Welcome news from UK Inflation

This morning has brought some good news for hard pressed UK consumers and workers from the Office for National Statistics.

The Consumer Prices Index (CPI) 12-month rate was 0.2% in August 2020, down from 1.0% in July…….The all items RPI annual rate is 0.5%, down from 1.6% last month.

As you can see there has been quite a fall which will help for example with real wages (which allow for inflation). After yesterday’s figures which showed us we have been seeing wages falls this is helpful. Although it would appear that someone at the BBC is keen to pay more for everything.

Before the latest figures were published, there had been fears that the UK inflation rate might turn negative, giving rise to what is known as deflation.

Economists fear deflation because falling prices lead to lower consumer spending, as shoppers put off big purchases in the expectation that they will get cheaper still.

They would have had REM on repeat if they had lived through the Industrial Revolution.

It’s the end of the world as we know it (time I had some time alone)
It’s the end of the world as we know it (time I had some time alone)

Briefly I thought my work was influencing them as I noted the start of the sentence below but the final bit is pretty woeful.  Mind you if you think that the Industrial Revolution was bad I guess you might also think that inflation is bad for borrowers.

Low inflation is good for consumers and borrowers, but can be bad for savers, as it affects the interest rates set by banks and other financial institutions.

What is happening?

Here is the official explanation.

“The cost of dining out fell significantly in August thanks to the Eat Out to Help Out scheme and VAT cut, leading to one of the largest falls in the annual inflation rate in recent years,” said ONS deputy national statistician Jonathan Athow.

“For the first time since records began, air fares fell in August as fewer people travelled abroad on holiday. Meanwhile. the usual clothing price rises seen at this time of year, as autumn ranges hit the shops, also failed to materialise.”

As you can see we have a market effect in travel and also a result of a government policy. It looks as though the latter was pretty successful.

Last month, discounts for more than 100 million meals were claimed through the Eat Out to Help Out scheme.

In terms of the inflation data it had this impact.

Falling prices in restaurants and cafes, arising from the Eat Out to Help Out Scheme, resulted in the largest downward contribution (0.44 percentage points) to the change in the CPIH 12-month inflation rate between July and August 2020.

As you can see they are desperate to try to push their CPIH measure. We can deduce from that number that the impact on CPI will be a bit over 0.5% via its exclusion of the fantasy imputed rents in CPIH.

If we switch to the RPI we see this.

Catering Annual rate -7.0%, down from +3.4% last month
Never lower since series began in January 1988.

In fact the catering sector reduced the RPI by 0.52%. There was also another significant factor in its fall.

Fares and other travel costs. Annual rate -8.4%, down from +0.9% last month
Never lower since series began in January 1957.

That sector resulted in a 0.33% fall in the index.

Moving onto other detail there are increasing concerns over pork prices after the discovery of a case of swine flu in Germany but so far any price changes have not impacted the UK. Pork prices were in fact 1.3% lower than a year ago with bacon 0.3% higher. I must be buying the wrong sort of tea as I am paying more yet apparently prices are 8.3% lower than a year ago.

Are we sure?

We are still failing to record more than a few prices.

we have collected a weighted total of 86.9% of comparable coverage collected previously (excluding unavailable items).

The next bit is curious as what is still excluded?

As the restrictions caused by the ongoing coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic have been eased, the number of CPIH items that were unavailable to UK consumers in August has reduced to eight……. these account for 1.1% of the CPIH basket by weight

When I checked it was things I should have thought of like football and theatre admission.

The Trend

There is downwards pressure on the goods sector in the short-term.

The headline rate of output inflation for goods leaving the factory gate was negative 0.9% on the year to August 2020, unchanged from June 2020.

This has been reinforced by the fall in the price of oil.

The price for materials and fuels used in the manufacturing process displayed negative growth of 5.8% on the year to August 2020, down from negative growth of 5.7% in July 2020…..The largest downward contribution to the annual rate of input inflation was from crude oil.

Owner Occupied Housing

It was hard not to laugh as I read this earlier.

The Consumer Prices Index including owner occupiers’ housing costs (CPIH) 12-month inflation rate was 0.5% in August 2020, down from 1.1% in July 2020.

Why? This is because the imputed rents used to keep the number lower have ended up producing a higher number than CPI.This is because they are smoothed are in fact on average from the turn of the year rather than now.

Private rental prices paid by tenants in the UK rose by 1.5% in the 12 months to August 2020, up from 1.4% in the 12 months to July 2020.

Quite a shambles may be building here because Daniel Farey-Jones has been following rent changes in London and here is an example from the last 24 hours.

Bloomsbury 1-bed down 21% to £1,300……….Waterloo 2-bed down 16% to £2,000……..Shoreditch 1-bed down 23% to £1,842.

Here is how this is officially reported.

London private rental prices rose by 1.3% in the 12 months to August 2020.

Whilst Daniel’s figures started as anecdotes he has built up a number of them which suggests there is something going on with rents that is very different to the official data.

Switching to house prices the official series is way behind so here is Acadata on the state of play.

In August, Halifax and Rightmove are showing broadly similar annual rates of price growth of 5.2%
and 4.6% respectively, with Nationwide and e.surv England and Wales reporting lower figures of 3.7%
and 1.5%

Comment

The lower inflation news is welcome but a fair bit of it is temporary as the Eat Out To Help Out scheme is already over. There is a feature in the numbers which is something that has popped up fairly regularly in recent times.

The CPI all goods index annual rate is -0.2%, down from 0.0% last month….The CPI all services index annual rate is 0.6%, down from 2.1% last month.

Goods inflation is lower than services inflation and in this instance went into disinflation.

However I think we are in for a period of price shifts as I note this.

The annual rate for CPI excluding indirect taxes, CPIY, is 1.8%, up from 1.0% last month.

So once the tax cuts end we will see a rally in headline inflation. Some places will need to raise prices but it is also true that others are cutting. For example Battersea Park running track and gym has just cut its monthly membership fee.

Trouble mounts for the ECB and Christine Lagarde

Today is ECB ( European Central Bank ) day where we get the results of their latest deliberations. We may get a minor move but essentially it is one for what we have come to call open mouth operations. This is more than a little awkward when the President has already established a reputation for putting her Hermes shod foot in her mouth. Who can forget this from March 12th?

Lagarde: We are not here to close spreads, there are other tools and other actors to deal with these issues.

If you are ever not sure of the date just take a look at a chart of the Italian government bond market as it is the time when the benchmark ten-year yield doubled. As many put it the ECB had gone from “Whatever it takes” to “Whatever.”

This issue has continued and these days President Lagarde reads from a script written for her which begs the issue of whether the questions from the press corps are known in advance? It also begs the issue of who is actually in charge? This is all very different from when prompted by an admiring Financial Time representative she was able to describe herself as a “wise owl” like her brooch. Whoever was in charge got her to change her tune substantially on CNBC later and got a correcting footnote in the minutes.

I am fully committed to avoid any fragmentation in a difficult moment for the euro area. High spreads due to the coronavirus impair the transmission of monetary policy. We will use the flexibility embedded in the asset purchase programme, including within the public sector purchase programme. The package approved today can be used flexibly to avoid dislocations in bond markets, and we are ready to use the necessary determination and strength.

Next comes her promise to unify the ECB Governing Council and have it singing from the same hymn sheet, unlike the term of her predecessor Mario Draghi. This has been crumbling over the past day or two as we have received reports of better economic expectations from some ECB members. This has been solidified by this in Eurofi magazine today.

Now that we have moved past the impact phase of the shock, we can shift our attention toward the recovery phase. Recently, forward looking confidence indicators look robust, while high frequency data suggest that mobility is recovering. These developments solidify the confidence in our baseline projection with a more favorable balance-of-risks. However, even if no further setbacks materialize
economic activity will only approach pre-corona levels at the end of 2022.

That is from Klass Knot the head of the DNB or Netherlands central bank and any doubts about his view are further expunged below.

Relying too heavily on monetary policy to get the job done might have contributed to perceptions of a “central bank put” in the recovery from the euro area debt crisis, where the ECB bore all of the downside risk to the economy.

Might?!

Also it was only a week ago we were getting reports ( more “sauces” ) that the ECB wanted to get the Euro exchange-rate lower. Whereas so far on announcement day it has talked it up.

The Economy

There are several issues here of which the first was exemplified by Eurostat on Tuesday.

The COVID-19 pandemic also had a strong impact on GDP levels. Based on seasonally adjusted figures, GDP
volumes were significantly lower than the highest levels of the fourth quarter of 2019 (-15.1% in the euro area and
-14.3% in the EU). This corresponds to the lowest levels since the the first quarter of 2005 for the euro area.

Such a lurch downwards has these days a duo fold response. What I mean by that os that central banks have got themselves into the trap of responding to individual events which they can do nothing about. The real issue is where the economy will be by the time the policy response ( more QE and a -1% interest-rate for banks) can actually take effect. I still recall an ECB paper which suggested response times had got longer and not shorter as some try to claim.

Accordingly I can only completely disagree with those who say this should be an influence.

In August 2020, a month in which COVID-19 containment measures continued to be lifted, Euro area annual
inflation is expected to be -0.2%, down from 0.4% in July according to a flash estimate from Eurostat,

For a start there are ongoing measurement issues and anyway the boat has sailed. The more thoughtful might wonder how this can happen with all the effort to raise recorded inflation? But they are usually ignored.

Next the new optimism rather collides with this from a week ago.

In July 2020, a month marked by some relaxation of COVID-19 containment measures in many Member States, the seasonally adjusted volume of retail trade decreased by 1.3% in the euro area and by 0.8% in the EU, compared
with June 2020, according to estimates from Eurostat.

That is for July so in these times a while ago but we also face the prospect of more restrictions and maybe more lock downs. If we look at the news from France earlier production was better in July but still well below February.

 Compared to February (the last month before the start of the general lockdown), output declined in the manufacturing industry (−7.9%), as well as in the whole industry (−7.1%).

Italy has different numbers but a similar pattern.

In July 2020 the seasonally adjusted industrial production index increased by 7.4% compared with the previous month. The change of the average of the last three months with respect to the previous three months was 15.0%.

The calendar adjusted industrial production index decreased by 8.0% compared with July 2019 (calendar working days in July 2020 being the same as in July 2019).

The unadjusted industrial production index decreased by 8.0% compared with July 2019.

Comment

We start with two issues which are that some of the ECB are singing along with D:Ream.

Things can only get better
Can only get better if we see it through
That means me and I mean you too.

That is a little awkward if you want to talk the currency down as we note the FT has a claimed scoop which catches up with us from a week ago.

Scoop: For the first time in more than two years, the
@ECB  is expected to include a reference to the exchange rate in today’s “introductory statement” – here’s four things to watch for as the euro’s strength raises alarms at the central bank.

Then there is the background issue that Mario Draghi who knows Christine Lagarde well thought he was setting monetary policy for her last autumn when the Deposit Rate was cut to -0.5% and a reintroduction of QE was announced. So she would have a year or more to bed in and read up on monetary policy. What could go wrong?

This is a contentious area so let me be clear.Appointing a woman to the role was in fact overdue. The problem is that diversity is supposed to bring new talent of which there are many whereas the establishment only picks ones from their club. In this instance there were two steps backwards. The first is simply Christine Lagarde’s track record which includes a conviction for negligence. Next is the fact that the ECB is now headed by two politicians as the reverse takeover completes and it can set about helping current politicians by keeping debt costs low and sometimes negative. The irony is that if you go back to the beginning of this post Christine Lagarde seems to have failed to grasp even that.

The Investing Channel

The ECB would do well to leave the Euro exchange-rate alone.

Over the past 24 hours we have seen something of a currency wars vibe return. This has other links as we mull whether for example negative interest-rates can boost currencies via the impact of the Carry Trade? In which case economics 101 is like poor old HAL 9000 in the film 2001. As so often is the case the Euro is at the heart of much of it and the Financial Times has taken a break from being the house paper of the Bank of England to take up the role for the ECB.

The euro’s rise is worrying top policymakers at the European Central Bank, who warn that if the currency keeps appreciating it will weigh on exports, drag down prices and intensify pressure for more monetary stimulus. Several members of the ECB’s governing council told the Financial Times that the euro’s rise against the US dollar and many other currencies risks holding back the eurozone’s economic recovery. The council meets next week to discuss monetary policy.

There are a range of issues here. The first is that we are seeing an example of what have become called ECB “sauces” rather then sources leak suggestions to the press to see the impact. Next we are left mulling if the ECB actually has any “top policymakers” as the FT indulges in some flattery. Especially as we then head to a perversion of monetary policy as shown below where lower prices are presented as a bad thing.

drag down prices

So they wish to make workers and consumers worse off ( denying them lower prices) whilst that the economy will be boosted bu some version of a wish fairy. Actually the sentence covers a fair bit of economic theory and modern reality so let us examine it.

The Draghi Rule

Back in 2014 ECB President Draghi gave us his view of the impact of the Euro on inflation.

Now, as a rule of thumb, each 10% permanent effective exchange rate appreciation lowers inflation by around 40 to 50 basis points.

There is a problem with the use of the word “permanent” as exchange-rate moves are usually anything but, However since the nadir in February when the Euro fell to 95.6 it has risen to 101.9 or 6.3 points. Thus we have a disinflationary impact of a bit under 0.3%. That is really fine-tuning things and feels that the ECB has been spooked by this.

In August 2020, a month in which COVID-19 containment measures continued to be lifted, Euro area annual
inflation is expected to be -0.2%, down from 0.4% in July……..

Perhaps nobody has told them they are supposed to be looking a couple of year ahead! This is reinforced by the detail as the inflation fall has been mostly driven by the same energy prices which Mario Draghi argued should be ignored as they are outside the ECB’s control.

Looking at the main components of euro area inflation, food, alcohol & tobacco is expected to have the highest
annual rate in August (1.7%, compared with 2.0% in July), followed by services (0.7%, compared with 0.9% in
July), non-energy industrial goods (-0.1%, compared with 1.6% in July) and energy (-7.8%, compared with -8.4% in
July).

The Carry Trade

This is the next problem for the “top policymakers” who appear to have missed it. Perhaps economics 101 is the only analysis allowed in the Frankfurt Ivory Tower, which misses the reality that interest-rate cuts can strengthen a currency. Newer readers may like to look up my articles on why the Swiss Franc surged as well as the Japanese Yen. But in simple terms investors borrow a currency because it terms of interest-rate (carry) it is cheaper. With an official deposit rate of -0.5% and many negative bond yields Euro borrowing is cheap. So some will borrow in it and cutting interest-rates just makes it cheaper and thereby even more attractive.

As an aside you may have spotted that a potential fix is for others to cut their interest-rates which has happened in many places. But with margins thin these days I suspect investors are playing with smaller numbers. You may note that this is both dangerous and a consequence of the QE era so you can expect some official denials to be floating around.

The Euro as a reserve currency

This is a case of be careful what you wish for! I doubt the current ECB President Christine Lagarde know what she was really saying when she put her name to this back in June.

On the one hand, the euro’s share in outstanding international loans increased significantly.

Carry Trade anyone? In fact you did not need to look a lot deeper to see a confession.

Low interest rates in the euro area continued to support the use of the euro as a funding currency – even after adjusting for the cost of swapping euro proceeds into other currencies, such as the US dollar.

The ECB has wanted the Euro to be more of a reserve currency so it is hard for it then to complain about the consequences of that which will be more demand and a higher price. Perhaps they did not think it through and they are now singing along with John Lennon.

Nobody told me there’d be days like these
Nobody told me there’d be days like these
Nobody told me there’d be days like these
Strange days indeed — strange days indeed

Economic Output

Mario Draghi was more reticent about the impact of a higher Euro on economic output which is revealing about the ECB inflation obsession. But back in 2014 when there were concerns about the Euro CaixaBank noted some 2008 research.

Since January 2013, the euro’s nominal effective exchange rate has appreciated by approximately 5.0%. Based on a study by the ECB,an increase of this size reduces exports by 0.6 p.p. in the first year and by close to 1.0 p.p. cumulative in the long term.

With trade being weaker I would expect the impact right now to be weaker as well. Indeed the Reserve Bank of Australia has pretty much implied that recently with the way it has looked at a higher Aussie Dollar which can’t impact tourism as much as usual for example, because there is less of it right now.

Comment

One context of this is that a decade after the “currency wars” speech from the Brazilian Finance Minister we see that we are still there. This is a particular issue for the Euro area because as a net exporter with its trade and balance of payments surplus you could argue it should have a higher currency as a type of correction mechanism. After all it was such sustained imbalances that contributed to the credit crunch and if you apply purchasing power parity to the situation then according to the OECD the exchange rate to the US Dollar should be 1.42 so a fair bit higher. There are always issues with the precision of such calculations but much higher is the answer. Thus reducing the value of the Euro from here would be seeking a competitive advantage and punishing others.

Next comes the way that this illustrates the control freakery of central bankers these days who in spite of intervening on an extraordinary scale want to intervene more. It never seems to occur to them that the problems are increasingly caused by their past actions.

The irony of course is that the elephant in the room which is the US Dollar mat have seen a nadir with the US Federal Reserve averaging inflation announcement. If so we learn two things of which the first is that the ECB may work as an (inadvertent) market indicator. The second is that central banks may do well to leave this topic alone as it is a sea bed with plenty of minefields in it. After all with a trade-weighted value of 101.53 you can argue it is pretty much where it started.

 

 

 

 

The economic problems of Greece are multiplying

Today is a case of hello darkness my old friend, I have come to talk to you again, as we look at Greece. Yet again we find a case of promised economic recovery turning into another decline although on this occasion it is at least nit the fault of the “rescue” party. The promised recovery was described by the Governor of the Bank of Greece back in February.

According to the Bank of Greece estimates, the Greek economy grew at a rate of 2.2% in 2019 while projections point to growth accelerating to 2.5% in 2020 and 2021, as the catching-up effect, after a long period of recession, through rises in investment and disposable income is projected to counterbalance the effect of the global and euro area slowdown.

Apart from the differences in the years used that could have been written back in 2010 and pretty much was. Maybe no-one should ever forecast 2% or so economic growth for Greece as each time the economy then collapses!

Also Governor Stournaras told us this.

The main causes of the crisis, namely the very large “twin” deficits (i.e. the general government and current account deficits) have been eliminated,

So let us take a look.

Balance of Payments

This morning’s release tells us this.

In June 2020, the current account balance showed a deficit of €1.4 billion, against a surplus of €805 million in June 2019.

So the Governor as grand statements like that tend to do found a turning point except the wrong way. Anyone with any knowledge of 2020 will not be surprised at the cause of this.

This development is mainly attributable to a deterioration in the travel balance and, therefore, the services balance, which was partly offset by an improvement in the balance of goods, as imports of goods decreased more than the respective exports. The primary and the secondary income accounts did not show any significant change.

Let us get straight to the tourism numbers.

The travel surplus narrowed, as non-residents’ arrivals and the corresponding receipts decreased by 93.8% and 97.5%, respectively. Moreover, travel payments dropped by 81.3%. The transport balance also declined, by 39.7%, due to a deterioration in the sea and air transport balances.

Nobody will be especially surprised about this falling off a cliff although maybe with restrictions being eased from mid June the numbers may not have been quite so bad. Also there is the kicker of the impact on Greece’s shipping companies.

Switching to the half-year we see this.

In the first half of 2020, the current account deficit came to €7.0 billion, up by €2.9 billion year-on-year, as the deteriorating services balance and secondary income account more than offset an improvement in the balance of goods and the primary income account.

That is awkward for out good Governor as we note a deficit last year but for our purposes there is something ominous in the goods balance improvement.

The deficit of the balance of goods fell, as imports decreased at a faster pace than exports.

Whilst some of that was the oil trade which was affected by the price fall there was also this.

Non-oil exports of goods declined by 3.9% at current prices (-3.4% at constant prices), while the corresponding imports fell by 10.1% (‑9.5% at constant prices).

Which suggests via the relative import slow down that we have a possible echo of what happened in 2010.

Government Deficit

This was the benchmark set by the Euro area authorities and the IMF. Back in the day they were called the Troika and then the Institutions which provides its own script for events. After all successes do not change their names do they? As for now we see this.

In January-July 2020, the central government cash balance recorded a deficit of €12,767 million, compared to a deficit of €2,432 million in the same period of 2019.

Unsurprisingly revenues are down and expenditure up.

During this period, ordinary budget revenue amounted to €22,283 million, compared to €25,871 million in the corresponding period of last year. Ordinary budget expenditure amounted to €32,423 million, from €29,870 million in January-July 2019.

That does not add up as we note the weasel word “ordinary” which apparently excludes public investment which is over 2.5 billion higher so far this year. Also debt costs are about 700 million higher mostly to “The Institutions”. That looks a little awkward but it seems they have decided to give it back.

(Luxembourg) – The Board of Directors of the European Financial Stability Facility (EFSF) decided today to reduce to zero the step-up margin accrued by Greece for the period between 1 January 2020 and 17 June 2020, as part of the medium-term debt relief measures agreed for the country in 2018. The value of the reduction amounts to €103.64 million.

Additionally, as part of the debt relief measures, the European Stability Mechanism (ESM), acting as an agent for the euro area member states and after their approval, will make a transfer to Greece amounting to €644.42 million, equivalent to the income earned on SMP/ANFA holdings.

The air of unreality about this was added to by ESM and EFSF head Klaus Regling who seems to think the Greek economy is recovering.

This is necessary to further support the economic recovery, improve the resilience of the economy and improve the country’s long-term economic potential.

What is he smoking?

ECB

It has stepped in to help with the Greek finances as these days Greece is issuing its own debt again. The ECB is running two QE programmes and the “emergency” PEPP one ( as opposed to the now apparently ordinary PSPP) had at the end of July bought some 10 billion Euros of Greek government bonds,

There was always an implicit gain from ECB QE for Greece in that its bonds would be made to look relatively attractive now it is explicit with the ECB purchases. Indeed it has so far bought more than Greece issued last year.

During 2019, the Hellenic Republic has successfully tapped the international debt capital markets through 4 market
transactions: 3 new bond series (5Y, 7Y, 10Y new issue + tap) for a total amount of € 9bn have been issued, ( Greece PDMA)

Greece was also grateful for the lower borrowing costs.

The average cost of funding for 10-year bonds has decreased from c. 4.4% to c.1.5%, while yields on 3m and 6m T-bills
have recently reached negative values

But I have never heard the ECB being called an insurance and pension fiund before, although it is in line with my “To Infinity! And Beyond! ” theme maybe the longest of long-term investors..

The investor base for Greece Government Bonds (GGBs) has significantly strengthened and broadened with an
increased share of long-term investors, notably insurance and pensions funds.

Just for clarity the PEPP purchases had not begun but the PSPP had.

Debt

The numbers here apparently have changed little but that is because Greece borrowed extra to give itself a cash buffer. So if we allow for that another 7.4 billion Euros were added to the debt pile in the second quarter of this year.

Comment

The saddest part of this is that the present pandemic has added to what was already a Great Depression in Greece. At current prices a GDP of 242 billion Euros in 2008 was replaced by one of 187.5 billion last year. At this point the casual observer might be wondering how a central bank Governor could be talking about a recovery?

But there is more as Greece arrived at the pandemic under another depressionary influence as it planned to run a fiscal surplus and I recall 3.5% of GDP being a target. Now you may notice that the same group of Euro area authorities seem rather keen on fiscal deficits as they have been taking advice from Kylie it would appear.

I’m spinning around
Move outta my way

To my mind the issue revolves around out other main indicator which is the balance of payments. This used to be the role of the IMF before it had French leaders. At the moment the Greek numbers have been hit hard by something it can do nothing about via the impact of lockdown on tourism. Sadly with the rise in cases of Covid-19 elements of that may return, although one of my friends is out there right now doing her best to keep the economy going. We will never know how much better that trajectory of the Greek economy would have been if the focus had been on reform and trade rather than debt and punishment, but we do know it would have been better and maybe a lot better.

 

GDP in Japan goes back to 2010 in another lost decade

Today we get to look East to the land of the rising sun or Nihon as we note its latest economic output figures. According to the Japanese owned Financial Times we should look at them like this.

Japan’s GDP decline less severe than US and Europe

Of course as we are looking at a country where the concept of the “Lost Decade” began in 1990 and is now heading into number 4 of them we need to be careful about which period we are looking at.

Japan’s economy shrank by a record 7.8 per cent in the second quarter of 2020 as it outperformed the US and Europe but lagged behind neighbouring South Korea and Taiwan in its response to coronavirus.

Okay so better than us in the West but not as good as its eastern competitors. Also I note that it relies quite a bit on seasonal adjustment when we have just had an economic season unlike any other as without it GDP fell by 9.9%.

Returning to the seasonally adjusted data we see a consequence of being an exporter at a time like this.

A fall in private consumption accounted for 4.8 percentage points of the decline in Japan’s GDP as the state of emergency reduced spending in shops and restaurants, while a large drop in exports accounted for the remaining 3 percentage points.

This is because exports fell by 18.5% with imports barely affected ( -0.5%) so there was a plunge in exports on a scale large enough to reduce GDP by 3%. Actually let me correct the FT here as it was domestic demand which fell by 4.8% with private consumption accounting for 4.5% and investment for 0.2% and the government sector not doing much at all. You may be pleased to read that Imputed Rent had only a minor impact on the quarterly change.

A cautionary note is that Japanese GDP data is particularly prone to revision or as the FT puts it.

Business investment was surprisingly strong, however, and contributed just 0.2 percentage points to the overall decline in output. That figure is often revised in updates to the data, but if confirmed, it would suggest resilience in the underlying economy and potential for a strong rebound.

International Comparison

Regular readers will know that due to the extraordinary move in the UK GDP Deflator ( the inflation measure for this area) of 6.2% in a single quarter our GDP fall may well have been more like 15%. Somehow the FT which is often very enthusiatic about combing through UK data has missed this.

The second-quarter decline in Japan’s GDP was comparable to a 9.5 per cent fall in the US during the same period, or a 10.1 per cent drop in Germany. It was less severe than the drop of more than 20 per cent in the UK, which was late to act but then imposed a severe lockdown. However, Japan did worse than neighbouring South Korea, where output fell 3.3 per cent in the second quarter, or Taiwan, where GDP was down just 0.7 per cent. Both countries managed to control the virus without extensive lockdowns, allowing their economies to function more normally.

It is typical of a Japanese owned publication to trumpet a form of national superiority though.

Japan’s performance relative to other advanced countries highlights how the effectiveness of a country’s coronavirus response affects the economy, with Japan forced to close schools but able to avoid the strict lockdowns used in Europe.

However, only time will tell whether that was more of a tactical than a strategic success.

Japan is suffering an increase in infections, with new cases running at more than 1,000 a day, but it has not imposed a fresh state of emergency.

Let me wish anyone who is ill a speedy recovery.

Context

The initial one is the economic output has now fallen in the last 3 quarters. Following the rise in Consumption Tax from 8% to 10% a decline was expected but now.of course, it looks really badly timed. Although in the period of the Lost Decade there is a bit of a shortage of good times to do such a thing.

Japan has if we look at the seasonally adjusted series gone back the beginning of 2010 and the middle of 2011 which was the same level.It has never achieved the “escape velocity” talked about by former Bank of England Governor Mark Carney.

Bank of Japan

The problem for it is that it was already doing so much or as the Red Queen put it.

“My dear, here we must run as fast as we can, just to stay in place. And if you wish to go anywhere you must run twice as fast as that.”

I noted Bloomberg reporting that it owns so 44% of the Japanese Government Bond market these days. Although there is an element of Alice In Wonderland here as via its stimulus programmes the Japanese government will be issuing ever more of them.

In May, the Japanese government approved a second large-scale ¥117tn ($1.1n or 21% of Japan’s GDP) economic rescue package, matching the size of the first stimulus introduced in April. ( OMFIF).

So there will be plenty more to buy so we can expect full employment to be maintained for the bond buyers at the Bank of Japan.

On a gross basis, the government plans to issue close to ¥253tn ($2.3tn) in government bonds and treasury bills in fiscal year 2020 (ending March 2021). This amount combines issues under all three budgetary plans. Excluding refinancing bonds, the net issuance of government bonds is reduced to almost ¥145tn (about 27% of GDP). This includes close to 4% of front-loaded bond issues from future fiscal years and is the largest net issuance in the post-world war II era.

Next there is its role as The Tokyo Whale to consider.

This phase saw the Bank of Japan buy on up as well as down days and the index it looks to match is the Nikkei 400.

There is also the negative interest-rate of -0.1% which I do not think the Bank of Japan has ever been especially keen on which is why it is only -0.1%. After all the years of propping up the banks we can’t have them failing again can we.

The latest move as is so often the case has echoes of the past so let me hand you over to Governor Kuroda.

The first is the Special Program to support corporate financing. The total size of this program is about 120 trillion yen. It consists of purchases of CP and corporate bonds with the upper limit of about 20 trillion yen and the Special Funds-Supplying Operations, which can amount to 100 trillion yen. Through this operation, the Bank provides funds on favorable terms to financial institutions that make loans in response to COVID-19. This operation also includes a scheme in which the government takes the credit risk while the Bank provides liquidity, thereby supporting financing together.

Comment

Japan is a mass of contradictions as we note that annual GDP was higher in the mid 1990s than it is now. The first switch is that the position per head is much better although that is partly because the population is in decline. Of course in terms of demand for resources that is a good thing for a country which has so few of them. That is not so hot when you have an enormous national debt which will be getting a lot larger via the stimulus effort. There are roads where it will reach 300% of GDP quite soon.

So why have things not collapsed under the weight of debt? One reason is the size of the Bank of Japan purchases in what is mostly (90% or so) a domestic market. Then we also need to note that in spite of it being official policy to weaken the Yen ( one of the arrows of Abenomics) it is at 106.4 versus the US Dollar looking strong in spite of all of the above. This is because even if the foreign investors started to leave the Japanese have large savings abroad and large reserves. As we stand they have had little success in pushing the Yen lower even with all the efforts of the Bank of Japan.

What is needed is some sustained economic growth but if Japan could do that the concept of the Lost Decade would have been consigned to the history books and it hasn’t. So we left with this thought by Graham Parker.

And there’s nothing to hold on to when gravity betrays you ( Discovering Japan)

Podcast on GDP measures

China is suffering from food and especially pork inflation

The week has opened with an additional focus on China. We have been reminded of the nature of its style of government by the arrest of the pro democracy business tycoon Jimmy Lai in Hing Kong. This adds to the issue of how the economy its doing post the original Covid-19 outbreak. Typically even the inflation data comes with a fair bit of hype and rhetoric.

In July , under the strong leadership of the Party Central Committee with Comrade Xi Jinping as the core, all regions and departments coordinated the epidemic prevention and control, emergency rescue and disaster relief, and economic and social development work, actively implemented the policy of ensuring supply and stabilizing prices, and the overall market operation was orderly.

Switching now to the actual numbers we are being told this.

From a month-on-month perspective, the CPI went from a decline of 0.1% last month to an increase of 0.6% ………From a year-on-year perspective, CPI rose by 2.7% , an increase of 0.2 percentage points from the previous month .

So out initial picture is that inflation is picking up a little again and that it is not far below the target which is around 3% ( one report said 3.5%). Yet again we see that those who rush to tell us inflation is over look like being wrong yet again.

Pork Prices

This is an important issue in China due to its importance in the diet and the swine flu problem which preceded the Covid-19 outbreak. According to this it has not gone away.

In food, with the gradual recovery of catering services, the demand for pork consumption continues to increase, and floods in many places have a certain impact on the transportation of pigs. The supply is still tight. The price of pork rose by 10.3% , an increase of 6.7 percentage points over the previous month.

The annual numbers further remind us of the issue.

In food, the price of pork increased by 85.7% , an increase of 4.1 percentage points from the previous month

The pig333 website only takes us to the end of July but reports a price of just under 37 Renminbi compared to a bit under 20 this time last year.

I also noted this on the same website and the emphasis is mine.

Senasa (National Service of Agri-Food Health and Quality) officials certified exports of 18,483 tons of pork products and by-products sent between January and June of 2020, representing an improvement of 49% compared to the 12,336 tons sent in the same period in 2019. The main destinations were: China (9,379 tonnes); Hong Kong (2,599 t), Russia (1,845 t), Chile (1,400 t) and Angola (644 t).

So some extra demand for Argentinian farmers which will no doubt be welcome in its difficulties. But Hub Trade China suggests it may be a while before things get better.

#China‘s #pork prices, which jumped in June and edged up in July, will continue to rise in coming months due to seasonal factors and the influence of #COVID19. But tight supplies will begin to ease in the 4th. quarter thanks to boosting hog production and the expansion of imports.

The official view of the Ministry of Agriculture is this.

In the first half of 2020, live pigs and sows have maintained momentum towards recovery. At the end of June, the national sow population of 36.29 million heads changed from negative to positive for the first time year-on-year, up 5.49 million head from the end of last year. The current sow population has recovered to represent 81.2% of the herd at the end of 2017.

We are left wondering what “largely under control” means in reality.

African swine fever has been largely under control, and no major regional animal epidemics occurred in the first half of the year.

I have tried to look at the underlying indices but the England version has not been updated but up until June we have seen them be 170% to 180% of what they were in the previous year.

Food Overall

In fact the annual rate of inflation is being driven by food prices.

Among them, food prices rose by 13.2% , an increase of 2.1 percentage points, affecting the increase in CPI by about 2.68 percentage points.

A major player in this is of course the pork prices we have just analysed, but it is far from the only player.

the price of fresh vegetables increased by 7.9% , an increase of 3.7 percentage points; the price of aquatic products rose by 4.7% , a decrease of 0.1 percentage point; the price of eggs fell 16.6% , The rate of decline expanded by 0.8 percentage points; the price of fresh fruits fell by 27.7% , and the rate of decline narrowed by 1.3 percentage points.

So if you can get by on eggs and fresh fruit you are okay, otherwise you are not. Although on a monthly basis egg prices rose so that trend mat have turned.

Fuel

I note these because after the excitement around the period when we saw negative prices for some crude oil futures things are rather different now. Brent Crude Oil was essentially above US $40 throughout July. So we see this in the report.

gasoline and diesel prices rose by 2.5% and 2.7% ( monthly)…….

If we switch to the producer prices report we see that the times they are a-changing.

Affected by the continued rebound in international crude oil prices, prices in petroleum-related industries continued to rise. Among them, the prices of petroleum and natural gas extraction industries rose by 12.0% , and the prices of petroleum, coal and other fuel processing industries rose by 3.4% .

So the situation has turned for oil and the overall picture is as follows.

PPI rose by 0.4% , the same rate as last month…….From a year-on-year perspective, PPI fell by 2.4% , and the rate of decline narrowed by 0.6 percentage points from the previous month

Comment

The rise in inflation in China is being reported as good news or rather a reason for a rally in equity markets. But in fact a look at the consumer inflation data shows that food prices have been rising in many areas with the price of pork continuing to surge. So the Chinese consumer and worker will be worse off. Of course central bankers love to ignore this sort of thing as for newer readers basically they define everything that is vital as non-core for inflation purposes. Also inflation calculations assume you substitute products when the price rises to keep the numbers lower, although here they may be correct because poorer Chinese may not be able to afford pork at all now.

On the other side of the coin should China find a way out of the pork problem then inflation would be very low. Well for consumers and workers that would be a good thing because as we stand the chances for wage rises seem slim and I fear the reverse.

Looking at the exchange rate we get regular reports of a collapse on the way but whilst it has joined the rise against the US Dollar it has not done much. At just below 7 versus the US Dollar it is down 1% on the year. Are they running a pegged currency?

Podcast on GDP

 

Time for some Bank of England Bingo for savers

Earlier this morning the Bank of England announced that it was taking the advice of the apocryphal civil servant Sir Humphrey Appleby by applying some “masterly inaction”

At its meeting ending on 4 August 2020, the MPC voted unanimously to maintain Bank Rate at 0.1%. The Committee voted unanimously for the Bank of England to continue with its existing programmes of UK government bond and sterling non-financial investment-grade corporate bond purchases, financed by the issuance of central bank reserves, maintaining the target for the total stock of these purchases at £745 billion.

Let me first focus on an interest-rate of 0.1% and take you back to the 28th of September 2010.

 “It’s very much swings and roundabouts. At the current juncture, savers might be suffering as a result of bank rate being at low levels, but there will be times in the future — as there have been times in the past — when they will be doing very well.

“Savers shouldn’t see themselves as being uniquely hit by this. A lot of people are suffering during this downturn … Savers shouldn’t necessarily expect to be able to live just off their income in times when interest rates are low. It may make sense for them to eat into their capital a bit.”  ( Deputy Governor Charlie Bean)

Savers will be eating “into their capital a bit” more these days as the “swings and roundabouts” never turned up but there was a slide with Bank Rate now 0.1% compared to the emergency 0.5% back then, That provides something of a contradiction to something else our Charlie said.

The Deputy Governor said the Bank’s 0.5  per cent base rate was part of an “aggressive policy” to deal with a “once-in-a-century” financial crisis.

What do you do with someone who gets the future completely wrong?

Sir Charles joined the OBR in January 2017 and also holds a part-time Professorship at the London School of Economics.

Yes you give them a job forecasting the economy. This is along the lines of Yes Prime Minister where an individual who does not even have a television is suggested as a perfect Governor for the BBC. You may note that rather than the slide that savers are on Sir Charles has been on a roundabout of other establishment jobs to top up his already substantial RPI linked pension. Yes the same RPI which is officially a bad measure of inflation until it applies personally.

Negative Interest-Rates.

In some ways it is hard to know where to start with this.

Some central banks have judged their ELB to be below
zero, and have implemented negative policy rates as a tool to stimulate the economy. In recent years, the MPC has
judged that the ELB for Bank Rate is close to but just above zero. But that judgement can change, and in the past
has changed.

Actually I have had two minor successes here. Firstly they admit negative interest-rates exist as believe it or not past analysis ignored the fact that merely crossing either The Channel or the Irish Sea took interest-rates to -0.6% and -1% for banks. Also that the view on the Effective Lower Bound or ELB switched overnight from 0.5% to 0.1%. Laughable really but nor as wild as the swings at the Bank of Canada.

The reality is that they are preparing us for a move to a negative Bank Rate. This is because the brighter ones there know they are in trouble.

Oh no I see
A spider web and it’s me in the middle
So I twist and turn
Here am I in my little bubble

But they are not bright enough to realise it is a trap of their own making. Meanwhile the PR spinning goes on.

The global fall in central bank interest rates to very low levels in part reflects falls in the ‘equilibrium interest rate’
— the interest rate at which monetary policy is neither expansionary nor contractionary.

So all the interest-rate cuts are nothing at all to do with them really, which is curious as only a couple of paragraphs earlier it is up to them.

The MPC is currently considering whether the ELB for Bank Rate could be below zero; that is whether a negative
policy rate could provide economic stimulus.

Indeed just on the wires as I type this comes another entry in my theme of never believe anything until it is officially denied.

BOE’s Bailey, negative rates are in the toolbox but no plans to use them ( @mhewson_CMC )

Quantitative Easing

There will be some ch-ch-changes here starting next week.

The Bank intends to purchase evenly across the three gilt maturity sectors.  For operations scheduled between 11 August 2020 and 16 December 2020 the planned size of auctions will be £1,473mn for each maturity sector. This auction size includes the reinvestment of the £7.0bn cash flows associated with the maturity on 7 September 2020 of a gilt owned by the APF.

So we see that a weekly rate of purchases of £6.9 billion will fall to slightly over £4.4 billion and if we allow for the Operation Twist style refinancing that is a bit below 60% of what it was.

Forecasts

It seems that the spirit of Professor Sir Charles Bean lives on.

The UK economic slump caused by Covid-19 will be less severe than expected, but the recovery will also take longer, the Bank of England has said.

It expects the economy to shrink by 9.5% this year.

While this would be the biggest annual decline in 100 years, it is not as steep as the Bank’s initial estimate of a 14% contraction. ( BBC)

Of course our valiant Knight’s present employer has done even worse. Who could possibly have expected this?

Housing Market

The Bank of England will have been fully behind this.

An overhaul of the country’s outdated planning system that will deliver the high-quality, sustainable homes communities need will be at the heart of the most significant reforms to housing policy in decades, the Housing Secretary has announced today (6 August 2020).

The landmark changes will transform a system that has long been criticised for being too sluggish in providing housing for families, key workers and young people and too ineffectual in obligating developers to properly fund the infrastructure – such as schools, roads and GP surgeries – to support them. ( UK Government)

There is even time for some smaller businesses rhetoric.

The changes will be a major boost to SME builders currently cut off by the planning process.

Are they the same ones which were supposed to be boosted by the Funding for Lending Scheme of the summer of 2012? How has that been going?

The current system has shown itself to be unfavourable to small businesses, with the proportion of new homebuilding they lead on dropping drastically from 40% 30 years ago to just 12% today.

Comment

Let me open with the economic view which is that 2020 so far has turned out not to be as bad as the Bank of England previously thought. That is welcome and we have seen a spread of better news. That means that their panic-stricken rush to cut Bank Rate to 0.1% was yet another policy mistake which they seem set to compound by cutting to negative interest-rates. Of course they have already inflicted negative bond yields on us ( up to around the 7 year maturity) via their financing of the UK government with total QE purchases now some £645 billion.

I am ignoring their forecasts for 2021 because the have just demonstrated they know not a lot about 2020 so how they know 2021? Also the next real clue comes when the furlough scheme runs out later this year.

Meanwhile since the Bank of England has gone quiet on the policy front one thing has improved which is the value of the UK Pound £. The headline of nearly US $1.32 flatters it as the real move in effective or trade-weighted terms has been from 73 to 78. Actually that shift itself is welcome as the anti-inflationary move versus the US Dollar has been larger than elsewhere. That leaves the intellectual titans at the Bank of England in quite a quandary because they want inflation higher so they can make people and savers worse off. You think that is too silly for them? Not in a world where the Governor of the Bank of England can publicly state cutting interest-rates works in an upswing.

BoE’s Bailey: Effectiveness Of Negative Rates Depends On What Point Of Cycle They Are Used, ECB Research Suggests Most Effective In An Upswing ( @LiveSquawk)

Is that how the ECB ended up with a deposit rate of -0.6%? If so the Euro area economy must have seen quiet a boom…..Oh wait.

The Investing Channel

 

 

The RBA is financing the Australian government as well as pumping the housing market

It is time for another trip to a land down under as even commodity rich Australia has found its economy affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. It raises a wry smile as I used to regularly reply to the World Economic Forum which periodically trumpeted Australia’s lack of a recession that with its enormous resources that was hardly a surprise and thus meant little about economic policy. However we eventually found something which did create a recession. From the Reserve Bank of Australia earlier.

The Australian economy is going through a very difficult period and is experiencing the biggest contraction since the 1930s. As difficult as this is, the downturn is not as severe as earlier expected and a recovery is now underway in most of Australia. This recovery is, however, likely to be both uneven and bumpy, with the coronavirus outbreak in Victoria having a major effect on the Victorian economy.

I would be careful about saying things are not as bad as expected after the reverse in Victoria if I was the RBA. So let us send our best wishes to those affected there as we note the detailed breakdown of the forecasts.

In the baseline scenario, output falls by 6 per cent over 2020 and then grows by 5 per cent over the following year. In this scenario, the unemployment rate rises to around 10 per cent later in 2020 due to further job losses in Victoria and more people elsewhere in Australia looking for jobs. Over the following couple of years, the unemployment rate is expected to decline gradually to around 7 per cent.

So they are expecting lower falls than in Europe but there is a familiar rebound next year which frankly feels based on Zebedee from The Magic Roundabout rather than any grounding in reality.

Financing The Government

Like so often this is what it boils down too.

At its meeting today, the Board decided to maintain the current policy settings, including the targets for the cash rate and the yield on 3-year Australian Government bonds of 25 basis points.

So even resources rich Australia found itself unable to resist the supermassive black hole pull of ZIRP and central bankers being pack animals. I suspect as I shall explain in a minute they have stopped slightly short of 0% because of fears for the banking sector. But the crucial point we are noting here is the control agenda for the bond market which mimics in concept if not level that applied by the Bank of Japan.

Why does the government need financing? Well there is this.

Government bond markets are functioning normally alongside a significant increase in issuance.

As to how much the Australian Office of Financial Management reinforced this last week.

On the 3rd of July we announced a weekly issuance rate for Treasury Bonds of $4-5 billion, with a weekly rate of issuance for Treasury Notes of $2-4 billion. We are confident this guidance will be reliable until the October Budget; absent of course a sharp unanticipated change in the fiscal position.

The major shift in fiscal policy is highlighted here.

Although to date we have only announced a weekly issuance rate and new maturities, the current plan for gross Treasury Bond issuance this year is around $240 billion.  This will comprise about $50 billion to fund maturing debt and $190 billion of net new issuance.  This is materially higher than the $128 billion issued last year, although almost $90 billion of that was issued in the last quarter.

So a near doubling as they went from not being that bothered about issuing debt.

Less than six months ago the AOFM was rationing issuance to best manage a market maintenance objective.

To a spell when they could not issue at all.

Temporary loss of access to funding markets is certainly something we had thought possible (and indeed likely at some point), but combined with the scale and timing of the increased pandemic financing task it was a more sobering experience than we could have imagined.

They would have been burning the midnight oil before International Rescue arrived.

We will never know how long the market would have taken to recover had the RBA not intervened.

If we return to the RBA statement let me present you with two outright lies.

Government bond markets are functioning normally alongside a significant increase in issuance.

If they are then why is this needed?

The yield has, however, been a little higher than 25 basis points over recent weeks. Given this, tomorrow the Bank will purchase AGS in the secondary market to ensure that the yield on 3-year bonds remains consistent with the target. Further purchases will be undertaken as necessary.

Then the next lie.

The yield target will remain in place until progress is being made towards the goals for full employment and inflation.

Actually it will remain in place until the government no longer needs financing. This may be open ended as we note that the only place which has this ( Japan) only ever seems to do more and never less. The initial salvo in Australia was this.

To date, the Reserve Bank has bought around $47 billion of government bonds ( April 21st)

The Precious! The Precious!

In another example of pack animal behaviour they have pretty much copied and pasted a Bank of England policy.

The Reserve Bank has established a Term Funding Facility (TFF) to offer three-year funding to authorised deposit-taking institutions (ADIs).

So they are avoiding calling them banks. Oh and whilst they get this.

to reinforce the benefits to the economy of a lower cash rate, by reducing the funding costs of ADIs and in turn helping to reduce interest rates for borrowers.

You may note how bank costs are “reduced” whereas it is “helping to reduce” them for others. We know who it will help and it is not these.

The scheme encourages lending to all businesses, although the incentives are stronger for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Well not unless they are in the mortgage or house price market. For those unaware of the UK situation when the policies were applied here small business lending did nothing but in a “completely unexpected development” mortgage rates plunged and lending surged.

So far just over 27 billion Australian Dollars have been supplied via this route.

Comment

Much here is familiar as we see a central bank implicitly financing its government and pumping up the housing market too. The RBA must have thought all its Christmases had come at once when the Aussie bond market had trouble at the shorter maturities and it could intervene at a place likely to impact on mortgage rates. It must feel the banks need help or it would have cut the official rate to 0%.

Thus has led to a money supply surge with narrow money going from 909 billion in June of last year to 1260 billion on June of this. Quite a shift for an aggregate which we had noted in the past was going nowhere and at times had fallen.

Switching to external events the Aussie Dollar or as some call it the little battler has been doing well. The trade weighted index which went as low as 49.9 on a day familiar to regular readers but the 19th of March for newer ones is now 61.4. As for influences I guess the relative hopes for the economy are in play as well as this.

Preliminary estimates for July indicate that the index increased by 0.9 per cent (on a monthly average basis) in SDR terms, after decreasing by 0.2 per cent in June (revised). The non-rural and base metals sub-indices increased in the month, while the rural sub-index decreased. In Australian dollar terms, the index decreased by 0.2 per cent in July.

Over the past year, the index has decreased by 12 per cent in SDR terms, led by lower coal, iron ore, LNG and oil prices. The index has decreased by 12.1 per cent in Australian dollar terms. ( RBA earlier today)

So an improvement for the resources base and looking ahead Gold is 7.5% of the index. Although the compilers of the index have just reduced its weight from 8.7% and will now find themselves in the deepest dark recesses of the RBA bunker where the cake trolley never goes.

Oh France! Oh Spain! Oh Italy!

After yesterday’s update from Germany we move onto the second, third and fourth largest economies in the Euro area, who rather curiously have produced their figures in that order this morning. So as we mull the fact that Germany accelerated the release of its GDP ( Gross Domestic Product) numbers at exactly the wrong time we also need to be ready for bad news.

In Q2 2020, GDP in volume terms declined: –13.8%, after –5.9% in Q1 2020. It is 19% lower than in Q2 2019.  ( Insee of France)

That is like two explosions going off with the 5.9% being credit crunch like but then it being followed by a much louder bang. The total of -19% is somewhat chilling.

We know the cause.

 GDP’s negative developments in first half of 2020 is linked to the shut-down of “non-essential” activities in the context of the implementation of the lockdown between mid-March and the beginning of May

But the beginning of the recovery seems understated.

The gradual ending of restrictions led to a gradual recovery of economic activity in May and June, after the low point reached in April.

In terms of the detail well everything in the domestic economy fell with one of the components being rather curious.

Household consumption expenditures dropped (–11.0% after –5.8%), as did total gross fixed capital formation in a more pronounced manner (GFCF: –17.8% after –10.3%). General government expenditure also stepped back (–8.0% after –3.5%).

I wonder how they managed to find a category of government spending that fell?! Maybe it was stuff they could not buy as it was out of stock. But it rather sticks out as does this.

 Food expenditure slightly decreased (–0.5% after +2.8%).

In the UK we still seem to be spending more on food whereas France seems to have stocked up and then begun to de-stock.

Although the numbers are larger trade turns out to be a much smaller factor which reminds us that trade numbers are unreliable at the best of times and maybe nearly hopeless right now.

In Q2 2020, imports declined strongly (–17.3% after –10.3%), notably in manufactured goods. Exports fell in a more pronounced manner (–25.5% after –6.1%), in particular in transport equipment. All in all, foreign trade contributed negatively to GDP growth this quarter (–2.3 points after –0.1points).

Make of that what you will.

Spain

This starts especially grimly as the opening page tells us there has been a 22.1% fall in GDP. So let us look more deeply at the state of play.

The Spanish GDP registers a variation of -18.5% in the second quarter of 2020 compared to the previous quarter in terms of volume. This rate is 13.3 points lower than that registered in the first quarter.

which brings us to this.

The year-on-year change in the GDP stood at −22.1%, compared to −4.1% for the quarter
preceding.

That is a bit of a “Boom! Boom! Boom!” moment although notin an economic sense and the breakdown is as follows.

The contribution of domestic demand to year-on-year GDP growth is −19.2 points, 15.5 points lower than that of the first quarter. For its part, external demand represents a contribution of −2.9 points, 2.5 points lower than that of the previous quarter.

We get a sort of confirmation from all of this from the hours worked numbers which at the same time provide a critique of the unemployment data.

In year-on-year terms, hours worked decreased by 24.8%, rate 20.6 points lower than in the first quarter of 2020, and full-time equivalent positions down 18.5%, 17.9 points less than in the first quarter, which represents decrease of 3,394 thousand full-time equivalent jobs in one year.

Some areas saw not far off a collapse in demand, because of past issues the construction numbers stood out to me.

Household final consumption expenditure experiences a year-on-year decrease of 25.7%, 19.9 points less than in the last quarter. For its part, the final consumption expenditure of the Public Administrations presented an inter annual variation of 3.5%, one tenth less than that of the preceding quarter.
Gross capital formation registered a decrease of 25.8%, 20.5 points higher than that of previous quarter. The investment in tangible fixed assets decreases at a year-on-year rate of 30.8%, which it represents 22.4 points more than in the previous quarter. By components, the investment in homes and other buildings and constructions decreased 22.6 points, going from −8.3% to -30.9%, while investment in machinery, capital goods and weapons systems it decreases 23 points when presenting a rate of −32.3%, compared to −9.3% in the previous quarter.

The reason why that sector stands out is the way it affected the economy and the banks as the credit crunch rolled into the Euro area crisis.

Italy

We advance on Italy nervously because of its past record but the fall was in fact the smallest of these three.

 In the second quarter of 2020 the seasonally and calendar adjusted, chained volume measure of Gross
Domestic Product (GDP) decreased by 12.4 per cent with respect to the previous quarter and by 17.3 per
cent over the same quarter of previous year.

As to the breakdown well it was everything if we skip over a slightly bizarre focus on farming.

The quarter on quarter change is the result of a decrease of value added in agriculture, forestry and
fishing, in that of industry as well as in services. From the demand side, there is a negative contribution
both by the domestic component (gross of change in inventories) and the net export component.

Farming is of course very important but it hardly the main player in this context.

Comment

There are a lot of contexts to this so let us start with the national ones. Spain was the main “Euro Boom” beneficiary with annual economic growth reaching 4.2% in early 2015 but now we are reminded that it can be the leader of the pack in down as well as upswings. Italy has lost less but it is hard not to think that is because it has less to lose and this from  @fwred is rather chilling.

As the morning has developed we can now look at the overall picture for the Euro area.

In the second quarter 2020, still marked by COVID-19 containment measures in most Member States, seasonally
adjusted GDP decreased by 12.1% in the euro area and by 11.9% in the EU, compared with the previous quarter,
according to a preliminary flash estimate published by Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union.
These were by far the sharpest declines observed since time series started in 1995. In the first quarter of 2020,
GDP had decreased by 3.6% in the euro area and by 3.2% in the EU.

We can use the numbers to compare with the United States as the annual decline of 15% of the Euro area is larger than the 9.5% there. I think this is outside the margin of error but potential errors right now will be large.

There is a collective assumption that these things will bounce back and I am sure that some areas will. But there are others where it will not and if we think of the “girlfriend in a coma” it never seems to do that. Quarterly economic output in Italy was 417 billion Euros at the beginning of 2017 rising to 431 billion and now falling to 356 billion.

In the end this is the problem with all the can kicking. We have arrived at the next storm without fixing the damage caused by the last one. Where do you go when the official interest-rate is -0.6% and of course -1% for the banks?

Germany sees quite a plunge in economic output or GDP

After last night’s rather damp squib from the US Federal Reserve ( they can expand QE within meetings) the Euro area takes center stage today. This is because the leader of its economic pack has brought us up to date on its economy.

WIESBADEN – The gross domestic product (GDP) in the 2nd quarter 2020 compared to the 1st quarter 2020 – adjusted by price, season and calendar – by 10.1%. This was the sharpest decline since the beginning of quarterly GDP calculations for Germany in 1970. It was even more pronounced than during the financial market and economic crisis (-4.7% in the first quarter of 2009).

So in broad terms we have seen a move double that of the credit crunch which was considered to be severe at the time.  The economy had also contracted in the first quarter of this year which we can pick up via the annual comparison.

Economic output also fell year-on-year: GDP in the second quarter of 2020 was 11.7% lower than in the previous year after adjustment for prices (including calendar adjusted). Here, too, there had not been such a sharp decline even in the years of the financial market and economic crisis of 2008/2009: the strongest decline to date was recorded in the second quarter of 2009 at -7.9% compared to the same quarter of the previous year.

So the worst annual comparison of the modern era although by not as large an amount.

We do not get an enormous amount of detail at this preliminary stage but there is some.

As the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) further reports, both exports and imports of goods and services collapsed massively in the second quarter of 2020, as did private consumer spending and investments in equipment. The state, however, increased its consumer spending during the crisis.

Just like in the film Airplane they chose a bad time to do this…

Beginning with the second quarter of 2020, the Federal Statistical Office published GDP for the first time 30 days after the end of the quarter, around two weeks earlier than before. The fact that the results are more up-to-date requires more estimates than was the case after 45 days.

Although not a complete disaster as they would have been mostly guessing anyway. One matter of note is that 2015 was better than previously though and 2017 worse both by 0.3%. That is not good news for the ECB and the “Euro Boom” in response to its policies.

Unemployment

There has been bad but not unexpected news from the Federal Employment Agency as well this morning.

Unemployment rose by 2.0% compared to the previous month and by 27.9% year-on-year to 2.9 million. Underemployment without short-time work increased by 1.3% compared to the previous month and by 14.6% compared to the previous month. It is 3.7 million The unemployment rate is 6.3%, the underemployment rate is 7.9%.

Now things get a little more awkward as the statistics office has reported this also.

According to the results of the labor force survey, the number of unemployed was 1.97 million in June 2020. That was 39,000 people or 2.1% more than in the previous month of May. Compared to June 2019, the number of unemployed rose by 653,000 (+ 49.2%). The unemployment rate was 4.5% in June 2020.

What we are comparing is registered unemployment or if you prefer those receiving unemployment benefits with those officially counted as unemployed. Whilst we have a difference in timing ( July and then June) the gap is far wider than the change. The International Labour Organisation has some work to do I think…..

Being Paid To Borrow

Regular readers will be aware that this has essentially been the state of play in Germany for some time now. In terms of the benchmark ten-year yield this started in the spring of last year, but the five-year has been negative for nearly the last five years. That trend has recently been picking up again with the ten-year going below -0.5% this week. With the thirty-year at -0.12% then at whatever maturity Germany is paid to borrow,

This represents yet another defeat for the bond vigilantes because even Germany’s fiscal position will take a pounding from the economic decline combined with much higher public spending. But these days a weaker economy tends to lead to even lower bond yields due to expectations of more central bank buying of them.

ECB Monthly Bulletin

After the German numbers above we can only say yes to this.

While incoming economic data, particularly survey results, show initial signs of a recovery, they still point to a historic contraction in euro area output in the second quarter of 2020.

The problem is getting any sort of idea of how quickly things are picking back up. The ECB seems to be looking for clues.

Both the Economic Sentiment Indicator and the PMI display a broad-based rebound across both countries and economic sectors. This pick-up in economic activity is also confirmed by high-frequency indicators such as electricity consumption.

Meanwhile it continues to pump it all up.

The Governing Council will continue its purchases under the pandemic emergency purchase programme (PEPP) with a total envelope of €1,350 billion…………Net purchases under the asset purchase programme (APP) will continue at a monthly pace of €20 billion, together with the purchases under the additional €120 billion temporary envelope until the end of the year……..The Governing Council will also continue to provide ample liquidity through its
refinancing operations. In particular, the latest operation in the third series of targeted
longer-term refinancing operations (TLTRO III) has registered a very high take-up of
funds, supporting bank lending to firms and households.

As to the last bit I can only say indeed! After all who would not want money given to you at -1%?

Comment

We now begin to have more of an idea about how much the economy of Germany has shrunk. Also this is not as some are presenting it because the economy changed gear in 2018 and the trade war of last year applied the brakes. Of course neither were on anything like the scale we have noted today. Whilst the numbers are only a broad brush they are a similar decline to Austria ( -10.7%) which gives things a little more credibility. Markets were a little caught out with both the Euro and the Dax falling as well as bond yields.

Looking ahead we can expect a bounce back in July but how much? The Markit PMI surveys seem to have lost their way as what does this mean?

The recovery in the German economy remained on
track in July, according to the latest ‘flash’ PMI® data
from IHS Markit

Which track?

“July’s PMI registered firmly in growth territory and
well above expectations, in a clear sign that
business conditions are improving across Germany
as activity and demand recover. Furthermore, for
an economy that is steered so much by exports, it
was encouraging to see manufacturers reporting a
notable upturn in sales abroad.”

I am not sure that anyone backing their views with actual trades are convinced by this. Of course things will have picked up as the lockdown ended but there will now be worries about this,

Germany records the highest number of new coronavirus cases in about six weeks ( Bloomberg)

So the recovery seems set to have ebbs and flows. Accordingly I have no idea how places can predict such strong bounce backs in economic activity in 2021 as we still are very unsure about 2020. I wish anyone ill with this virus a speedy recovery but I suspect that economies will take quite some time.