UK GDP growth is as flat as a pancake

Today brings us the last major set of UK economic data before the General Election on Thursday at least for those who vote in person. It is quite a set as we get trade, production, manufacturing and construction data but the headliners will be monthly and quarterly GDP. As the latter seem set to be close to and maybe below zero no doubt politicians will be throwing them around later. Let’s face it they have thrown all sorts of numbers around already in the campaign.

The UK Pound

This has been the economic factor which has changed the most recently although it has not got the attention it deserves in my opinion. At the time of writing the UK Pound £ is above US $1.31, 1.18 to the Euro and nearing 143 Yen. This means that the effective or trade-weighted index calculated by the Bank of England is at 81.1 which is about as good as it has been since the post EU leave vote fall ( there were similar levels in April of last year). This particular rally started on the 9th of August from just below 74 so it has been strong or if you prefer for perspective we opened the year at 76.4.

Thus using the old Bank of England rule of thumb we have seen the equivalent of more than a 1% rise in official interest-rates or Bank Rate in 2019 so far. This has produced two economic developments or at least contributed to them. The first is that inflation prospects look good and I mean by my definition not the Bank of England one. The CPI versions could head below 1% in the months to come and RPI towards 1.5%. The other is that it may have put a small brake on the UK economy and contributed to our weak growth trajectory although many producers are probably used to swings in the UK Pound by now.

Some good news

The trade figures will be helped by this from UK wind.

GB National Grid: #Wind is currently generating 13.01GW (33.08%) out of a total of 39.34GW

The catch is that of course we are reliant on the wind blowing for a reliable supply. Also that it is expensive especially in its offshore guise, as it it both outright expensive to add to the costs of a back-up.

GDP

As to growth well our official statisticians could not find any.

UK GDP was flat in the three months to October 2019.

If we look at the different sectors we see what has become a familiar pattern.

The services sector was the only positive contributor to gross domestic product (GDP) growth in the three months to October 2019, growing by 0.2%. Output in both the production and construction sectors contracted, by 0.7% and 0.3%, respectively. The weakness seen in construction was predominantly driven by a fall of 2.3% in October.

So services grew and production shrank with construction erratic but also overall lower. If you wish to go to another decimal place you can find a small smidgeon of growth as services pushed GDP up by 0.17%, production cost 0.1% and construction cost 0.02% leaving a net 0.05%. But that is spurious accuracy as that puts the numbers under too much pressure.

Services

There was something of note in the monthly series ( October).

Services also grew by 0.2% in October, with widespread growth in several industries. The most notable of these were real estate activities and professional, scientific and technical activities, which both contributed 0.06 percentage points to gross domestic product (GDP) growth. The latter was driven by strength in both architectural and engineering activities, and research and development.

Two things stand out from this. Firstly the quarterly growth was essentially October  and next that much of it was from real estate and architecture. Is Nine Elms booming again? But more seriously something is perhaps going on here that has not been picked up elsewhere.

Production

Here the news has been pretty gloomy all round although the energy part is good news in terms of better weather and less expense for consumers.

Total production output decreased by 0.7% for the three months to October 2019, compared with the three months to July 2019; this was led by manufacturing output, which fell by 0.7%, followed by falls in mining and quarrying (2.6%) and electricity and gas (1.0%).

This reminds us that these areas have been seeing a depression in the credit crunch era.

Production output in the UK remained 6.2% lower for the three months to October 2019 than the pre-downturn peak for the three months to March 2008……..Manufacturing output in the UK remained 3.5% lower for the three months to October 2019 than the pre-downturn peak for the three months to March 2008.

It was not so long ago that it looked like manufacturing was about to escape this but then the trade war happened.

There was a flicker in October alone but the impact of the swings in the pharmaceutical industry are usually much stronger than that.

The growth of 0.1% in total manufacturing output in October 2019, compared with September 2019, was mainly because of widespread strength, with 8 of the 13 subsectors displaying upward contributions. The largest of these came from the volatile pharmaceutical products subsector, which rose by 2.1%, following two consecutive periods of significant monthly weakness during August and September 2019.

Trade

The issue here is the uncertainty of the data which today has illustrated,

The total UK trade deficit (goods and services) widened £2.3 billion to £7.2 billion in the three months to October 2019, as imports grew faster than exports

That seems clear but then again maybe not.

Excluding unspecified goods (which includes non-monetary gold), the total trade deficit narrowed £4.3 billion to £2.9 billion in the three months to October 2019.

The oversea travel and tourism problems have still not be solved.

For earlier monthly releases of UK Trade
Statistics that have also been affected by this error, the versions on the website should be amended
to make clear to users that the errors led the Authority to suspend the National Statistics
designation on 14 November 2014.

Moving on there is also this.

In current prices, the trade in goods deficit widened £6.8 billion to £35.6 billion, largely driven by rising imports; the trade in services surplus widened £4.4 billion to £28.4 billion, largely driven by rising exports.

So there is hope for the UK services exports which seem to be doing well and I have long suspected have been under recorded. For example smaller businesses are likely to be missed out. The scale of this is simply unknown and as we have issues here this must feed into the wider GDP numbers which are so services driven.

So our trade problem is a case of definitely maybe.

Comment

We perhaps get the best perspective from the annual rate of GDP growth which is now 0.8% using the quarterly methodology. If we take out the spring blip that has been declining since the 2% of August 2018. There are some ying and yangs in the detail because of we start with the positive which is services growth ( 1.3%) it has been pulled higher by the information and communication category which is up by 5.4% and education which is up by 3%. But on the other side of the coin the depression in production and manufacturing has worsened as both have fallen by 1.5%. I have little faith in the construction numbers for reasons explained in the past but growth there has fallen to 0%.

There are lots of permutations for the General Election but yet another interest-rate cut by the Bank of England just got more likely. It meets next week. Also political spending plans are getting harder to afford in terms of economic growth,

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “UK GDP growth is as flat as a pancake

  1. Hello Shaun,

    re :” but yet another interest-rate cut by the Bank of England just got more likely. ”

    I reckon that’s 95 % certainty

    and 100% if Corbyn gets in! 😉

    Forbin

    • Hi Forbin

      Well maybe not as the UK Pound would be heading south and maybe rather quickly. I heard shadow Chancellor John McDonnell saying it would rise yesterday which is shall we say unlikely. Then there is the large fiscal boost that would be on its way.

      So I think the departing Governor Carney might leave things to his successor…

  2. And sterling just keeps going up and up, the forex market is anticipating us staying in the EU after a conservative victory and never leaving(and that’s before the farce of pretending to sort out a trade next year plays out, nothing a swift cut in interest rates and another devaluation won’t sort out.

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