Portugal has house price growth of 10% but apparently negative inflation!

It is time to turn our telescope towards Portugal as we have not looked at it for a while and signals abound that the times they are a-changing. Let me give you an example of that from this morning.

“The eurozone economy ground to a halt in
September, the PMI surveys painting the darkest
picture since the current period of expansion began
in mid-2013. GDP looks set to rise by 0.1% at best
in the third quarter, with signs of further momentum
being lost as we head into the fourth quarter,
meaning the risk of recession is now very real.” ( IHS Markit )

Actually those surveys were already projecting growth at 0.1% so I am not sure how it stays there with the reading falling from 51.9 to 50.1. Perhaps it is a refreshing acknowledgement that the survey is much blunter than using decimal points. Also ther are some grim portents looking ahead.

Export trade remained a key source of new
business weakness as highlighted by another
monthly decline in overall new export orders.
According to the PMI figures, exports have been
falling throughout the past year and September’s
deterioration was the sharpest since composite
export data were first available just over five years
ago.

There is a nuance here in that the Euro area PMI survey is for the larger economies so not Portugal. But it does provide a background as well as likely trend. Also I have looked at the export trend in particular as this is an issue for Portugal on several fronts. If we look back in time we see that its regular visits to the International Monetary Fund or IMF for help and aid have been driven by trade deficits. Next if we move forwards to the Euro area crisis from around 2011/12 one of the policies applied was called “internal devaluation” which was to make the economy more competitive in trade terms. Oh and as an aside “internal devaluation”  essentially means lower real wages, it just sounds better.

This feeds into a current feature of the Portuguese economy which has been the growth of the motor sector which accounts for around 4% of economic output or GDP. This has been a trend in that against the stereotype car production in the Euro area has headed south into the Iberian peninsular. Portugal has benefited from this with the flagship being the large Volkswagen operation there. In January Caixa Bank did some research on the sector showing its significance.

 in the latter part of 2018, exports of the automotive industry reached 13.0% of the total exports of goods (the highest figure since the end of 2004) and 3.7% of GDP (an all-time high). In addition, as can be seen in the second chart, in October 2018 the sector’s exports registered a growth of 39.4% year-on-year (reaching 7.5 billion euros for the 12-month cumulative total).

This has been a good news story but we now look at it with not a little trepidation as it was only yesterday we looked at manufacturing problems which have been driven by the motor sector. The reputation of Volkswagen is not what it was either.

Trade Figures

If we look at the official data we see this.

In July 2019, exports and imports of goods recorded nominal year-on-year growth rates of +1.3% and +7.9%
respectively (-8.3% and -3.7% in the same order, in June 2019). The emphasis was on the increase of 27.9% in
imports of Transport equipment, mainly Other transport equipment (mostly Airplanes), contributing by +4.2 p.p. to the total year-on-year rate of change.

If we take out what was presumably an aircraft purchase by TAP we see that import growth was at 3.7% well above export growth and not only was there a deficit but it is growing.

The trade balance deficit amounted to EUR 1,751 million in July 2019, increasing by EUR 452 million when compared
to the same month of 2018.

So we see a troubling picture. But we can add to this as monthly figures are unreliable in this area and we are not allowing for a strength of Portugal which is tourism so let us widen our search.

The goods account deficit increased by €2,028 million and the services account surplus declined by €137 million year on year.

In the first seven months of the year, exports of goods and services grew by 3% (2.2% in goods and 4.6% in services) and imports rose by 7.4% (6.7% in goods and 10.8% in services). ( Bank of Portugal )

As you can see the general picture remains the same of a rising deficit although the nuance changes as the export picture gets better. It looks as though tourism has helped but has been swamped by imports of unspecified services.

Before I move on the motor industry has more than a few similarities with the UK.

Lastly, despite the buoyancy of exports in the automotive sector as a whole, in net terms the sector’s trade balance remains negative. However, this situation has improved considerably in the last year: in October 2018, the balance of the automotive sector stood at –1.3 billion euros, compared to –2.7 billion euros in October 2017.  ( Caixa Bank)

Production

On Monday we were updated but as you can see there is little detail.

Industrial Production year-on-year change rate was -4.8% in August (-2.4% in the previous month). Manufacturing
Industry year-on-year change rate was -1.7% (-0.4% in July).

According to Trading Economics we do have some car production data for the month before.

Car production in Portugal decreased 4.2 percent year-on-year to 20,969 units in July 2019.

We do have the official view on September though for manufacturing overall.

In Manufacturing Industry, the confidence indicator decreased in September, reversing the increase observed in
August. The evolution of the indicator reflected the negative contribution of the balances of the opinions on global
demand and on the evolution of stocks of finished products, while the opinions on the production perspectives
stabilized.

Comment

Before this new phase there was much to like about the economic performance of Portugal. The cold recessionary and indeed depressionary winds of the Euro area crisis had been replaced by some badly needed economic growth. This meant that the unemployment situation has improved considerably from the crisis highs.

The provisional unemployment rate estimate for August 2019 was 6.2% and decreased by 0.2 pp from the previous month.

Indeed the past was revised higher still last month.

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) grew 3.5% in real terms in 2017, where the high growth of Investment stands out
(11.9%). In 2018, GDP presented a growth rate of 2.4% in real terms, where Investment remained as the most
dynamic component (growth rate of 6.2%).

So the number I looked at back on the 9th of May will be better than this now.

In 2018 real GDP was 1.2% higher than in 2008…

So far the official data still looks good.

In comparison with the first quarter of 2019, GDP increased by 0.5% in real terms, maintaining the growth rate
recorded in the previous quarter.

The fear though is that the growth phase was driven higher by the Euro boom and ECB policy and to add to the trade fears above there is this.

The House Price Index (HPI) increased 10.1% in the 2nd quarter of 2019, when compared to the same period of 2018, 0.9 percentage point (pp) more than in the previous quarter………On a quarter-to-quarter basis, the HPI grew 3.2%.

This leaves me with two thoughts for you. Firstly Portuguese first time buyers must wonder how there can be no inflation?

The estimate of the Portuguese Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices (HICP) annual rate of change was -0.3% (-0.1% in August).

Next that it was overheating issues that have led to my long-running theme for Portugal that economic growth does not average more than 1% for long. Can anybody spot any signs of that?

The Investing Channel

4 thoughts on “Portugal has house price growth of 10% but apparently negative inflation!

  1. Hello Shaun,

    yes its a sign of our times . Housing is non core , same as food and fuel .

    eventually as the consumer economy goes phut ! , the CPI figures will become meaningless ( if not already ).

    Forbin

    • Hi Forbin

      I had not thought of it in that way but yes. In fact it is even worse as housing is so unnecessary in the world of the Euro establishment and central bankers that they ignore those who own their own homes entirely. After all who needs shelter?

  2. Great blog and great video as usual, Shaun.
    I wasn’t aware that motor vehicle production in the EU was moving south into Iberia just as in the NAFTA countries it is moving south into Mexico and the southern United States. I imagine labour costs must be a big consideration in both cases.
    Re the Portuguese housing sector, the Eurostat owner-occupied housing price indices tables are only updated with a big lag, and the most recent update is still for 2019Q1, but it shows Portugal’s quarter-on –quarter change at 2.2%, tied with the Netherlands for the highest inflation rate in the euro area. Number one spot goes to Portugal’s Iberian neighbour, Spain, at 2.5%. The 2019Q2 update should be available shortly.

    • Hi Andrew and thank you

      Yes I remember writing on here several years back that there was a drift in Euro area car production to Spain and Portugal. Since then it has gone further south as there have been developments across the Mediterranean into Tunisia and Algeria.

      The issue with the Eurostat house price indices is that it seems it is a case of going through the motions. The Euro establishment have no intention of letting house prices get into the inflation indices and wasted a couple of years of our time with their enquiry/review.

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