Welcome news from UK Inflation

This morning has brought some good news for hard pressed UK consumers and workers from the Office for National Statistics.

The Consumer Prices Index (CPI) 12-month rate was 0.2% in August 2020, down from 1.0% in July…….The all items RPI annual rate is 0.5%, down from 1.6% last month.

As you can see there has been quite a fall which will help for example with real wages (which allow for inflation). After yesterday’s figures which showed us we have been seeing wages falls this is helpful. Although it would appear that someone at the BBC is keen to pay more for everything.

Before the latest figures were published, there had been fears that the UK inflation rate might turn negative, giving rise to what is known as deflation.

Economists fear deflation because falling prices lead to lower consumer spending, as shoppers put off big purchases in the expectation that they will get cheaper still.

They would have had REM on repeat if they had lived through the Industrial Revolution.

It’s the end of the world as we know it (time I had some time alone)
It’s the end of the world as we know it (time I had some time alone)

Briefly I thought my work was influencing them as I noted the start of the sentence below but the final bit is pretty woeful.  Mind you if you think that the Industrial Revolution was bad I guess you might also think that inflation is bad for borrowers.

Low inflation is good for consumers and borrowers, but can be bad for savers, as it affects the interest rates set by banks and other financial institutions.

What is happening?

Here is the official explanation.

“The cost of dining out fell significantly in August thanks to the Eat Out to Help Out scheme and VAT cut, leading to one of the largest falls in the annual inflation rate in recent years,” said ONS deputy national statistician Jonathan Athow.

“For the first time since records began, air fares fell in August as fewer people travelled abroad on holiday. Meanwhile. the usual clothing price rises seen at this time of year, as autumn ranges hit the shops, also failed to materialise.”

As you can see we have a market effect in travel and also a result of a government policy. It looks as though the latter was pretty successful.

Last month, discounts for more than 100 million meals were claimed through the Eat Out to Help Out scheme.

In terms of the inflation data it had this impact.

Falling prices in restaurants and cafes, arising from the Eat Out to Help Out Scheme, resulted in the largest downward contribution (0.44 percentage points) to the change in the CPIH 12-month inflation rate between July and August 2020.

As you can see they are desperate to try to push their CPIH measure. We can deduce from that number that the impact on CPI will be a bit over 0.5% via its exclusion of the fantasy imputed rents in CPIH.

If we switch to the RPI we see this.

Catering Annual rate -7.0%, down from +3.4% last month
Never lower since series began in January 1988.

In fact the catering sector reduced the RPI by 0.52%. There was also another significant factor in its fall.

Fares and other travel costs. Annual rate -8.4%, down from +0.9% last month
Never lower since series began in January 1957.

That sector resulted in a 0.33% fall in the index.

Moving onto other detail there are increasing concerns over pork prices after the discovery of a case of swine flu in Germany but so far any price changes have not impacted the UK. Pork prices were in fact 1.3% lower than a year ago with bacon 0.3% higher. I must be buying the wrong sort of tea as I am paying more yet apparently prices are 8.3% lower than a year ago.

Are we sure?

We are still failing to record more than a few prices.

we have collected a weighted total of 86.9% of comparable coverage collected previously (excluding unavailable items).

The next bit is curious as what is still excluded?

As the restrictions caused by the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic have been eased, the number of CPIH items that were unavailable to UK consumers in August has reduced to eight……. these account for 1.1% of the CPIH basket by weight

When I checked it was things I should have thought of like football and theatre admission.

The Trend

There is downwards pressure on the goods sector in the short-term.

The headline rate of output inflation for goods leaving the factory gate was negative 0.9% on the year to August 2020, unchanged from June 2020.

This has been reinforced by the fall in the price of oil.

The price for materials and fuels used in the manufacturing process displayed negative growth of 5.8% on the year to August 2020, down from negative growth of 5.7% in July 2020…..The largest downward contribution to the annual rate of input inflation was from crude oil.

Owner Occupied Housing

It was hard not to laugh as I read this earlier.

The Consumer Prices Index including owner occupiers’ housing costs (CPIH) 12-month inflation rate was 0.5% in August 2020, down from 1.1% in July 2020.

Why? This is because the imputed rents used to keep the number lower have ended up producing a higher number than CPI.This is because they are smoothed are in fact on average from the turn of the year rather than now.

Private rental prices paid by tenants in the UK rose by 1.5% in the 12 months to August 2020, up from 1.4% in the 12 months to July 2020.

Quite a shambles may be building here because Daniel Farey-Jones has been following rent changes in London and here is an example from the last 24 hours.

Bloomsbury 1-bed down 21% to £1,300……….Waterloo 2-bed down 16% to £2,000……..Shoreditch 1-bed down 23% to £1,842.

Here is how this is officially reported.

London private rental prices rose by 1.3% in the 12 months to August 2020.

Whilst Daniel’s figures started as anecdotes he has built up a number of them which suggests there is something going on with rents that is very different to the official data.

Switching to house prices the official series is way behind so here is Acadata on the state of play.

In August, Halifax and Rightmove are showing broadly similar annual rates of price growth of 5.2%
and 4.6% respectively, with Nationwide and e.surv England and Wales reporting lower figures of 3.7%
and 1.5%

Comment

The lower inflation news is welcome but a fair bit of it is temporary as the Eat Out To Help Out scheme is already over. There is a feature in the numbers which is something that has popped up fairly regularly in recent times.

The CPI all goods index annual rate is -0.2%, down from 0.0% last month….The CPI all services index annual rate is 0.6%, down from 2.1% last month.

Goods inflation is lower than services inflation and in this instance went into disinflation.

However I think we are in for a period of price shifts as I note this.

The annual rate for CPI excluding indirect taxes, CPIY, is 1.8%, up from 1.0% last month.

So once the tax cuts end we will see a rally in headline inflation. Some places will need to raise prices but it is also true that others are cutting. For example Battersea Park running track and gym has just cut its monthly membership fee.

Australia sees a GDP plunge whilst it prepares for a trade war

This morning has brought us much more up to date on the state of economic play in a land down under. Even what we have come to call the South China Territories could not keep up its record of economic expansion this year.

Gross Domestic Product (GDP) fell a historic 7.0% this quarter, as the COVID-19 pandemic and the corresponding movement restrictions continued to impact economic activity. The June quarter release records the first annual estimate of GDP for 2019/20, which fell 0.2%,ending Australia’s longest streak of continuous growth, 28 years. ( Australia Statistics)

We find ourselves in curious times as we note two things. Firstly that this is a depression which will only end when output regains the lost ground. Also that a quarterly fall of 7% is a relatively good performance which does question some of the things we keep being told as locked down Australia has done better than the more laissez faire Sweden. Curiously the media seem to be concentrating on this being a recession ( GDP fell by 0.3% in the first quarter) which seems to be quite an under playing of it.

The Detail

We see a familiar pattern of a sharp decline in private demand.

Private demand detracted 7.9 percentage points from GDP, with household final consumption expenditure driving the fall. Public demand partly offset the fall, contributing 0.6 percentage points, as government increased spending in response to COVID-19.

Indeed so much of what has happened was a consumption plunge.

Household final consumption expenditure fell a record 12.1%, detracting 6.7 percentage points from GDP. Household expenditure fell 2.6% for the 2019/20 financial year, the first annual fall in recorded history.

The next bit is intriguing as we have seen elsewhere rises in purchases of food as a type of stockpiling.

Spending on services fell 17.6% reflecting temporary shutdown of businesses and movement restrictions. Spending on goods fell 2.8% driven by record falls in operation of vehicles and clothing and footwear, while spending on food recorded the biggest decline since June 1983.

There was something of a space oddity in the trade data however. One might reasonably think that as China was something of an epicentre for the pandemic then supplying it with resources was not going to be a winner. But net trade provided a boost.

The record fall in imports (-12.9%) was greater than the fall in exports (-6.7%). Imports of goods fell 2.4%, reflecting reduced imports of consumption and capital goods. Imports of services fell 50.5% with travel services falling 98.7% in response to travel bans. Exports of goods fell 3.5%, driven by falls in non-rural and rural goods due to a fall in global demand. Exports of services fell 18.4%, reflecting the travel bans.

Whilst no-one will be surprised at the travel data we know that national accounts struggle to measure services trade with any degree of accuracy. It seems more than a little curious that in a pandemic physical trade was barely affected whereas services and especially imports of services were hammered. If we put the number below back we get close to what Sweden did.

Net exports contributed 1.0 percentage point to GDP

There was another curiosity in the shop.

Health care and social assistance value added experienced its greatest fall since September 1997, down 7.9% in June quarter. The fall was driven by a decline in both private and public health services with reduced demand for medical aids, hospital services and allied health services as face to face visits to practitioners were limited.

The last bit is really rather Orwellian as a reduction in supply is reported as a reduction in demand! This issue of course goes way beyond Australia as whilst some health care areas were flat out others pretty much shut down. It looks quite a mess frankly.

Savings and Wages

There are two separate trends here as some did well.

The household saving to income ratio rose to 19.8%, the highest rate since June 1974. This was driven by the record fall in consumption. Gross disposable income rose 2.2%, driven by an historic 41.6% increase in social assistance benefits, due to both an increase in the number of recipients and additional COVID-19 support payments.

But the wages numbers suggest the well-off may have done okay but the poorest did not. The emphasis is mine.

Compensation of employees fell a record 2.5% this quarter. Average compensation per employee rose an 3.1% this quarter reflecting a compositional shift in the work force with reduced employment in part-time and lower paid jobs.

Reserve Bank of Australia

It seems that the RBA has its eyes on the housing market.

Investment in new and used dwellings fell 7.3% in the quarter due to weakened demand and COVID-19 restrictions, the largest fall since December 2000. ( Australia Statistics)

This is because yesterday it announced new moves to pump it up as it copies the Bank of England.

Under the expanded Term Funding Facility, authorised deposit-taking institutions (ADIs) will have access to additional funding, equivalent to 2 per cent of their outstanding credit, at a fixed rate of 25 basis points for three years. ADIs will be able to draw on this extra funding up until the end of June 2021………To date, ADIs have drawn $52 billion under the Term Funding Facility and further drawings are expected over coming weeks. Today’s change brings the total amount available under this facility to around $200 billion.

The first point is that “banks” are so unpopular now that they have apparently had their name changed to “authorised deposit-taking institutions ” or ADIs. That is curious when we are discussing lending rather than depositing. I see the RBA looking at its impact like this.

There is a very high level of liquidity in the Australian financial system and borrowing rates are at historical lows.

Let us go straight to the heat of the action as the RBA is repeating a policy designed to get mortgage interest-rates lower. We see why it has announced an expansion as we note mortgage rates. Variable rates for new borrowers were 3.5% in July last year and were 2.92% this. So we have two contexts of which the first is that they have not moved much when we consider the Cash Rate was also cut to 0.25% and we are seeing QE (of which more later). Also they are relatively high if we look internationally.

The picture looks better for the RBA if we look at fixed-rate mortgages. If we look at ones for up to three-years we see that it fell over the year to June from 3.43% to 2.3% making fixed-rates look attractive to say the least. Apologies for the way they have one set of numbers for the year to July and another to June but I think we get the picture.

There is a chart comparing these rates with swap rates so the cost of the banks intermediation is in fact 2% of the 2.3%.

Comment

There are some particularly Australian features here. Let me address the issue of a boost from trade via this I spotted from @chigrl

India, Australia and Japan on Tuesday agreed to launch an initiative to ensure the resilience of supply chains in the Indo-Pacific, with the move coming against the backdrop of tensions created by China’s aggressive actions across the region.

The creation of the “Supply Chain Resilience Initiative” was mooted by Japan amid the Covid-19 crisis, which has played havoc with supply and manufacturing chains,  ( Hindustan Times)

I doubt that will be welcomed by Australia’s largest customer and that has clear trade implications.

Next let me return to the RBA. As I am a polite man I will call this quite a cheek.

 Government bond markets are functioning normally, alongside a significant increase in issuance.

In fact they are so normal they had to buy a barrel load…….Oh hang on.

Over the past month, the Bank bought a further $10 billion of Australian Government Securities (AGS) in support of its 3-year yield target of 25 basis points. Since March, the Bank has bought a total of $61 billion of government securities. Further purchases will be undertaken as necessary.

Number Crunching

The Governor of the Bank of England Andrew Bailey will be interviewed by the Treasury Select Committee and I have put in a question request.

With Apple now worth more than the UK FTSE 100 will someone please ask the Governor why he is buying Apple Corporate Bonds?

The UK finds itself with a trade surplus

In many ways that is quite a chocking headline. It has been quite some time since the UK has been in a surplus situation as regarding trade. On a personal level I have got used to pointing out that not only has it been years since we sustained one it has in fact been decades. It was around 1997/98 that we did so as the effect of what turned out to be White Wednesday or the UK’s exit from the ERM ( Exchange-Rate Mechanism). I suppose that raises an initial point as it seems we need quite a economic shock to ever be in surplus. Also as people dip into my blogs over years I would point out that the 1997/98 has been revised in and out over time, less likely now for obvious reasons but you never know. In a way that provides its own critique of trade statistics.

You may be wondering why this was not on the news yesterday? I suppose like the extraordinary inflation numbers it was either not read or dismissed. One area where I do have sympathy though is that the concept of “theme days” that the Office for National Statistics does flood the system with too much data at once. Fans of Yes Prime Minister will know that this is a deliberate tactic to hide bad news, so somewhere Sir Humphrey Appleby and Jim Hacker are having a quiet chuckle.

The UK Surplus

The headline is this.

The total trade surplus, excluding non-monetary gold and other precious metals, widened by £8.6 billion to £8.6 billion in Quarter 2 (Apr to June) 2020, as imports fell by £35.2 billion and exports fell by a lesser £26.7 billion; the largest underlying total trade surplus on a three-month basis since records began in 1998.

As Shalamar are wont to put it.

There it is, there it is
What took us so long, ooh, to find each other, baby?
There it is, there it is
This time I’m not wrong

Actually the last line is more than risky as trade numbers at a time like this will see revisions.

Returning to the numbers it is immediately clear that we have not come to the surplus in the best of ways. This is because unless we have suddenly kicked out addiction to imports the fall in imports represents a consequence of the depressionary level fall in economic output we looked at yesterday. Also exports fell as well meaning out own domestic output was lower. One request I would make to the ONS is that they stop implying that ( in this instance) records began in 1998. After all if there were no records in the mid-1960s we would not have devalued in 1967 would we?! Ironically the records were wrong but the ONS statement should add recorded in this manner or something similar.

It is no great surprise to learn that the falls were everywhere.

Falling imports and exports in Quarter 2 2020 were largely seen in trade in goods, excluding non-monetary gold and other precious metals, where imports and exports fell by £21.4 billion and £14.0 billion respectively, while for trade in services they fell by £13.9 billion and £12.7 billion respectively.

A Goods Deficit

One familiar feature persisted in spite of the changes elsewhere.

The trade in goods deficit, excluding precious metals, narrowed by £7.4 billion to £20.7 billion in Quarter 2 2020 (Figure 2). Goods imports fell by £21.4 billion to £87.0 billion, while goods exports fell by £14.0 billion to £66.4 billion. Falling imports and exports were largely seen in machinery and transport equipment, and fuels, with larger falls of each in imports than exports.

So whilst it shrank we still had one and I doubt anyone fell off their chairs whilst noting the areas which were affected the most. Interestingly one major part of this saw a switch in which side of the ledger was worst affected.

The falls in exports and imports of machinery and transport equipment in Quarter 2 2020 were largely seen in road vehicles, where exports and imports fell by £7.8 billion and £4.2 billion respectively.

Switching to fuel and oil I am not sure I have seen numbers like this before.

Demand down by a record 31 per cent as a result of the COVID-19 lockdown. Demand in the three months to May 2020 was just 11.3 million tonnes, a record low in the series and 2.7 million tonnes under the previous low seen in the three months to April 2020.

Aviation fuel demand fell by 75% in the three months to May.

Services

Here is all we get.

The trade in services surplus widened by £1.2 billion to £29.3 billion in Quarter 2 2020. Services imports fell by £13.9 billion to £35.3 billion, while services exports fell by £12.7 billion to £64.6 billion.

Good job it is not around 80% of our economy…..Oh wait.

Allowing for Inflation

After the extraordinary GDP Deflator number of yesterday it is perhaps for best that in fact this does not seem that large a player here.

In volume terms, the total trade surplus (goods and services), excluding unspecified goods (which includes non-monetary gold), widened £7.2 billion to £7.8 billion in Quarter 2 (Apr to June) 2020, as imports fell by £31.1 billion and exports fell by £23.8 billion.

Although this deserves an investigation as which prices rose?

Total trade import prices fell 0.8% in Quarter 2 2020, while export prices fell 0.4%. Fuels were the largest drivers of the fall in both import and export prices, by 35.7% and 36.7% respectively.

We should at least be told.

An Annual Surplus

The party continues here.

The total trade balance (goods and services), excluding non-monetary gold and other precious metals, increased by £37.6 billion to a surplus of £3.7 billion in the 12 months to June 2020, as imports fell by £67.6 billion and exports fell by a lesser £29.9 billion.

The detailed breakdown is below.

The increase of the underlying total trade balance in the 12 months to June 2020 was largely because of a £39.5 billion narrowing of the trade in goods deficit to £104.6 billion. Imports decreased by £61.7 billion, while exports decreased by £22.1 billion. The fall in both imports and exports of goods was largely seen with machinery and transport equipment, and fuels.

As usual we get no detail on the services position.

The trade in services surplus narrowed by £1.9 billion to £108.3 billion in the 12 months to June 2020, as exports fell by £7.8 billion and imports fell by a lesser £5.9 billion.

Comment

The warm glow provided by a UK trade surplus soon starts to fade. Whilst there may well have been a shift towards producing more domestically it will hardly have been at play on this scale. In reality it is the fall in demand affecting the demand for imports which has somewhat artificially created a trade surplus. One area where this is clearly in play is fuel and energy as production of oil and gas in the North Sea only fell by 2.6% in the three months to June as opposed to the much larger demand falls noted earlier.

What we are also reminded of is how little detail is provided on the sector which provides around four-fifths of out economy. Even the annual figures which allow for some actual surveys to be done – for newer readers the main services trade survey is quarterly leading to the reverse of Meatloaf’s two out of three aint bad – tell us nothing more than the bare numbers which hardly inspires confidence. I have long suspected the numbers for services are better than those recorded but doubt they fully offset the trade deficit. Of course trying to track this down is a complex business, but then it is also true that the gains in information technology have been exytaordinary.

 

China is suffering from food and especially pork inflation

The week has opened with an additional focus on China. We have been reminded of the nature of its style of government by the arrest of the pro democracy business tycoon Jimmy Lai in Hing Kong. This adds to the issue of how the economy its doing post the original Covid-19 outbreak. Typically even the inflation data comes with a fair bit of hype and rhetoric.

In July , under the strong leadership of the Party Central Committee with Comrade Xi Jinping as the core, all regions and departments coordinated the epidemic prevention and control, emergency rescue and disaster relief, and economic and social development work, actively implemented the policy of ensuring supply and stabilizing prices, and the overall market operation was orderly.

Switching now to the actual numbers we are being told this.

From a month-on-month perspective, the CPI went from a decline of 0.1% last month to an increase of 0.6% ………From a year-on-year perspective, CPI rose by 2.7% , an increase of 0.2 percentage points from the previous month .

So out initial picture is that inflation is picking up a little again and that it is not far below the target which is around 3% ( one report said 3.5%). Yet again we see that those who rush to tell us inflation is over look like being wrong yet again.

Pork Prices

This is an important issue in China due to its importance in the diet and the swine flu problem which preceded the Covid-19 outbreak. According to this it has not gone away.

In food, with the gradual recovery of catering services, the demand for pork consumption continues to increase, and floods in many places have a certain impact on the transportation of pigs. The supply is still tight. The price of pork rose by 10.3% , an increase of 6.7 percentage points over the previous month.

The annual numbers further remind us of the issue.

In food, the price of pork increased by 85.7% , an increase of 4.1 percentage points from the previous month

The pig333 website only takes us to the end of July but reports a price of just under 37 Renminbi compared to a bit under 20 this time last year.

I also noted this on the same website and the emphasis is mine.

Senasa (National Service of Agri-Food Health and Quality) officials certified exports of 18,483 tons of pork products and by-products sent between January and June of 2020, representing an improvement of 49% compared to the 12,336 tons sent in the same period in 2019. The main destinations were: China (9,379 tonnes); Hong Kong (2,599 t), Russia (1,845 t), Chile (1,400 t) and Angola (644 t).

So some extra demand for Argentinian farmers which will no doubt be welcome in its difficulties. But Hub Trade China suggests it may be a while before things get better.

#China‘s #pork prices, which jumped in June and edged up in July, will continue to rise in coming months due to seasonal factors and the influence of #COVID19. But tight supplies will begin to ease in the 4th. quarter thanks to boosting hog production and the expansion of imports.

The official view of the Ministry of Agriculture is this.

In the first half of 2020, live pigs and sows have maintained momentum towards recovery. At the end of June, the national sow population of 36.29 million heads changed from negative to positive for the first time year-on-year, up 5.49 million head from the end of last year. The current sow population has recovered to represent 81.2% of the herd at the end of 2017.

We are left wondering what “largely under control” means in reality.

African swine fever has been largely under control, and no major regional animal epidemics occurred in the first half of the year.

I have tried to look at the underlying indices but the England version has not been updated but up until June we have seen them be 170% to 180% of what they were in the previous year.

Food Overall

In fact the annual rate of inflation is being driven by food prices.

Among them, food prices rose by 13.2% , an increase of 2.1 percentage points, affecting the increase in CPI by about 2.68 percentage points.

A major player in this is of course the pork prices we have just analysed, but it is far from the only player.

the price of fresh vegetables increased by 7.9% , an increase of 3.7 percentage points; the price of aquatic products rose by 4.7% , a decrease of 0.1 percentage point; the price of eggs fell 16.6% , The rate of decline expanded by 0.8 percentage points; the price of fresh fruits fell by 27.7% , and the rate of decline narrowed by 1.3 percentage points.

So if you can get by on eggs and fresh fruit you are okay, otherwise you are not. Although on a monthly basis egg prices rose so that trend mat have turned.

Fuel

I note these because after the excitement around the period when we saw negative prices for some crude oil futures things are rather different now. Brent Crude Oil was essentially above US $40 throughout July. So we see this in the report.

gasoline and diesel prices rose by 2.5% and 2.7% ( monthly)…….

If we switch to the producer prices report we see that the times they are a-changing.

Affected by the continued rebound in international crude oil prices, prices in petroleum-related industries continued to rise. Among them, the prices of petroleum and natural gas extraction industries rose by 12.0% , and the prices of petroleum, coal and other fuel processing industries rose by 3.4% .

So the situation has turned for oil and the overall picture is as follows.

PPI rose by 0.4% , the same rate as last month…….From a year-on-year perspective, PPI fell by 2.4% , and the rate of decline narrowed by 0.6 percentage points from the previous month

Comment

The rise in inflation in China is being reported as good news or rather a reason for a rally in equity markets. But in fact a look at the consumer inflation data shows that food prices have been rising in many areas with the price of pork continuing to surge. So the Chinese consumer and worker will be worse off. Of course central bankers love to ignore this sort of thing as for newer readers basically they define everything that is vital as non-core for inflation purposes. Also inflation calculations assume you substitute products when the price rises to keep the numbers lower, although here they may be correct because poorer Chinese may not be able to afford pork at all now.

On the other side of the coin should China find a way out of the pork problem then inflation would be very low. Well for consumers and workers that would be a good thing because as we stand the chances for wage rises seem slim and I fear the reverse.

Looking at the exchange rate we get regular reports of a collapse on the way but whilst it has joined the rise against the US Dollar it has not done much. At just below 7 versus the US Dollar it is down 1% on the year. Are they running a pegged currency?

Podcast on GDP

 

The RBA is financing the Australian government as well as pumping the housing market

It is time for another trip to a land down under as even commodity rich Australia has found its economy affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. It raises a wry smile as I used to regularly reply to the World Economic Forum which periodically trumpeted Australia’s lack of a recession that with its enormous resources that was hardly a surprise and thus meant little about economic policy. However we eventually found something which did create a recession. From the Reserve Bank of Australia earlier.

The Australian economy is going through a very difficult period and is experiencing the biggest contraction since the 1930s. As difficult as this is, the downturn is not as severe as earlier expected and a recovery is now underway in most of Australia. This recovery is, however, likely to be both uneven and bumpy, with the coronavirus outbreak in Victoria having a major effect on the Victorian economy.

I would be careful about saying things are not as bad as expected after the reverse in Victoria if I was the RBA. So let us send our best wishes to those affected there as we note the detailed breakdown of the forecasts.

In the baseline scenario, output falls by 6 per cent over 2020 and then grows by 5 per cent over the following year. In this scenario, the unemployment rate rises to around 10 per cent later in 2020 due to further job losses in Victoria and more people elsewhere in Australia looking for jobs. Over the following couple of years, the unemployment rate is expected to decline gradually to around 7 per cent.

So they are expecting lower falls than in Europe but there is a familiar rebound next year which frankly feels based on Zebedee from The Magic Roundabout rather than any grounding in reality.

Financing The Government

Like so often this is what it boils down too.

At its meeting today, the Board decided to maintain the current policy settings, including the targets for the cash rate and the yield on 3-year Australian Government bonds of 25 basis points.

So even resources rich Australia found itself unable to resist the supermassive black hole pull of ZIRP and central bankers being pack animals. I suspect as I shall explain in a minute they have stopped slightly short of 0% because of fears for the banking sector. But the crucial point we are noting here is the control agenda for the bond market which mimics in concept if not level that applied by the Bank of Japan.

Why does the government need financing? Well there is this.

Government bond markets are functioning normally alongside a significant increase in issuance.

As to how much the Australian Office of Financial Management reinforced this last week.

On the 3rd of July we announced a weekly issuance rate for Treasury Bonds of $4-5 billion, with a weekly rate of issuance for Treasury Notes of $2-4 billion. We are confident this guidance will be reliable until the October Budget; absent of course a sharp unanticipated change in the fiscal position.

The major shift in fiscal policy is highlighted here.

Although to date we have only announced a weekly issuance rate and new maturities, the current plan for gross Treasury Bond issuance this year is around $240 billion.  This will comprise about $50 billion to fund maturing debt and $190 billion of net new issuance.  This is materially higher than the $128 billion issued last year, although almost $90 billion of that was issued in the last quarter.

So a near doubling as they went from not being that bothered about issuing debt.

Less than six months ago the AOFM was rationing issuance to best manage a market maintenance objective.

To a spell when they could not issue at all.

Temporary loss of access to funding markets is certainly something we had thought possible (and indeed likely at some point), but combined with the scale and timing of the increased pandemic financing task it was a more sobering experience than we could have imagined.

They would have been burning the midnight oil before International Rescue arrived.

We will never know how long the market would have taken to recover had the RBA not intervened.

If we return to the RBA statement let me present you with two outright lies.

Government bond markets are functioning normally alongside a significant increase in issuance.

If they are then why is this needed?

The yield has, however, been a little higher than 25 basis points over recent weeks. Given this, tomorrow the Bank will purchase AGS in the secondary market to ensure that the yield on 3-year bonds remains consistent with the target. Further purchases will be undertaken as necessary.

Then the next lie.

The yield target will remain in place until progress is being made towards the goals for full employment and inflation.

Actually it will remain in place until the government no longer needs financing. This may be open ended as we note that the only place which has this ( Japan) only ever seems to do more and never less. The initial salvo in Australia was this.

To date, the Reserve Bank has bought around $47 billion of government bonds ( April 21st)

The Precious! The Precious!

In another example of pack animal behaviour they have pretty much copied and pasted a Bank of England policy.

The Reserve Bank has established a Term Funding Facility (TFF) to offer three-year funding to authorised deposit-taking institutions (ADIs).

So they are avoiding calling them banks. Oh and whilst they get this.

to reinforce the benefits to the economy of a lower cash rate, by reducing the funding costs of ADIs and in turn helping to reduce interest rates for borrowers.

You may note how bank costs are “reduced” whereas it is “helping to reduce” them for others. We know who it will help and it is not these.

The scheme encourages lending to all businesses, although the incentives are stronger for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Well not unless they are in the mortgage or house price market. For those unaware of the UK situation when the policies were applied here small business lending did nothing but in a “completely unexpected development” mortgage rates plunged and lending surged.

So far just over 27 billion Australian Dollars have been supplied via this route.

Comment

Much here is familiar as we see a central bank implicitly financing its government and pumping up the housing market too. The RBA must have thought all its Christmases had come at once when the Aussie bond market had trouble at the shorter maturities and it could intervene at a place likely to impact on mortgage rates. It must feel the banks need help or it would have cut the official rate to 0%.

Thus has led to a money supply surge with narrow money going from 909 billion in June of last year to 1260 billion on June of this. Quite a shift for an aggregate which we had noted in the past was going nowhere and at times had fallen.

Switching to external events the Aussie Dollar or as some call it the little battler has been doing well. The trade weighted index which went as low as 49.9 on a day familiar to regular readers but the 19th of March for newer ones is now 61.4. As for influences I guess the relative hopes for the economy are in play as well as this.

Preliminary estimates for July indicate that the index increased by 0.9 per cent (on a monthly average basis) in SDR terms, after decreasing by 0.2 per cent in June (revised). The non-rural and base metals sub-indices increased in the month, while the rural sub-index decreased. In Australian dollar terms, the index decreased by 0.2 per cent in July.

Over the past year, the index has decreased by 12 per cent in SDR terms, led by lower coal, iron ore, LNG and oil prices. The index has decreased by 12.1 per cent in Australian dollar terms. ( RBA earlier today)

So an improvement for the resources base and looking ahead Gold is 7.5% of the index. Although the compilers of the index have just reduced its weight from 8.7% and will now find themselves in the deepest dark recesses of the RBA bunker where the cake trolley never goes.

What is the case for Gold?

It is time to look again at a subject which pops up every now and then and this morning has done exactly that. From The Guardian

The price of gold hit $1,865 per ounce for the first time since September 2011 this morning.

Gold has surged by 20% since the depths of the pandemic, and some analysts reckon it could hit $2,000 for the first time ever.

A weak dollar is good for gold, given its reputation as a safe-haven from inflation and money-printing.

Let us start with the price noting that this is a futures price ( August) as we remind ourselves that there is often quite a gap between futures prices and spot gold these days. That leads to a whole raft of conspiracy theories, but I will confine myself to pointing out that in a world where interest-rates are pretty much zero one reason for the difference is gone. Strictly we should use the US Dollar rate which is of the order of 0.1% or not much.

Actually a rally had been in play before the Covid-19 pandemic as we ended 2019 at US $1535 and the rallied. However like pretty much all financial markets there was a pandemic sell-off peaking on March 19th a date we keep coming back to. My chart notes a low of US $1482. Since then it has not always been up,up and away but for the last 6 weeks or so the only way has indeed been up. Of course there is a danger in looking at a peak highlighted by this from The Stone Roses.

I’m standing alone
I’m watching you all
I’m seeing you sinking
I’m standing alone
You’re weighing the gold
I’m watching you sinking
Fool’s gold

What is driving this?

Weak Dollar

The Guardian highlights this and indeed goes further.

Marketwatch says the the US dollar is getting “punched in the mouth” – having dropped 5.1% in the last quarter.

It’s lost 2.3% just in July so far, partly due to a revival in the euro. And there could be wore to come:

There is some more detail.

The US dollar is taking a pummelling, sending commodity prices rattling higher.

The dollar has sunk to its lowest level since early March, when the coronavirus crisis was sweeping global markets. The selloff has driven the euro to its highest level in 18 months, at $1.1547 this morning.

Sterling has also benefited, hitting $1.276 last night for the first time in six weeks.

Here we do have a bit of a problem as whilst the US Dollar is lower it is not really weak. Of course it is against Gold by definition but it was not long ago we were considering it to be strong and it certainly was earlier this year especially against the emerging market currencies. At the beginning of 2018 US Dollar index futures fell to 89 as opposed to the 95.4 of this morning but the Gold price was US $1340. So whilst monthly charts are a broad brush our man or woman from Mars might conclude that a higher Dollar has led to a higher Gold price.

If we stay with currencies those from my country the UK have done much better out of Gold. Looking at a Sterling or UK Pound £ price we see £1465 this morning compared to a previous peak of less than US $1200 and before this surge a price of around US $1000. Another perspective is provided by India a nation with many Gold fans and those fans should they have owned Gold will according to GoldPrice.org have made 996% over the past 20 years.

Negative Interest-Rates

Whilst there has been a general trend towards this super massive black hole there are particular features. For example a nation renowned for being Gold investors cut its official interest-rate to -0.75% in January 2015 and it is still there. That is Switzerland and the Swissy has remained strong overall, so the weak currency argument fades here. We have a small pack of “Carry Trade” nations who end up with strong currencies and negative interest-rates including Japan and more recently the Euro.

The generic situation is that we have seen substantial interest-rate cuts. The UK cut from 0.75% to 0.1% for example reducing the price of holding Gold. But I think that there is more than that. You see official interest-rates are increasingly irrelevant these days as we note cutting them has not worked and the way that people have adapted for example the increased number of fixed-rate mortgages. If we look a my indicator for that I note that we have seen a new record low of -0.11% for the UK five-year bond yield this morning. So now all of the countries I have noted have negative interest-rates or if you prefer the 0% provided by Gold is a gain and not a loss.

As I pointed out in my article of July 10th the US does not have negative bond yields but is exhibiting so familiar trends. The five-year yield has nudged a little nearer at 0.26% this morning. That contrasts sharply with the (just under) 3% of October 2018. So a 2.7% per annum push since then in Gold’s favour.

Inflation

The arrival of the pandemic was accompanied by a wave of experts predicting zero and negative inflation. As I pointed out back then I hope I have taught you all what that means and this highlighted by @chigrl earlier links in with the Gold theme.

India can expect inflation to surge to more than double the central bank’s target and the currency could lose a quarter of its value if the Reserve Bank of India begins printing money to fund the government’s spending…….Rabobank estimates that inflation could surge to an average of 12% in 2021 if the RBI was to finance a second stimulus package of $270 billion, a similar amount to what was announced in the first spending plan earlier this year. The rupee could plunge 16% against the dollar from 2020 levels and almost 25% from 2019 under that scenario.

They are essentially making a case for Indians being long Gold although they have not put it like that.

In the UK last night saw the latest in an increasingly desperate series of attempts by the UK Office for National Statistics to justify its attempt to reduce the UK RPI by around 1% per annum. That would affect around 10 million pensioners according to the actuary who spoke. Indeed the economics editor of the Financial Times Chris Giles was reduced to quoting a couple of anonymous replies to one of his own articles as evidence.How weak is that? Still I guess that when you are impersonating King Canute any piece of wood looks like a branch.

But inflation is on the horizon which of course is why the UK keeps looking for measures which produce lower numbers.

Comment

As you can see there are factors in play supporting the Gold price. The only issue is when they feed in because having established an annual gain of 2.7% from lower US bond yields only an Ivory Tower would expect that to apply each year. In fact I think I can hear one typing that right now. In reality once we come down to altitudes with more oxygen we know that such a thing creates a more favourable environment but exactly when it applies is much less predictable. I have used negative interest-rates rather than the “money printing” of The Guardian because it is a more direct influence.

I have posted my views on the problems of using Gold ( the fixed supply is both a strenght and a weakness) before as a monetary anchor. It was also covered in my opinion by Arthur C. Clarke in 2061. So let move onto something that used to be used as the money supply and some famous British seafarers made their name by stealing.

Silver rallied Tuesday to finish at its highest level since 2014, up by more than 80% from the year’s low, benefiting as both a precious and industrial metal as it looks to catch up with gold’s impressive year-to-date performance…..In Tuesday trading, September silver contract SIU20, 3.26% rose $1.37, or 6.8%, to settle at $21.557 an ounce on Comex. Prices based on the most-active contracts marked their highest settlement since March 2014, according to Dow Jones Market Data. They trade 83% above the year-to-date low of $11.772 seen on March 18, which was the lowest since January 2009. ( MarketWatch)

So I will leave you with those who famously advised us that we may not get what we want but we may get what we need.

Oh babe, you got my soul
You got the silver you got the gold
If that’s your love, it just made me blind

The one thing we can be sure of is that the inflation numbers are wrong

Today’s has brought us inflation data with more and indeed much more than its fair share of issues. But let me start by congratulating the BBC on this.

The UK’s inflation rate fell in April to its lowest since August 2016 as the economic fallout of the first month of the lockdown hit prices.

The Consumer Prices Index (CPI) fell to 0.8% from 1.5% in March, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) said.

Falling petrol and diesel prices, plus lower energy bills, were the main drivers pushing inflation lower.

But prices of games and toys rose, which the ONS said may have come as people occupied their time at home.

They have used the CPI inflation measure rather than the already widely ignored CPIH which the propagandists at HM Treasury are pushing our official statisticians to use. Although in something of an irony CPIH was lower this month! Also it would be better to use the much more widely accepted RPI or Retail Prices Index and the BBC has at least noted it.

Inflation as measured by the Retail Prices Index (RPI) – an older measure of inflation which the ONS says is inaccurate, but is widely used in bond markets and for other commercial contracts – dropped to 1.5% from 2.6%.

Yes it is pretty much only the establishment which makes that case about the RPI now as supporters have thinned out a lot. It also has strengths and just as an example does not require Imputed or fantasy Rents for the housing market as it uses actual prices for houses and mortgages.

So as an opener let us welcome the lower inflation numbers which were driven by this.

Petrol prices fell by 10.4 pence per litre between March and April 2020, to stand at 109.0 pence per litre, and
diesel prices fell by 7.8 pence per litre, to stand at 116.0 pence per litre……..which was the result of a 0.2% rise in
the price of electricity and a 3.5% reduction in the price of gas between March and April 2020, compared with price rises of 10.9% and 9.3% for electricity and gas over the same period last year.

Problems. Problems,Problems

Added to the usual list of these was the fact that not only did the Office for National Statistics have to shift to online price collection for obvious reasons which introduces a downwards bias there was also this.

Hi Shaun, the number of price quotes usually collected in store was about 64% of what was collected in February – so yes just over a third. This is for the local collection only.

Let me say thank you to Chris Jenkins for replying so promptly and confirming my calculations. However the reality is that there is a problem and let me highlight with one example.

prices for unavailable seasonal items such as international travel were imputed for April 2020. This imputation was calculated by applying the all-items annual growth rate to the index from April 2019.

Yes you do read that correctly and more than one-third of the index was imputed. In addition to this rather glaring problem there is the issue of the weighting being wrong and I am sure you are all already thinking about the things you have spent more on and others you have spent less on. Officially according to our Deputy National Statistician Jonathan Athow it does not matter much.

A second was to also account for lower consumption of petrol and diesel, which has been falling in price. Reducing the weight given to petrol and diesel gives a figure similar to the official CPI estimate.

Sadly I have learnt through experience that such research is usually driven by a desire to achieve the answer wanted rather than to illuminate things. If we switch to the ordinary experience I was asked this earlier on social media.

Are face masks and hand sanitiser included in the CPI basket? (@AnotherDevGuy)

I have just checked and they are not on the list. This poses a couple of issues as we note both the surge in demand ( with implications for weighting) and the rise in price seen. A couple of area’s may pick things up as for example household cleaners are on the list and judging by their suddenly popularity albeit in a new role lady’s scarves but they are on the margins and probably underweighted.

The New Governor Has A Headache

If we check the inflation remit we see that the new Governor Andrew Bailey will be getting out his quill pen to write to the new Chancellor Rishi Sunak.

If inflation moves away from the target by more than 1 percentage point in either direction, I
shall expect you to send an open letter to me, covering the same considerations set out above
and referring as necessary to the Bank’s latest Monetary Policy Report and forecasts, alongside
the minutes of the following Monetary Policy Committee meeting.

He will of course say he is pumping it up with record low interest-rates and the like. He is unlikely to be challenged much as this morning has brought news of a welcome gift he has given the Chancellor.

Negative Interest-Rates in the UK Klaxon!

For the first time the UK has issued a Gilt (bond) with a negative yield as the 2023 stock has -0.003%. So yes we are being paid to borrow money.

A marginal amount but it establishes a principle which we have seen grow from an acorn to an oak tree elsewhere.

There is trouble ahead

There are serious issues I have raised with the ONS.

How will price movements for UK houses be imputed when there are too few for any proper index? The explanation is not clear at all and poses issues for the numbers produced.

Also this feeds into another issue.

“It should be noted that the methodologies used in our consumer price statistics for many of these measures tend to give smoothed estimates of price change and will therefore change slowly.”

The suspension of the house price index below after today poses big problems for the RPI which uses them and actually as happens so often opens an even bigger can of worms which is smoothing.

In other words we are being given 2019 data in 2020 and this is quite unsatisfactory. So whilst the ONS may consider this a tactical success it is a strategic failure on the issue of timeliness for official statistics. I think all readers of this would like to know more detail on the smoothing process here as to repeat myself it goes against the issue of producing timely and relevant numbers.

Some of you may recall the disaster smoothing had on the with-profits investment industry and once people understand its use in inflation data there will be plenty of issues with it there too. My full piece for those who want a fuller picture is linked to below.

https://www.statsusernet.org.uk/t/measuring-prices-through-the-covid-19-pandemic/8326/2

Comment

As the media projects lower inflation ahead sadly the picture is seeing ch-ch-changes,

Oil prices rose for a fourth straight session on Tuesday amid signs that producers are cutting
output as promised just as demand picks up, stoked by more countries easing out of curbs
imposed to counter the coronavirus pandemic. Brent crude, climbed 25 cents or 0.7% to
$35.06 a barrel, after earlier touching its highest since April 9. (uk.reuters.com 19 May 2020)

That may not feed into the May data but as we move forwards it will. That also highlights something which may be one of the Fake News events of our time which is the negative oil price issue. Yes it did happen but since then we have seen quite a bounce as we are reminded that some issues are complex or in this instance a rigged game.

How much of other price rises the inflation numbers will pick up is open to serious doubt. Some of this is beyond the control of official statistics as they could hardly be expected to know the changes in the patterns for face masks for example. But the numbers will be under recorded right now due to factors like this from the new HDP measure.

Out of stock products have been removed where these are clearly labelled, however, there may be products out of stock that have still been included for some retailers. If the price of these items do not change, this could cause the index to remain static.

What do you think might have happened to prices if something is out of stock?

Meanwhile there is another signal that inflation may be higher ahead.

BoE Deputy Governor Ben Broadbent said it might go below zero around the end of 2020

The reality is of a complex picture of disinflation in some areas and inflation sometimes marked inflation in others.

 

 

 

The Bank of England sets interest-rates for the banks and QE to keep debt costs low

This morning has seen a change to Bank of England practice which is a welcome one. It announced its policy decisions at 7 am rather than the usual midday. Why is that better? It is because it voted last night so cutting the time between voting and announcing the result reduces the risk of it leaking and creating an Early Wire. The previous Governor Mark Carney preferred to have plenty of time to dot his i’s and cross his t’s at the expense of a clear market risk. If it was left to me I would dully go back to the old system where the vote was a mere 45 minutes before the announcement to reduce the risk of it leaking. After all the Bank of England has proved to be a much more leaky vessel than it should be.

Actions

We got further confirmation that the Bank of England considers 0.1% to be the Lower Bound for official UK interest-rates.

At its meeting ending on 6 May 2020, the MPC voted unanimously to maintain Bank Rate at 0.1%.

That is in their terms quite a critique of the UK banking system as I note the Norges Bank of Norway has cut to 0% this morning and denied it will cut to negative interest-rates ( we know what that means) and of course the ECB has a deposit rate of -0.5% although to keep that it has had to offer Euro area banks a bung ( TLTRO) at -1%

Next comes an area where action was more likely and as I will explain we did get a hint of some.

The Committee voted by a majority of 7-2
for the Bank of England to continue with the programme of £200 billion of UK government bond and sterling
non-financial investment-grade corporate bond purchases, financed by the issuance of central bank reserves, to
take the total stock of these purchases to £645 billion. Two members preferred to increase the target for the
stock of asset purchases by an additional £100 billion at this meeting.

The two who voted for “More! More! More!” were Jonathan Haskel and Michael Saunders. The latter was calling for higher interest-rates not so long ago so he has established himself as the swing voter who rushes to vote for whatever is right in front of his nose. Anyway I suspect it is moot as I expect them all to sing along with Andrea True Connection in the end.

(More, more, more) how do you like it, how do you like it
(More, more, more) how do you like it, how do you like it

What do they expect?

The opening salvo is both grim and relatively good.

The 2020 Q1 estimate of a fall in GDP of around 3% had been informed by a wide range of high-frequency indicators, as set out in the May Monetary Policy Report.

A factor in that will be that the UK went into its version of lockdown later than many others. But then the hammer falls.

The illustrative scenario in the May Report incorporated a very sharp fall in UK GDP in 2020 H1 and a
substantial increase in unemployment in addition to those workers who were furloughed currently. UK GDP was
expected to fall by around 25% in Q2, and the unemployment rate was expected to rise to around 9%. There were large uncertainty bands around these estimates.

As you can see GDP dived faster than any submarine But fear not as according to the Bank of England it will bounce like Zebedee.

UK GDP in the scenario falls by 14% in 2020 as a whole. Activity picks up materially in the latter part of 2020 and into 2021 after social distancing measures are relaxed, although it does not reach its pre‑Covid level until the second half of 2021 . In 2022, GDP growth is around 3%. Annual household consumption growth follows a similar
pattern.

Is it rude to point out that it has been some time since we grew by 3% in a year? If so it is perhaps even ruder to point out that it is double the speed limit for economic growth that the Bank of England keeps telling us now exists. I guess they are hoping nobody spots that.

Anyway to be fair they call this an illustrative scenario although they must be aware it will be reported like this.

NEW: UK GDP set for ‘dramatic’ 14% drop in 2020 amid coronavirus shutdown, Bank of England predicts ( @politicshome )

Inflation Problems

In a way this is both simple and complicated. Let us start with the simple.

CPI inflation had declined to 1.5% in March and was likely to fall below 1% in the next few months, in large
part reflecting developments in energy prices. This would require an exchange of letters between the Governor
and the Chancellor of the Exchequer.

So for an inflation targeting central bank ( please stay with me on this one for the moment) things are simple. Should the Governor have to write to the Chancellor he can say he has cut interest-rates to record lows and pumped up the volume of QE. The Chancellor will offer a sigh of relief that the Bank of England is implicitly funding his spending and try to write a letter avoiding mentioning that.

However things are more complex as this sentence hints.

Measurement challenges would temporarily increase the noise in the inflation data, and affect the nature and behaviour of the index relative to a normal period.

It is doing some heavy lifting as I note this from the Office for National Statistics.

There are 92 items in our basket of goods and services that we have identified as unavailable for the April 2020 index (see Annex B), which accounts for 16.3% of the CPIH basket by weight. The list of unavailable items will be reviewed on a monthly basis.

There is their usual obsession with the otherwise widely ignored CPIH, But as you can see there are issues for the targeted measure CPI as well and they will be larger as it does not have imputed rents in it. A rough and ready calculation suggests it will be of the order of 20%. Also a downwards bias will be introduced by the way prices will be checked online which will mean that more expensive places such as corner shops will be excluded.

Also I am not surprised the Bank of England does not think this is material as the absent-minded professor Ben Broadbent is the Deputy Governor is in charge of this area but I do.

The ONS and the joint producers have taken the decision to temporarily suspend the UK House Price Index (HPI) publication from the April 2020 index (due to be released 17 June 2020) until further notice……..The UK HPI is used to calculate several of the owner occupiers’ housing costs components of the RPI. The procedures described in this plan apply to those components of the RPI that are based on the suspended UK HPI data.

Perhaps they will introduce imputed rents via the back door which is a bit sooner than 2030! Also the point below is rather technical but is a theme where things turn out to be different from what we are told ( it is annual) so I will look into it.

 

Unfortunately, since weights are lagged by two years, we would see no effect until we calculate the 2022 weights1. This means that the current weights are not likely to be reflective of current expenditure and that the 2022 weights are unlikely to be reflective of 2022 expenditure.

That sort of thing popped up on the debate about imputed rents when it turned out that they are (roughly) last year’s rather than the ones for now.

Comment

There are three clear issues here. Firstly as we are struggling to even measure inflation the idea of inflation-targeting is pretty much a farce. That poses its own problems for GDP measurement. Such as we have is far from ideal.

The all HDP items index show a stable increase over time, with an increase of 1.1% between Week 1 and Week 7. The index of all food has seen no price change from Week 5 to Week 7, resulting in a 1.2% price increase since Week 1.

As to Bank of England activity let me remind you of a scheme which favours larger businesses as usual.

As of 6 May, the Covid Corporate Financing Facility
(CCFF), for which the Bank was acting as HM Treasury’s agent, had purchased £17.7 billion of commercial
paper from companies who were making a material contribution to the UK economy.

I wonder if Apple and Maersk are on the list like they are for Corporate Bonds?

Within that increase, £81 billion of UK government bonds,
and £2.5 billion of investment-grade corporate bonds, had been purchased over recent weeks.

By the way that means that their running totals have been wrong. As to conventional QE that is plainly targeted at keeping Gilt yields very low ( the fifty-year is 0.37%)

Let me finish by pointing out we have a 0.1% interest-rate because it is all the banks can stand rather than it being good for you,me or indeed the wider business sector. Oh did I mention the banks?

As of 6 May, participants had drawn £11 billion from the TFSME

Podcast

 

 

India faces hard economic times with Gold and Liquor

Early this morning we got news on a topic we have been pursuing for several years now and as has become familiar it showed quite an economic slow down.

At 27.4 in April, the seasonally adjusted IHS Markit India
Manufacturing PMI® fell from 51.8 in March. The latest reading pointed to the sharpest deterioration in business conditions across the sector since data collection began over 15 years ago.

It caught my eye also because it was the lowest of the manufacturing PMI series this morning. Although some care is needed as the decimal point is laughable and the 7 is likely to be unreliable as well. But the theme is clear I think. Of course much of this is deliberate policy.

The decline in operating conditions was partially driven by
an unprecedented contraction in output. Panellists often
attributed lower production to temporary factory closures that were triggered by restrictive measures to limit the spread of COVID-19.

So that deals with supply and here is demand.

Amid widespread business closures, demand conditions were severely hampered in April. New orders fell for the first time in two-and-a-half years and at the sharpest rate in the survey’s history, far outpacing that seen during the global financial crisis.

So there was something of a race between the two and of course external demand was heading south as well.

Total new business received little support from international markets in April, as new export orders tumbled. Following the first reduction since October 2017 during March, foreign sales fell at a quicker rate in the latest survey period. In fact, the rate of decline accelerated to the fastest since the series began over 15 years ago.

The plunges above sadly have had an inevitable impact on the labour market as well.

Deteriorating demand conditions saw manufacturers drastically cut back staff numbers in April. The reduction in employment was the quickest in the survey’s history. There was a similar trend in purchasing activity, with firms cutting input buying at a record pace.

Background and Context

We learn from noting what had already been happening in India.

Real GDP or Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at Constant (2011-12) Prices in the year 2019-20 is estimated to attain a level of ₹ 146.84 lakh crore, as against the First Revised Estimate of GDP for the year 2018-19 of ₹ 139.81 lakh crore, released on 31st January 2020. The growth in GDP during 2019-20 is estimated at 5.0 percent as compared to 6.1 percent in 2018-19. ( MOSPI )

Things had been slip-sliding away since the recent peak of 7.7% back around the opening of 2018. So without the Covid-19 pandemic we would have seen falls below 5%. In response to that the Reserve Bank of India had been cutting interest-rates. I would have in the past have typed slashed but for these times four cuts of 0.25% and one of 0.35% in 2019 do not qualify for such a description.

Before that was the Demonetisation episode of 2016 where the Indian government created a cash crunch but withdrawing 500 and 1000 Rupee notes. This was ostensibly to reduce financial crime but also created quite a bit of hardship. Later as so much of the money returned to the system it transpired that the gains were much smaller than the hardship created.

For newer readers you can find more details on these issues in my back catalogue on here.

Looking Ahead

On April 17th the Governor of the RBI tried his best to be upbeat.

 India is among the handful of countries that is projected to cling on tenuously to positive growth (at 1.9 per cent). In fact, this is the highest growth rate among the G 20 economies………For 2021, the IMF projects sizable V-shaped recoveries: close to 9 percentage points for global GDP. India is expected to post a sharp turnaround and resume its pre-COVID pre-slowdown trajectory by growing at 7.4 per cent in 2021-22.

He was of course running a risk by listening to the IMF and ignoring what the trade date was already signalling.

In the external sector, the contraction in exports in March 2020 at (-) 34.6 per cent has turned out to be much more severe than during the global financial crisis. Barring iron ore, all exporting sectors showed a decline in outbound shipments. Merchandise imports also fell by 28.7 per cent in March across the board, barring transport equipment.

On Friday the Business Standard was reporting on expectations much more in line with the trade data.

While acknowledging some downside risks from a lockdown extension in urban areas beyond 6 June, we maintain our GDP projection of 0% GDP growth for CY2020, and 0.8% for FY21,” wrote Rahul Bajoria of Barclaysin a report.

If we stay with that source then we get another hint from what caused the drop in share prices for car manufacturers today.

Shares of automobile companies declined on Monday as many firms reported nil sales in the month of April after a nationwide lockdown kept factories and showrooms shut.

At 10:11 AM, the Nifty Auto index was down 7.33 per cent as compared to 5.1 per cent decline in the Nifty50 index.

Monetary Policy

You will not be surprised to learn that the RBI acted again as the policy Repo Rate is now 4.4% and the Governor gave a summary of other actions in the speech referred to above.

 In my statement of March 27, I had indicated that together with the measures announced on March 27, the RBI’s liquidity injection was about 3.2 per cent of GDP since the February 2020 MPC meeting.

Those who follow the ECB will note he announced something rather familiar.

 it has been decided to conduct Targeted Long-Term Repo Operations (TLTRO) 2.0 at the policy repo rate for tenors up to three years for a total amount of up to ₹ 50,000 crores, to begin with, in tranches of appropriate sizes.

Oh and as we are looking at India by ECB I am referring to the central bank and not cricket.

If we switch to the money supply data we see that in the fortnight to April 10th the heat was on as M3 grew by 1.2% raising the annual rate of growth to 10.8%. But there was a counterpoint to this as there were heavy withdrawals of demand deposits with fell by 7.8% in a fortnight. We have looked before at the problems of the Indian banking sector and maybe minds were focused on this as the pandemic hit.

Gold

I am switching to this due to its importance in India and gold bugs there may be having a party as they read the Business Standard.

The sharp rise in the prices of gold —which almost doubled over the past one year —has been the only good for investors at a time when both equities and debt returns have been under pressure.

That price may be a driving factor in this.

India’s demand declined by a staggering 36 per cent during the January-March quarter, to hit the lowest quarterly figure in 11 years due to nationwide that has forced the closure of wholesale and retail showrooms.

Comment

The situation is made worse by the fact that India starts this phase as a poor country. Things are difficult to organise in such a large country as the opening of the Liquor Shops today has shown.

Long queues witnessed outside #LiquorShops in several parts of Chhattisgarh, people defy social distancing norms at many places: Officials ( Press Trust of India)

Also a problem was around before we reached the pandemic phase.

Armies of locusts swarming across continents pose a “severe risk” to India’s agriculture this year, the UN has warned, prompting the authorities to step up vigil, deploy drones to detect their movement and hold talks with Pakistan, the most likely gateway for an invasion by the insects, on ways to minimise the damage. ( Hindustan Times from March)

Now let me give you another Indian spin. The gold issue has several other impacts. No doubt the RBI is calculating the wealth effects from the price gain. However I think of it is another form of money supply as to some extent it has that function there. Also part of the gain is due to another decline in the Rupee which is at 75.6 to the US Dollar. Regular readers will recall it was a symbolic issue when it went through 70. This creates a backwash as it will make people turn to gold even more.

Let me finish with some good news which is that the much lower oil price will be welcome in energy dependent India.

Podcast

 

 

 

 

The Tokyo Whale is hungry again!

A new week has started with something which we will find awfully familiar although not everyone will as I will explain. But first let me give you something of a counterpoint and indeed irony to the news.

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Oil prices fell on Monday on signs that worldwide oil storage is filling rapidly, raising concerns that production cuts will not come fast enough to fully offset the collapse in demand from the coronavirus pandemic.

U.S. oil futures led losses, falling by more than $2 a barrel on fears that storage at Cushing, Oklahoma, could reach full capacity soon. U.S. crude inventories rose to 518.6 million barrels in the week to April 17, near an all-time record of 535 million barrels set in 2017. [EIA/S]

In ordinary times this would be a case of let’s get this party started in Japan. This is because it is a large energy importer and thus it would be getting both and balance of payments and manufacturing boost. In itself it would have been extremely welcome because you may recall that its economy had seen a reverse before the present pandemic.

The contraction of Japan’s 4Q 2019 GDP was worse than expected, coming in at -1.8% q/q (- 7.1% annualized rate) versus the first estimate of -1.6% q/q (-6.3% annualized rate) as the contraction in business spending was deeper than what was first reported in February, ( FXStreet )

So the land of the rising sun or Nihon was already in what Taylor Swift would call “trouble, trouble,trouble”, The raising of the Consumption Tax ( what we call VAT) had in an unfortunate coincidence combined with the 2019 trade war. The former was rather like 2014 as we mull all the promises it would not be. Also let me give you a real undercut, Japan acted to improve its fiscal position just in time for it to be considered much less important.

The Tokyo Whale

Let me open with something which for newer readers may come as a shock.

The Bank will actively purchase ETFs and J-REITs for the time being so that their amounts outstanding will increase at annual paces with the upper limit of about 12 trillion
yen and about 180 billion yen, respectively.

Yes the Bank of Japan is buying equities and has just suggested it will double its annual purchases of them. Those who follow me will be aware it has been buying more as for example it is now buying around 120 billion Yen on the days it buys ( nine so far in April) as opposed to the previous 70 billion or so having bought over 200 billion when equity markets were hit hard. The detail is that it buys via Exchange Traded Funds ( ETFs) to avoid the embarrassment of having to vote at AGMs and the like.

Oh and in another familiar theme upper limits are not always upper limits.

With a view to lowering risk premia of asset prices in an appropriate manner, the Bank may increase or decrease the amount of purchases depending on market conditions.

Also the ,you may note that the limit for commercial property purchases has been doubled too. I do sometimes wonder why they bother with the commercial property buys although now we have an extra factor which is that in so many places around the world commercial property looks under a lot of pressure. For example if there is more working from home as seems likely.

The Precious! The Precious!

Japan has an official interest-rate of -0.1% but not for quite everybody.

(3) apply a positive interest rate of 0.1 percent to the outstanding balances of current accounts held by financial institutions at the Bank that correspond to the amounts outstanding of loans provided through this
operation.

For whom?

Twice as much as the amounts outstanding of the loans will continue to be included in the Macro Add-on Balances in current accounts held by financial institutions at the Bank.

Yes the banks and as you can see they will be a “double-bubble” gain from lending under the new Bank of Japan scheme. I wonder if the Japanese taxpayer has noted that extension of operations to the private debt sphere as well?

expand the range of eligible collateral to private debt in general, including household debt (from about 8
trillion yen to about 23 trillion yen as of end-March 2020),

Corporate Bonds and Commercial Paper

I have highlighted another risk being taken on behalf of the Japanese taxpayer.

The Bank decided, by a unanimous vote, to significantly increase the maximum amount
of additional purchases of CP and corporate bonds and conduct purchases with the upper
limit of the amount outstanding of about 20 trillion yen in total. In addition, the maximum amounts outstanding of a single issuer’s CP and corporate bonds to be purchased will be raised substantially.

Should there be a default there might be trouble.

The Bank will increase the maximum share of the Bank’s holdings of CP and corporate
bonds within the total amount outstanding of issuance by a single issuer from the current
25 percent to 50 percent and 30 percent, respectively.

Surely at any sign of trouble everyone will simply sell to the Bank of Japan which will then be a buyer of more like first than last resort.

Who will provide the grand design?
What is yours and what is mine?
‘Cause there is no more new frontier
We have got to make it here ( The Eagles )

Japanese Government Bonds

This is something we have been expecting and just as a reminder the previous target was between 70 and 80 trillion Yen a year.

The Bank will purchase a necessary amount of JGBs without setting an upper limit so that 10-year JGB yields will remain at around zero percent.

It is hard to get too worked up about that as we have been expecting it to be along. In theory the plan remains the same, although there is a slight shuffle as in the past they have indicated a range between 0% and -0.1%.

Comment

The first issue is that the Japanese economy is doing extremely badly. It already had problems and the PMI business survey suggested a GDP decline of the order of 10%. With its “face” culture that is likely to be an underestimate. In response there has been this.

The Japanese government has outlined details of its plan to hand out 100,000 yen, or more than 900 dollars, in cash to all residents as part of its economic response to the coronavirus outbreak.

The cash handouts will go to every person listed on Japan’s Basic Resident Register, regardless of nationality. ( NHK)

They tried something like this back in the 90s and I remember calculating it as £142 as compared to £752 this time. As to adjusting for inflation well in the Lost Decade era Japan has seen so little of that.

So we see that the Bank of Japan is underwriting the spending plans of the Japanese government which of course is the same Japanese government which underwrites the bond buying of the Bank of Japan! It seems set to make sure that the Japanese government can borrow for free in terms of yield as I note this.

In case of a rapid increase in the yields, the Bank will purchase JGBs promptly and appropriately.

In fact just like a parent speaking to a child you can indulge in the JGB market but only if you play nicely.

While doing so, the yields may move upward and downward to some extent mainly depending on developments in economic activity and prices.

You will find many cheering “Yield Curve Control” although more than a few of those will be hoping that there claims that the Bank of Japan will need to intervene less have been forgotten. Actually there have been phases where it has kept yields up rather than down.

In the future will the Bank of Japan own everything?

The Express

I have done some interviews for it recently and here is one on the benefits of lower oil prices

https://www.express.co.uk/finance/city/1272278/coronavirus-news-oil-prices-negative-inflation-uk-wages-spt

Podcast on central bank equity purchases