The UK government plans to rip us all off

This morning has seen the publishing of some news which feels like it has come from another world.

The all items CPI annual rate is 1.7%, down from 1.8% in January…….The all items RPI annual rate is 2.5%, down from 2.7% last month.

Previously we would have been noting the good news and suggesting that more is to come as we look up the price chain.

The headline rate of output inflation for goods leaving the factory gate was 0.4% on the year to February 2020, down from 1.0% in January 2020. The price for materials and fuels used in the manufacturing process displayed negative growth of 0.5% on the year to February 2020, down from positive growth of 1.6% in January 2020.

There is something that remains relevant however as I note this piece of detail.

Petroleum products made the largest downward contribution to the change in the annual rate of output inflation. Crude oil provided the largest downward contribution to the change in the annual rate of input inflation.

That is something which is set to continue because if we look back to February the base for the oil price ( Brent Crude) was US $50 whereas as I type this it is US $27.50. So as you can see input and output costs are going to fall further. This will be offset a bit by the lower UK Pound £ but I will address it later. In terms of consumer inflation the February figures used are for diesel at 128.2 pence per litre whereas the latest weekly number is for 123.4 pence which is some 7.7% lower than a year ago. So there will be a downwards pull on inflation from this source.

There is a bit of an irony here because the Russo/Saudi turf war which began the oil price fall on the supply side has been overtaken by the large falls in demand we are seeing as economies slow. According to The Guardian we may run out of spaces to put it.

Analysts at Rystad estimate that the world has about 7.2bn barrels of crude and products in storage, including 1.3bn to 1.4bn barrels onboard oil tankers at sea.

In theory, it would take nine months to fill the world’s remaining oil stores, but constraints at many facilities will shorten this window to only a few months.

The Rip-Off

The plan hatched by a combination of HM Treasury and its independent puppets the UK Statistics Authority and the Office for National Statistics is to impose a type of stealth tax of 1% per annum. How?

In drawing up his advice, the National Statistician considered the views of the Stakeholder Advisory Panel on Consumer Prices (APCP-S). The Board accepted his advice and that was the basis of the proposals we put to the Chancellor to cease publication of RPI and in the short term to bring the methods of CPIH into RPI.The Chancellor responded that he was not minded to promote legislation to end RPI, but that the Government intended to consult on whether to bring the methods in CPIH into RPI between 2025 and 2030, effectively aligning the measures.

The emphasis is mine and the plan is to put the fantasy Imputed Rents that are used in the widely ignored CPIH into the RPI. There is good reason that the CPIH has been ignored so let me explain why. In the UK the housing market is a big deal and so you might think what owner-occupiers pay would be a considerable influence on inflation. But in 2002 a decision was made to completely ignore it in the new UK inflation measure called CPI ( Consumer Prices Index).

Putting it in was supposed to be on its way but plans took a decade and the saga took a turn in 2012 when the first effort to use Imputed Rents began. It got strong support from the Financial Times economics editor Chris Giles at the time. He stepped back from that when it emerged that there had been a discontinuity in the numbers, which in statistical terms is a disaster. So the fantasy numbers ( owner-occupiers do not pay rent) are based on an unproven rental series.

Why would you put a 737 Max style system when you have a reliable airplane? You would not, as most sensible people would be debating between the use of the things that are paid such as house prices and mortgage payments. That is what is planned in the new inflation measure which has been variously called HII and HCI. You may not be surprised to learn that there have been desperate official efforts to neuter this. Firstly by planning to only produce it annually and more latterly by trying to water down any house price influence.

At a time like this you may not think it is important but when things return to normal losing around 1% per year every year will make you poorer as decisions are made on it. Also it will allow government’s to claim GDP and real wages are higher than they really are.

Gold

There is a lot going on here as it has seen its own market discontinuity which I will cover in a moment. But we know money is in the offing as I note this from the Financial Times.

Gold continued to push higher on Tuesday as a recent wave of selling dried up and Goldman Sachs told its clients the time had come to buy the “currency of last resort”. Like other asset classes, gold was hit hard in the recent scramble for US dollars, falling more than 12 per cent from its early March peak of around $1,700 a troy ounce to $1,460 last week.  The yellow metal started to see a resurgence on Monday, rising by more than 4 per cent after the Federal Reserve said it would buy unlimited amounts of government bonds and the US dollar fell.

So we know that the blood funnel of the Vampire Squid is up and sniffing. On its view of ordinary clients being “Muppets” one might reasonably conclude it has some gold to sell.

Also there have been problems in the gold markets as I was contacted yesterday on social media asking about the gold price. I was quoting the price of the April futures contact ( you can take the boy out of the futures market but you cannot etc….) which as I type this is US $1653. Seeing as it was below US $1500 that is quite a rally except the spot market was of the order of US $50 below that. There are a lot of rumours about problems with the ability of some to deliver the gold that they owe which of course sets alight the fire of many conspiracy theories we have noted. This further went into suggestions that some banks have singed their fingers in this area and are considering withdrawing from the market.

Ole Hansen of Saxo Bank thinks the virus is to blame.

Having seen 100’s of anti-bank and anti-paper #gold tweets the last couple of days I think I will give the metal a rest while everyone calm down. We have a temporary break down in logistics not being helped by CME’s stringent delivery rules of 100oz bars only.

So we will wait and see.

Ah, California girls are the greatest in the world
Each one a song in the making
Singin’ rock to me I can hear the melody
The story is there for the takin’
Drivin’ over Kanan, singin’ to my soul
There’s people out there turnin’ music into gold ( John Stewart )

 

Comment

Quite a few systems are creaking right now as we see the gold market hit the problems seen by bond markets where prices are inconsistent. Ironically the central banks tactics are to help with that but their strategy is fatally flawed because if you buy a market on an enormous scale to create what is a fake price ( lower bond yields) then liquidity will dry up. I have written before about ruining bond sellers ( Italy) and buyers will disappear up here. Please remember that when the central banks tell us it is nothing to do with them and could not possibly have been predicted. Meanwhile the US Federal Reserve will undertake another US $125 billion of QE bond purchases today and the Bank of England some £3 billion. The ECB gives fewer details but will be buying on average between 5 and 6 billion Euros per day.

Next we have the UK deep state in operation as they try to impose a stealth tax via the miss measurement of inflation. Because they have lost the various consultations so far and CPIH has remained widely ignored the new consultation is only about when and not if.

The Authority’s consultation, which will be undertaken jointly with that of HM Treasury, will begin on 11 March. It will be open to responses for six weeks, closing on 22 April. HM Treasury will consult on the appropriate timing for the proposed changes to the RPI, while the Authority will consult on the technical method of making that change to the RPI.

Meanwhile for those of you who like some number crunching here is how a 123.4 pence for the price of oil gets broken down. I have done some minor rounding so the numbers add up.

Oil  44.9 pence

Duty 58 pence

VAT 20.5 pence

The world wants and needs US Dollars and it wants them now

In the midst if the financial market turmoil there has been a consistent theme which can be missed. Currency markets rarely get too much of a look in on the main stream media unless they can find something dramatic. But CNN Business has given it a mention.

The US dollar is rallying against virtually every other currency and it seems like nothing can stop it.

There are lots of consequences and implications here but let us start with some numbers. My home country has seen an impact as the UK Pound £ has been pushed back to US $1.20 and even the Euro which has benefited from Carry Trade reversals ( people borrowed in Euros to take advantage of negative interest-rates) has been pushed below 1.10. Even the Japanese Yen which is considered a safe haven in such times has been pushed back to 107.50. We can get more thoughts on this from The Straits Times from earlier today.

SYDNEY (REUTERS) – The Australian dollar was ravaged on Wednesday (March 18) after toppling to 17-year lows as fears of a coronavirus-induced global recession sent investors fleeing from risk assets and commodities, with panic selling even spilling over into sovereign bonds.

The New Zealand dollar was also on the ropes at US$0.5954, having shed 1.7 per cent overnight to the lowest since mid-2009.

The Aussie was pinned at US$0.6004 after sliding 2 per cent on Tuesday to US$0.5958, depths not seen since early 2003.

So there are issues ans especially in a land down under as an Aussie Dollar gets closer to the value of a Kiwi one. In fact the Aussie has been hit again today falling to US $0.5935 as I type this. No doubt it is being affected by lower commodity prices signalled in some respects by Dr. Copper falling by over 4% to US $2.20

Sadly the effective or trade-weighted index is not up to date but as of the 13th of this month the official US Federal Reserve version was at 120.7 as opposed to the 115 it began the year.

Demand for Dollars

It was only on Monday we looked at the modifications to the liquidity or FX Swaps between the world’s main central banks. Hot off the wires is this.

BoE Allots $8.210B In 7 Day USD Repo Operation ( @LiveSquawk )

This means that even in the UK we are seeing demands for US Dollars which cannot be easily got in the markets right now. Maybe whoever this is has been pushing the UK Pound £ down but we get a perspective by the fact that this facility had not been used since mid-December when the grand sum of $5 million was requested. There were larger requests back in November 2008.

I was surprised that so little notice was taken when I pointed this out yesterday.

Interesting to see the Bank of Japan supply some US $30.3 billion this morning until June 11th. Was it Japanese banks who were needing dollars?

Completing the set comes the European Central Bank or ECB.

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – The European Central Bank on Wednesday lent euro zone banks $112 billion at two auctions aimed at easing stress in the U.S. dollar funding market, part of the financial fallout of the coronavirus outbreak.

The ECB said it had allotted $75.82 billion in its new 84-day auction, introduced by major central banks last weekend in response to global demand for greenbacks, and $36.27 billion at its regular 7-day tender.

Actually it was good the ECB found the time as it is otherwise busy arguing with itself.

With regards to comments made by Governor Holzmann, the ECB states:

The Governing Council was unanimous in its analysis that in addition to the measures it decided on 12 March 2020, the ECB will continue to monitor closely the consequences for the economy of the spreading coronavirus and that the ECB stands ready to adjust all of its measures, as appropriate, should this be needed to safeguard liquidity conditions in the banking system and to ensure the smooth transmission of its monetary policy in all jurisdictions.

So we see now why the Swap Lines were reinforced and buttressed.

Oh and even the Swiss Banks joined in.

*SNB GETS $315M BIDS FOR 84-DAY DOLLAR REPO ( @GregBeglaryan )

Emerging Markets

This is far worse and let me give you a different perspective on this. During the period of the trade war we looked regularly at the state of play in the Pacific as it was being disproportionately affected.

Let me hand you over to @Trinhnomics or Trinh Nguyen.

Swap lines to EM please (also to Australia – we like Australia in Asia too as it’s APAC). “the supply of liquidity by central banks is beneficial only to those who can access it,

Her concern was over that region and EM is Emerging Markets. I enquired further.

Operationally, the bid for USD in Asia and squeeze in liquidity reflects the massive role of the USD in the global economy & finance. For example, 87% of China merchandise trade is invoiced in US. and the loss of income from export earnings will further push higher the demand of USD. To overcome the global USD squeeze, the Fed must step up its operational support via swap lines with economies such as South Korea.

That was from a piece she wrote for the Financial Times but got cut from it. On twitter she went further with a theme regular readers will find familiar

Guys, the reason why we have a dollar shortage is because we have levered!!!!!!!!!!! So when income collapses, we got major problem because we have leveraged & so debt needs servicing etc. Aniwaize, the stress u see is because we live in a world that’s too leveraged!!!

And again although I would point out that leverage can simply be a gamble rather than a hope for better times.

Don’t forget that low rates only lower interest expense, u still got principal that is high if ur debt stock is high. When u lever, u think the FUTURE IS BETTER THAN TODAY. Obvs very clearly that whoever thought there was growth is in for a surprise given the pandemic situation.

She looks at this from the perspective of the Malaysian Ringgit which has fallen to 4.37 versus the US Dollar and the Singapore Dollar which is at 1.44.

Comment

We are now seeing a phase of King Dollar or Holla Dollar and let me add some more places into the mix. We have previously looked at countries which have borrowed in US Dollars and they will be feeling the strain especially if they are commodity producers as well. This covers quite a few countries in Latin America and of course some of those have their own problems too boot. I also recall Ukraine running the US Dollar as pretty much a parallel currency.

The beat goes on.

In times of stress, capital flees emerging markets to seek safety in $USD . This crisis is no different. ( @IceCapGlobal)

which got this reply.

Investors have yanked at least US$55bn from EMs since January 21, according to the Institute of International Finance, exceeding the withdrawal in 2008. ( @alexharfouche1 )

Let me finish by reminding you that ordinarily we discuss matters around the price of something. But here as well as that we are discussing how much you can get and for some right now that people will not trade with you at all. That is why we are seeing what is effectively the world’s central bank the Federal Reserve offering US Dollars in so many different ways. It is spraying US $500 billion Repo operations around like confetti but I am reminded of the words of Glenn Frey.

The heat is on, on the street
Inside your head, on every beat
And the beat’s so loud, deep inside
The pressure’s high, just to stay alive
‘Cause the heat is on

The Investment Channel

The biggest move by the US Federal Reserve was the one concerning liquidity or FX Swaps

Last night the week started with the arrival of the Kiwi cavalry as the Reserve Bank of New Zealand announced this.

The Official Cash Rate (OCR) is 0.25 percent, reduced from 1.0 percent, and will remain at this level for at least the next 12 months.

With international sporting events being cancelled this was unlikely to have been caused by a defeat for the All Blacks as the statement then confirmed.

The negative economic implications of the COVID-19 virus continue to rise warranting further monetary stimulus.

But soon any muttering in the virtual trading rooms was replaced by quite a roar as this was announced.

Consistent with its statutory mandate, the Committee seeks to foster maximum employment and price stability. The effects of the coronavirus will weigh on economic activity in the near term and pose risks to the economic outlook. In light of these developments, the Committee decided to lower the target range for the federal funds rate to 0 to 1/4 percent. The Committee expects to maintain this target range until it is confident that the economy has weathered recent events and is on track to achieve its maximum employment and price stability goals. This action will help support economic activity, strong labor market conditions, and inflation returning to the Committee’s symmetric 2 percent objective. ( US Federal Reserve)

So a 1% interest-rate cut to the previous credit crunch era low for interest-rates and whilst the timing was a surprise it was not a shock. This is because on Saturday evening President Donald Trump had ramped up the pressure by saying that he had the ability to fire the Chair Jeroen Powell. The odd points in the statement were the reference to returning to being “on track” for its objectives which seems like from another world as well as reminding people of Greece which has been “on track” to recovery all the way through its collapse into depression. Also “strong labor market conditions” is simply untrue now. All that is before the reference to inflation returning to target when some will be paying much higher prices for goods due to shortages.

QE5

This came sliding down the slipway last night which will have come as no surprise to regular readers who have followed to my “To Infinity! And Beyond!” theme.

To support the smooth functioning of markets for Treasury securities and agency mortgage-backed securities that are central to the flow of credit to households and businesses, over coming months the Committee will increase its holdings of Treasury securities by at least $500 billion and its holdings of agency mortgage-backed securities by at least $200 billion.

This is quite punchy as we note that the previous peak for its balance sheet was 4.5 trillion Dollars and now it will go above 5 trillion. The Repos may ebb and flow bad as we stand it looks set to head to 5.2 trillion or so. The odd part of the statement was the reference to the “smooth functioning” of the Treasury Bond market when buying such a large amount further reduces liquidity in a market with liquidity problems already. For those unaware off the run bonds ( non benchmarks) have been struggling recently. The situation for mortgage bonds is much clearer as some will no doubt be grateful for any buyers at all. Although whether buying the latter is a good idea for the US taxpayer underwriting all of this is a moot point. At least the money used is effectively free at around 0%.

Liquidity Swaps

This was the most significant announcement of all for two reasons. Firstly it was the only one which was coordinated and secondly because it stares at the heart of one of the main problems right now. Cue Aloe Blacc.

I need a dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
Hey hey
Well I need a dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
Hey hey
And I said I need dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
And if I share with you my story would you share your dollar with me
Bad times are comin’ and I reap what I don’t sow.

I have suggested several times recently that there will be banks and funds in trouble right now as we see simultaneous moves in bond, equity and oil markets. That will only be getting worse as the price of a barrel of Brent Crude Oil approaches US $31. This means that some – and the rumour factory will be at full production – will be finding hard to get US Dollars and some may not be able to get them at all. So the response is that the main central banks will be able to.

The Bank of Canada, the Bank of England, the Bank of Japan, the European Central Bank, the Federal Reserve, and the Swiss National Bank are today announcing a coordinated action to enhance the provision of liquidity via the standing U.S. dollar liquidity swap line arrangements.

These central banks have agreed to lower the pricing on the standing U.S. dollar liquidity swap arrangements by 25 basis points, so that the new rate will be the U.S. dollar overnight index swap (OIS) rate plus 25 basis points.

So it appears that price matters for some giving us a hint of the scale of the issue here. If I recall correct a 0.5% cut was made as the credit crunch got into gear. Also there was this enhancement to the operations.

 To increase the swap lines’ effectiveness in providing term liquidity, the foreign central banks with regular U.S. dollar liquidity operations have also agreed to begin offering U.S. dollars weekly in each jurisdiction with an 84-day maturity, in addition to the 1-week maturity operations currently offered. These changes will take effect with the next scheduled operations during the week of March 16.

Then we got something actively misleading because the real issue here is for overseas markets.

The new pricing and maturity offerings will remain in place as long as appropriate to support the smooth functioning of U.S. dollar funding markets.

For newer readers wondering who these might be? The main borrowers in recent times have been the European Central Bank and less so the Bank of Japan. This is repeated at the moment as some US $58 million was borrowed by a Euro area bank last week. Very small scale but maybe a toe in the water.

Comment

Some of the things I have feared are taking place right now. We see for example more and more central banks clustering around an interest-rate of 0% or ZIRP ( Zero Interest-Rate Policy). Frankly I expect more as you know my view on official denials.

#BREAKING Fed’s Powell says negative interest rates not likely to be appropriate ( @AFP )

You could also throw in the track record of the Chair of the US Federal Reserve for (bad) luck.

Meanwhile rumours of fund collapses are rife.

Platinum down 18%, silver down 14% Palladium down 12%, Gold down 4% – someone is getting liquidated ( @econhedge )

Some of that may be self-fulfilling but there is a message in that particular bottle.

As to what happens next? I will update more as this week develops but I expect more fiscal policy back stopped by central banks. More central banks to buy equities as I note the Bank of Japan announced earlier it will double its operations this year. Helicopter Money is a little more awkward though as gathering to collect it would spread the Corona Virus. As Bloc Party put it.

Are you hoping for a miracle? (it’s not enough, it’s not enough)
Are you hoping for a miracle? (it’s not enough, it’s not enough)
Are you hoping for a miracle? (it’s not enough, it’s not enough)
Are you hoping for a miracle? (it’s not enough, it’s not enough)

Let me sign off for today by welcoming the new Bank of England Governor Andrew Bailey.

Podcast

I would signpost the second part of it this week as eyes will turn to the problems in the structure of the ECB likely to be exposed in a crisis.

 

 

Welcome to the oil price shock of 2020

Today is one where we are mulling how something which in isolation is good news has led to so much financial market distress overnight and this morning. So much so that for once comparisons with 2008 and the credit crunch have some credibility.

And I felt a rush like a rolling bolt of thunder
Spinning my head around and taking my body under
Oh, what a night ( The Four Seasons)

Just as people were getting ready for markets to be impacted by the lock down of Lombardy and other regions in Italy there was a Mexican stand-off in the oil market. This came on top of what seemed at the time large falls on Friday where depending on which oil benchmark you looked at the fall was either 9% or 10%.Then there was this.

DUBAI, March 8 (Reuters) – Saudi Arabia, the world’s top oil exporter, plans to raise its crude oil production significantly above 10 million barrels per day (bpd) in April, after the collapse of the OPEC supply cut agreement with Russia, two sources told Reuters on Sunday.

State oil giant Aramco will boost its crude output after the current OPEC+ cut deal expires at the end of March, the sources said.

Whilst they are playing a game of who blinks first the oil price has collapsed. From Platts Oil

New York — Crude futures tumbled roughly 30% on the open Sunday evening, following news that Saudi Aramco cut its Official Selling Prices for April delivery. ICE front-month Brent fell $14.25 on the open to $31.02/b, before climbing back to trade around $35.22/b at 2238 GMT. NYMEX front-month crude futures fell $11.28 to $30/b on the open, before rising to trade at around $32.00/b.

The Real Economy

Let us get straight to the positive impact of this because in the madness so many are missing it.

We find that a 10 percent increase in global oil inflation increases, on average, domestic inflation by about 0.4
percentage point on impact, with the effect vanishing after two years and being similar between advanced and developing economies. We also find that the effect is asymmetric, with positive oil price shocks having a larger effect than negative ones. ( IMF 2017 Working Paper )

There is plenty of food for thought in the reduced relative impact of lower oil prices for those who believe they are passed on with less enthusiasm and sometimes not passed on at all. But if the IMF are right we will see a reduction in inflation of around 0.6% should oil prices remain here.

As to the impact on economic growth the literature has got rather confused as this from the Bank of Spain in 2016 shows.

Although our findings point to a negative influence from oil price increases on economic growth, this phenomenon is far from being stable and has gone through different phases over time. Further research is necessary to fathom this complex relationship.

Let me give you an example of how it will work which is via higher real wages. Of course central bankers do not want to tell us that because they are trying to raise inflation and are hoping people will not spot that lower real wages will likely be a consequence. To be fair to the IMF it does manage to give us a good laugh.

The impact of oil price shocks, however,
has declined over time due in large part to a better conduct of monetary policy.

That does give us the next link in the story but before we get there let me give you two major problems right now which have links. The first is that the oil price Mexican stand-off has a silent player which is the US shale oil industry. As I have pointed out before it runs on a cash flow business model which has just seen likely future flows of cash drop by a third.

Now we get to the second impact which is on credit markets. Here is WordOil on this and remember this is from Thursday.

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) –Troubled oil and gas companies may have a hard time persuading their bankers to keep extending credit as the outlook darkens for energy, potentially leading to more bankruptcies in the already-beleaguered sector.

Lenders evaluate the value of oil reserves used as collateral for bank loans twice a year, a process that’s not likely to go well amid weak commodity prices, falling demand, shuttered capital markets and fears of coronavirus dampening global growth. Banks may cut their lending to cash-starved energy companies by 10% to 20% this spring, according to investors and analysts.

That will all have got a lot worse on Friday and accelerated today. I think you can all see the problem for the shale oil producers but the issue is now so large it will pose a risk to some of those who have lent them the money.

US oil/junk bonds: busts to show folly of last reboot ( FT Energy )

I am not sure where the FT is going with this bit though.

There will be no shortage of capital standing ready to recapitalise the energy sector….

Perhaps they have a pair of glasses like the ones worn by Zaphod Beeblebrox in The Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy. Meanwhile back in the real world there was this before the latest falls.

More than one-third of high-yield energy debt is trading at distressed levels. Oil and gas producers with bonds trading with double-digit yields include California Resources Corp., Range Resources Corp., Southwestern Energy Co., Antero Resources Corp., Comstock Resources Inc., Extraction Oil & Gas Inc. and Oasis Petroleum Inc. ( World Oil)

Central Banks

As the oil price news arrived central bankers will have been getting text messages to come into work early. Let me explain why. Firstly we know that some credit markets were already stressed and that the US Federal Reserve had been fiddling while Rome burns as people sang along with Aloe Blacc.

I need a dollar, dollar a dollar is what I need
hey hey
Well I need a dollar, dollar a dollar is what I need
hey hey
And I said I need dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need.

Whoever decided to taper the fortnightly Repo operations to US $20 billion had enough issues when US $70 billion was requested on Thursday, now I guess he or she is not answering the phone. Anyway the role of a central bank in a crisis like this is to be lender of last resort and splash the cash. At the same time it should be doing emergency investigations to discover the true state of affairs in terms of solvency.

This is because some funds and maybe even banks must have been hit hard by this and may go under. Anyone long oil has obvious problems and if that is combined with oil lending it must look dreadful. If anyone has geared positions we could be facing another Long-Term Capital Management. Meanwhile in unrelated news has anyone mentioned the derivatives book of Deutsche Bank lately?

The spectre of more interest-rate cuts hangs over us like a sword of damocles. I type that because I think they will make things worse rather than better and central banks would be better employed with the liquidity issues above. They are much less glamorous but are certainly more effective in this type of crisis. Frankly I think further interest-rate cuts will only make things worse.

Comment

I have covered a lot of ground today but let me move onto home turf. We can also look at things via bond yields and it feels like ages ago that I marked your cards when it was only last Thursday! Anyway we have been on this case for years.

Treasury 10-Year Note Yield Slides Below 0.5% for First Time ( @DiMartinoBooth)

Yes it was only early last week that we noted a record low as it went below 1%. Meanwhile that was last night and this is now.

Overnight the US 10-year traded 0.33%, under 0.44% now. The longbond traded down to 0.70% overnight. The bond futures were up over 12 points. Now trading 0.85%. Note how “gappy” this chart is. Liquidity is an issue. ( @biancoresearch )

This really matters and not in the way you may be thinking. The obvious move is that if you are long bonds you have again done really well and congratulations. Also there is basically no yield these days as for example, my home country the UK has seen a negative Gilt yield this morning around the two-year maturity.

But the real hammer on the nail will not be in price ( interest-rates) it will be in quantity as some places will be unable to lend today. Some of it will be predictable ( oil) but in these situations there is usually something as well from left field. So let me end this part Hill Street Blues style.

Let’s be careful out there

Podcast

I have not mentioned stock markets today but I was on the case of bank shares in my weekly podcast. Because at these yields and interest-rates they lack a business model.

 

 

 

What does Safe Haven mean in these troubled times?

We find ourselves yet again in a crisis and are reminded that some perspective is needed.  From CNBC at the end of last year.

The S&P 500 has returned more than 50% since President Trump was elected, more than double the average market return of presidents three years into their term, according to Bespoke Investment Group.

After that the equity market took the advice of Jeff Lynne and ELO as 2020 began.

And you, and your sweet desire
You took me higher and higher, baby
It’s a livin’ thing

Whereas a few minutes ago Bloomberg tweeted this.

European equities are poised for their worst week since the 2008 financial crisis.

So ch-ch-changes and another clear reminder of this came from Bloomberg as recently as the 20th of this month.

Virgin Galactic climbed again to a record high, defying analysts who say the stock is overdue for correction

We can stay with the theme of the man who fell to earth because since then the share price has halved from $41.55 to $21.30 after hours last night.

If we take this as a broad sweep ELO were on the case it seems.

It’s a terrible thing to lose
It’s a given thing
What a terrible thing to lose

Where can you go?

Japanese Yen, Swiss Franc and Euro

You may be questioning two of those so let me explain. If you look back in time I wrote quite a few articles on the “Currency Twins” the Yen and the Swissy. This was because they were borrowed heavily in before the credit crunch and people rushed to cover positions as it developed. This was equivalent to buying them and they surged building a safe haven psychology. Although it was more minor there was some of this in the Euro as well.

If we move forwards to now the simplest is the Swiss Franc based as it is in a country which is considered safe and secure, hence the demand at times of fear and uncertainty. The Swiss National Bank has returned to selling the Swiss Franc recently to try and keep it down. Switching to the Yen the main issue here is the large size of Japanese overseas private investments. At times of uncertainty the fear is that the Japanese will start to repatriate this and push the Yen higher so markets shift the price just in case. The Euro is not quite so clear but the area does have strengths as for example its current account surplus. Also at times like this it gets a bit of a German sheen as well.

You may have noted an interesting similarity here. This is that all these three currencies have negative interest-rates and I have posted before that there are avenues ahead where the SNB will cut to -1%.

US Treasury Bonds

There are two factors here of which the opening one is the effective reserve currency status of the US Dollar. So you can always buy commodities and the like in US Dollars with no risk of devaluation or depreciation. Next comes the fact that bonds offer a guaranteed return as in you will always get your nominal US $100 back as well as some interest, or if you prefer yield or coupon. So you get both the reserve currency and some interest, hence the knee-jerk rush into US Treasuries at a time like this.

The problem is the old familiar refrain that things aren’t what they used to be. In particular you get a lot less yield now as for example both the two and five-year yields have fallen below 1% overnight. I have chosen these because in a safe haven trade you tend  buy short maturity bonds. But it is also true that longer-dated bonds do not offer much these days as even the ten-year Treasury Note has seen its yield fall below 1.2% now. Some events here are contradictory because the two-year future is up 27 ticks this week and whilst that is really rather satisfactory for those who got in early it should not move like that if you are looking for stability. You do not want Blood Sweat and Tears.

What goes up must come down
Spinnin’ wheel got to go ’round
Talkin’ ’bout your troubles it’s a cryin’ sin
Ride a painted pony let the spinnin’ wheel spin

Some of the logic above applies to other bond markets which have soared too. Although in some cases the logic gets awkward because both the German and Swiss bond markets have yields which are negative across all maturities. So here we are back to the currency being a safe haven and such a strong one that people are willing to accept increasingly negative yields to take advantage of it. My home country the UK has seen Gilt yields plummet too as a combination of factors are in play. The irony is that the safest UK  haven which is RPI linked Gilts already were extremely expensive and frankly having little relationship with inflation which seems set to fall in response to the present crisis.

Gold

This is something of an old curiosity shop in these times. In general we have seen a gold price rally which continues a phase we have been noting in recent months. But it is also true that just when we might have expected it to rally rally further the price of gold fell backwards.  There are an enormous number of conspiracy stories about gold and its price but for out purposes it is something of a patchy safe haven. Our favourite precious metal was of course “The Precious! The Precious! ” in Lord of the Rings but in our world the central banks give that title to other banks.They however are most certainly not a safe haven as we learn more about the use of the word “resilient ” by central bankers.

Comment

Let me add another factor in the safe haven world which is timing.If you had movd into any of the markets above earlier this week you would now be doing rather well. This comex with an implication that prices and levels matter which often gets forgotten in the melee and excitement.

There are also other winners which get given temporary safe haven status at times like these.For example those producigface masks or involved in teleconferencing.  I have to confess I had a wry smile at the price of teleconferencing companý Zoom rising as it did not work on my laptop when I tried it for Rethinking the Dollar.

Apologies to those affected by a blog misfire earlier as Windows 10 played up again.

Where next for the economy of India?

A subject we returned to several times in 2019 was the economy of India. There were two main drivers here which were interrelated. One was the economic slow down and the second was the wave of interest-rate cuts we saw from the Reserve Bank of India. At the moment India is back in the news on two fronts. Firstly President Trump is in town although by his pronounciation of Sachin Tendulkar he had a lot to learn about the national sport. Second and much more sadly there are riots in Delhi continuing a recent theme of unrest in India. For our purposes though, we need to switch back to the economic situation and how India can deal as best as it can with the economic effects of the Corona Virus.

Where do we stand?

The latest minutes from the Reserve Bank of India tell us this.

Moving on to the domestic economy, the first advance estimates (FAE) released by the National Statistical Office (NSO) on January 7, 2020 placed India’s real gross domestic product (GDP) growth for 2019-20 at 5.0 per cent.

Whilst these would be considered fast numbers for elsewhere they are really rather underwhelming for India. Indeed numbers for the past are being revised down as well.

 In its January 31 release, the NSO revised real GDP growth for 2018-19 to 6.1 per cent from 6.8 per cent given in the provisional estimates of May 2019. On the supply side, growth of real gross value added (GVA) is estimated at 4.9 per cent in 2019-20 as compared with 6.0 per cent in 2018-19.

The RBI also gave us a reminder of how much has cut interest-rates in response to this.

As against the cumulative reduction in the policy repo rate by 135 bps since February 2019, transmission to various money and corporate debt market segments up to January 31, 2020 ranged from 146 bps (overnight call money market) to 190 bps (3-month CPs of non-banking finance companies).

It will be happy to see greater impacts than its move and India’s government will be grateful for this impact too.

Transmission through the longer end of government securities market was at 73 bps (5-year government securities) and 76 bps (10-year government securities).

Although caution is required here as bond markets have been rallying anyway so it is hard to determine the exact cause of any move. However amidst the cheerleading there is something we have seen elsewhere.

Transmission to the credit market is gradually improving. …….. The weighted average lending rate (WALR) on fresh rupee loans sanctioned by banks declined by 69 bps and the WALR on outstanding rupee loans by 13 bps during February-December 2019.

This is a familiar feature of the credit crunch era where interest-rate cuts get lost in the banking system and do not reach the borrower be they individual or business.

Know Your Onions

These are a staple part of the Indian diet and back on December 2nd this was the state of play.

Households and restaurants in India are reeling under pressure as onion prices have surged exponentially  across the country. A kilo of onion is retailing at Rs 90-100 in most Indian states, peaking at Rs 120-130 per kilo in major cities like Kolkata, Chennai, Mumbai, Odisha, and Pune.

This hurt consumers and especially the poor adding to the economic difficulties faced by Indians. Well according to the Times of India things are now much better.

PANAJI: After burning a hole in the pockets of the common man for over three months, prices of onions have come down to  ..Rs 29 per kg at the outlets run by the Goa State  Horticulture Corporation Limited (GSHCL).

Whilst the onion crisis has faded from view the inflation situation has got worse with the annual rate rising to 7.59% in January. In spite of the fall in Onion prices it is being pulled higher by food (and drink) inflation which is 11.79% as the inflation shifts.

On the other hand, the recent pick-up in prices of non-vegetable food items, specifically in milk due to a rise in input costs, and in pulses due to a shortfall in kharif production, are all likely to sustain. ( RBI)

Looking back we see an index set at 100 in 2012 is now at 150.2 so India has seen more inflation than in many other places. I will let readers decide for themselves about housing inflation at 4.2% because in other countries we would consider that to be high but for India perhaps not.

Copying the Euro area

Firstly let us give the RBI some credit ( sorry) as we note that it got ahead of the US Federal Reserve which stumbled in this area last autumn.

Since June 2019, the Reserve Bank has ensured that comfortable liquidity is available in the system in order to facilitate the transmission of monetary policy actions and flow of credit to the economy.

Although that does rather beg a question of what it was doing in the years and decades before then! Also we seem to need more liquidity after all the monetary easing in India and elsewhere which is much more in line with my arguments that it is not working than the official claims of success.

The model was taken from the Euro area.

As announced in the Statement on Developmental and Regulatory Policies on February 06, 2020, it has been decided to conduct Long Term Repo Operations (LTROs) for one-year and three-year tenors for up to a total amount of ₹ 1,00,000 crores at the policy repo rate.

Yesterday’s one-year operation saw plenty of demand.

The total bids that were received amounted to `1,23,154 crore, implying a bid to cover ratio (i.e., the amount of bids received relative to the notified amount) of 4.9.

So the system is keen on what Stevie V called cold hard cash, dirty money and we see that there was even more demand for the longer version earlier this month.

The response to the LTRO has been highly encouraging. The total bids that were received amounted to ₹ 1,94,414 crore, implying a bid to cover ratio (i.e., the amount of bids received relative to the amount announced) of 7.8. The total amount of bids has, in fact, exceeded the aggregate amount of ₹ 1,00,000 crore proposed to be offered under the LTRO scheme.

We can add “highly encouraging” to my financial lexicon for these times. After all if LTROs are the triumph they are officially claimed to be the Euro area economy would not be where it is.

Comment

Today has been a journey through the problems faced by the economy of India. If we start with economic growth then it was weakening anyway and I have my doubts about the first bit from the RBI below.

the easing of global trade uncertainties should encourage exports and spur investment activity. The breakout of the corona virus may, however, impact tourist arrivals and global trade.

So far whilst the letter I has been over represented in the Corona Virus outbreak India has thankfully been quiet, but it cannot escape the wider economic effects.

Next comes the issue of inflation as India’s workers and consumers have been suffering from a burst of it just as its inflation targeting central bank has cut interest-rates substantially. So there will have been hardship which is fertile breeding ground for the unrest we are seeing.

Also there seems to be a thirst for liquidity in the financial sector in India. We have looked in the past at the problems of the banks there and it would seem that like in the Euro area they are in something of a drought for liquidity. The RBI deserves credit for so far avoiding the way the US central bank has ended up like a dog chasing its tail. But we return as so often to wondering why ever more liquidity is required? Which leads to whether it is merely masking underlying solvency issues.

Meanwhile The Donald is in full flow.

Trump in India: If I don’t win, you’ll see a crash like you’ve never seen before ( Maria Tadeo of Bloomberg)

The Investing Channel

 

Thailand, Singapore and Australia show we are still heading for lower interest-rates

Today has opened with something that has become rather familiar in the credit crunch era. So familiar in fact it is the 736th version of this,as the Bank of Thailand joined the party.

The Committee voted unanimously to cut the policy rate by 0.25 percentage point from 1.25 to 1.00 percent effective immediately.

Actually they gave thrown something of what in baseball is called a curve ball at the end of last week when they released this.

In December2018, the Thai economy continued to expand from the previous month. Private
consumption indicators suggested expansion in all spending categories, albeit at a slower pace due partly
to the high base effect. Manufacturing production and private investment indicators suggested continued
expansion. The number of foreign tourists continued to increase. Nonetheless, the value of merchandise
exports and public spending contracted, particularly in capital expenditure.

We find central banks regularly doing this where rate cuts come with explanations that things are going well! As an aside there may be a hint in there that the Japanese manufacturers who relocated to Thailand may be doing okay. However this morning the Bank of Thailand gave a rather different picture and emphasis.

In deliberating their policy decision, the Committee assessed that the Thai economy would
expand at a much lower rate in 2020 than the previous forecast and much further below its
potential due to the coronavirus outbreak, the delayed enactment of the Annual Budget
Expenditure Act, and the drought.

If we pick our way through this we see that the Corona Virus is having an impact.

Tourist figures were expected to grow at a
much lower rate than the previous forecast.

This adds to the ongoing drought which added to the issues in the Pacific economy we have looked at before. Indeed this bit smacks of a bit of panic.

Financial stability became more vulnerable due to the prospect of economic slowdown. In this situation, there was an urgent need to coordinate monetary and fiscal measures.

It feels that inflation will now be below target both this year and next which is interesting if we note what the target is.

The MPC and the Minister of Finance have mutually reviewed the appropriate inflation target and hence agreed to propose headline inflation within the range of 1-3 percent as the new monetary policy target.

Let me give them some credit here because they have trimmed their target as they can see we are in a lower inflation world.

These changes include (1) technological advancements, which reduce costs of production and boost supply of goods and services; (2) an expansion of e-commerce, which foster greater price competition, thereby reducing entrepreneurs’ pricing power; and (3) the aging society, which will contribute to the decline in overall demand for goods and services going forward, since the elderly, which normally receive lower income after retirement, constitute a larger share of the entire population.

Other central banks could and in my opinion should follow this lead. The only caveat I would have is to point 3 where there will be an impact from health care inflation which tends to be higher than average.

Singapore

Here they decided on different tactics and the emphasis is mine.

Singapore, 5 February 2020… In response to media queries, the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) said that its monetary policy stance remains unchanged. However, there is sufficient room within the policy band to accommodate an easing of the Singapore Dollar Nominal Effective Exchange Rate (S$NEER) in line with the weakening of economic conditions as a result of the outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in China and other countries, including Singapore.

As you can see they would like a lower exchange-rate although the catch with that is someone else’s has to rise hence the use of the phrase “beggar thy neighbour” to describe such policies.

Foreign Exchange Swaps

These were features of the credit crunch era as central banks made sure they could get their equivalent of cold hard cash if they needed it. Except in contrast to official statements we see that this emergency measure seems not to have faded away. From November.

Singapore, 29 November 2019…The Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS) today announced the renewal of the Bilateral Local Currency Swap Arrangement with the Bank of Japan (BOJ) for another three years.

 

2     The agreement was established in November 2016 to enable the two central banks to exchange local currencies with each other of up to SGD 15 billion or JPY 1.1 trillion.

So the MAS has concerns about getting hold of Yen presumably fearing a situation where the Japanese repatriate their large foreign investments.

In the same month there was a renewal of the deal with Indonesia which started conventionally.

A local currency bilateral swap agreement that allows for the exchange of local currencies between the two central banks of up to SGD 9.5 billion or IDR 100 trillion (about USD 7 billion equivalent);

But had quite a chaser?

A bilateral repo agreement of USD 3 billion that allows for repurchase transactions between the two central banks to obtain USD cash using G3 Government Bonds [1] as collateral.

Have we seen any examples of US Dollar shortages? But if we move from being tongue in cheek back to serious there is quite a definition of what I will call super prime collateral here so let me spell it out.

US Treasuries, Japanese Government Bonds and German Government Bonds.

Actually that begs loads of question but let me for now stay with today’s interest-rate theme by pointing out this is one of the reasons why so much of the German government bond market is at negative yields. The benchmark ten year is at -0.4% because foreign demand for high quality capital is added to what has been net negative supply with the ECB buying whilst Germany is running a surplus.

Australia

The Reserve Bank of Australia ( RBA ) did not act yesterday mostly due to this.

With interest rates having already been reduced to a very low level and recognising the long and variable lags in the transmission of monetary policy, the Board decided to hold the cash rate steady at this meeting.

Having cut to 0.75% last year it had made its move, or perhaps not all of it.

The Board will continue to monitor developments carefully, including in the labour market. It remains prepared to ease monetary policy further if needed to support sustainable growth in the economy, full employment and the achievement of the inflation target over time.

Comment

Perhaps the most revealing statement came from the RBA.

Due to both global and domestic factors, it is reasonable to expect that an extended period of low interest rates will be required in Australia to reach full employment and achieve the inflation target.

Let us look at the global factors.

The outlook for the global economy remains reasonable. There have been signs that the slowdown in global growth that started in 2018 is coming to an end. Global growth is expected to be a little stronger this year and next than it was last year

So not really that one but there is the domestic issue.

The central scenario is for the Australian economy to grow by around 2¾ per cent this year and 3 per cent next year, which would be a step up from the growth rates over the past two years.

So if they were the Beatles they would be singing this.

I have to admit it’s getting better (Better)
It’s getting better
Since you’ve been mine

Except that we apparently need low interest-rates for years ahead. So I think we can be pretty sure that the road ahead should they actually think things will slow down will involve even more interest-rate cuts. For all the talk of things like r* the reality is that we are still in a scenario where interest-rates are singing along with Alicia Keys.

Oh, baby
I, I, I, I’m fallin’
I, I, I, I’m fallin’
Fallin