Where will all the extra US Money Supply end up?

Today brings both the US economy and monetary policy centre stage. The OECD has already weighed in on the subject this morning.

The COVID-19 outbreak has brought the longest economic expansion on record to a juddering halt. GDP
contracted by 5% in the first quarter at an annualised rate, and the unemployment rate has risen
precipitously. If there is another virus outbreak later in the year, GDP is expected to fall by over 8% in 2020
(the double-hit scenario). If, on the other hand, the virus outbreak subsides by the summer and further
lockdowns are avoided (the single-hit scenario), the impact on annual growth is estimated to be a percentage
point less.

Actually that is less than its view of many other countries. But of course we need to remind ourselves that the OECD is not a particularly good forecaster. Also we find that the official data has its quirks.

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 2.5 million in May, and the unemployment rate
declined to 13.3 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today……In May, employment rose sharply in leisure and hospitality, construction, education and health services, and retail trade. By contrast, employment
in government continued to decline sharply……….The unemployment rate declined by 1.4 percentage points to 13.3 percent in May, and the number of unemployed persons fell by 2.1 million to 21.0 million.

Those figures not only completely wrong footed the forecasters they nutmegged them as well in one of the most spectacular examples of this genre I have seen. I forget now if they were expecting a rise in unemployment of eight or nine million but either way you get the gist. We do not know where we are let alone where we are going although the Bureau of Labor Statistics did try to add some clarity.

If the workers who were recorded as employed but absent from work due to “other  reasons” (over and above the number absent for other reasons in a typical May) had
been classified as unemployed on temporary layoff, the overall unemployment rate  would have been about 3 percentage points higher than reported (on a not seasonally  adjusted basis).

We learn more about the state of play from the New York Federal Reserve.

The New York Fed Staff Nowcast stands at -25.5% for 2020:Q2 and -12.0% for 2020:Q3. News from this week’s data releases increased the nowcast for 2020:Q2 by 10 percentage points and increased the nowcast for 2020:Q3 by 24.5 percentage points. Positive surprises from labor, survey, and international trade data drove most of the increase.

As you can see the labo(u)r market data blew their forecasts like a gale and leave us essentially with the view that there has been a large contraction but also a wide possible and indeed probable error range.

The Inflation Problem

We get the latest inflation data later after I publish this piece. But there is a problem with the mantra we are being told which is that there is no inflation. Something similar to the April reading of 0.3% is expected. So if we switch to the measure used by the US Federal Reserve which is based on Personal Consumption Expenditures the annual rate if we use our rule of thumb would in fact be slightly negative right now. On this basis Chair Powell and much of the media can say that all the monetary easing is justified.

But there are more than a few catches which change the picture. Let me start with the issues I raised concerning the Euro area yesterday where the numbers will be pushed downwards by a combination of the weights being (very) wrong, many prices being unavailable and the switch to online prices. It would seem that the ordinary person has been figuring this out for themselves.

The May 2020 Survey of Consumer Expectations shows small signs of improvement in households’ expectations compared to April. Median inflation expectations increased by 0.4 percentage point at the one-year horizon to 3.0 percent, and were unchanged at the three-year horizon at 2.6 percent. ( NY Fed Research from Monday)

It is revealing that they describe an increase in inflation that is already above target as an “improvement” is it not? But we see a complete shift as we leave the Ivory Towers and media palaces as the ordinary person surveyed expects a very different picture. Still the Ivory Towers can take some solace from the fact that inflation is in what they consider to be non-core areas.

Expected year-ahead changes in both food and gasoline prices displayed sharp increases for the second consecutive month and recorded series’ highs in May at 8.7% and 7.8%, respectively, in May.

Just for the avoidance of doubt I have turned my Irony meter beyond even the “turn up to 11” of the film Spinal Tap.

Central bankers will derive some cheer from the apparent improvement in perceptions about the housing market.

Median home price change expectations recovered slightly from its series’ low of 0% reached in April to 0.6% in May. The slight increase was driven by respondents who live in the West and Northeast Census regions.

Credit

More food for thought is provided in this area. If we switch to US Federal Reserve policy Chair Jerome Powell will tell us later that the taps are open and credit is flowing. But those surveyed have different ideas it would seem.

Perceptions of credit access compared to a year ago deteriorated for the third consecutive month, with 49.6% of respondents reporting credit to be harder to get today than a year ago (versus 32.1% in March and 48.0% in April). Expectations for year-ahead credit availability also worsened, with fewer respondents expecting credit will become easier to obtain.

Comment

I now want to shift to a subject which is not getting the attention it deserves. This is the growth in the money supply where the three monthly average for the narrow measure M1 has increased in annualised terms by 67.2% in the three months to the 25th of May. Putting that another way it has gone from a bit over US $4 trillion to over US $5 trillion over the past 3 months. That gives the monetary system quite a short-term shove the size of which we can put into context with this.

In April 2008, M1 was approximately $1.4 trillion, more than half of which consisted of currency.  ( NY Fed)

Contrary to what we keep being told about the decline of cash it has grown quite a bit over this period as there is presently a bit over US $1.8 trillion in circulation.

Moving to the wider measure M2 we see a similar picture where the most recent three months measured grew by 40.6% compared to its predecessor in annualised terms. Or if you prefer it has risen from US $15.6 billion to US $18.1 billion. Again here is the historical perspective from April 2008.

 M2 was approximately $7.7 trillion and largely consisted of savings deposits.

So here is a question for readers, where do you think all this money will go? Whilst you do so you might like to note this from the 2008 report I have quoted.

While as much as two-thirds of U.S. currency in circulation may be held outside the United States….

The Investing Channel

 

The Lebanon poses a problem for central banks and the belief they cannot fail

There is a lot going on in the Lebanon to say the least so let me open by offering my sympathy to those suffering there. My beat is economics where there is an enormous amount happening too and it links into the role of the new overlords of our time which is,of course, the central banking fraternity. They have intervened on an enormous scale and we are regularly told nothing can go wrong rather like in the way that The Titanic was supposed to be indestructible. If you like me watched Thunderbirds as a child you will know that there were few worse portents than being told nothing can go wrong.

The State of Play

The central bank summed things up in its 2019 review like this.

The Lebanese economy has moved into a state of recession in 2019 with GDP growth touching the negative territory. The International Monetary Fund projected Lebanon’s real GDP to shrink by 12% in 2020, a new double-digit contraction not seen in more than 30 years. In comparison, the IMF forecasted real GDP to contract by 3.3% in the MENA region and by 3% globally in 2020. Inflation in Lebanon recorded 2.9% in 2019, and it is expected to reach 17% in 2020, according to the IMF.

As you can see we have two double-digit measures as output falls by that as we note that the ordinary person will be hurt by double-digit inflation. This poses yet another question for output gap theory. I have to confess I am a little surprised to note that the IMF has not updated the forecasts unlike the government. From the Financial Times.

The government says the economy shrank by 6.9 per cent of GDP last year and expects a further contraction this year of 13.8 per cent — a full-blown depression with an estimated 48 per cent of people already below the poverty line.

The next feature is a currency peg to the US Dollar as we return to the Banque Du Liban.

At the monetary level, the year was marked by noticeable net conversions in favor of foreign currencies, a decline in deposit inflows, a shortage of US dollars and a lack of local currency liquidity. As a result, BDL’s assets in foreign currencies witnessed a contraction of 6% to reach $37.3 billion at end December 2019.

Troubling and a signal that if you control the price via a currency peg the risk is that you have a quantity problem which is always likely to be a shortage of US Dollars.

Well I need a dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
Hey hey
And I said I need dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
And if I share with you my story would you share your dollar with me ( Aloe Blacc)

This led to what Taylor Swift would call “trouble,trouble,trouble”

It is worth mentioning that in the last quarter of 2019, the Lebanese pound has plunged on a parallel market by nearly 50% versus an official rate of 1507.5 pounds to the dollar. The Central Bank is still maintaining the official peg in bank transactions and for critical imports such as medicine, fuel and wheat.

This leads to the sort of dual currency environment we have looked at elsewhere with Ukraine coming to mind particularly.

The present position is that the official peg is “Under Pressure” as Queen and David Bowie would say as it has been above 1500 for the whole of the last year. There was particular pressure on the 4th of May when it went to 1522. Switching to the unofficial exchange rate then Lira Rate have it at 3890/3940. I think that speaks for itself.

The official Repo rate is 10% and rise as we move away from overnight to 13.46% for three-year paper. Just as a reminder the United States has near zero interest-rates so this is another way of looking at pressure on the currency peg and invites all sorts of problems.For example the forward rate for the official Lebanese Pound will be around 10% lower for a year ahead due to the interest-rate gap. So more pressure on a rate which is from an alternative universe.

It looks like there has been some currency intervention as in the fortnight to the end of May foreign currency assets fell from 51.6 trillion Lebanese Pounds to 50.5 trillion.

Corruption

We start with the Financial Times bigging up the banking sector but even it cannot avoid the consequences of what has happened.

The banks, long the jewel in Lebanon’s economic crown, and the central bank, the Banque du Liban, are at the heart of this crisis. The banks long offered high interest rates to attract dollar deposits, especially from the far-flung Lebanese diaspora. But Riad Salameh, BdL governor since 1993, began from 2016 offering unsustainable interest returns to the banks to lend on these dollars to the government, through the central bank.

That has led to a type of economic dependency.

In sum, 70 per cent of total assets in the banking system were lent to an insolvent state. The recovery programme estimates bank losses at $83bn and “embedded losses” at the BdL at $44bn (subject to audit). Together that is well over twice the size of the shrinking economy.

One of the worst forms of corruption is where government and the banks get together. For them it is symbiotic and both have lived high on the hog but they have a parasitical relationship with the ordinary Lebanese who now find the price is inflation and an economic depression.

Bankers are protesting at government plans to force mergers and recapitalisation, through a mix of wiping out existing shareholdings; fresh capital investment for banks that wish to stay in business, especially by repatriating dividends and interest earnings; recovered illicit assets; and “haircuts” on wealthy depositors.

Or as Reuters put it.

But the banks were not responsible for the devastating waste, pillage and payroll padding in the public sector – about which this plan has little detailed to say.

Comment

We find that this sort of situation involves both war and corruption. Big business, the banks and government getting to close is another warning sign and one we see all around us. But as we review a parallel currency, an economic depression and upcoming high inflation there is also this.

The sources say the plan focuses overwhelmingly on the banks and the central bank, which together lent more than 70% of total deposits in the banking system to an insolvent state at increasingly inflated interest rates put in place by central bank governor Riad Salameh. ( Reuters)

Ordinarily we assume that a central bank cannot fold as the stereotype is of one backed by the national treasury to deal with losses. There is a nuance with the Euro area where the fact there are 19 national treasuries adds not only nuance but risk for the ECB. But in general if you control the currency you can just supply more to settle any debts.the catch is its overseas value or exchange rate as we note that Mr and Mrs Market have already voted on the Lebanese Pound. But there is more as I noted on Twitter last week.

Auditors are asking banks to take a provision of ~40% against exposure to its central bank. This has to be a first in history. ( @dan_azzi)

We have become used to that being the other way around. The next bit is rather mind boggling as we mull the moral hazard at play here.

Even funnier is that BDL is about to send a circular asking banks to take a 30% provision on their exposure to BDL.

Frankly both look too low which means for the ordinary person that there is a risk of bail ins.

Podcast

 

The 2020 Currency War and the role of the US Dollar

As we step into June we have an opportunity to reflect on what has been on the media under card but only because so much has been happening elsewhere. Also we can note yet another fail for economics 101 because the advent of large-scale asset purchases or QE was supposed to cause a currency decline and maybe a large one. A higher supply of money leading to a fall in the price. The Ivory Towers of the central banks were keen on that one as they originally justified QE on the basis of being able to hit their inflation target partly via that route. Of course that has not gone well either as we noted with the ECB that has been on average some 0.7% below its holy grail of just below 2% per annum.

The US Dollar

So on that reading the world’s reserve currency the greenback should be in trouble as we observe this.

The Federal Reserve added $60 billion to its balance sheet last week, now totaling $7.097 trillion. Much of the increase this time (over $41 billion) was in corporate credit and commercial paper facilities. ( @LynAldenContact )

There is a sort of irony in US $60 billion in a week not seeming very much! Anyway the heat has been on.

The Federal Reserve’s balance sheet has expanded a staggering $1.9 trillion since February 26, just days after the S&P 500 peaked. ( @USGlobalETFs )

So plenty of new US Dollar liquidity and as part of that we recall what we might call the external supply which are the liquidity swaps for foreign central banks or US $449 billion.

To that can add an official interest-rate just above 0% ( roughly 0.1%)

Added to those factors the Financial Time has decided to put on its bovver boots and give the Dollar a written kicking.

That begs a question that has been seen as controversial — are we entering a post-dollar world? It might seem a straw-man question, given that more than 60 per cent of the world’s currency reserves are in dollars, which are also used for the vast majority of global commerce. The US Federal Reserve’s recent bolstering of dollar markets outside of the US, as a response to the coronavirus crisis, has given a further boost to global dollar dominance.

The FT writer has rather fumbled the ball there and later again emphasises a US Dollar strength.

Among the many reasons for central banks and global investors to hold US dollars, a key one is that oil is priced in dollars.

Indeed and we have looked at efforts to make ch-ch-changes from the supply side ( Russia) and the demand side ( China) but it remains dominant. There are of course plenty of other commodity markets which have a US Dollar price.

Next is something which intrigues me because if it is true in the US how do you even start with Japan and then of course you get a really rather long list of other countries doing exactly the same.

Finally, there are questions about the way in which the Fed’s unofficial backstopping of US government spending in the wake of the pandemic has politicised the money supply.

Oh and for those of you with inflation concerns ( me too) then this is close to an official denial.

The issue here isn’t really a risk of Weimar Republic-style inflation, at least not any time soon.

Actually the main inflation risk is in asset markets with the S&P 500 above 3k, the Nikkei 225 above 22,000 and the FTSE 100 above 6100 I think we can see clear evidence tight now. But of course the economics editorial line under Chris Giles is that asset prices are not part of inflation and should be ignored as part of his campaign to mislead on this subject.

Emerging Markets

If they were hoping for a US Dollar decline then such hopes have been dashed. One country which has been under the cosh is Brazil where an exchange to the US Dollar of 4 as we began the year has been replaced by one of 5.35 and even that is a fair bit better than the 5.96 at the nadir. Things have been less dramatic for the Argentine Peso but it had a bad 2019 to a move from 60 to the US Dollar to above 68 is further pain and of course an interest-rate of an eye-watering for these times of 38% has been required to restrict it to even that.

India

We have a sub-category all to itself as we note the currency of over a billion people. Let me start with something being debated in so many places, and here is the Economic Times of India from last Tuesday.

The government stimulus package of Rs 20 lakh crore seems to be inadequate to revive the economy, as a large part of it accounts for liquidity-boosting measures by RBI. It is clear that the weak fiscal position forced the government to restrict the stimulus. It is in this scenario, that the need for monetisation of deficit has been widely debated.

In layman’s language, monetisation of deficit means printing more money. In other words, monetisation of deficit happens when RBI buys government securities directly from the primary market to fund government’s expenses.

The Rupee has been a case of slip-sliding away as we note it nearly made 77 and is now 75.3 and that is in spite of the impact of the lower oil price ( and for a while much lower) on India.

Euro

This has not done much at all as I note an annual change of all of -0.38%! We did see some moves as it went to 1.14 at the height of the pandemic panic as the Euro’s “safe haven”  role was stronger than the Dollar’s one. But we then had a dip and now a bounce. So loads of column inches about the world’s main currency pair have led to a net not very much as we stand here today.

Yen

This is really rather similar to the above as we note an annual change of -.0,52% this time after a safe haven spell. Actually 107 or so for the Yen feels strong for it as we remind ourselves that the QE, negative interest-rates and equity purchases of Abenomics were supposed to keep it falling.

UK Pound

The annual picture ( -2%) is a little more misleading here as we have seen swings. The UK Pound £ has been following equity markets so went below US $1.15 at the nadir but has hit US $1.24 as we have bounced. Troubling if you are like me wondering about the equity market bounce. Still we could be the UK media that once again declared this at the bottom.

It’s the end of the world as we know it
It’s the end of the world as we know it
It’s the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine.

Places like the FT and BBC have proved very useful as when they have a “panic party” about the £ and claim it is looking over a cliff is invariably the time to buy it.

Comment

So we see that the situation is in fact one of where the various QE and interest-rate moves have offset more often than been different. In some ways the central banking “More! More! More!” culture means that differences in pace or size get ignored because they are all rocking a “To Infinity! And Beyond!” vibe as shown by the official denial below.

‘Comfortable’ Now, But On B/Sheet ‘Cannot Go To Infinity ( Jerome Powell via @LiveSquawk )

Let me conclude with another perspective which is the world of precious metals and another form of precious. One way of judging a currency is in this vein and as someone who recalls studying mercantilism which essentially revolved around country’s holdings of silver this provided some food for thought.

Those of us with longer memories have no faith in US paper dollars.  Prior to 1964, US coinage was made of 90% silver.  Today, a roll of 40 quarter dollar coins made of 90% silver, worth $10 in 1964, will cost you about $165.  The real purchasing power of the US dollar has plunged. ( h/t ahimsaka in the FT comments )

Podcast

The blue touch paper has been lit on the Money Supply boom of 2020

Today as I shall explain later is a case of back to the future especially for me. It brings an opportunity to examine one of the economic features of the current Covid-19 pandemic. This is a surge in money supply growth which has been quite something such that I think we will look back and consider it to be unprecedented. I expect that to be true in absolute terms in many places and it is already being true in relative terms in many.

The Euro Area

This morning has brought another signal of this so let us go straight to the ECB data.

Annual growth rate of narrower monetary aggregate M1, comprising currency in circulation and overnight deposits, increased to 11.9% in April from 10.4% in March.

Previously we had eight months of growth of ~8% so as you can see going to 10.4% and then 11.9% shows that the accelerator has been pressed hard and maybe the pedal has been pushed to the metal. If we switch to the cause of this which is mostly the rate of QE purchases by the ECB well you can see below. Apologies for the alphabeti spaghetti.

ECB PSPP (EUR): +9.545B To 2.216T (prev +10.936B To 2.207T) –

CSPP: +1.181B To 213.147B (prev +2.324B To 211.966B) – CBPP: +1.028B To 280.778B (prev +1.030B To 279.750B) – ABSPP: -377M To 30.738B (prev +161M To 31.115B) –

PEPP: +30.072B To 211.858B (prev +28.878B To 181.786B) ( @LiveSquawk) ( B= Billion and T=Trillion )

These are the weekly increases and if we stick to the money supply we see that in one week alone some 42 billion Euros of QE took place which means that on the other side of the ledger the narrow money supply has been increased by the same amount. Some of this was previously taking place and the more recent boost is called PEPP and is of the order of 30 billion Euros a week.

What this means is that the total amount of narrow money has gone from just under 9 trillion Euros in January to just over 9.5 trillion in April and will be going past 10 trillion fairly soon ( at the current pace in July).

Tucked away in the detail is that people have been wanting cash as well. The amount in circulation rose by 25.6 billion Euros in March and by 15.1 billion in April. Only a couple of months but that represents a clear shift of gear as we note April was the same as the whole of the third quarter last year and 2020 so far has already exceeded 2019.

Broad Money

This is a case of the same old song.

Annual growth rate of broad >monetary aggregate M3 increased to 8.3% in April 2020 from 7.5% in March.

The pick-up in annual growth is of the order of 3% and this is the highest growth rate for nearly 12 years, well until next month anyway! Switching to totals it is now 13.6 trillion Euros.

The breakdown is rather revealing I think.

The annual growth rate of the broad monetary aggregate M3 increased to 8.3% in April 2020 from 7.5% in March, averaging 7.1% in the three months up to April. The components of M3 showed the following developments. The annual growth rate of the narrower aggregate M1, which comprises currency in circulation and overnight deposits, increased to 11.9% in April from 10.4% in March. The annual growth rate of short-term deposits other than overnight deposits (M2-M1) decreased to -0.3% in April from 0.0% in March, while the annual growth rate of marketable instruments (M3-M2) decreased to 6.7% in April from 10.1% in March.

This tells us a couple of things. The opener is that the expansion is a narrow money thing and in fact narrow money over explains it. That means that in terms of wider bank intermediation there was a credit contraction here as we shift from M1 to M3 via M2.

Also at first it looks like the rate of deposits from businesses has picked up but then we see it seems to be insurance companies and pension funds. Or if you prefer the ECB has just bought a load of bonds off them and they have deposited the cash for now.

From the perspective of the holding sectors of deposits in M3, the annual growth rate of deposits placed by households increased to 6.7% in April from 6.0% in March, while the annual growth rate of deposits placed by non-financial corporations increased to 13.7% in April from 9.7% in March. Finally, the annual growth rate of deposits placed by non-monetary financial corporations (excluding insurance corporations and pension funds) decreased to 12.3% in April from 16.9% in March.

Although that might seem obvious we have seen stages where it has not appeared to be true.

Credit

The credit punch bowl has been out too.

As regards the dynamics of credit, the annual growth rate of total credit to euro area residents increased to 4.9% in April 2020 from 3.6% in the previous month. The annual growth rate of credit to general government increased to 6.2% in April from 1.6% in March, while the annual growth rate of credit to the private sector increased to 4.4% in April from 4.2% in March.

The main thing of note here is the surge in credit given to governments which links to the increases in public expenditure we have seen. There has been quite a swing here as it was negative ( -2%) as recently as February and had been negative for 9 months. So the Stability and Growth Pact was applied and then abandoned.

Looking at the breakdown the fall in loans to households is presumably a decline in mortgage lending and I think you can all figure out why companies were borrowing more.

The annual growth rate of adjusted loans to the private sector (i.e. adjusted for loan sales, securitisation and notional cash pooling) stood at 4.9% in April, compared with 5.0% in March. Among the borrowing sectors, the annual growth rate of adjusted loans to households decreased to 3.0% in April from 3.4% in March, while the annual growth rate of adjusted loans to non-financial corporations increased to 6.6% in April from 5.5% in March.

@fwred of Bank Pictet has got his microscope out.

Wow, another massive increase in bank loans / credit lines to euro area corporates, up €73bn in April following €121bn in March (both the largest on record by a huge margin)…….Finally, the surge in bank loans in March-April was broad-based across countries. No one left behind.

His Euro area glass is always full so let me point out that there are times when companies are borrowing to invest (good) and times they are borrowing because they are in trouble.

Also he has been kind enough to illustrate one of my main themes so thank you Fred and the emphasis is mine

Euro area corporates are drawing on their credit lines and taking new bank loans like there *is* tomorrow.

Side-effect: most banks will easily qualify for the lowest TLTRO-III rate from June (-1%).

What a coincidence!

Comment

This is an example in a way of the circle of life as back in the day I got a job because as a graduate monetary economist City firms wanted people to look at the money supply. Although there was a difference in that the central banks and governments were trying to bring it down as opposed to pumping it up. Rather ominously it did not work as planned and sometimes did not work at all.

How should it work? In essence the extra money balances (narrow money) should be spent relatively quickly and thereby give the economy a boost. That is why I look at narrow money and as an indicator it has worked pretty well. The catch or “rub” as Shakespeare would put it is velocity or how quickly the money circulates and there we have a problem as it is hard to measure especially right now. We know that for a while it will have been extremely low because in many areas you simply cannot spend money at the moment.

As we look internationally we see many examples of this. I have gone through the Euro area data today but if we switch to the US the numbers are even higher. The annual rate of M1 growth is 27.5% there so the pedal may even have been pushed through the metal. Care is needed as definitions vary but even using a more Euro area one it looks as though it would be over 20%.

As well as some hoped for economic growth there is a clear and present danger which is inflation. We seem likely to be singing along with BB King.

Hey, Mr. President
All your congressmen too
You got me frustrated
And I don’t know what to do
I’m trying to make a living
I can’t save a cent
It takes all of my money
Just to eat and pay my rent

I got the blues
Got those inflation blues

Is Hong Kong really over as a financial centre?

Today I thought I would take a slightly different tack and look at a potential shift in world financial markets. It concerns a place that for many years has had an economic party based on “location, location, location” as Hong Kong has been a sort of add-on to China. We have previously looked at the economic consequences of the unrest there and now the ante is being upped by China. This poses the question can it survive as one of the world’s major financial centres?

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s parliament on Thursday overwhelmingly approved directly imposing national security legislation on Hong Kong to tackle secession, subversion, terrorism and foreign interference in a city roiled last year by months of anti-government protests.

Also I do not know about you but the 6 were brave and the 1 was courageous.

The National People’s Congress voted 2,878 to 1 in favour of the decision to empower its standing committee to draft the legislation, with six abstentions. The legislators gathered in the Great Hall of the People burst into sustained applause when the vote tally was projected onto screens.

If we switch to Hong Kong itself there is plainly trouble ahead.

Earlier on Thursday, angry exchanges in the city’s assembly, the Legislative Council, during debate on the anthem bill saw some lawmakers removed in chaotic scenes and the session adjourned.

If we look wider there is of course The Donald to consider.

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump said on Tuesday the United States was working on a strong response to China’s planned national security legislation for Hong Kong and it would be announced before the end of the week.

So quite a bit of realpolitik and this adds to the Trade Wars issue. Not exactly what you want when you are a hub for financial trade.

Rich Chinese are expected to park fewer funds in Hong Kong on worries that the security law could allow mainland authorities to seize their wealth, bankers and other industry sources said.

That is quite damning for Hong Kong’s future on its own. So many things have rolled out of this and I remember Rolex watches being bought as collateral and then sold as well as if course the Bitcoin purchases. So there are more questions than answers before we even leave China.

The Equity Market

There is of course a Trump Tweet for this now the market is rallying.

Stock Market up BIG, DOW crosses 25,000. S&P 500 over 3000. States should open up ASAP. The Transition to Greatness has started, ahead of schedule. There will be ups and downs, but next year will be one of the best ever!

They are of course a bit thinner on the ground in declines but there is an issue here if we switch to the Hang Seng Index. This is from rthk on the 22nd of this month.

Hong Kong stocks dropped 5 percent in the noon session after Beijing said it plans to push through a national security law for the city, adding to tensions with the US and fuelling fears of fresh civil unrest.

The Hang Seng Index sank 5 percent, or 1,204 points, to 23,075, midway into the second session.

Although it slipped a little today it has not done much overall since then as it closed at 23,132. That is a relative loss at a time other markets have rallied. If we move on from the cheerleading of The Donald I note that the Nikkei 225 has over the past week gone from below the Hang Seng at circa 20500 to above it at this morning’s 21,916.

Exchange-Rates

Let me briefly hand you over to the Hong Kong Monetary Authority.

The Linked Exchange Rate System (LERS) has been implemented in Hong Kong since 17 October 1983. Through a rigorous, robust and transparent Currency Board system, the LERS ensures that the Hong Kong dollar exchange rate remains stable within a band of HK$7.75-7.85 to one US dollar.

The LERS is the cornerstone of Hong Kong’s monetary and financial stability.  It has weathered many economic cycles and has proved highly resilient in the face of regional and global financial crises over the years.

Oh dear “resilient” looks like being as applicable as it is to the banks! Anyway we have a currency peg in action which seems to be news to some. That means they follow US interest-rates too athough you can pick-up a bit more than 0.5% a year.

The Federal Open Market Committee of the US Fed announced last night to adjust downward the target range for the US federal funds rate by 100 basis points to 0-0.25%. In light of the Fed’s decision, the Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) also adjusted downward the Base Rate today. The Base Rate is set at 0.86% today according to a pre-set formula ( 16th of March)

Actually it has been edging higher and is now 1.11% so maybe a little heat is on.

In terms of any response to pressure the HKMA would intervene first and at 3.6 trillion Hong Kong Dollars worth it has quite a war chest. Trouble is reserves never seem to be quite enough however large and in a panic interest-rate rises do not achieve much either. Well apart from applying a brake in the economy.

It could use the liquidity swaps system of the US Federal Reserve to get US Dollars and sell them but the lifespan of that would presumably be until The Donald spotted it.

Moving onto the Yuan and its offshore variant there has been a lot of talk about it but it has been remarkably stable considering the times ( that is a translation of the Chinese ave obviously been intervening) and is at 7.15 versus the US Dollar.

The Economy

This was in a bad way and things have got worse.

Hong Kong’s coronavirus-ravaged economy has suffered its worst decline on record, shrinking 8.9 per cent year on year in the first quarter and sparking an appeal from the city’s finance chief for unity to face the grim months ahead…….Hong Kong’s coronavirus-ravaged economy has suffered its worst decline on record, shrinking 8.9 per cent year on year in the first quarter and sparking an appeal from the city’s finance chief for unity to face the grim months ahead. ( South China Morning Post )

In case any central bankers are reading here is their priority.

Hong Kong SAR (China)’s Real Residential Property Price Index was reported at 189.610 2010=100 in Sep 2019. This records a decrease from the previous number of 194.800 2010=100 for Jun 2019 ( CEIC)

It will be lower now as I note this from the HKMA.

The Hong Kong Mortgage Corporation Limited (HKMC) announces that, the pilot scheme for fixed-rate mortgages will start receiving applications from 7 May (Thursday). In response to the change in market interest rates, mortgage interest rates under the pilot scheme are lowered, as compared to the levels previously announced in the 2020-21 Budget (Budget). The interest rates per annum for 10, 15 and 20 years of the Fixed-Rate Mortgage Pilot Scheme are as follows:

2.55%, 2.65% and 2.75% respectively in case you were wondering.

Comment

The situation is a bit like a dam which invariably looks perfectly secure until it bursts. Indeed there are some bouncing bombs in play.

TRUMP ADMN TO EXPEL CHINESE STUDENTS WITH TIES TO MILITARY SCHOOLS: NYT ( @FirstSquawk )

Financial markets are more likely to be troubled by this from Secretary Pompeo.

Today, I reported to Congress that Hong Kong is no longer autonomous from China, given facts on the ground. The United States stands with the people of Hong Kong.

This is the real question will they be able to operate freely? Next comes the issue of where will the business go? This begs lots of question as I have a friend who works there.

Looking at Hong Kong itself the currency peg looks vulnerable in spite of the large foreign exchange reserves. It so often turns out that Newt from the film Aliens was right.

It wont make any difference

The real ray of hope is that the Chinese may adapt their bill which lacks detail.

Harmful elements in the air
Symbols clashing everywhere
Reaps the fields of rice and reeds
While the population feeds
Junk floats on polluted water
An old custom to sell your daughter
Would you like number twenty three?
Leave your yens on the counter please
Ho-oh, ho-oh-oh-oh
Hong Kong Garden
Ho-oh, ho-oh-oh-oh
Hong Kong Garden ( Siouxsie and the Banshees )

As to the housing market is this how Nine Elms ( confession my part of London) finds some new buyers?

Eurobonds To be? Or not to be?

We find that some topics have a habit of recurring mostly because they never get quite settled, at least not to everyone’s satisfaction. At the time however triumph is declared as we enter a new era until reality intervenes, often quite quickly. So last night’s Franco-German announcement after a virtual summit caught the newswires.

France and Germany are proposing a €500bn ($545bn; £448bn) European recovery fund to be distributed to EU countries worst affected by Covid-19.

In talks on Monday, French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel agreed that the funds should be provided as grants.

The proposal represents a significant shift in Mrs Merkel’s position.

Mr Macron said it was a major step forward and was “what the eurozone needs to remain united”. ( BBC)

Okay and there was also this reported by the BBC.

Mrs Merkel, who had previously rejected the idea of nations sharing debt, said the European Commission would raise money for the fund by borrowing on the markets, which would be repaid gradually from the EU’s overall budget.

There are a couple of familiar features here as we see politicians wanted to spend now and have future politicians ( i.e not them face the issues of paying for it). There is an undercut right now in that the choice of Frau Merkel reminds those of us who follow bond markets that Germany is being paid to borrow with even its thirty-year yield being -0.05%. So in essence the other countries want a slice of that pie as opposed to hearing this from Germany.

Money, it’s a crime
Share it fairly but don’t take a slice of my pie
Money, so they say
Is the root of all evil today
But if you ask for a raise it’s no surprise that they’re
Giving none away, away, away ( Pink Floyd)

Actually France is often paid to borrow as well ( ten-year yield is -0.04%) but even it must be looking rather jealously at Germany.Here is how Katya Adler of the BBC summarised its significance.

Chancellor Merkel has conceded a lot. She openly agreed with the French that any money from this fund, allocated to a needy EU country, should be a grant, not a loan. Importantly, this means not increasing the debts of economies already weak before the pandemic.

President Macron gave ground, too. He had wanted a huge fund of a trillion or more euros. But a trillion euros of grants was probably too much for Mrs Merkel to swallow on behalf of fellow German taxpayers.

She has made a technical error, however, as Eurostat tends to allocate such borrowing to each country on the grounds of its ECB capital share. So lower borrowing for say Italy but not necessarily zero.

The ECB

Its President Christine Lagarde was quickly in the press.

So there is zero risk to the euro?

Yes. And I would remind you that the euro is irreversible, it’s written in the EU Treaty.

Of course history is a long list of treaties which have been reversed. Also there was the standard tactic when challenged on debt which is whataboutery.

Every country in the world is seeing its debt level increase – according to the IMF’s projections, the debt level of the United States will reach more than 130% of GDP by the end of this year, while the euro area’s debt will be below 100% of GDP.

Actually by trying to be clever there, she has stepped on something of a land mine. Let me hand you over to the French Finance Minister.

French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said on Tuesday, the European Union (EU) recovery fund probably will not be available until 2021.

The 500 bln euro recovery fund idea is a historic step because it finances budget spending through debt, he added. ( FXStreet )

So the height of the pandemic and the economic collapse will be over before it starts? That is an issue which has dogged the Euro area response to not only this crisis but the Greek and wider Euro area one too. It is very slow moving and in the case of Greece by the time it upped its game we had seen the claimed 2% per annum economic growth morph into around a 10% decline meaning the boat had sailed. In economic policy there is always the issue of timing and in this instance whatever you think of the details of US policy for instance it has got on with it quickly which matters in a crisis.

Speaking of shooting yourself in the foot there was also this.

Growth levels and prevailing interest rates should be taken into account, as these are the two key elements.

The latter is true and as I pointed out earlier is a strength for many Euro area countries but the former has been quite a problem. Unless we see a marked change we can only expect the same poor to average performance going ahead. Mind you we did see a hint that her predecessor had played something of a Jedi Mind Trick on financial markets.

Outright Monetary Transactions, or OMTs, are an important instrument in the European toolbox, but they were designed for the 2011-12 crisis, which was very different from this one. I don’t think it is the tool that would be best suited to tackling the economic consequences of the public health crisis created by COVID-19.

They had success without ever being used.

Market Response

Things have gone rather well so far. The Euro has rallied versus the US Dollar towards 1.10 although it has dipped against the UK Pound. Bond markets are more clear cut with the Italian bond future rising over a point and a half to above 140 reducing its ten-year yield to 1.62%. The ten-year yield in Spain has fallen to 0.7% as well. It seems a bit harsh to include Spain after the economic growth spurt we have seen but nonetheless maybe it did not reach escape velocity.

Comment

Actually there already are some Eurobonds in that the ESM ( European Stability Mechanism) has issued bonds in the assistance programmes for Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain. Although they were secondary market moves mostly allowing countries to borrow more cheaply rather than spend more. On that subject I guess life can sometimes come at you fast as how is this going?

Taking into account these measures, the
government remains committed to meeting the
primary fiscal surplus for 2020 and forecasts a
primary surplus at  3.6% of GDP ( Greece Debt Office)

On the other side of the coin it will be grateful for this.

81% of the debt stock is held by official sector creditors,
allowing for long term maturity profile and low interest
rates

On a Greek style scale the 500 billion Euros is significant but now we switch to Italy we see that suddenly the same sum of money shrinks a lot. I notice that Five Star ( political party not the band) have already been on the case.

It’s just too little, too late
A little too long
And I can’t wait ( JoJo)

This brings me to the two real issues here of which the first is generic. In its history fiscal policy finds that it can not respond quickly enough which is why the “first responder” is monetary policy. The problem is that the ECB has done this so much it is struggling to do much more and the European Union is always slow to use fiscal policy. Such as it has then the use has been in the other direction via the Stability and Growth Pact.

Next comes the fact that there are 19 national treasuries to deal with for the Euro and 27 for the European Union as I note that last night’s deal was between only 2 of them. Perhaps the most important ones but only 2.

Economic growth German style has hit the buffers

Today gives us the opportunity to look at the conventional and the unconventional so let us crack on via the German statistics office.

WIESBADEN – The corona pandemic hits the German economy hard. Although the spread of the coronavirus did not have a major effect on the economic performance in January and February, the impact of the pandemic is serious for the 1st quarter of 2020. The gross domestic product (GDP) was down by 2.2% on the 4th quarter of 2019 upon price, seasonal and calendar adjustment. That was the largest decrease since the global financial and economic crisis of 2008/2009 and the second largest decrease since German unification. A larger quarter-on-quarter decline was recorded only for the 1st quarter of 2009 (-4.7%).

So we start with a similar pattern to the UK as frankly a 0.2% difference at this time does not mean a lot. Also we see that this is essentially what we might call an Ides of March thing as that is when things headed south fast. However some care is needed because of this.

The recalculation for the 4th quarter of 2019 has resulted in a price-, seasonally and calendar-adjusted GDP decrease of 0.1% on the previous quarter (previous result: 0.0%).

For newer readers this brings two of my themes into play. The first is that I struggled to see how Germany came up with a 0% number at the time ( and this has implications for the Euro area GDP numbers too). If they were trying to dodge the recession definition things have rather backfired. The second is that Germany saw its economy turn down in early 2018 which is quite different to how many have presented it. Some of the news came from later downwards revisions which is obviously awkward if you only read page one, but also should bring a tinge of humility as even in more stable times we know less than we might think we do.

Switching now to the context there are various ways of looking at this and I have chosen to omit the seasonal adjustment as right now it will have failed which gives us this.

a calendar-adjusted 2.3%, on a year earlier.

No big change but it means in context that the economy of Germany has grown by 4% since 2015 or if you prefer returned to early 2017.

In terms of detail we start with a familiar pattern.

Household final consumption expenditure fell sharply in the 1st quarter of 2020. Gross fixed capital formation in machinery and equipment decreased considerably, too.

But then get something more unfamiliar when we not we are looking at Germany.

However, final consumption expenditure of general government and gross fixed capital formation in construction had a stabilising effect and prevented a larger GDP decrease.

So the German government was already spending more although yesterday brought some context into this.

GERMAN FINANCE MIN. SCHOLZ: OUR FISCAL STIMULUS MEASURES WILL BE TIMELY, TARGETED, TEMPORARY AND TRANSFORMATIVE. ( @FinancialJuice )

As he was talking about June I added this bit.

and late…….he forgot late….

Actually they have already agreed this or we were told that.

Germany has approved an initial rescue package worth over 750 billion euros to mitigate the impact of the coronavirus outbreak, with the government taking on new debt for the first time since 2013.

The first package agreed in March comprises a debt-financed supplementary budget of 156 billion euros and a stabilisation fund worth 600 billion euros for loans to struggling businesses and direct stakes in companies. ( Reuters )

Warnings

There is this about which we get very little detail.

Both exports and imports saw a strong decline on the 4th quarter of 2019.

If we switch to the trade figures it looks as though they were a drag on the numbers.

WIESBADEN – Germany exported goods to the value of 108.9 billion euros and imported goods to the value of 91.6 billion euros in March 2020. Based on provisional data, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that exports declined by 7.9% and imports by 4.5% in March 2020 year on year.

Ironically this gives us something many wanted which is a lower German trade surplus but of course not in a good way. A factor in this will be the numbers below which Google Translate has allowed me to take from the German version.

Passenger car production (including motorhomes) was compared to March 2019
by more than a third (-37%) and compared to February 2020 by more than a quarter (-27%)
around 285,000 pieces back.

The caveats I pointed out for the UK about seasonality, inflation and the (in)ability to collect many of the numbers will be at play here.

Looking Ahead

The Federal Statistics Office has been trying to innovate and has been looking at private-sector loan deals.

The preliminary low was the week after Easter (16th calendar week from April 13th to 19th) with 36.7% fewer new personal loan contracts than achieved in the previous week. Since then, the new loan agreements have ranged from around 30% to 35% below the same period in the previous year.

That provides food for thought for the ECB and Christine Lagarde to say the least.

Also in an era of dissatisfaction with conventional GDP and the rise of nowcasting we have been noting this.

KÖLN/WIESBADEN – The Federal Office for Goods Transport (BAG) and the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) report that the mileage covered by trucks with four or more axles, which are subject to toll charges, on German motorways decreased a seasonally adjusted 10.9% in April 2020 compared with March 2020. This was an even stronger decline on the previous month than in March 2020, when a decrease of -5.8% on February 2020 had been recorded, until then the largest month-on-month decline since truck toll was introduced in 2005.

That is quite a drop and leaves us expecting a 10%+ drop for GDP in Germany this quarter especially as we note that many service industries have been hit even harder.

Comment

I promised you something unconventional so let me start with this.

Covid-19 has uncovered weaknesses in France’s pharmaceutical sector. With 80 percent of medicines manufactured in Asia, France remains highly dependent on China and India. Entrepreneurs are now determined to bring France’s laboratories back to Europe. ( France24 )

I expect this to be a trend now and will be true in much of the western world. But this ball bounces around like Federer versus Nadal. Why? Well I immediately thought of Ireland which via its tax regime has ended up with a large pharmaceutical sector which others may now be noting. Regular readers will recall the times we have looked at the “pharmaceutical cliff” there when a drug has lost its patent and gone full generic so to speak. That might seem odd but remember there were issues about things like paracetamol in the UK for a bit.

That is before we get to China and the obvious issues in may things have effectively been outsourced to it. Some will be brought within national borders which for Germany will be a gain. But the idea of trade having a reversal is not good for an exporter like Germany as the ball continues to be hit. Perhaps it realises this hence the German Constitutional Court decision but that risks upsetting a world where Germany is paid to borrow and of course a new Mark would surge against any past Euro value.

 

India faces hard economic times with Gold and Liquor

Early this morning we got news on a topic we have been pursuing for several years now and as has become familiar it showed quite an economic slow down.

At 27.4 in April, the seasonally adjusted IHS Markit India
Manufacturing PMI® fell from 51.8 in March. The latest reading pointed to the sharpest deterioration in business conditions across the sector since data collection began over 15 years ago.

It caught my eye also because it was the lowest of the manufacturing PMI series this morning. Although some care is needed as the decimal point is laughable and the 7 is likely to be unreliable as well. But the theme is clear I think. Of course much of this is deliberate policy.

The decline in operating conditions was partially driven by
an unprecedented contraction in output. Panellists often
attributed lower production to temporary factory closures that were triggered by restrictive measures to limit the spread of COVID-19.

So that deals with supply and here is demand.

Amid widespread business closures, demand conditions were severely hampered in April. New orders fell for the first time in two-and-a-half years and at the sharpest rate in the survey’s history, far outpacing that seen during the global financial crisis.

So there was something of a race between the two and of course external demand was heading south as well.

Total new business received little support from international markets in April, as new export orders tumbled. Following the first reduction since October 2017 during March, foreign sales fell at a quicker rate in the latest survey period. In fact, the rate of decline accelerated to the fastest since the series began over 15 years ago.

The plunges above sadly have had an inevitable impact on the labour market as well.

Deteriorating demand conditions saw manufacturers drastically cut back staff numbers in April. The reduction in employment was the quickest in the survey’s history. There was a similar trend in purchasing activity, with firms cutting input buying at a record pace.

Background and Context

We learn from noting what had already been happening in India.

Real GDP or Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at Constant (2011-12) Prices in the year 2019-20 is estimated to attain a level of ₹ 146.84 lakh crore, as against the First Revised Estimate of GDP for the year 2018-19 of ₹ 139.81 lakh crore, released on 31st January 2020. The growth in GDP during 2019-20 is estimated at 5.0 percent as compared to 6.1 percent in 2018-19. ( MOSPI )

Things had been slip-sliding away since the recent peak of 7.7% back around the opening of 2018. So without the Covid-19 pandemic we would have seen falls below 5%. In response to that the Reserve Bank of India had been cutting interest-rates. I would have in the past have typed slashed but for these times four cuts of 0.25% and one of 0.35% in 2019 do not qualify for such a description.

Before that was the Demonetisation episode of 2016 where the Indian government created a cash crunch but withdrawing 500 and 1000 Rupee notes. This was ostensibly to reduce financial crime but also created quite a bit of hardship. Later as so much of the money returned to the system it transpired that the gains were much smaller than the hardship created.

For newer readers you can find more details on these issues in my back catalogue on here.

Looking Ahead

On April 17th the Governor of the RBI tried his best to be upbeat.

 India is among the handful of countries that is projected to cling on tenuously to positive growth (at 1.9 per cent). In fact, this is the highest growth rate among the G 20 economies………For 2021, the IMF projects sizable V-shaped recoveries: close to 9 percentage points for global GDP. India is expected to post a sharp turnaround and resume its pre-COVID pre-slowdown trajectory by growing at 7.4 per cent in 2021-22.

He was of course running a risk by listening to the IMF and ignoring what the trade date was already signalling.

In the external sector, the contraction in exports in March 2020 at (-) 34.6 per cent has turned out to be much more severe than during the global financial crisis. Barring iron ore, all exporting sectors showed a decline in outbound shipments. Merchandise imports also fell by 28.7 per cent in March across the board, barring transport equipment.

On Friday the Business Standard was reporting on expectations much more in line with the trade data.

While acknowledging some downside risks from a lockdown extension in urban areas beyond 6 June, we maintain our GDP projection of 0% GDP growth for CY2020, and 0.8% for FY21,” wrote Rahul Bajoria of Barclaysin a report.

If we stay with that source then we get another hint from what caused the drop in share prices for car manufacturers today.

Shares of automobile companies declined on Monday as many firms reported nil sales in the month of April after a nationwide lockdown kept factories and showrooms shut.

At 10:11 AM, the Nifty Auto index was down 7.33 per cent as compared to 5.1 per cent decline in the Nifty50 index.

Monetary Policy

You will not be surprised to learn that the RBI acted again as the policy Repo Rate is now 4.4% and the Governor gave a summary of other actions in the speech referred to above.

 In my statement of March 27, I had indicated that together with the measures announced on March 27, the RBI’s liquidity injection was about 3.2 per cent of GDP since the February 2020 MPC meeting.

Those who follow the ECB will note he announced something rather familiar.

 it has been decided to conduct Targeted Long-Term Repo Operations (TLTRO) 2.0 at the policy repo rate for tenors up to three years for a total amount of up to ₹ 50,000 crores, to begin with, in tranches of appropriate sizes.

Oh and as we are looking at India by ECB I am referring to the central bank and not cricket.

If we switch to the money supply data we see that in the fortnight to April 10th the heat was on as M3 grew by 1.2% raising the annual rate of growth to 10.8%. But there was a counterpoint to this as there were heavy withdrawals of demand deposits with fell by 7.8% in a fortnight. We have looked before at the problems of the Indian banking sector and maybe minds were focused on this as the pandemic hit.

Gold

I am switching to this due to its importance in India and gold bugs there may be having a party as they read the Business Standard.

The sharp rise in the prices of gold —which almost doubled over the past one year —has been the only good for investors at a time when both equities and debt returns have been under pressure.

That price may be a driving factor in this.

India’s demand declined by a staggering 36 per cent during the January-March quarter, to hit the lowest quarterly figure in 11 years due to nationwide that has forced the closure of wholesale and retail showrooms.

Comment

The situation is made worse by the fact that India starts this phase as a poor country. Things are difficult to organise in such a large country as the opening of the Liquor Shops today has shown.

Long queues witnessed outside #LiquorShops in several parts of Chhattisgarh, people defy social distancing norms at many places: Officials ( Press Trust of India)

Also a problem was around before we reached the pandemic phase.

Armies of locusts swarming across continents pose a “severe risk” to India’s agriculture this year, the UN has warned, prompting the authorities to step up vigil, deploy drones to detect their movement and hold talks with Pakistan, the most likely gateway for an invasion by the insects, on ways to minimise the damage. ( Hindustan Times from March)

Now let me give you another Indian spin. The gold issue has several other impacts. No doubt the RBI is calculating the wealth effects from the price gain. However I think of it is another form of money supply as to some extent it has that function there. Also part of the gain is due to another decline in the Rupee which is at 75.6 to the US Dollar. Regular readers will recall it was a symbolic issue when it went through 70. This creates a backwash as it will make people turn to gold even more.

Let me finish with some good news which is that the much lower oil price will be welcome in energy dependent India.

Podcast

 

 

 

 

Euro area money supply is booming again

In ordinary times the 25 members of the Governing Council of the European Central Bank would be getting ready to go to Frankfurt. This time though, they may well be making sure their version of Zoom works properly.I do hope they are not using Zoom itself as it is not secure meaning that the hedge funds will be listening in again. As to there being 25 members it has an Executive Board of 6 as well as a representative of each country. Rather confusingly not all vote as there are too many to sit around the ECB table and around 4 drop out with the most significant being the Netherlands this time around. But as the main decisions have already been made and only perhaps some fine tuning in the offing that is a moot point this week.

Money Supply

This morning has brought news on past decisions however. In the melee it is easy to forget that before the pandemic the ECB had restarted QE and then fired something of a peashooter on the 12th of March.

A temporary envelope of additional net asset purchases of €120 billion will be added until the end of the year, ensuring a strong contribution from the private sector purchase programmes

So strong in fact that only 6 days later they announced this.

This new Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme (PEPP) will have an overall envelope of €750 billion. Purchases will be conducted until the end of 2020 and will include all the asset categories eligible under the existing asset purchase programme (APP).

These will have fed into the March data because the PEPP began on the 26th and the original much more minor “strong contribution” will have been in play for around half of the month. So what impact did they have?

Annual growth rate of narrower monetary aggregate M1, comprising currency in circulation and overnight deposits, increased to 10.3% in March from 8.1% in February.

Putting it another way M1 increased by 273 billion Euros to 9335 billion in March. As this replaced 24 billion in January and 89 billion in February we see two things The accelerator was already being pressed but then the foot pressed down much harder. As an aside cash rose by 26 billion in March which backs up to some extent my argument of yesterday about it. A clear rise but of course only one month.

Broad Money

As you can see this soared as well.

Annual growth rate of broad monetary aggregate M3, increased to 7.5% in March 2020 from 5.5% in February.

If we take the advice of Kylie ( I’m breaking it down) we see this.

Looking at the components’ contributions to the annual growth rate of M3,, the narrower aggregate M1 contributed 7.0 percentage points (up from 5.5 percentage points in February), short-term deposits other than overnight deposits (M2-M1) contributed 0.0 percentage point (up from -0.1 percentage point) and marketable instruments (M3-M2) contributed 0.5 percentage point (up from 0.1 percentage point).

So we see that the QE push is such that this time around broad money is effectively narrow money. We can ignore M2 which is doing almost nothing but then we see marketable instruments are in the game as well albeit more minor at 34 billion Euros. Indeed this is almost entirely debt-securities with a maturity of up to two years. I am picking them out because their total is only 60 billion so they have seen more than a doubling in one month.

Counterparts

We can do this almost MMT style and do indeed learn a thing or two.

the annual growth rate of M3 in March 2020 can be broken down as follows: credit to the private sector contributed 4.5 percentage points (up from 3.7 percentage points in February), net external assets contributed 2.1 percentage points (down from 2.7 percentage points), credit to general government contributed 0.6 percentage point (up from -0.7 percentage point), longer-term financial liabilities contributed -0.2 percentage point (up from -0.5 percentage point), and the remaining counterparts of M3 contributed 0.4 percentage point (up from 0.3 percentage point).

Care is needed as this sort of application of mathematics to economics is invariably presented as a type of Holy Grail followed by the sound of silence when it then goes wrong. But we do see that the credit impulse is now much more domestic as the foreign flows decline in absolute percentage terms and then have a second effect of being compared to a larger number.

What about credit flows?

The initial impact is a swing towards the public sector as we see credit there taking quite a move.

As regards the dynamics of credit, the annual growth rate of total credit to euro area residents increased to 3.5% in March 2020 from 2.0% in the previous month. The annual growth rate of credit to general government increased to 1.6% in March from -2.0% in February, while the annual growth rate of credit to the private sector increased to 4.2% in March from 3.4% in February.

The growth rate had been negative since last June and I expect quite a surge now because it was 15.7% at its peak in the credit crunch and we see so much fiscal policy being enacted.

Switching to the private-sector we lack the detail to really take a look.

The annual growth rate of adjusted loans to the private sector (i.e. adjusted for loan sales, securitisation and notional cash pooling) increased to 5.0% in March from 3.7% in February. Among the borrowing sectors, the annual growth rate of adjusted loans to households decreased to 3.4% in March from 3.7% in February, while the annual growth rate of adjusted loans to non-financial corporations increased to 5.4% in March from 3.0% in February.

We learn a couple of things. There will be a lag before we pick up the fall in mortgage lending and new business lending was a record.

New bank loans to euro area non-financial corporates in March: +€118bn. Previous record was €66bn in December 2007………French banks were the largest contributors (€38bn in new corporate loans out of €118bn total) but the rise was fairly broad-based: Germany €22bn; Italy €17bn; Spain €16bn. ( @fwred)

This goes as follows. Good as banks are lending to companies but then Bad as we think why they want it and can they pay it back?!

Comment

These numbers matter because they give us a good idea of what is coming around the economic corner. For example narrow money growth impacts the domestic economy in somewhere between a few months and six months ahead. We have not seen double-digit-growth for a while and when we last did we got the Euro boom of 2017/18. Except these are about as far from ordinary times as we have seen and we are seeing the carburetor being flooded with petrol and the economy stalling. Putting it back into monetary terms velocity seems set to collapse again.

Another perspective is provided by the “pure” broad money growth which is the monetary equivalent of incestuous. Why? Well those short-term securities look as if they might be designed to be bought by the PEPP programme.

To expand the range of eligible assets under the corporate sector purchase programme (CSPP) to non-financial commercial paper, making all commercial papers of sufficient credit quality eligible for purchase under CSPP.

(3) To ease the collateral standards by adjusting the main risk parameters of the collateral framework. In particular, we will expand the scope of Additional Credit Claims (ACC) to include claims related to the financing of the corporate sector.

More recently there has been this.

ECB to grandfather until September 2021 eligibility of marketable assets used as collateral in Eurosystem credit operations falling below current minimum credit quality requirements

In case you are wondering why? I am thinking Italy and Renault but I am sure there are others.

Moving on let me highlight a catch in this Such programmes will help big business but what about the smaller ones? We are back to the zombie culture and perhaps zombie money supply growth.

 

The future for cash is more hopeful than you might think

This is a hardy perennial pf a subject but it now comes with a new twist provided for us by Which Money.

According to the Bank of England: ‘Like any other surface that large numbers of people come into contact with, banknotes can carry bacteria or viruses.’ So whether handling cash, debit card or credit cards, wash your hands when you get home. If you can, pay using a bank card.

That seems rather unpleasant doesn’t it? Also I do hope that the new plastic bank notes are cleaner than the old ones or the Bank of England has scored something of an own goal here. Still at least you are no longer in danger of former Governor Mark Carney dipping into into your curry.

However Which point out that many still use cash.

Many are still reliant on cash. Two thirds of those who depend on cash have no digital skills and over a third are likely to be a vulnerable customer. It may be impractical for these people to apply & learn to use a debit card for online shopping in the midst of the pandemic.

There are also age issues here.

Nearly half of those who rely or depend on cash are aged over 65, while nearly a third are aged 55 to 64. Both groups are more likely to need to self-isolate and ask friends, family or volunteers to shop for them.

Actually that reminds me of one of my aunts who is suing cash to settle with her neighbours who are kindly doing some shopping for her. I have helped her fix her internet so she could pay them online if necessary but I have no great hopes although she does realise the hygiene danger in using an ATM.

In the week the UK went into lockdown, ATM use fell by 50%, according to ATM network Link.

On the other side of the coin the banks do occassionally get something right.

The good news is that many banks and building societies have introduced the ability for you to pay a cheque in by taking a photo of it and uploading it to your mobile bank app.

Sweden

Now let us have a ying to the yang above as Sweden is the country which has moved the furthest in terms of using electronic money.

Cash is used to a lesser extent. The figure shows that the proportion of those who paid for their most recent purchase in cash has decreased from 39 per cent in 2010 to 13 per cent in 2018. (As from the beginning of 2018, the question refers only to purchases in physical shops). Source: The Riksbank.

If we switch to a more modern payment method which is using your smartphone then according to the Riksbank it is now as popular as using cash.

Number of payments by Swish increasing sharply. The figure shows that the number of Swish payments (millions of payments per year) made by mobile phone (in real time) has increased from 0 in 2012 to 400 million in 2018. Source: Bankgirot.

On a personal level I remember being impressed when the patient ahead of me paid for their physio with their phone which let me putting some notes in my bag feel a little antediluvian. But on the other hand I have seen people getting into a mess trying to pay that way at the supermarket. The trend are clear though.

 In ten years, the average Swede has doubled their card use.

Cash in circulation has been dropping for some time but there has been something of a reversal in recent times. For example it was over 100 billion Kroner in 2010 and fell to 57 billion in 2017 but has since picked up to 63 billion so we will have to see. The rally is of course minor compared to the previous drop but is intriguing when for example the use of smartphones for payment might make you think it would drop further. Maybe negative interest-rates have had an inverse effect in the same way they have boosted saving.

Speaking of negative interest-rates there have been some ch-ch-changes in approach and the emphasis is mine.

At today’s monetary policy meeting, the Executive Board has decided to continue the purchases of covered bonds and government bonds until the end of September, and to hold the repo rate unchanged at zero per cent. The Riksbank is prepared to continue to use the tools at its disposal to  support the economy and inflation.

This is very significant because it previously was one of the standard-bearers for negative interest-rates. Having plunged into their icy-cold grip early in 2015 they only ended the experiment at the end of last year and went as low as -0.5%. Yet in spite of the economic situation described by them below they have not returned.

The great uncertainty over the course of the pandemic
means that the Riksbank, in this report, has chosen to discuss developments on the basis of two different scenarios, rather than a single specific forecast. In these scenarios, GDP in Sweden this  year will be 7 or 10 per cent lower than in 2019, respectively, at  the same time as unemployment will rise to close to 10 or 11 per
cent, respectively.

Staying with the cash issue we now see that unless there is yet another U-Turn from the Riksbank it will not be put under pressure by the establishment lust for negative interest-rates for some time if at all. Of course for the Riksbank this means it has run negative interest-rates in a boom and raised them in a collapse which gives them something of a dunce’s cap or as Madness would put it.

You’re an embarrassment

Comment

There are many different perspectives here. I have looked at Sweden moving away from negative interest-rates and in a minor way ( banks only) Japan nudged away a little yesterday. On the other hand the Euro area seems firmly in their grasp. There have been rumours about New Zealand today which look just that for now but also ones about the US Federal Reserve. However I think they are not the central banking go to they once were not because of any concern for us but because of The Precious.

The reach of negative rates is limited, however, because commercial banks find it hard to charge negative rates to their retail depositors, who might choose to hold their wealth in cash. ( St. Louis Fed)

Of course ambitious young central bankers will be trying to think up ways of subverting this.

Also whilst Sweden has seen less cash in circulation others have seen it rise.

There are over 70 billion pounds worth of notes in circulation…….That is roughly twice as much as a decade ago… ( Bank of England)

The US has seen a not dissimilar pattern with the amount of cash in circulation being US $942 billion back in 2010 but US $1745 billion in March this year.

So the in spite of moves like the phasing out of the 500 Euro note by the ECB there is in fact more cash around in many places. So it is not dead yet. As ever the official campaign to discredit it goes on.

Large sums are also likely to be held overseas or for illegal uses: the so-called ‘shadow’ economy. ( Bank of England)

Meanwhile the large amounts of banking fraud going on is something they hope you will not spot although to be fair the Riksbank of Sweden gives it a mention.

The number of frauds with stolen card details or identities has increased, for example.