How is the Swedish experiment going?

These days the headline above no doubt has you thinking about an alternative approach to the Coronavirus pandemic. However, I would also like to remind you that Sweden was at the fore front of applying negative interest-rates to a country and in addition applied them into something of an economic boom. Or if you prefer they applied exactly the reverse of the old saying that the job of a central banker is to take away the punch bowl as the party gets going. Instead they decided to give it a refill.

The first perspective is that for all the past talk of a different approach they now seem to be in the same boat as the rest of us.

During the summer, a recovery was initiated, but in recent months the spread of infection has increased again and restrictions have been tightened in many countries. This setback shows the great uncertainty that the global economic recovery is still facing. The economic prospects for Sweden and abroad have been revised down, and the economy is expected to weaken again in the near term ( Riksbank)

Where do we stand?

This morning Sweden Statistics has updated us.

GDP increased by 4.9 percent in the third quarter, seasonally adjusted and compared with the second quarter. The recovery was mainly driven by increased exports of goods and household consumption following the historic decline in the second quarter. Calendar adjusted and compared with the third quarter of 2019, GDP decreased by 2.5 percent.

This is a relatively good performance compared to what we have become used to and as the paragraph above notes has been driven by this.

Household final consumption increased by 6.3 percent. Consumption of transports, as well as hotel and restaurant services contributed most to this increase……..Exports increased by 11.2 percent and imports increased by 9.2 percent. Overall, net exports contributed upwards to GDP growth by 1.1 percentage points.

The return of the hospitality sector boosted many economies in the third quarter and I note Sweden benefited from trade. Although if we look at the trade detail the numbers were heavily affected by the oil price.

Exports of mineral fuels and electric current decreased by 40 percent in value and by 10 percent in volume. The large difference between the value and volume trends is due to lower prices on petroleum products……….Imports of crude petroleum oils decreased by 45 percent in value and by 17 percent in volume.

The story shifts a little if we take a look at Sweden’s Nordic peers. This morning we have also learnt some more about Finland.

According to Statistics Finland’s preliminary data, the volume 1) of Finland’s gross domestic product increased in July to September by 3.3 per cent from the previous quarter. Compared with the third quarter of 2019, GDP adjusted for working days contracted by 2.7 per cent.

So for all the talk of differences of approach in fact the annual economic change in Finland and Sweden is well within the margin of error. Maybe the real difference here is that they have populations which are spread out.

Looking Ahead

We see that the retail sector saw some growth in October.

In October, the retail trade sales volume increased by 0.5 percent, compared with September 2020. Retail sales in durables increased by 0.9 percent and retail sales in consumables (excluding Systembolaget, the state-owned chain of liquor stores) increased by 0.1 percent.

This meant that the annual picture looked healthy.

In October, the year-on-year growth rate in the volume of retail sales was 3.6 percent in working-day adjusted figures. Retail sales in durables increased by 4.8 percent and retail sales in consumables (excluding Systembolaget) increased by 0.7 percent.

However that was then and this is now according to the Riksbank.

The growth forecasts for the coming six months
have therefore been revised down…. However, high-frequency data show signs that demand is now slowing down again…….GDP is expected to decline again during the fourth quarter and the situation on the labour market to deteriorate further. The forecast assumes that GDP growth will decline also for the first quarter of next year before it
picks up again both abroad and in Sweden during the second quarter.

The Swedes seem yo be preparing for a rough start to next year which does differentiate them as most have yet to get past a contraction in this quarter.

The Riksbank Response

You might think as an enthusiast for negative interest-rates the Riksbank would have rushed to deploy them in 2020. But we have got something rather different.

The repo rate is held unchanged at zero per cent and is expected to remain at this level in the coming years.

So they have cast aside a past central banking orthodoxy but joined in with a new one.The latter is the plan to apply ZIRP ( in this instance literally at 0%) and to say interest-rates will stay there for some years. So not quite as explicit as the US Federal Reserve which has guided towards a period of 3 years but essentially the same tune. The abandoned orthodoxy is the enthusiasm for negative interest-rates which leaves the Riksbank with quite a lot of egg on its face. After all they have applied negative interest-rates in a boom. Then raised them in a period of economic weakness ( unemployment was rising pre pandemic). Now they do not use them in a clear example of a depression.

By contrast they are more than happy to support any borrowing by the Swedish government.

To improve the conditions for a recovery, the Executive Board has decided to expand the envelope for the asset purchases by SEK 200 billion, to a total nominal amount of up to SEK 700 billion, and to extend the asset purchase programme to 31 December 2021. The Executive Board has also decided to increase the pace in the asset purchases during the first quarter of 2021, in relation to the fourth quarter of 2020.

They have also decided to interfere in the private-sector as well.

The Executive Board has moreover decided that the Riksbank will only offer to buy corporate bonds issued by companies deemed to comply with international standards and norms for sustainability.

So another central bank sings along with The Kinks.

And when he does his little rounds
‘Round the boutiques of London Town
Eagerly pursuing all the latest fads and trends
‘Cause he’s a dedicated follower of fashion

If they were an army this would be called mission creep.

Comment

As you can see the Riksbank seems to have pretty much abandoned the interest-rate weapon it previously waved with such abandon. There is an additional nuance to this if we shift from the domestic to the external situation. The Krona has been rising against the Euro. There have been ebbs and flows but the 11.2 of March 2020 has been replaced by 10.2 now. If we note that the Euro has also been firm then the Krona has had a strong 2020 and it is interesting that the Riksbank is ignoring this. Perhaps it thought more QE would help, but as I pointed out earlier this week pretty much everyone is at that game.

But like elsewhere the Riksbank is keen to make borrowing cheaper for its government in a new twist on the word independent. With Sweden being paid to borrow ( ten-year yield is -0.13%) no doubt the government is suitably grateful.

 

 

What is happening to the economy of Germany?

As both the largest economy and indeed the bellweather for the Euro area Germany is of obvious importance. This morning has brought us more up to date in the state of play. Firstly the statistics office has continued to update its data on the quarter just gone.

WIESBADEN – The gross domestic product (GDP) rose by 8.5% in the third quarter of 2020 compared with the second quarter of 2020 after adjustment for price, seasonal and calendar variations. Thus, the German economy could offset a large part of the massive decline in the gross domestic product recorded in the second quarter of 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic. However, the price-, seasonally and calendar-adjusted GDP was still 4.0% lower in the third quarter of 2020 thanin the fourth quarter of 2019, that is the quarter before the global coronavirus crisis.

That is an improvement of the order of 0.3% on what was previously thought. This does in fact give us a partial V-Shape as you can see below.

In the circumstances that is a reasonably good performance and the statistics office puts it like this.

For the whole EU, Eurostat released a preliminary result of -4.3% for the third quarter of 2020. The United States also recorded a strong decline of their gross domestic product (-2.9%, converted figure) compared with the third quarter of 2019. In contrast, year-on-year GDP growth as published by the People’s Republic of China amounted to 4.9% in the third quarter.

There is another context which is that the German economy had previously been struggling. This began with the 0.2% decline at the opening of 2018 which was claimed to be part of the “Euro Boom”. Economic growth was a mere 1.3% in 2018 which then slowed to 0.6% in 2019 so we can see that there were pre pandemic issues.

The Breakdown

I thought that I would switch to the labour market for this and an ongoing consequence for other areas.

The labour volume of the overall economy, which is the total number of hours worked by all persons in employment, declined even more sharply by 4.0% over the same period.

I am using a measure of underemployment as the international definition of unemployment has simply not worked. Next we can switch to wages.

According to first provisional calculations, the compensation of employees was down by just 0.7% year on year, while property and entrepreneurial income fell sharply by 7.8%. On average, gross wages and salaries per employee fell by 0.4%, while net wages and salaries rose slightly by 0.5%.

So we see a familiar situation of income being supported by the furlough scheme although outside it there has been quite a hit. But as there have been restrictions on spending we see a surge in saving.

According to provisional calculations, the savings ratio was 13.5% in the third quarter of 2020.

We wait to see what will be the full economic impact of a surge in involuntary saving but here is the flip side.

Household final consumption expenditure at current prices, however, showed a decrease of 4.0%.

What about now?

This morning has brought the latest update from the Ifo Institute.

Munich, November 24, 2020 – Sentiment among German managers has deteriorated. The ifo Business Climate
Index fell from 92.5 points in October to 90.7 points in November. The drop was due above all to companies’
considerably more pessimistic expectations. Their assessments of the current situation were also a little worse.
Business uncertainty has risen. The second wave of coronavirus has interrupted Germany’s economic recovery.

It is the services sector which has taken the brunt of this.

In the service sector, the Business Climate Index dropped noticeably. For the first time since June, it is back in
negative territory. Assessments of the current situation are much less positive than they were. Moreover,
substantially more companies are pessimistic about the coming months. The indicators for hotels and
hospitality absolutely nosedived.

The one area which has managed some growth is manufacturing.

This month’s bright spot is manufacturing. The business climate improved here, with companies assessing their
current situation as markedly better. Incoming orders rose, albeit more slowly than last month. However,
expectations for the coming months turned notably less optimistic.

Although as you can see the new restrictions due to Covid-19 have affected expectations. But the picture for the overall economy was that things continued to improve in October but have now reversed. So the vaccine news has not impacted expectations there yet and the V-Shape above will see at least a kink. The general view is similar to that given yesterday by the Matkit business survey.

New lockdown measures to curb the spread of
coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) led to an
accelerated decline in services activity across
Germany in November, latest ‘flash’ PMI®
from IHS Markit showed. However, the country’s
manufacturing sector continued to exhibit strong
growth, helping to support overall economic activity.

They did however hint that the Far East is helping German manufacturing.

which the survey shows is
benefitting for growing sales to Asia in particular.

Financial Conditions

These remain extraordinarily easy. There is the -0.5% deposit rate of the ECB with the -1% interest-rate for the banks. Then there is the enormous amount of bond buying which under the original programme ( PSPP) totaled some 562 billion Euros at the end of October. It is a sign of the times that there is another buying programme as well as the ECB tries to muddy the waters and as of the end of September it had bought another 125 billion.

Today Germany issues a two-year bond and it will be paid to do so as the yield is -0.75% as I type this. Furthermore this yield has been negative for over 5 years now as that state of play looks ever more permanent. Indeed with the thirty-year at -0.16% the whole yield curve is negative.

Switching to the Euro exchange-rate things are not so bright. If we take a long-term context Germany joined to get a weaker exchange-rate. However in recent times it has been rising and the effective index is at 121.5 or 21% higher than when the Euro began. Whilst November has seen a dip the index started 2020 at 115.

Comment

The context is that at the end of the third quarter the German economy had grown by 2.7% compared to the 2015 benchmark. But the news restrictions mean that it has “And it’s gone” to quote South Park. There are vaccine hopes for 2021 now but 2020 looks like being a year to forget.

This brings us to the role of the ECB which is already heavily deployed. Can it respond to the latest dip? Not in any timely way as we note the lags in the system. Also for Germany there is not a lot more that can be done in terms of interest-rates or bond yields as all are heavily negative. The wheels of fiscal policy are being oiled by this as well. Looking at it like that only leaves us with the Euro exchange-rate. Can ECB President Lagarde fire a “bazooka” at that? As I pointed out yesterday looking at the UK with all central banks easing that is easier to say than do.

Meanwhile returning to the world of finance there is this.

FRANKFURT (Reuters) – Germany’s blue-chip DAX index will expand to 40 from the current 30 companies with tougher membership criteria, exchange operator Deutsche Boerse said on Tuesday.

In general a good idea as it is too narrow an index for an economy the size of Germany, especially in the light of this.

The most recent departure was payments company Wirecard, which in a blow to Germany’s capital markets, filed for insolvency just two years after its promotion to the index. The payments company owed creditors billions in what auditor EY described as a sophisticated global fraud.

The perils of indexation?

 

 

Where next for interest-rates and bond yields?

As we find ourselves in a phase where possible solutions to the Covid-19 pandemic are in the news, the economic consequences for 2021 are optimistic. For example, it looks as though it will mean the type of Lockdown the UK is experiencing will get less and less likely. That is a relief as the issue of the Lockdown strategy is that you end up in a repeating loop. The more hopeful reality does have potential consequences for interest-rates and some of this has been highlighted by Reuters.

LONDON (Reuters) – Expectations of interest rate cuts in some of the world’s biggest economies have melted within the space of a month on hopes a successful coronavirus vaccine will fuel a growth bounceback next year.

Why? Well in line with this from Bank of England Chief Economist Andy Haldane yesterday.

LONDON (Reuters) – Bank of England Chief Economist Andy Haldane said the economic outlook for 2021 was “materially brighter” than he had expected just a few weeks ago despite short-term uncertainty from a renewed COVID-19 lockdown in England.

Except as you can see the changes are in fact really rather minor in the broad scheme of things.

Between Nov. 5-9, a period when it became clear Democrat Joe Biden had won the U.S. election and Pfizer announced its vaccine news, eurodollar futures, which track short-term U.S. rate expectations, flipped to reflect expectations of 10 bps in rate hikes by Sept 2022.

Just the previous week, markets were predicting no changes. Futures now expect U.S. rates at 0.50% by September 2023, from 0.25% forecast a month previously.

At the ECB where rates are already minus 0.5%, a nine bps cut was expected by September 2021 but that is now slashed to only five bps.

After all the interest-rate cuts we see that the US is expected to increase interest-rates by a mere 0.25% over the next 3 years. That is a bit thin if you note the promises of economic recovery. But it is in line with one of my main themes which are that interest-rate cuts are for the now and are large whereas interest-rate rises are for some future date and are much smaller if they happen at all. For example Bank of England Governor Mark Carney provided Forward Guidance for interest-rate increases in the summer of 2013. It is hard not to laugh as I type that his next move was to cut them! There was a rise some 5 years or so later to above the original “emergency” level of 0.5% which rather contrasts with the cuts seen in March.

As to the ECB which hasn’t has any increases at all since 2011 there has been this today by its President Christine Lagarde.

While all options are on the table, the pandemic emergency purchase programme (PEPP) and our targeted longer-term refinancing operations (TLTROs) have proven their effectiveness in the current environment and can be dynamically adjusted to react to how the pandemic evolves.

So Definitely Maybe, although these days interest-rate cuts may not be widely announced as for example the present TLTROs allow banks access to funds at -1% as opposed to the more general -0.5% of the Deposit Rate.

Meanwhile

I did point out earlier that interest-rate cuts are for the here and now and they seem to be rather en vogue this morning starting early in the Pacific region.

BI Board of Governors Meeting (RDG) in November 2020 decided to lower the BI 7-Day Reverse Repo Rate (BI7DRR) by 25 bps to 3.75%, as well as the Deposit Facility and Lending Facility rates which fell by 25 bps, to 3.00% and 4.50%.

Bank Indonesia did not have to wait long for company as the central bank of the Philippines was in hot pursuit.

At its meeting on monetary policy today, the Monetary Board decided to cut the interest rate on the BSP’s overnight reverse repurchase facility by 25 basis points to 2.0 percent, effective Friday, 20 November 2020. The interest rates on the overnight deposit and lending facilities were likewise reduced to 1.5 percent and 2.5 percent, respectively.

Perhaps the Bank of  Russia fears missing out.

Russian Central Bank: Monetary Policy To Remain Accommodative In 2021…….Russian Central Bank: See Room For Further Rate Cuts But Not That Big.

Probably they are emboldened by the recent rise in the oil price which is a major issue for the Russian economy.

Indonesia

We looked at the Pacific region back in 2019 as an area especially affected by the “trade war” between the US and China. Some of that looks set to fade with the new US President but the Pacific now has another one.

China is digging in its heels as the trade spat between Canberra and Beijing continues, with officials laying responsibility for the tensions solely at Australia’s feet. ( ABC)

As well as the interest-rate cut Bank Indonesia is working to reduce bond yields.

As of 17 November 2020, Bank Indonesia has purchased SBN on the primary market through a market mechanism in accordance with the Joint Decree of the Minister of Finance and the Governor of Bank Indonesia dated April 16, 2020, amounting to IDR 72.49 trillion, including the main auction scheme, the Greenshoe Option (GSO) and Private Placement.

Primary purchases are unusual especially for an emerging market and another 385 trillion IDR have been bought via other forms of QE.

Philippines

The central bank gives us a conventional explanation around inflation as a starter.

Latest baseline forecasts continue to indicate a benign inflation environment over the policy horizon, with inflation expectations remaining firmly anchored within the target range of 2-4 percent. Average inflation is seen to settle within the lower half of the target band for 2020 up to 2022, reflecting slower domestic economic activity, lower global crude oil prices, and the recent appreciation of the peso. The balance of risks to the inflation outlook also remains tilted toward the downside owing largely to potential disruptions to domestic and global economic activity amid the ongoing pandemic.

But we all know that the main course is this.

Meanwhile, uncertainty remains elevated amid the resurgence of COVID-19 cases globally. However, the Monetary Board also observed that global economic prospects have moderated in recent weeks. At the same time, the Monetary Board noted that while domestic output contracted at a slower pace in the third quarter of 2020, muted business and household sentiment and the impact of recent natural calamities could pose strong headwinds to the recovery of the economy in the coming months.

Comment

As you can see the story about the end of interest-rate cuts has already hit trouble. Central bankers seem unable to break their addiction. I will have to do a proper count again but I am pretty sure we have now had around 780 interest-rate cuts in the credit crunch era. So it seems that the muzak played on the central bank loudspeakers will keep this particular status quo for a while yet.

Get down deeper and down
Down down deeper and down
Down down deeper and down
Get down deeper and down.

There are issues as I noted on the 11th of this month as all the fiscal stimuli puts upward pressure on interest-rates. But the threshold for interest-rate cuts is far lower than for rises. Also we get cuts at warp speed whereas rises have Chief Engineer Scott telling us that the engines “cannae take it”

Putting it another way we have another example of a bipolar world where there may be drivers for higher interest-rates but the central banksters much prefer to cut them.This gets more complex as we see so many countries with or near negative interest-rates and bond yields.

The UK Plan is to turn a good inflation measure (RPI) into a bad one ( CPIH)

A feature of these times is that we see so many official attempts to hide the truth. In the UK at the moment one of the main efforts is around the inflation numbers and next week on the 25th we will get an announcement about it. The official documentation shows the real reason for the change albeit by accident.

Since 2010, the measured rate of RPI annual inflation has been on average one percentage point per annum above the CPIH.

They want to get rid of the RPI for that reason that it gives a reading some 1% higher as they can then tell people inflation is 1% higher at a stroke. The “independent” UK Statistics Authority and National Statistician have  thoroughly embarassed themselves on this issue. There have been 2 main efforts to scrap the RPI both of which have crumbed under their own inconsistencies and now the plan is to neuter it by applying some Lord of the Rings style logic.

One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.

In the future we will only have one inflation measure and it will be the one that has been widely ignored since its introduction in spire of desperate attempts to promote it.

The Authority remains minded to address the shortcomings of the RPI by bringing the methods and data sources from the National Statistic, the CPIH, into the RPI. In practice this means that, from the implementation date, the RPI index values will be calculated using the same methods and
data sources as are used for the CPIH. Monthly and annual growth rates will then be calculated directly from the new index values.

So the “improvement” will involve including rents which do not exist and they comprise quite a bit of the index.

Given that the owner occupiers’ housing costs (OOH) component accounts for around 16% of the CPIH, it is the main driver for differences between the CPIH and CPI inflation rates.

For those unaware if you own your own home you are assumed to pay yourself rent and then increases in the rent you do not pay are put in the inflation numbers. Even worse they have little faith in the numbers used ( from actual renters) so they “smooth” them with an average lag of about 9 months. So today’s October rent numbers reflect what was happening around January and are therefore misleading. Putting it another way if you wish to have any idea of what is happening in the UK rental sector post pandemic do not look here for clues.

The supposedly inferior RPI uses house prices via a depreciation component ( a bit over 8%) and mortgage interest-rates ( 2.4%). Apparently using things people actually pay is one of the “shortcomings”. Meanwhile back in the real world if I was reforming the RPI I would put house prices in explicitly.

I find myself in complete agreement with the TUC on this.

Nobody is claiming the RPI is perfect. But it remains the best measure for living costs and would be straight forward to modernise.

As has been shown across Europe it would be perfectly possible to have RPI existing in parallel to CPIH (​or CPI) and have the latter measure focus on guiding monetary policy.

We are disappointed that expert calls to retain the RPI have been repeatedly ignored. The Royal Statistical Society and House of Lords Economic Affairs ​Committee have both presented compelling evidence for keeping it.

The basic issue is that the inflation numbers will be too low.In addition measures of real wages will be distorted too. These things echo around the system as for example when RPI was replaced by CPI in the GDP data the statistician Dr. Mark Courtney calculated that GDP was then higher by up to 0.5% a year. If you cant change reality then change how it is presented.

Today’s Data

We see that inflation is starting to pick up.

The Consumer Prices Index (CPI) 12-month rate was 0.7% in October 2020, up from 0.5% in September.

Remember that prices are being depressed right now by the VAT cut.

On 8 July 2020, the government announced that it would introduce a temporary 5% reduced rate of VAT for certain supplies of hospitality, hotel and holiday accommodation, and admissions to certain attractions.

I appreciated it last night when I bought a cooked chicken which has become cheaper. In terms of the inflation numbers we do have measures which allow for this. They are at 2.3% ( if you exclude indirect taxes called CPIY) and 2.4% ( if you have constant indirect tax rates or CPI-CT). We do not know exactly how prices would have changed without it but we do know that inflation would be a fair bit higher and would change the metric around Bank of England policy and its 2% inflation target.

The major movers were as follows.

Clothing; food; and furniture, furnishings and carpets made the largest upward contributions (with the contribution from these three groups totalling 0.16 percentage points) to the change in the CPIH 12-month inflation rate between September and October 2020………These were partially offset by downward contributions of 0.06 and 0.04 percentage points, respectively, from the recreation and culture, and transport groups.

You may note they have sneaked CPIH in there as it is the only way they can get it a mention as it is so poor it is widely ignored.

Another point of note is that the inflation measured by CPI is in services at 1.4% whereas good inflation is 0%.

If we look at the RPI we see another reason why it is described as having “shortcomings”. It has produced a higher number as it has risen from 1.1% in September to 1.3% in October.

The trend

In terms of the 2 basic measures we see that opposite influences are at play. The UK Pound £ has been reasonably firm and is just below US $1.33 as I type this so mo currency related inflation is on the way and maybe a little of the reverse. However the price of crude oil has been picking up lately with the January futures contract at US $44.27. Whilst this is around 30% below a year ago the more recent move this month has been for a US $7 rise.

In terms of this morning’s release there was a hint of a change.

The headline rate of output inflation for goods leaving the factory gate was negative 1.4% on the year to October 2020, up from negative growth of 1.7% in September 2020……The price for materials and fuels used in the manufacturing process showed negative growth of 1.3% on the year to October 2020, up from negative growth of 2.2% in September 2020.

So less negative and at this point crude oil was still depressing the prices so we can expect much more of a swing next time around if we stay at present levels.

Petroleum products and crude oil were the largest downward contributors to the annual rate of output inflation and input inflation respectively.

House Prices

I think you can see immediately why they want to keep house prices out of the official inflation measures.

UK average house prices increased by 4.7% over the year to September 2020, up from 3.0% in August 2020, to stand at a record high of £245,000.

They much prefer to put this in.

Private rental prices paid by tenants in the UK rose by 1.4% in the 12 months to October 2020, down from an increase of 1.5% in September 2020.

Just as a reminder home owners do not pay rent so this application of theory over reality conveniently reduces the headline inflation number called CPIH.

As ever there are regional differences in house price growth.

Average house prices increased over the year in England to £262,000 (4.9%), Wales to £171,000 (3.8%), Scotland to £162,000 (4.3%) and Northern Ireland to £143,000 (2.4%)….London’s average house prices hit a record high of £496,000 in September 2020.

Comment

Next week we will get the result of the official attempt to misrepresent inflation in the UK. All inflation measures have strengths and weaknesses but the UK establishment is trying to replace what is a strong measure (RPI) with a poor one ( CPIH). I think it is particularly insidious to keep the name RPI but in reality to make it a CPIH clone. A group that will be heavily affected is first time buyers of property who will be told there is little inflation because of a theoretical manipulation involving imputed rents but face a reality of much higher house prices.

“It takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!” ( Mad Hatter )

If you set out to destroy trust in national statistics then they are on the right road.

It is a sign of the times that Bitcoin is doing so well

The past week or two has seen quite a rally in the price of Bitcoin and as I type this it is US $16.700. This gives various perspectives and let me open with a bit of hype, or at least what I think is hype.

An independent report from Citi Bank’s Managing Director argues that Bitcoin is the digital gold of the 21st century. The devaluation of the worlds’ reserve currency—the U.S. dollar—formed the basis of the commentary. ( Crypto.Com)

As a starter Citibank have suggested that the US Dollar will fall or depreciate by 20% which has created something of a stir in itself. There are bears around for plenty of currencies tight now as others suggested that the expected December move by the ECB might put the skids under the Euro. Both roads would look bullish for Bitcoin as it is an alternative. The Citibank view starts with a comparison with Gold post Bretton Woods.

With a relatively free currency market, gold’s price grew enormously for the next 50 years.

The monetary inflation and devaluation of the greenback are the basis of Fitzpatricks’ comparison of Bitcoin with gold. ( Crypto.Com)

This is then linked to what we have seen with Bitcoin.

Bitcoin move happened in the aftermath of the Great Financial crisis (of 2008) which saw a new change in the monetary regime as we went to ZERO percent interest rates.

The next step is this.

Fitzpatrick pointed out that the first bull cycle in Bitcoin from 2011 to 2013 when it increased by 555 times resulted from this.
Currently, the COVID-19 crisis and the government’s associated monetary and fiscal response are creating a similar market environment as gold in the 1970s. Governments have made it clear that they will not shy away from unprecedented money printing until the GDP and employment numbers are back up.  ( Crypto.Com)

He then applies his technical analysis.

“You look at price action being much more symmetrical or so over the past seven years forming what looks like a very well defined channel giving us an up move of similar time frame to the last rally (in 2017).”

Which leads to this.

Fitzpatrick did not stop there; his price prediction chart sees Bitcoin price at $318,000 by December 2021.  ( Crypto.Com)

That in itself will no doubt be contributing to the present rise as it puts us in what is called FOMO or Fear Of Missing Out territory.

The Economics

The issue of the money supply and its growth is an issue of these times whereas the situation for Bitcoin is different.

Bitcoin’s total supply is limited by its software and will never exceed 21,000,000 coins. New coins are created during the process known as “mining”: as transactions are relayed across the network, they get picked up by miners and packaged into blocks, which are in turn protected by complex cryptographic calculations. ( coinmarketcap.com)

So there are two differences. Firstly there is a cap and with the present number in circulation being 18.5 million it is not that far away. Secondly whilst there is growth the process of creation is likely to be slower rather than fiat money which as I am about to discuss has been rather up,up and away.

If we start with the world’s reserve currency which is the US Dollar I note a reference to money printing in the Citibank report which we could argue is QE.

Consistent with this directive, the Desk plans to continue to increase SOMA holdings of Treasury securities by approximately $80 billion per month……Similarly, the Desk plans to continue to increase SOMA holdings of agency MBS by approximately $40 billion per month. ( New York Fed)

So we have US $120 billion a month from the main two efforts where bonds are swapped for electronically produced money.

My preferred way of looking at this is the money supply and if we do that we see that in the year to the 2nd of this month the narrow measure of the US money supply has risen by 41% over the past year. This sort of measure used to be called high powered money although right now due to the plunge in velocity it is anything but. However it has been created and I also note that having gone through US $2 trillion in August the amount of cash in circulation is also rising and was US $2.04 trillion in October. So mud in the eye for those predicting its death,especially as we note the switches to using electronic money in retail. As the Belle Stars put it.

This is the sign of the times
Piece of more to come

If we go to the wider money supply measure called M2 we see that it has grown by 23.9% in the year to November 2nd. That is quite something for a number that is now just shy of 19 trillion. So there is a money supply argument in the background. We can add to it by noting fast rises in other types of fiat money. Japan has been at the game for some time and we have seen notable expansions in Euros and UK Pounds as well.

Interest-rates

There was a time that the lack of an interest-rate from Bitcoin was a weakness. The 0% compared unfavourably to what you could get in fiat currencies. After all pre credit crunch many of the major currencies provided interest-rates of 4 to 5%. But now life is very different as we have seen the US Federal Reserve cut interest-rates to just above 0%. Indeed in some cases now Bitcoin has a relative advantage because the spread of not only negative official interest-rates but of negative bond yields ( which total around US $17 trillion now) makes it look much more attractive than before.

Who would have thought that a 0% interest-rate would be attractive? But increasingly that is true.

Comment

When we look at something like this we see that it requires a combination of reality and psychology/belief. The former gets reinforced because as I have pointed out over the past decade the direction of travel has been both clear and consistent. This morning has seen an example of part of this journey.

Italy’s Ruling 5-Star: ECB Should Cancel Covid-Related Debt It Owns – Party Blog Doing So Would Be “Not Only Fair But Easily Achievable” ( @LiveSquawk )

These sort of proposals appear and will no doubt be denied and rejected. But in a year or two’s time past history suggests it may well be on the agenda and then get implemented. It is quite a cynical game but we see it played regularly and feeds into our “To Infinity! And Beyond” theme.

Also there will be demand from those looking to park what are considered to be ill gotten gains. The official response will be around crime but it is probably more likely to be another version of this.

Many Turkish companies and individuals bought foreign currency last week even as the lira registered its biggest weekly gain in almost two decades, Bloomberg reported, citing currency traders it did not identify. ( Ahval )

Turks are using the Lira rally as a chance to buy more US Dollars in a clear safe haven trade. People will disagree about how safe that is but there will be similar flows into Bitcoin. It has its own risks as we note the issues around security and the wide swings in price. The latter are something of an irony because they are exacerbated by a strength which is the supply restrictions and limit. But this is a time of risk in so many areas.

Another way of looking at the change in perception of Bitcoin is the way that central banks are now looking at Digital Coins in a type of spoiler move as it poses a potential challenge to their monopoly over money.

I will be particularly interested in reader’s thoughts on this topic

 

 

Will the rally in the Turkish Lira last?

This week has brought a pretty much text book example of what can happen when a currency is in distress as well as a reminder of perspective. Let me start with the trigger for some changes which came last weekend.

The shock departure of finance minister Berat Albayrak, who is President Tayyip Erdogan’s son-in-law, and central bank chief Murat Uysal over the weekend gave the lira its best day in over two years on Monday.

Investors hope their successors will deliver another of the country’s pirouettes, where long-suppressed interest rates are lifted dramatically, providing the currency with some much-needed relief. ( Reuters)

There is a lot going on there. But let’s start with a possible end or at least reduction in cronyism. There we have an unusual mention of a Lira rally followed by a curious mention of “long-suppressed interest-rates”. That depends on your perspective because in these times the rate below is rather extraordinary as it is.

keep the policy rate (one-week repo auction rate) constant at 10.25 percent,

Back on October 12th we noted a change in swap rates to 11.75% to try and support the Lira but in what may seem extraordinary a 1.5% move in these circumstances is not much. The real issue when an interest-rate is trying to support a currency is the gap between it and others. This week we have looked at an interest-rate maybe reaching 1% in the US ( ten-year bond yield) and Japan where we are around 0% so there is quite a gap. Even those are high relative to the -0.5% of the Euro and the around -0.5% of the German ten-year yield and of course there is a lot of trade between the Euro area and Turkey.

The textbook

Put mostly simply a currency is helped by an interest-rate advantage as investors include it in their calculations of expected capital gains. The problem in practice is that in times of real distress the expected currency falls are much larger than any likely interest-rate increase. I provided an example of this back on the 12th of October.

Because of the economic links the exchange-rate with the Euro is significant. Indeed some Euro area banks must be mulling their lending to Turkish borrowers as well as Euro area exporters struggling with an exchange-rate of 9.32. That is some 43% lower than a year ago.

So even with a pick-up of the order of 11% you have lost 32% over the past 12 months.

However this can change rapidly because the moment there is any sort of stability the carry is suddenly rather attractive. After all you can get more in the Turkish Lira in a month than most places in a year and in some cases you can do that in a week. This leads to the situation suddenly reversing and giving us this.

ISTANBUL (Reuters) – Turkey’s lira firmed on Friday to its strongest level in seven weeks, notching a weekly gain of some 12%, after President Tayyip Erdogan’s pledge to adopt a new economic model raised expectations of a sharp rate hike from the central bank.

So we have seen a jump higher in the Lira with expectations now of this.

The central bank is seen raising its policy rate next week to 15% from 10.25%, a Reuters poll showed. Erdogan’s speech was viewed as implying he would condone such a hike.

So the expected carry is even higher and for once there is a capital gain. Some will like this although I have to confess if I had been long the Lira this week I would be considering the advice of the Steve Miller Band.

Hoo-hoo-hoo, go on, take the money and run
Go on, take the money and run
Hoo-hoo-hoo, go on, take the money and run
Go on, take the money and run

As whilst there may be changes there are icebergs waiting for this particular Titanic.

In contrast to previous episodes of lira turmoil, the central bank is estimated to have burnt through more than $100 billion of reserves this year, leaving it effectively around $36 billion overdrawn on those reserves, according to UBS.

The central bank has not commented on analysis suggesting its reserves are ‘net’ negative, though it has said its buffers fluctuate naturally in times of stress. ( Reuters)

So “buffers fluctuate in times of stress” can be added to my financial lexicon for these times.

The economy

There has been some better economic news this morning especially from consumption.

There was better news for retail sales in the country on Friday. The volume of goods purchased by consumers increased by an annual 7.8 percent in September after 6 percent growth in August, the statistics institute said. The monthly increase was 2.8 percent, more than three times the August figure of 0.9 percent. ( Ahval)

Also industrial production rose although Ahval is rather downbeat about it.

Industrial output in the country expanded at the slowest pace on a monthly basis since the outbreak of the coronavirus in March, official data published on Friday showed. Production increased by 1.7 percent month-on-month in September compared with 3.4 percent in August and 8.4 percent in July……..Manufacturing of non-durable goods in the country grew by just 0.6 percent month-on-month in September, the Turkish Statistical Institute said. Production of intermediate goods expanded by 0.7 percent.

There is a catch though in that the better retail sales news rather collides with one of the ongoing economic problems which is the trade deficit.On Wednesday the central bank ( CBRT) updated us about this.

The current account posted USD 2,364 million deficit compared to USD 2,828 million surplus observed in the same month of 2019, bringing the 12-month rolling deficit to USD 27,539 million.

So the passing twelve months have brought a switch from a monthly surplus to deficit and we see that the annual picture is the same. The driving forces of this are below.

This development is mainly driven by the net outflow of USD 3,709 million in the goods item increasing by USD 3,044 million, as well as the net inflow of USD 1,692 million in services item decreasing by USD 2,869 million compared to the same month of the previous year.

One of the issues of economic theory is applying theory to practice. But the expected J-Curve improvement in the trade balance has collided with another currency plunge starting the clock all over again. It has created quite a mess as one clear impact of the Covid-19 pandemic has been on a strength for Turkey which is tourism. Back on October the 12th I noted the numbers for this.

 If we look at the year so far we see this is confirmed by a surplus of US $4.15 billion as opposed to one of US $19.17 billion in the same period in 2019. Another way of looking at this is that 3,225,033 visitors are recorded as opposed to 13,349,256 last year.

Next at a time of currency crisis comes inflation as imports become more expensive.

A rise in general index was realized in CPI (2003=100) on the previous month by 2.13%, on December of the previous year by 10.64%, on same month of the previous year by 11.89% and on the twelve months moving averages basis by 11.74% in October 2020. ( Turkey Statistics)

That may look bad enough but there are two additional kickers. The first is that this is on the back of previous inflation and the second is that far from responding wages have gone the other way putting quite a squeeze on living-standards.

Gross wages-salaries index including industry, construction, trade-services sectors decreased by 8.4% in the second quarter of 2020 compared with the same quarter of the previous year. When sub-sectors are examined; industrial sector decreased by 5.2%, construction sector decreased by 8.6% and trade-services sector decreased by 10.5%. ( Turkey Statistics)

Comment

I promised at the beginning to give some perspective and we get some from looking at the exchange-rate on October 12th which was 7.87 versus the US Dollar and considered a crisis then and the 7.67 as I type this. So better but not by a lot as the rally memes are compared to the 8.58 of last Friday. Thus we have a move for financial markets but for the real economy not so much. It can be looked at in terms of what used to be described as the Misery Index where you add inflation to the unemployment rate which gives you a number around 25% or very bad.

The CBRT looks to have rather boxed itself in on an increase in interest-rates to 15% next week. But whilst it may provide some currency support for a time these are Catch-22 style moves. Because such an interest-rate will provide yet another brake to the domestic economy just at a time it can least afford it. After all whilst a vaccine provides hope for the return of mass tourism in the summer of 2021 that is a while away and is still just a hope, albeit a welcome one. Then there is the vaccine hopium of this week as we mull how much of this week’s Lira rise was due to it?

 

 

What are the consequences of bond yields rising further?

This week has brought an unusual development for the credit crunch era. Let me illustrate with an example of the reverse and indeed what we have come to regard as the new normal from last week.

AMSTERDAM, Nov 5 (Reuters) – Italy’s five-year bond yield turned negative for the first time on Thursday as uncertainty from the U.S. election supported government bonds in Europe.

Prima facie that seems insane but of course as I will explain later it is more complicated than that. That is for best when we add in this from Marketwatch on Monday.

Investors now pay Greece for the privilege of owning its debt, an incredible turnaround from its securities being the source of global financial instability a decade ago.

Greece’s three-year debt turned negative on Friday, and then the country received more good news after the surprise decision by Moody’s Investors Service on Friday night to upgrade the nation’s debt. The upgrade, from Ba3 from B1 previously, still leaves Greek debt in junk market territory, and three notches away from becoming investment grade.

The yield on Greek 10-year debt TMBMKGR-10Y, 0.834% fell 4 basis points to 0.77%. In 2012, the yield on Greek 10-year debt surpassed 35%.

Amazing in its own way and well done to investors who got their timing right in these markets. Although a large Grazie is due to Mario Draghi who set things in motion.

US Treasury Bonds

However there has been something of a contrary signal from the US bond market. There was a hint of something going on in what is called the Long Bond which is the thirty-year maturity. Some of you may recall at the height of the pandemic panic in financial markets in March the yield here dipped below 1%. This was driven by two factors.The first was a move to a perceived safe haven in times of trouble and US Treasury Bonds are AAA rated as well as being in the world’s reserve currency. Also there would have been some front-running of the expected bond buying or QE from the US Federal Reserve. It did indeed charge in like the US Cavalry with purchases at the peak of US $75 billion per day.

But around 2 weeks ago the mood music was rather different as the debate was then about whether the yield would break above the 1.6% level that market traders felt was significant. As the election results began to come in it did so and now we find it at 1.75%.

If we switch to the benchmark ten-year ( called the Treasury Note) we see a slightly delayed pattern but also a move higher. In fact it gave us a head fake as the initial response to the election was a rally leading to lower yields and we noted it at 0.72%. But there were ch-ch-changes on the way and now we see it is 0.96%. So perhaps on the cusp of what is called a big figure change should it make 1%.

Why does this matter?

The first reason is for the US economy itself and there is a direct line in from mortgage rates.

Over the course of the past few days, 10yr yields are up roughly 0.2%.  This time around, the mortgage market hasn’t been able to avoid taking its lumps with the average lender now quoting 30yr fixed rates that are 0.125% higher compared to last Thursday.    ( Mortgage Daily News)

The housing market has been juiced by ever lower and indeed record low mortgage rates up until now. The change will feed into other personal and corporate borrowing as well.

Next comes its role as the world’s biggest bond market with some US $21.1 billion and of course rising at play here. I will come back to the domestic issues but there is a worldwide role here.For example back in my days in the UK Gilt ( bond) market the beginning of the day was checking what the US market had done overnight before pricing in any UK changes. That theme will be in play around the world and in fact on spite of the Italian and Greek moves above we have seen it.

For the US there is the domestic issue of debt costs. These have been a pack of dogs that have not barked but with the increases in the size of the bond market and hence higher levels of borrowing and refinancing smaller moves now matter. We know that President Elect Biden wants to spend more and looked at this on the 5th of this month although there remains doubt over how much of it he will be able to get through what looks likely to be a Republican controlled Senate. Even before this here are the projections of the Congressional Budget Office.

Debt. As a result of those deficits, federal debt held by the public is projected to rise sharply, to 98 percent of GDP in 2020, compared with 79 percent at the end of 2019 and 35 percent in 2007, before the start of the previous recession. It would exceed 100 percent in 2021 and increase to 107 percent in 2023, the highest in the nation’s history.

Best I think to take that as a broad sweep as there are a lot of moving parts in the equations used.

Yield Curve Control

This is, as you can see, not going so well! We have looked at the Japanese experience as recently as Monday and in the US it would be a case of recycling a wartime policy.

In early 1942, shortly after the United States declared war, the Fed effectively abdicated its responsibility for monetary policy despite its concern about inflation and focused instead on helping the Treasury finance the conflict. After a series of negotiations with the Treasury, the Fed agreed to peg the Treasury-bill yield at 0.375 percent, to cap the critical long-term government bond yield at 2.5 percent, and to limit all other government securities’ yields in a consistent manner.  ( Cleveland Fed)

The Long Bond yield is still quite some distance from the 2.5% of back then but as I have already explained the situation is I think more exposed now.

Oh and there was a concerning consequence to this.

The Treasury, however, did not wish to relinquish its control over Fed monetary policy and only acquiesced to small increases in short-term interest rates starting in July 1947, after inflation had been hovering around 18 percent for a year. The Treasury believed that it could not possibly finance its unprecedented levels of public debt at reasonable interest rates without the Fed’s continued participation in the government-securities market; in its view, only unrealistically high interest rates could coax enough private-sector savings to finance the debt.

Comment

Let me now switch to what we might expect if we had free markets. The extra borrowing we have looked at would be pushing yields higher. Another influence would be the fact the real ( after inflation) bond yields are heavily negative unless you think US inflation will be less than 1% per year for the next ten years. Even then it is not much of a return, especially compared to the 5% in one day some equity markets have just provided. The reality is that bond markets provide the prospect of capital gains rather than interest right now.

Also the modern era provides something very different from free markets as the US Federal Reserve will be thinking at what point will it intervene? Or to be more precise at what point will it do so on a larger scale as it is already buying some US $80 billion per month of US treasury bonds. It was not so long ago that such amounts were considered to be a lot. The path to Yield Curve Control may be via bond yield rises now followed by its response. So the real question is what level will they think is too much? This quickly becomes an estimate of what they think the US government can afford? As they have become an agent of fiscal policy again.

 

It is party time at The Tokyo Whale as the Japanese stock market surges

Sometimes you have to wait for things and be patient and this morning has seen an example of that. If we look east to the and of the rising sun we see that it has been a while since it was at the level below.

Japan’s Nikkei 225 stock index closed on Friday at its highest level since November 1991 as individual investors bought up the shares of blue-chip companies at the expense of smaller, more speculative groups. The benchmark, which has been described by some analysts as a “barbarous relic” but remains the favourite yardstick of Japanese retail investors, was propelled to its 29-year high by resurgent stocks like Sony, SoftBank and Uniqlo parent Fast Retailing.

That is from the Financial Times over the weekend and its Japanese owners will no doubt be pointing out that it should be covering this morning’s further rally.

Investing.com – Japan stocks were higher after the close on Monday, as gains in the Paper & PulpRailway & Bus and Real Estate sectors led shares higher.

At the close in Tokyo, the Nikkei 225 rose 2.12% to hit a new 5-year high.

Curiously Investing.com does not seem to have spotted that we have not been here for much longer than 5 years. The market even challenged 25,000 but did not quite make it.

There was something familiar about this but also something new as the FT explained.

Mizuho Securities chief equity strategist Masatoshi Kikuchi said that the Nikkei’s move was driven by individual investors using leverage to magnify their potential returns and losses — a much larger and more active group since the Covid-19 pandemic restricted millions to their homes and prompted many to open online trading accounts.

The Japanese are savers and investors hence the Mrs. Watanabe stereotype but the gearing here reminds us of the Robinhood style investors in the US as well.

The Tokyo Whale

As ever if we look below the surface there has been much more going on and we can start at the Bank of Japan which regular readers will be aware has been buying equities for a while now.Also it increased its purchases in response to the Covid-19 pandemic in two ways. It did not just buy on down days and it also increased its clip size.

For the time being, it would actively purchase ETFs and J-REITs so that their amounts outstanding would increase
at annual paces with the upper limit of about 12 trillion yen and about 180 billion yen, respectively. ( Bank of Japan Minutes)

In October it bought 70 billion Yen’s worth on six occasions and on three days in a row from the 28th. If we recall that world stock markets were falling back then we find ourselves noting the most extreme version of a central bank put option for equity markets we have seen so far. Indeed this is confirmed in the Minutes.

With a view to lowering risk premia of asset prices in an appropriate manner, the Bank might increase or
decrease the amount of purchases, depending on market conditions.

What is appropriate and how do they decide? This morning’s summary of opinions release suggests that some at the Bank of Japan are troubled by all of this. The emphasis is mine.

It is necessary to continue with active purchases of exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and Japan real estate investment trusts (J-REITs) for the time being. However, given that monetary easing is expected to be prolonged, the Bank should further look for ways to enhance sustainability of the policy measure so that it will not face difficulty in conducting such purchases when a lowering of risk premia of asset prices is absolutely necessary.

As “monetary easing” has been going on for around 3 decades now it has already been very prolonged. I wonder on what grounds they would regard it as “absolutely necessary” to reduce the value of its large equity holdings. As of the end of October it had bought some 34,771,759,339,000 Yen of it.

Rather curiously the Bank of Japan share price has not responded to the rise in value of its equity holdings. Yes it was up 1.9% today to 26,780 but that is a long way short of the 220,000 or so of November 1991.

The Bank is a juridical person established based on the Bank of Japan Act. Its stated capital is 100 million yen. The issued share capital is owned by the government (55 percent) and the private sector (45 percent).

Abenomics

There is something of an irony in this landmark being reached after Prime Minister Abe has left office. Because as well as the explicit equity buying effort above there were a lot of implicit boosts for the equity market from what became called Abenomics. Back in November 2012 I put it like this.

Also the Japanese stock market has had a good couple of days in response to this and has got back above the 9000 level on the Nikkei 225 at a time when other stock markets have fallen.

As you can see the market has been singing along to Chic in the Abenomics era.

Good times, these are the good times
Leave your cares behind, these are the good times
Good times, these are the good times
Our new state of mind, these are the good times
Happy days are here again
The time is right for makin’ friends.

We have seen interest-rates reduced into negative territory and the Bank of Japan gorge itself on Japanese Government Bonds both of which make any equity dividends more attractive. Also there was the Abenomics “arrow” designed to reduce the value of the Japanese Yen and make Japan’s exporters more competitive. Often the Japanese stock market is the reverse of that day’s move in the Yen but in reverse so Yen down means stick market up.

The latter gave things quite a push at first as the exchange-rate to the US Dollar went from 78 into the mid 120s for a while. However in more recent times the Yen has been mimicking The Terminator by saying “I’ll be back” and is at 103.60 as I type this. There is a lot of food for thought here on the impact of QE on a currency but for our purposes today we see that the currency is weaker but by much less than one might have thought.

Comment

The Japanese stock market has recently received boost from other influences. For example what is becoming called the “Biden Bounce” has seen the Nikkei 225 rally by around 8% in a week. Also this morning’s data with the leading indicator for September rising to 92.9 will have helped. But also we have seen an extraordinary effort by the Japanese state to get the market up over the past 8 years. In itself it has been a success but it does raise problems.

The first is that Japan’s economic problems have not gone away as a result of this. Even if we out the Covid pandemic to one side the economy was struggling in response to the Consumption Tax rise of last autumn. The official objective of raising the inflation rate has got no nearer and the “lost decade” rumbles on. The 0.1% have got a lot wealthier though.

Then there is the issue of an exit strategy, because if The Tokyo Whale stops buying and the market drops there are two problems. First for the value of the Bank of Japan’s holdings and next for the economy itself. So as so often we find ourselves singing along with Elvis Presley.

We’re caught in a trap
I can’t walk out
Because I love you too much, baby

Meanwhile on a personal level I recall these days as I worked for Barings pre collapse.

Baring Nikkei options in the money now! ( @WildboyMarkets)

Indeed I had an indirect role as there were 4 of us on the futures and options desk and we feared trouble and left. So they promoted Nick Leeson from the back office and what happened next became famous even leading to a film.

Podcast

 

Australia cuts interest-rates again

This morning as the world waits on tenterhooks for news on the US election there was yet another move in one of the longest running themes of my work. For that we need to travel to what is often called a land “down under” or more recently the South China Territories. So let me hand you over to the Reserve Bank of Australia.

The elements of today’s package are as follows:

  • a reduction in the cash rate target to 0.1 per cent
  • a reduction in the target for the yield on the 3-year Australian Government bond to around 0.1 per cent
  • a reduction in the interest rate on new drawings under the Term Funding Facility to 0.1 per cent
  • a reduction in the interest rate on Exchange Settlement balances to zero

So we see yet another interest-rate cut in this instance from 0.25% to 0.1% which means that we have gad around 770 in total now since the credit crunch began. There is something very curious about this action because you see that apparently things are going really rather well.

Encouragingly, the recent economic data have been a bit better than expected and the near-term outlook is better than it was three months ago.

Indeed you might also think that as this rate cutting cycle began in June last year when the rate was cut from 1.5% to 1.25% you might wait for its impact to hit, at least if you believe it will have any. After all there were cuts two months in a row meaning a 0.5% cut which should be impacting now. If they do not work how will one of less than a third of the size?

The theme above has become something of a central banking standard where they tell us things are better than expected but cut interest-rates anyway! But I do not see others calling them out for it. After all if you are the South China Territories then this is rather bullish.

The global economy has been recovering from the initial virus outbreaks, with the recovery most advanced in China.

Quantitative Easing

I am sure you have spotted that the trend to more QE is in force as well. It always goes longer in time in line with my “To Infinity! And Beyond!” theme.

Under the program to purchase longer-dated bonds, the Bank will buy bonds issued by the Australian Government and by the states and territories, with an expected 80/20 split. These bonds will be bought in the secondary market through regular auctions, with the first auction to be held this Thursday for Australian Government securities.

As well as going longer there is always “More! More! More!” as a theme too as the extra 100 billion Australian Dollars is only a starting point.

The Bank remains prepared to purchase bonds in whatever quantity is required to achieve the 3-year yield target. Any bonds purchased to support this target would be in addition to the $100 billion bond purchase program.

Of course if you are going longer and presumably feel that is a good idea then why bother keeping the 3-year yield target? But the central planners never seem to give anything up once they have gained control.

The Aussie Dollar

We do get a bit of a divergence from the central bankers rule book with the bit I have highlighted below.

The combination of the RBA’s bond purchases and lower interest rates across the yield curve will assist the recovery by: lowering financing costs for borrowers; contributing to a lower exchange rate than otherwise; and supporting asset prices and balance sheets.

So we have an actual attempt at devaluation or more strictly exchange-rate depreciation. Of course President Trump may be about to depart but should he stay will he be looking at Australia as looking for an economic advantage via a weaker exchange-rate?

If we look at the Trade Weighted Index it’s recent peak was at 65.7 at the end of January 2018. It then gently declined towards 60 and then plunged to around 50 as the pandemic hit. So there was a substantial depreciation,although with economies plunging any economic gains were likely to be small. The index then bounced to a bit above 62 in August and was 59.5 yesterday.So there was and indeed is no clear case for needing a depreciation especially if you are benefiting from some re-stocking by China.

So far this year, Australian exports of iron ore and liquefied natural gas to China have increased by eight percent and nine percent respectively year on year, according to Wood Mackenzie. China’s coal imports from Australia also far exceeded the levels before the pandemic. ( CGTN from the 28th of July).

Housing Market

I see that the Australian Broadcasting Corporation has been on the case already.

Adelaide homeowners Mark and Verity Riessen are eagerly waiting to see how much of the rate cut will be passed on to them by their lender.

“The last rate cut the RBA passed through, was not passed on to us by our lender,” Mr Reissen said.

So the banks have behaved like well banks in not passing on the previous interest-rate cut and that is a theme. What do I mean by that? As interest-rates have approached and then in some places gone below zero the responsiveness or delta of the mortgage-rate changes has clearly declined. It always was important to check the terms of your mortgage but the ones saying linked to Cash Rate ( of the RBA) will be in prime position today.Also you need to check for exemptions as some around the world have (sneakily) imposed a minimum interest-rate.

According to the RBA the Reissen’s are at 3.2% paying what is pretty much the average rate with new mortgages being at 2.69% on average.

House Prices

We only have numbers up until the end of June but here is Australia Statistics.

Weighted average of the eight capital cities Residential Property Price Index:

  • fell 1.8% this quarter.
  • rose 6.2% over the last twelve months.

The total value of residential dwellings in Australia fell $98.2b to $7,138.2b this quarter.

The idea that the number above is any sort of value is pretty much laughable as has there been a bid for the lot? But we see that the RBA may have been triggered by house price falls which central bankers hate.

The index is at 143.2 as opposed to the 100 of 2012.

Comment

Let us look at the reality of the situation. Starting with interest-rates if you are wondering what is the point of a 0.15% cut after so many you are on the right track and the psychobabble continues with this.

Given the outlook, the Board is not expecting to increase the cash rate for at least three years.

So more meaningless Forward Guidance although some seem fooled by it. From ABC.

Dr Hunter said the bank outlining it did not expect to raise the cash rate over the next three years would “provide households and businesses with some certainty over their individual borrowing rates in the near term”.

Perhaps someone should tell Dr.Hunter about the existence of fixed interest-rates! Also as the last interest-rate rise was a decade ago today who exactly expects any sort of interest-rate rise? The fact it was to 4.75% provides plenty of food for thought.

The reality is that central banks have two aims now and that is why we are seeing so much QE and credit easing. Aim one is to help government fiscal policy by keeping the rate at which it can borrow very low and also pumping house prices by reducing mortgage rates.

Meanwhile I know Halloween was a few days ago but this still chills the spine.

Dr Lowe also said the cash rate was very unlikely to drop below zero.

 

 

 

 

Central bank Digital Coins are to enforce negative interest-rates

The weekend just gone produced quite a lot of news. Another lockdown in the UK is in the offing and there is of course the not so small matter of tomorrow’s US election. But something that does not make such headlines was also very significant and it came from ECB President Christine Lagarde.

We’ve started exploring the possibility of launching a digital euro. As Europeans are increasingly turning to digital in the ways they spend, save and invest, we should be prepared to issue a digital euro, if needed. I’m also keen to hear your views on it.

Actually it looks as though they have already decided and are launching a public consultation as cover for the exercise. After all most will not understand what are the real consequences of this especially as it will be presented as being modern and something which is happening anyway. The Covid-19 pandemic has provided a push for electronic forms of payment which is really rather convenient for this purpose. So they have a good chance of getting support and if they do not well they will simply ignore it. I must say it is hard not to laugh at the “if needed” because it is the central bankers as I shall explain who need it and not the Euro areas consumers and savers.

The real problem is highlighted here.

The outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic came as a deep shock to all of us and warranted fast policy responses. I’m proud to say that we’ve delivered: our measures have been providing crucial support to the eurozone economy and to European citizens.

It is the first sentence which applies here although I have to say the tone deaf nature of “we’ve delivered” in the second is pretty shocking. The ECB already had problems with the Euro area economy as the “Euroboom” faded and growth was not only poor but the largest economy and indeed bell weather Germany was struggling. Then the pandemic hit and made everything worse.

The ECB’s Problem

This arises from the fact that in response to the issues above it has used so many monetary policy options. It was as long ago as June 2014 that it introduced negative interest-rates and there have been further reductions since. Its Deposit Rate is now -0.5% and via the TLTROs it has reduced its interest-rates for the banks to -1%. This is a crucial point in today’s narrative because they feel they cannot keep interest-rates at these negative levels without throwing some free fish to the banks. There is a lot of irony here because interest-rates were cut to help the banks but the supposed cure has turned out to be poison at the dosages required. You do not need to take my word for it just tale a look at bank’s share prices. For example my old employer Deutsche Bank has a share price which has nudged over 8 Euros this morning which is around half of what it was in early 2017 and well you do the maths in the fall from this.

The all-time high Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft stock closing price was 159.59 on May 11, 2007. ( macrotrends.net )

So the banks are struggling with negative interest-rates as they are which poses a problem for a central bank wanted to go lower or in the new buzzword be “recalibrated”.

The Plan

Actually the ECB was part of a group of central banks which asked the Bank for International Settlements to look into this issue in January.

In jurisdictions where cash use is declining and digitalisation is increasing, CBDC could also play an important role in maintaining access to, and expanding the utility of, central bank money. ( CBDC = Central Bank Digital Coin)

As that is not a problem they are up to something else here. Also they are worried that it might make the problem they are supposed to stop worse.

There are two main concerns: first that, in times of financial crisis, the existence of a CBDC could enable larger
and faster bank runs; and second, and more generally, that a shift from retail deposits into CBDC
(“disintermediation”) could lead banks to rely on more expensive and less stable sources of funding.

In the end it is always about the banks in their role as The Precious. I think we get more of the truth here.

CBDC may offer opportunities that are not possible with cash. A convenient and accessible
CBDC could serve as an alternative to potentially unsafe forms of private money, offer users privacy, reduce
illegal activity, facilitate fiscal transfers and/or enable “programmable money”. Yet these opportunities may
involve trade-offs and unless these have a bearing on a central bank’s mandate (eg through threatening
confidence in the currency), they will be secondary motivations for central banks.

To my mind the opportunities are for central bankers and not for us.

The IMF lets the cat out of the bag

Back in February 2019 it told us this.

In a cashless world, there would be no lower bound on interest rates. A central bank could reduce the policy rate from, say, 2 percent to minus 4 percent to counter a severe recession.

I am sure you have already spotted why the ECB is now on the case. As to cash it turns out it has a feature which makes central bankers hate it. This is simply that it offers 0% which as the IMF explains below is a barrier to central bank “innovation”,

When cash is available, however, cutting rates significantly into negative territory becomes impossible. Cash has the same purchasing power as bank deposits, but at zero nominal interest. Moreover, it can be obtained in unlimited quantities in exchange for bank money. Therefore, instead of paying negative interest, one can simply hold cash at zero interest. Cash is a free option on zero interest, and acts as an interest rate floor.

There is an irony in this as by doing nothing it has turned out to be a powerful tool. The central bankers will be furious at the advice given by the rather prescient Steve Miller Band.

Hoo-hoo-hoo, go on, take the money and run
Go on, take the money and run
Hoo-hoo-hoo, go on, take the money and run
Go on, take the money and run.

Banning a song usually only makes it more popular. That would also be true of cash I suspect.

Comment

As so often what we are told is very different to what is the plan. A central bank digital coin is a way of imposing even deeper negative interest-rates. The IMF gave a template for this below.

To illustrate, suppose your bank announced a negative 3 percent interest rate on your bank deposit of 100 dollars today. Suppose also that the central bank announced that cash-dollars would now become a separate currency that would depreciate against e-dollars by 3 percent per year. The conversion rate of cash-dollars into e-dollars would hence change from 1 to 0.97 over the year. After a year, there would be 97 e-dollars left in your bank account. If you instead took out 100 cash-dollars today and kept it safe at home for a year, exchanging it into e-money after that year would also yield 97 e-dollars.

This brings us back to the ECB which last week told us this.

this recalibration exercise will touch on all our instruments. It is not going to be one or the other. It is not going to be looking at one single instrument. It will be looking at all our instruments, how they interact together, what will be the optimal outcome, and what will be the mix that will best address the situation.

It fears that further interest-rate cuts could cause a bank run. I agree with that and have written before that somewhere around -1.5% to -2% seems likely to be the threshold. Thus any more cuts will bring them near that especially as the LTRO rate is already -1%. So in their view a new plan is required and some of you may already be mulling their existing plan to phase out the 500 Euro note which is their highest denomination.

Putting this another way they are worried by two developments. One is Bitcoin which potentially challenges the monopoly power of central banks and also the demand for cash is rising not falling. In the Euro area it was 1.33 trillion Euros in September as opposed to 1.2 trillion a year before.

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