Chinese economic growth looks set to slow further in 2019

This morning brings us up to date on what has been a theme for a little while now as we have observed one of the main engines of world economic growth starting to miss a beat or two. This from Bloomberg gives us some context and perspective.

China accounted for more than 36% of global GDP growth in 2016.

That sort of growth has led to this according to the Spectator Index.

China’s GDP as a share of US GDP. (nominal) 2009: 35.4% 2019: 65.8%

This has led to all sorts of forecasts around China overtaking the US in terms of total size of its economy with of course the same old problem so familiar of simply projecting the past into the future. Let us know switch to the official view published this morning.

In 2018, under the strong leadership of the CPC Central Committee with Comrade Xi Jinping as the core, all regions and departments implemented the decisions and arrangements made by the CPC Central Committee and the State Council, adhered to the general working guideline of making progress while maintaining stability, committed to the new development philosophy, promoted high quality development, focused on the supply-side structural reform, stayed united and overcame difficulties.

And I thought I sometimes composed long sentences! It also provokes a wry smile if we convert that to the country where we are in as I mull Theresa May telling the UK we “stayed united and overcame difficulties.”

Gross Domestic Product

Firstly we are told a version of tractor production being on target.

According to the preliminary estimation, the gross domestic product (GDP) of China was 90,030.9 billion yuan in 2018, an increase of 6.6 percent at comparable prices over the previous year, achieving the set target of around 6.5 percent growth for the year.

But then we get a version of slip-sliding away.

Specifically, the year-on-year growth of GDP was 6.8 percent for the first quarter, 6.7 percent for the second quarter, 6.5 percent for the third quarter, and 6.4 percent for the fourth quarter.

The trend is exactly as we have been expecting. Also let us take a moment to note how extraordinary it is that a nation as described below can produce its economic output data in only 21 days. There’s mud in the eye of the western capitalist imperialists.

By the end of 2018, the total population of mainland China was 1,395.38 million  an increase of 5.30 million over that at the end of 2017.

That brings us to a clear problem which is that we can I think have confidence in the GDP trend but not in the outright number. Not everyone seems to believe that as many have repeated this sort of line.

According to just-released official statistics, ‘s grew 6.6% in 2018. While it’s the lowest annual annual expansion in almost 30 years, it still is quite a robust rate for an that faced — and is facing — several internal and external uncertainties.

That was Mohammed El-Erian of Allianz.

Industrial Production

Perspective is provided as I note that 6.2% growth is described as “slow but stable” and we remain on message with this.

the value added of the state holding enterprises was up by 6.2 percent……. and enterprises funded by foreign investors or investors from Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan, up by 4.8 percent.

A clear superiority of the state over foreign private investors and especially the pesky Taiwanese. But they cannot hide this.

In December, the total value added of the industrial enterprises above the designated size was up by 5.7 percent year-on-year, 0.3 percentage point higher than that of last month, or up by 0.54 percent month-on-month.

We are told about the monthly improvement which is welcome but it is still below the average.

The real growth of the total value added of the industrial enterprises above the designated size in 2018 was 6.2 percent, with slow yet stable growth.

So with 6.2% being slow and stable if 5.7% just slow? Many countries would love such a rate of growth but not China.

Services

Again we see a monthly rise being reported.

In December, the Index of Services Production was up by 7.3 percent year-on-year, 0.1 percentage point higher than that of last month.

However this is also against a backdrop of a weakening over the full year.

In 2018, the Index of Services Production increased by 7.7 percent over that of last year, maintained comparatively rapid growth.

That theme continues as we note that year on year growth was 8.3% in December of 2017.

Retail Sales

We find ourselves in familiar territory.

In 2018, the total retail sales of consumer goods reached 38,098.7 billion yuan, up by 9.0 percent over last year which kept fast growth……..In December, the growth of total retail sales of consumer goods was 8.2 percent year-on-year, or 0.55 percent month-on-month.

If we look back the reported growth rate in December 2017 was 10.2%.

Property

This has been an area that has fueled growth in China but Reuters now have their doubts about it.

Real estate investment, which mainly focuses on the residential sector but includes commercial and office space, rose 8.2 percent in December from a year earlier, down from 9.3 percent in November, according to Reuters calculations based on data released by National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) on Monday.

That was just ahead of the slowest pace of growth last year at 7.7 percent recorded for October.

So the two lowest numbers were at the end of the year and compare to this.

For the full year, property investment increased 9.5 percent from the year-earlier period, down from 9.7 percent in January-November.

I note that in the official data whilst prices are still rising volume growth has slowed to a crawl in Chinese terms.

The floor space of commercial buildings sold was 1,716.54 million square meters, up by 1.3 percent. Specifically, the floor space of residential buildings sold was up by 2.2 percent. The total sales of commercial buildings were 14,997.3 billion yuan, up by 12.2 percent, among which the sales of residential buildings were up by 14.7 percent.

Trade

This was a factor in things slowing down as we note the faster import growth over 2018 as a whole.

The total value of exports was 16,417.7 billion yuan, up by 7.1 percent; the total value of imports was 14,087.4 billion yuan, up by 12.9 percent.

Those who consider the trade surplus to be one of the world’s economic imbalances should echo the official line.

the Trade Structure Continued to Optimize

Comment

So we find that the official data is catching up with our view of an economic slow down in China. Those late to the party have the inconvenience of December showing some data a little better on a monthly basis but the trend remains clear. Looking ahead then even the official business survey shows a decline because the 54s and 53s were replaced by 52.6 in December.

However if we switch to my favourite short-term indicator which is narrow money we see that the economic brakes are still on. The M1 money supply statistics show us that growth was a mere 1.5% over 2018 which is a lot lower than the other economic numbers coming out of China and meaning that we can expect more slowing in the early part of 2019. No wonder we have seen some policy easing and I would not be surprised if there was more of it.

Still it is not all bad news as it has been a while since there has been so little publicity about the annual shindig in Davos. Perhaps someone has spotted that flying to an Alpine resort to lecture others about climate change has more than a whiff of hypocrisy about it.

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Lower UK inflation provides some welcome good news for real wages

This morning allows us to take a deep breath and move from last night’s excitement which rapidly turned to apparent stalemate to a whole raft of UK inflation data. As we stand the UK Pound has rallied a bit to US $1.288 and 1.129 versus the Euro but in inflation terms that represents a drop as it was around 7% higher versus the US Dollar a year ago. So that is what is around the corner as today the influence will be a bit more than that as the UK Pound was weaker in December versus the Dollar which is the currency in which commodities are priced.

Moving to the price of crude oil there will be a downwards influence on today’s numbers from it as we note a March futures price which peaked at US $84.58 and was more like US $56 around the time the UK numbers are collected. If we look at the weekly fuel prices we see that petrol prices dropped from being around 12 pence per litre dearer than a year before to more like 2 pence. However this gain has been offset to some extent by the way that diesel has become much more expensive than petrol with the gap between the two being around 4 pence in December 2017 but more like 10 pence in December 2018. Does anybody have a good reason for this?

Inflation Targeting

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney answered some online questions on the 9th of this month at what is called the Future Forum. Let me open with a point of agreement.

On your question about the level of the inflation target, long and varied experience has shown that price stability is the best contribution monetary policy can make to the public good.

The problem is that whilst I mean price stability he is being somewhat disingenuous as that is not what he means. Let me highlight with this.

There are good reasons why central banks around the world, including the Bank of England, target a low, positive rate of inflation not no inflation.

As you can see he talks the talk but does not walk the walk and here is his explanation.

 A little inflation ‘greases the wheels’ of the economy, for example by helping inflation-adjusted wages adjust more smoothly to changes in companies’ demand for labour and facilitating shifts in resources between sectors in response to changes in supply and demand. Moreover, a positive inflation rate gives monetary policy space to deliver better outcomes for jobs and growth

So it helps him to look like a master of the universe and helps wages adjust. Seeing as wages have adjusted downwards I hope he was challenged on that point. But there is more.

From a more technical point of view, the official rate of inflation might also over-estimate the true rate at which prices are rising because it is hard to strip out increases that reflect improvements in the quality of goods and services on offer. Aiming for a 0% inflation target would risk forcing the economy into deflation in the medium term.

That is really rather breathtaking! Let me explain why by comparing his “might” by the reality that UK consumer inflation has since the change to CPI as the inflation target in 2003 consistently under recorded inflation via the way that owner occupied housing is ignored completely. They always meant to get around to it but somehow forget until they managed to find a way ( imputed rent) of having one of the fastest areas of inflation recorded as one of the slowest in the new “comprehensive” CPIH measure.

At least he has dropped the effort to claim that relative prices could not move with a 0% inflation target. This is because I kept pointing out that when we had around 0% around 3 years ago there was a big relative price shift via the much lower price of crude oil which had driven it. So it is good that this particular fantasy had its bubble burst but not so good that the Ivory Towers responsible carry on regardless.

Also if we return to the quality issue a powerful point was made by the statistician Simon Briscoe who stood up and stated that each time he bought a new I-Pad it cost him more than a thousand pounds. But whilst he realised each one was better how does that work if he neither needs nor uses the additions or only uses a few of them?

Inflation

As we had been expecting the consumer inflation numbers provided some good news this morning.

The all items CPI annual rate is 2.1%, down from 2.3% in November……..The all items RPI annual rate is 2.7%, down from 3.2% last month.

The main driver here was transport costs as we expected because if we throw in the whole sector then annual inflation was cut by a bit more than 0.2% due to it. Actually slightly more for the RPI as it has a higher weight for air fares. Also the RPI was affected by something a little embarrassing for a Bank of England which had raised Bank Rate in November by 0.25%.

Mortgage interest payments, which decreased the RPI 12-month rate by 0.09 percentage points between November and December 2018 but are excluded from the CPIH.

Of course they are excluded from the woeful CPIH which essentially only includes things which do not exist in its calculations about owner occupied housing and ignores things which are paid. Here is its major player.

Private rental prices paid by tenants in the UK rose by 1.0% in the 12 months to December 2018, up from 0.9% in November 2018.

As you can see even at the new overall lower trend for house price growth (which was previously around 5% per annum ) it way undershoots the number.

Average house prices in the UK increased by 2.8% in the year to November 2018, up slightly from 2.7% in October 2018 (Figure 1). Over the past two years, there has been a slowdown in UK house price growth, driven mainly by a slowdown in the south and east of England.

The lowest annual growth was in London, where prices fell by 0.7% over the year to November 2018, unchanged from October 2018.

 

Comment

There are two entwined elements of good news here as we note first the fact that the annual rate of inflation has fallen and done so quite sharply if we look at RPI. The next is that it has helped UK real wage growth into positive territory on a little more clear-cut basis. Should total pay growth continue to exceed 3% ( it was last 3.3%) then it is hardly a boom but hopefully we will see a sustained rise. At a time when the economic outlook has plenty of dark clouds this is welcome especially as the outlook seems set fair.

The headline rate of output inflation for goods leaving the factory gate was 2.5% on the year to December 2018, down from 3.0% in November 2018. The growth rate of prices for materials and fuels used in the manufacturing process slowed to 3.7% on the year to December 2018, down from 5.3% in November 2018.

Inflationary pressure in the system has slowed.

Moving to measurement I have some hopes for this from the House of Lords Economic Affairs Committee.

Next Thursday 17 January we will publish “Measuring Inflation”, our report on the use of RPI.

It did appear that something of a stitch-up was underway but efforts were made to provide an alternative view as for example I invited them to a debate at the Royal Statistical Society on the subject. They then became quite critical of the way that our official statistician have refused to update the RPI even for changes which would be simple. So fingers crossed! Although of course the establishment is a many-headed hydra.

Sticking with the RPI I referred yesterday to an article in the Financial Times about index-linked Gilts and here is the most relevant sentence.

 This implies inflation of about 3.2 per cent — well above current levels and the Bank of England’s 2 per cent target.

So it implies inflation of 3.2% which was well above the 3.2% the RPI was at the time the piece was written?!

 

 

China may have landed on the moon but its economy is slowing

This morning has brought more news on the economic theme of late 2018 and early 2019 which is of a slowing. As ever at the beginning of the week it comes from the Far East as eyes turn to China. From the South China Morning Post.

Total exports fell to US$221.25 billion in December, down 1.4 per cent from November, and 4.4 per cent from the same month in 2017, according to data from China’s General Administration of Customs.

This is at least party driven by the ongoing trade war.

The December figures give the first indication of the full impact of the US-China trade war.

Exports in previous months were supported by “front loading” of orders by Chinese producers to beat the planned rise in US tariffs to 25 per cent, scheduled to go into effect on January 1 before Chinese President Xi Jinping and his US counterpart Donald Trump agreed to a 90-day tariff ceasefire in their meeting on December 1.

So we move on noting that external demand for the Chinese economy is showing a sign of weakening and as usual the experts were whistling in the wind.

The December drop – the biggest since December 2016, when China grew at its slowest pace since 1990 – was unexpected, with analysts forecasting a 2 per cent rise, according to a Bloomberg survey.

However in my opinion there was something even more significant which was this.

Total imports fell to US$164.19 billion, a fall of 10 per cent from last month and down 7.6 per cent a year earlier.

This is because falls in import volumes are usually a sign of a weakening economy as lower consumption leads to lower import demand.  But to see this fully we need to remind ourselves that the Chinese consume in Yuan and that in it the numbers were down 9.7% on a monthly basis but 3.1% on an annual basis with the difference reflecting a fall in the Yuan. This is quite a change as the numbers for 2018 as a whole showed imports to be 12.9% higher. There is of course an irony in this as we note that imports are a subtraction from GDP ( Gross Domestic Product) numbers so this change will boost it as highlighted below.

Those trade flows still resulted in a trade surplus of $57bn in December, the highest in three years. ( Financial Times)

Although of course contrary to the way the media has reported all this it will be reported in the Chinese GDP data in Yuan as 395 billion.

If we switch to the Financial Times I suspect Donald Trump will be focusing on this bit.

China’s annual trade surplus with the US rose to $323bn for 2018, a jump of more than 17 per cent to the highest level on record, according to Reuters data reaching back to 2006.

Meanwhile there was plenty of food for thought for those in the South China Territories ( Australia) from this bit.

Data also showed that China’s imports of iron ore fell for the first time since 2010, a development that will have impacted commodity exporters.

Xinhua News

It is always interesting to see how things are being reported in China itself so here we go.

 China’s foreign trade rose 9.7 percent year on year to a historic high of 30.51 trillion yuan (about 4.5 trillion U.S. dollars) in 2018, the General Administration of Customs (GAC) said Monday……..Exports rose 7.1 percent year on year to 16.42 trillion yuan last year, while imports grew 12.9 percent to 14.09 trillion yuan, resulting in a trade surplus of 2.33 trillion yuan, which narrowed by 18.3 percent.

No mention of any declines but there was space and indeed time to mention something else favourable to China.

Trade with countries along the Belt and Road registered faster-than-average growth, with the trade volume standing at 8.37 trillion yuan, up 13.3 percent year on year.

If we stay with Chinese reporting then we can take a look at the value of the Yuan as well.

The central parity rate of the Chinese currency renminbi, or the yuan, strengthened 349 basis points to 6.7560 against the U.S. dollar Monday, according to the China Foreign Exchange Trade System.

The new rate was the strongest since July 19, 2018, according to data from the system.

Since the beginning of this year, the yuan’s central parity rate has strengthened more than 1.5 percent against the dollar.

Presumably driven by the stronger trade figures… ( sorry couldn’t resist it). But the Bank of China New York branch plays along with the official drumbeat.

China’s economy has been undergoing structural reform with the introduction of various macro-economic policies. The bank believed that the yuan’s strong buying momentum showed world financial markets have restored confidence in the Chinese currency.

“With the deepening of China’s reform and opening-up, steady expansion of the domestic financial market, and the higher status of CNY in the international monetary system, it is expected that investors’ willingness to hold CNY will increase further,” said the bank’s foreign exchange desk.

I must say they do have rather eloquent foreign exchange traders as most of the ones I have met communicate mostly in words with only four letters in them.

Indeed things are even going rather well in space.

To better understand the lunar environment and prepare for a human return to the moon, the Chang’e-4 probe, which has just made the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon, carries payloads jointly developed by Chinese, German and Swedish scientists to conduct research.

This of course contrasts with the efforts of the evil capitalist Imperialists.

U.S. space technology firm SpaceX, led by Elon Musk, will lay off about 10 percent of its more than 6,000 employees, according to media reports.

Also there is something which reminds us of the Belt and Road plan.

Passengers waiting to board a train from Nigeria’s capital Abuja on Saturday were wowed when they were informed that the train service had been safely operating for 900 days.

A male voice announced from a public address system that the train service had been in commercial operation for 900 days and without any major accident recorded since its inception.

This Chinese built railway is apparently a modern wonder.

Many looked in amazement, expressing satisfaction at the safe operation of the Abuja-Kaduna train service, the first standard gauge railway in Nigeria and West Africa…..Many looked in amazement, expressing satisfaction at the safe operation of the Abuja-Kaduna train service, the first standard gauge railway in Nigeria and West Africa.

One should not be too churlish as there are plenty of issues both security and otherwise in Nigeria but “many looked in amazement” is the sort of thing written about the first journey’s of George Stephenson and his Rocket back in the day.

Football

Another example of a combination of economics combining with foreign policy is the way Chinese football clubs have been offering very high wages to marquee players. West Ham fans will currently be fearing that Marko Anautovic will leave especially if the rumours of a new £45 million bid plus £300,000 a wage wages are true. But it is hard not to raise a wry smile at this perspective from Barney Ronay of the Guardian.

Marco Arnautović latest: am hearing he will move to a club whose wealth is built on a state-subsidised stadium, owned by “colourful” businessmen and with a manager brought in from Hebei China Fortune… Hang on. No sorry, that’s his current club. My mistake

Comment

It is always difficult to measure an economic slow down because of the way that vested interests and the establishment move to delay and block such efforts. This is how they invariably end up being presented as a surprise. China is of course particularly opaque with much of its data leading people to use alternative measures such as electricity consumption before it too got gamed and manipulated. But we are getting more and more signs of a slowing trend. If we look for other signs then we maybe saw one from Europe earlier as well.

In November 2018 compared with October 2018, seasonally adjusted industrial production fell by 1.7% in the euro
area (EA19) and by 1.3% in the EU28, according to estimates from Eurostat,

Which no doubt reflects this from Reuters.

China car sales fell 13 percent in December, the sixth straight month of declines, bringing annual sales to 28.1 million, down 2.8 percent from a year earlier, China’s Association of Automobile Manufacturers (CAAM) said.

This was against a 3-percent annual growth forecast set at the start of 2018 and is the first time China’s auto market has contracted since the 1990s.

Beneath all this though the move into Africa via the Belt and Road policy continues as seemingly does the football combination of economics and diplomacy. They also seem to have been listening to Pink Floyd.

And if the cloud bursts, thunder in your ear
You shout and no one seems to hear.
And if the band you’re in starts playing different tunes
I’ll see you on the dark side of the moon.

 

 

Did the Riksbank of Sweden just panic?

This morning has brought news of an event that had been promised so many times but turned out to be a false dawn. Indeed on their way to apparently making sense of this world Rosa & Roubini Associates told us this.

Riksbank Likely to Wait Longer Before Lift-Off

I guess you are now all expecting this.

Economic activity is strong and the conditions are good for inflation to remain close to the inflation target in the period ahead. As inflation and inflation expectations have become established at around 2 per cent, the need for a highly expansionary monetary policy has decreased slightly. The Executive Board has therefore decided to raise the repo rate from −0.50 per cent to −0.25 per cent.

Actually there is quite a bit that is odd about this as indeed there has been, in my opinion, about the monetary policy of the world’s oldest central bank for some time. Let me give you two clear reasons to be doubtful. Firstly GDP growth plummeted from the 1% of the second quarter of this year to -0.2% in the third. Or as the Riksbank puts it.

As expected, Swedish GDP growth has slowed down during
the second half of this year. However, the downturn in the third  quarter was greater than expected.

So if we step back we immediately wonder why you raise rates when economic growth is slowing when you could have done so when it was rising? The excuse provided looks weak especially as we note the automobile industry has continued to struggle.

One contributory cause of  this was that household consumption fell by a surprisingly large  degree, but this can partly be explained by temporarily weak car sales.

Also inconvenient numbers are regularly described as temporary even when they are nothing of the sort.

Moving onto inflation the outlook has also changed as we have moved towards the end of 2018.

The inflation rate according to the CPI with a fixed interest rate (CPIF) was 2.1 percent in November 2018 (2.4 percent in October). The CPIF decreased by 0.1 percent from October to November.  ( Sweden Statistics)

Here is FXStreet from last week when these numbers came out.

Nordea Markets 1/2: : CPIF inflation stood at 2.1% in November, below consensus and 0.3% point below the ’s forecast. Core inflation, i.e. CPIF ex energy, came out at 1.4%, as much as 0.3% point below the Riksbank’s call.

To be fair to Nordea they were expecting a hike so perhaps they had received an official nod because there is now another factor at play. That is of course the lower trajectory of the oil price which looks set to depress headline inflation numbers in the weeks and months ahead. If we take a broad sweep the price of a barrel of Brent Crude Oil has fallen some US $30 since the Riksbank balked at raising Swedish interest-rates. I think you can spot the problem here. Apparently the wages fairy will turn up which of course is yet another central banking standard view in spite of reality not being that helpful.

Wage growth has certainly become a little lower than
the Riksbank’s forecast over recent months and the forecast has been revised downwards slightly.

The Riksbank’s own view

Let me know switch to some sections of their monetary report which frankly would fit better with an interest-rate cut.

The global economy, which has grown rapidly in recent years, is now entering a phase of more subdued GDP growth, which is in line with the Riksbank’s earlier forecasts.

So Sweden is swimming against the trend?

Economic activity in Sweden is still strong, although GDP growth and inflation have been weaker than expected.

So definitely maybe. What about inflation prospects?

Even though inflation has been lower than expected, the conditions remain good for inflation to stay close to the inflation target going forward.

Then we get quite a swerve because you might think that with the claimed view of the Riksbank more interest-rate hikes will be on the way. It would be logical assuming there is anyone who believes the growth path remains strong and inflation will be ~2% per annum. But apparently not.

The forecast for the repo rate has therefore been revised downwards to indicate that the next repo rate rise will probably occur during the second half of 2019 . After this, the forecast indicates approximately two rate rises per year by 0.25 percentage points each time.

If we skip the last sentence on the grounds that this has been not far off the promised pattern since the Riksbank last raised back in 2011 we see that what is now called a “dovish hike” has just taken place. What that means is that whilst there has been a rise the future expected path falls. Thus if you follow central banking forward guidance interest-rates as 2019 develops may now be lower than you were expecting.

Operation Twist and QE

The other factors in Sweden’s monetary policy are described below.

At the end of November, the Riksbank’s government bond
holdings amounted to just under SEK 350 billion, expressed as a nominal amount.

But they are giving Operation Twist an extra squeeze.

In December 2017, the Executive Board also decided that reinvestments of the large principal payments due in the first six months of 2019 should be allocated evenly across the period from January 2018 to June 2019 . This means that the Riksbank’s holdings of government bonds will increase temporarily in 2018 and the beginning of 2019.

If you wished to tighten monetary policy then you could simply let these bonds mature and not replace them.

US Federal Reserve

As we were expecting it did this last night.

Today, we raised our target range for short-term interest
rates by another quarter of a percentage point. ( Chair Powell)

Not everyone was on board however as there was a nearly 800 point swing in the Dow Jones Industrial Average in response to it. This also meant it ignored the advice from President Trump not to do so and to cut the amount of Quantitative Tightening. The issue was summed up by the Wall Street Journal but not in the way the author thought it meant.

The data says the economy is doing great; the markets say it could be headed for a recession.

At turning points the data is always too late by definition which means that some sort of judgement call is required. Central banks have about a 0% success rate in predicting recessions.

Comment

There is a fair bit to consider in the latest central banking moves but the major point is one of timing. Monetary policy is supposed to lead events and not to lag them which is why “data dependency” is not only flawed it is illogical. To be fair to the US Federal Reserve it has at least tried to get ahead of events whereas the Riksbank has not.

Meanwhile there is a country with a central bank meeting today which has just had some strong economic news.

The quantity bought in November 2018 when compared with October 2018 increased by 1.4%, with a strong monthly growth of 5.3% in household goods stores….The strongest growth can be seen in comparison with the same period a year earlier where the amount spent increased by 5.0% and the quantity bought increased by 3.6%.

Is anybody expecting Mark Carney and the Bankof England to have raised interest-rates in response to the strong retail sales data? I am using the past tense as the vote was last night.

Number Crunching

 

 

 

 

UK Inflation starts to head lower and help real wage growth

Today brings the latest UK official inflation data into focus. However the last 24 hours have brought another shift in the environment because the crude oil price had another of those days when it took something of a dive. Here is Oilprice.com on the subject.

Crude prices fell 4 percent on Monday and about 7 percent on Tuesday. WTI dropped below $47 per barrel and Brent fell to the $56 handle.

Moving onto the likely causes they tell us this.

Oil prices crashed to new one-year lows on Tuesday, dragged down by a deepening sense of global economic gloom as well as fears of oversupply in the oil market itself.

The reasons for the sudden meltdown were multiple. Rising crude oil inventories and expected increases in shale production weighed on oil prices, but the price crash was accentuated by the broader selloff in financials.

Genscape said that inventories are rising, which has raised fears of tepid demand amid soaring supply growth.

We are back to mulling an increase in shale oil production at a time when demand is weakening. As ever there is an undercut as we wonder if the shale oil producers will be so enthusiastic if the oil price remains at these new lower levels. If we switch to the impact on the inflation outlook then we now have an oil price that is around 10% lower than a year ago if we use the Brent Crude benchmark and more than that using West Texas Intermediate as the gap between the two has approached US $10.

The impact of this should be felt to some extent in the input version of the producer price data for November and maybe via fuel prices at the pump in a much more minor way on the consumer price inflation number. By the time we get the December data there will be a stronger influence and this will be accompanied by other commodity prices falls. For example Dr. Copper is at US $2.68 as I type this or 14% lower than a year ago. The CRB Commodity Index has not fallen as much but is still some 6% lower than a year ago.

Central Banks

The news above will be debated at the US Federal Reserve as it decides US interest-rates and the subject of QT today. Of course central bankers ignore what they call non-core factors such as energy and food in their favourite inflation measures but the ordinary person cannot and the picture has changed. Also as @fwred reminds us central banks are no longer using their balance sheets to raise inflation.

From an economic perspective, we’ll be debating the impact of QE for years looking at the counterfactual and the complementary effects of other policy tools, including negative rates. ECB’s estimate: ~2% boost both to real GDP and inflation, or +40bp per year.

Well apart from the Bank of Japan anyway, but it has failed to do much about inflation at all in spite of the size of its actions which now exceed annual economic output or GDP.

Today’s data

Having emphasised the impact of lower oil prices let us get straight to the impact.

The annual rate of inflation for materials and fuels purchased by manufacturers (input prices) slowed to 5.6% in November 2018, down 4.7 percentage points from October 2018 . The 12-month rate of input inflation has been positive since July 2016. The annual rate was driven predominantly by crude oil prices, which showed growth of 15.5% in November 2018, although this was down from 40.4% in October 2018. The one-month rate for materials and fuels fell 3.1 percentage points to a negative 2.3% in November 2018.

As you can see there was quite a change in the trajectory in November and as the annual rate remained positive there is more to come. There was also the beginning of an effect on the output number.

The annual rate of inflation for goods leaving the factory gate (output prices) fell by 0.2 percentage points to 3.1% in November 2018 . The 12-month rate of output inflation has remained positive since July 2016. On the month, output inflation also slowed, falling 0.1 percentage points to 0.2%.

Actually there was a larger impact from the lower oil price than this but it got offset by this.

This increase reflects the rise in Tobacco Duty introduced in November 2018 and is the highest the rate has been since March 2014.

So not the best of months for Oasis fans.

But all I need are cigarettes and alcohol!

Consumer Inflation

Here we also saw a marginal nudge lower in the main two measures.

The all items CPI annual rate is 2.3%, down from 2.4% in October…….The all items RPI annual rate is 3.2%, down from 3.3% last month

This was driven by lower rates of inflation for recreation and culture and this.

Petrol prices fell by 2.6 pence per litre between October and November 2018, compared with a rise of 1.8 pence per litre between October and November 2017.

Actually I noted this mention about recreation and culture.

Price movements for both
computer games and live music events can often be relatively large depending on the composition of
bestseller charts and the bands that are touring at the time of price collection.

This was on my mind due to the fact that Ringo Starr and Ronnie Wood joined Paul McCartney on stage at the O2 in London on Sunday night. My point is that you can measure the ticket price but what is your quality measure? From the excitement on social media that changed by Ringo’s presence in the crowd before we get to having the only surviving Beatles playing on stage and to top it off being joined by a Rolling Stone.

How to measure inflation

We can move onto the widely ignored official measure called CPIH.

The all items CPIH annual rate is 2.2%, unchanged from last month.

It is widely ignored because of the way it uses Imputed Rents to get to this.

The OOH component annual rate is 1.1%, unchanged from last month ( OOH = Owner Occupied Housing).

House Prices

A couple of weekends ago when the economics editor of the Financial Times was presumably otherwise engaged I noted this.

The original consumer price index included house prices. But they were removed in 1983 and replaced with “non-market rents” — an estimate of how much owners could charge to let their homes…….
Including house prices in the new index would not guarantee a higher rate of inflation as high house price inflation might be offset by smaller increases, if not a decline, in rents or offset by price changes in other components. But large and persistent acceleration in this new economy-wide index would be a sign of more general inflation.

This was about the US and written by Joseph Carson but it applies to the UK as well. I note it got widespread support in the comments, although we cannot make a comparison to the pro Imputed Rent articles as they seem to have suspended the comments system for those.

The rate of UK house price inflation has slowed and I welcome that but it remains a much better guide to inflation than any rental fantasies.

Average house prices in the UK increased by 2.7% in the year to October 2018, down from 3.0% in September 2018. This is the lowest annual rate since July 2013 when it was 2.3%. Over the past two years, there has been a slowdown in UK house price growth, driven mainly by a slowdown in the south and east of England.

Comment

There is some pre-Christmas cheer in the UK inflation data today as we see the new lower oil price start to have an impact on the numbers. If it is true that the New Year Sales have started early then that too may impact on the December data although of course it will wash out to some extent in January.

But for the moment the trend for consumer and indeed asset inflation is down and we should welcome the way that will benefit real wages and indeed first time buyers in the property market. Also as someone who has spent the last 6 years or so arguing about inflation measurement with official bodies being operated like puppets by HM Treasury I had a wry smile at this tweet which ignores the measure it has pressed for.

The fall in the price of crude oil is a welcome development for UK inflation

One of the problems of official statistics is that we have to wait to get them. Of course numbers have to be collected, collated and checked and in the case of inflation data it does not take that long. After all we receive October’s data today. But yesterday saw some ch-ch-changes which will impact heavily on future producer price trends as you can see below.

Oil traders’ worries over record supplies arriving in Asia just as the outlook for its key growth economies weakens have pulled down global crude benchmarks by a quarter since early October. Ship-tracking data shows a record of more than 22 million barrels per day (bpd) of crude oil hitting Asia’s main markets in November, up around 15 percent since January 2017, and an increase of nearly 5 percent since the start of this year.

Not only is supply higher but there are issues over likely demand.

China, Asia’s biggest economy, may see its first fall in car sales on record in 2018 as consumption is stifled amid a trade war between Washington and Beijing.

In Japan, the economy contracted in the third quarter, hit by natural disasters but also by a decline in exports amid the rising protectionism that is starting to take its toll on global trade.

And in India, a plunging rupee has resulted in surging import costs, including for oil, stifling purchases in one of Asia’s biggest emerging markets. India’s car sales are also set to register a fall this year.

You may note along the way that this is a bad year for the car industry as we add India to the list of countries with lower demand. But as we now look forwards supply seems to be higher partly because the restrictions on Iran are nor as severe as expected and demand lower. Does that add up to the around 7% fall in crude oil benchmarks yesterday? Well it does if we allow for the fact that it seems the market has been manipulated again.

Hedge funds and other speculative money have swiftly changed from the long to the short side.

When the bank trading desks mostly withdrew from punting this market it would seem all they did was replace others. Of course OPEC is the official rigger of this market but its effort last weekend did not cut any mustard. So we advance with Brent Crude Oil around US $66 per barrel and before we move on let us take a moment for some humour.

As recently as September and October, leading oil traders and analysts were forecasting oil prices of $90 or even $100 a barrel by year-end.

Leading or lagging?

The UK Pound £

This can be and indeed often is a powerful influence except right now as the film Snatch put it, “All bets are off!” This is because it will be bounced around in the short-term ( and who knows about the long-term) by what we might call Brexit Bingo Bongo. Personally I think the deal was done weeks and maybe months ago and that in Yes Prime Minister style the Armistice celebrations gave a perfect opportunity to settle how it would be presented to us plebs. For those who have not seen Yes Prime Minister its point was such meetings are perfect because everybody thinks you are doing something else. The issue was whether it could be got through Parliament which for now is unknown hence the likely volatility.

Producer Prices

These are the official guide to what is coming down the inflation pipeline.

The headline rate of output inflation for goods leaving the factory gate was 3.3% on the year to October 2018, up from 3.1% in September 2018. The growth rate of prices for materials and fuels used in the manufacturing process slowed to 10.0% on the year to October 2018, from 10.5% in September 2018.

Except if we now bring in what we discussed above you can see the issue at play.

Petroleum and crude oil provided the largest contribution to both the annual and monthly rates of inflation for output and input inflation respectively.

They bounce the input number around and also impact on the output series.

The monthly rate of output inflation was 0.3%, with the largest upward contribution from petroleum products (0.14 percentage points). The monthly growth for petroleum products rose by 0.5 percentage points to 2.0% in October 2018.

Actually the impact is higher than that because if we look at another influence which is chemical and pharmaceutical products they too are influenced by energy costs and the price of oil. So next month will see quite a swing the other way if oil price remain where they are. We have had a 2018 where oil prices have been well above their 2017 equivalent whereas now they are not far from level ( ~3% higher).

Inflation now

We saw a series of the same old song.

The all items CPI annual rate is 2.4%, unchanged from last month……..The all items RPI annual rate is 3.3%, unchanged from last month.

This was helped by something especially welcome to all but central bankers who of course do not partake in any non-core activities.

Food prices remain little changed since the start of 2018 and fell by 0.1% between September and October 2018 compared with a rise of 0.5% between the same
two months a year ago.

Happy days in particular if you are a fan of yoghurt and cheese. The other factor was something which an inflation geek like me will be zeroing in on.

Clothing and footwear, where prices fell between September and October 2018 but rose between
the same two months a year ago.

There is an issue of timing as we are in the Taylor Swift zone of “trouble,trouble,trouble” on that front but this area is a big issue in the inflation measurement debate. Let me look at this from a new perspective presented by Sarah O’Connor of the FT.

Online fast-fashion brands have enjoyed success catering to what Boohoo calls the “aspirational thrift” of young millennials. They sell clothes that are often made close to home so that they can be produced more quickly in response to customer trends. “Our recent evidence hearing raised alarm bells about the fast-growing online-only retail sector,” said Mary Creagh, the committee’s chair. “Low-quality £5 dresses aimed at young people are said to be made by workers on illegally low wages and are discarded almost instantly, causing mountains of non-recycled waste to pile up.”

This is a direct view on the area of fast and often disposable fashion which is one of the problem areas of UK inflation measurement. There are issues here of poverty wages and recycling. But the inability of our official statisticians to keep up with this area is a large component of the gap between CPI and RPI, otherwise known as the “formula effect”.

Comment

The fall in the price of crude oil is a very welcome development for the trajectory of UK inflation. Should it be sustained then we may yet see UK inflation fall back to its target of 2% per annum. For example the price of fuel at the pump is some 10 pence per litre higher than a year ago for petrol and 14 pence per litre higher than a year ago for diesel, so the drop is not in the price yet. That may rule out an influence for November’s figures but we could see an impact in December. Other prices will be influenced too although probably not domestic energy costs which for other reasons only seem to go up. But as we looked at yesterday the development would be good for real wages where we scrabble for every decimal point.

Meanwhile I have left the “most comprehensive” measure of inflation to last which is what it deserves. This is because the CPIH measure ignores a well understood and real price – what you pay for a house – which is rising at an annual rate of 3.5% and replaces it with Imputed Rents which are never paid to get this.

The OOH component annual rate is 1.1%, up from 1.0% last month.

But I do not need to go on because the body that has pushed for this which is Her Majesty’s Treasury which plans to save a fortune by using it may be having second thoughts if it’s media output is any guide.

 

Inflation reality is increasingly different to the “preferred” measure of the UK

Today brings us a raft of UK data on inflation as we get the consumer, producer and house price numbers. After dipping my toe a little into the energy issue yesterday it is clear that plenty of inflation is on its way from that sector over time. I have a particular fear for still days in winter should the establishment succeed in persuading everyone to have a Smart Meter. Let us face it – and in a refreshing change even the official adverts now do – the only real benefit they offer is for power companies who wish to charge more at certain times. The “something wonderful” from the film 2001 would be an ability to store energy on a large scale or a green consistent source of it. The confirmation that it will be more expensive came here. From the BBC quoting Scottish Power.

We are leaving carbon generation behind for a renewable future powered by cheaper green energy.

We will likely find that it is only cheaper if you use Hinkley B as your benchmark.

Inflation Trends

We find that of our two indicators one has gone rather quiet and the other has been active. The quiet one has been the level of the UK Pound £ against the US Dollar as this influences the price we pay for oil and commodities. It has changed by a mere 0.5% (lower) over the past year after spells where we have seen much larger moves. This has been followed by another development which is that UK inflation has largely converged with inflation trends elsewhere. For example Euro area inflation is expected to be announced at 2.1% later and using a slightly different measure the US declared this around a week ago.

The all items index rose 2.3 percent for the 12 months ending September, a smaller increase than the 2.7-percent increase for the 12 months ending August.

There has been a familiar consequence of this as the Congressional Budget Office explains.

To account for inflation, the Treasury Department
adjusts the principal of its inflation-protected securities each month by using the change in the consumer price index for all urban consumers that was recorded two months earlier. That adjustment was $33 billion in fiscal year 2017 but $60 billion in the current fiscal
year.

The UK was hit by this last year and if there is much more of this worldwide perhaps we can expect central banks to indulge in QE for inflation linked bonds. Also in terms of inflation measurement whilst I still have reservations about the use of imputed rents the US handles it better than the UK.

The shelter index continued to rise and accounted for over half of the seasonally adjusted monthly increase in the all items index.

As you can see it does to some extent work by sometimes adding to inflation whereas in the UK it is a pretty consistent brake on it, even in housing booms.

Crude Oil

The pattern here is rather different as the price of a barrel of Brent Crude Oil has risen by 41% over the past year meaning it has been a major factor in pushing inflation higher. Some this is recent as a push higher started in the middle of August which as we stand added about ten dollars. Although in a startling development OPEC will now be avoiding mentioning it. From Reuters.

OPEC has urged its members not to mention oil prices when discussing policy in a break from the past, as the oil producing group seeks to avoid the risk of U.S. legal action for manipulating the market, sources close to OPEC said.

Seeing as the whole purpose of OPEC is to manipulate the oil price I wonder what they will discuss?

Today’s data

After the copy and pasting of the establishment line yesterday on the subject of wages let us open with the official preferred measure.

The Consumer Prices Index including owner occupiers’ housing costs (CPIH) 12-month inflation rate was 2.2% in September 2018, down from 2.4% in August 2018.

For newer readers the reason why it is the preferred measure can be expressed in a short version or a ore complete one. The short version is that it gives a lower number the longer version is because it includes Imputed Rents where homeowners are assumed to pay rent to themselves which of course they do not.

The OOH component annual rate is 1.0%, unchanged from last month.

As you can see these fantasy rents which comprise around 17% of the index pull it lower and we can see the impact by looking at our previous preferred measure.

The Consumer Prices Index (CPI) 12-month rate was 2.4% in September 2018, down from 2.7% in August 2018.

This trend seems likely to continue as Generation Rent explains.

The experience of the past 14 years suggests rents are most closely linked to wages – i.e. what renters can afford to pay.

With wage growth weak in historical terms then rent growth is likely to be so also and thus from an establishment point of view this is perfect for an inflation measure. This certainly proved to be the case after the credit crunch hit as Generation Rent explains.

As the credit crunch hit in 2008, mortgage lenders tightened lending criteria and the number of first-time buyers halved, boosting demand for private renting – the sector grew by an extra 135,000 per year between 2007 and 2010 compared with 2005-07.  According to the property industry’s logic, the sharp increase in demand should have caused rents to rise – yet inflation-adjusted (real) rent fell by 6.7% in the three years to January 2011.

Meanwhile if we switch to house prices which just as a reminder are actually paid by home owners we see this.

UK average house prices increased by 3.2% in the year to August 2018, with strong growth in the East Midlands and West Midlands.

As you can see 3.2% which is actually paid finds itself replaced with 1% which is not paid by home owners and the recorded inflation rate drops. This is one of the reasons why such a campaign has been launched against the RPI which includes house prices via the use of depreciation.

The all items RPI annual rate is 3.3%, down from 3.5% last month.

There you have it as we go 3.3% as a measure which was replaced by a measure showing 2.4% which was replaced by one showing 2.2%. Thus at the current rate of “improvements” the inflation rate right now will be recorded as 0% somewhere around 2050.

The Trend

This is pretty much a reflection of the oil price we looked at above as its bounce has led to this.

The headline rate of output inflation for goods leaving the factory gate was 3.1% on the year to September 2018, up from 2.9% in August 2018….The growth rate of prices for materials and fuels used in the manufacturing process rose to 10.3% on the year to September 2018, up from 9.4% in August 2018.

So we have an upwards shift in the trend but it is back to energy and oil again.

The largest contribution to both the annual and monthly rate for output inflation came from petroleum products.

Comment

It is indeed welcome to see an inflation dip across all of our measures. It was driven by these factors.

The largest downward contribution came from food and non-alcoholic beverages where prices fell between August and September 2018 but rose between the same two months a year ago…..Other large downward contributions came from transport, recreation and culture, and clothing.

Although on the other side of the coin came a familiar factor.

Partially offsetting upward contributions came from increases to electricity and gas prices.

Are those the cheaper prices promised? I also note that the numbers are swinging around a bit ( bad last month, better this) which has as at least a partial driver, transport costs.

Returning to the issue of inflation measurement I am sorry to see places like the Resolution Foundation using the government’s preferred measures on inflation and wages as it otherwise does some good work. At the moment it is the difference between claiming real wages are rising and the much more likely reality that they are at best flatlining and perhaps still falling. Mind you even officialdom may not be keeping the faith as I note this announcement from the government just now.

Yes that is the same HM Treasury which via exerting its influence on the Office for National Statistics have driven the use of imputed rents in CPIH has apparently got cold feet and is tweeting CPI.