothing for us too.

    Long gone are the days when your TV was made in South Wales as the Panasonic factory closed a while back.

    • Hi bootsy

      I used to think that Israel was stretching the Eurovision definition but as Australia way gazumped that, then I have to give you your greater European area. As to the economy we may have been buying more clothes and there does seem to be ever larger TVs so cheers for some detail as to our imports from Turkey.

      Oh and as I look at my TV across the room it says Panasonic……

  3. Hello Shaun,

    interesting to see that Turkey has 55% of electricity supplied by fossil fuels and is looking to build 2-3 nuclear plants ( Russian – the West will not help) . Also to expand HEPP as they have a mountainous terrain. Solar is expected to be good too. potential for Geo-thermal is good.

    the regulatory regime seems to built along European lines.

    so long as they don’t go too authoritarian they might be ok, energy independence is a major goal ( unlike us ……)

    Forbin

    • Hi Bones

      Nice to hear from you again and thanks for the link. I look forwards to Saturday with a bit more confidence after beating SA but also realise we were lucky that their line out thrower was unable to hit a barn door. Also if Saturday was any guide then Brad Shields looks like a 5th columnist.

      As to (new) radicals they used to produce some decent music

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