Trade revisions post a warning for UK GDP

This morning has shown us that the way that the UK government deals with the private-sector has issues. From Reuters.

Interserve Plc’s (L:IRV) shares sank almost 60 percent in value on Monday after the British outsourcing company announced a rescue plan that was likely to see a big part of its debt converted into new equity, potentially handing control of the company to its creditors.

Interserve, which employs 75,000 worldwide and has thousands of UK government contracts to clean hospitals and serve school meals, said on Sunday it would seek to cut its debt to 1.5 times core earnings in a plan it hopes to finalise early next year.

I am not sure that the next bit inspires much confidence either.

Interserve Chief Executive Debbie White reiterated that the company’s fundamentals were strong and that the debt reduction plan, first raised in a refinancing in April, had the support of 10 Downing Street.

This provokes echoes of this from January.

Carillion was liquidated after contract delays and a slump in business left it swamped by debt and pensions liabilities., triggering Britain’s biggest corporate failure in a decade and forced the government to step in to guarantee public services from school meals to road works.

If we switch to the Financial Times what could go wrong with this bit?

 after moving into areas in which it had no expertise, including waste from energy plants and probation services.

It is hard not to feel that this particular company is yet another zombie that will be kept alive as another failure will be too embarrassing for the establishment. The share price is understandably volatile but at the time of typing had halved to a bit over 12 pence. This compares to the around £5 as we moved into 2016.

Also according to the FT there is something of a queue forming behind it.

The crisis at Interserve is the latest to hit Britain’s troubled outsourcing sector, with Kier, Capita and Mitie also seeking to rebuild their balance sheets. Kier, another construction and support services company, launched a £264m emergency rescue rights issue last month as it warned that lenders were seeking to cut their exposure to the sector. Kier, which employs 20,000 in the UK, emphasised that it needed the “proceeds on the group’s balance sheet by December 31 . . . in light of tighter credit markets”. It said its debt had increased from £186m in June to £624m at the end of October.

I do not know about you but debt trebling in a few months is something that is in financial terms terrifying.

Monthly GDP

This morning brought the latest in the UK’s monthly GDP reports and the opening salvo was better than what we have seen recently.

Monthly growth rose to 0.1% in October 2018, following flat growth in August and September 2018.

If we look into the detail we see that yet again this was driven by the service sector which on its own produced 0.2% growth in October. Here is some detail on this.

The professional, scientific and technical activities sector made the largest contribution to the month-on-month growth, contributing 0.11 percentage points.

However as it outperformed total GDP growth there had to be issues elsewhere and we find the main one in the production sector.

In October 2018, total production output fell by 0.6%, compared with September 2018, due to a fall of 0.9% in manufacturing; this was partially offset by a 1.8% increase in mining and quarrying.

Whether that number will prove to be a general standard I do not know but we do know production in Germany fell by 0.5% in October as we looked at that only on Friday. As for more detail there is this.

The monthly decrease in manufacturing output of 0.9% was due mainly to weakness from transport equipment, falling by 3.2% and pharmaceutical products, falling by 5.0%; 5 of the 13 manufacturing subsectors increased.

Anyone who has been following the news will not be surprised to see the transport sector lower as for example there was a move to a 3 day week for at least one of the Jaguar Land Rover factories. Regular readers will be aware that the pharmaceutical sector has regular highs and lows and recently June was a high and October a low as we wait for a more general pattern to emerge.

Maybe there was also some food for thought for Interserve and the like here.

Construction output decreased by 0.2% in October 2018

Quarterly GDP

The performance was more solid than you might have expected from the monthly data.

UK gross domestic product (GDP) grew by 0.4% in the three months to October 2018.

In case you were wondering how this happened? Here is the explanation.

While the three most recent monthly growths were broadly flat, the lower level in the base period gives a comparatively strong rolling three-month growth rate.

If we move forwards to the detail we see something that is rather familiar,

Rolling three-month growth in the services sector was 0.3% in October 2018, contributing 0.23 percentage points to GDP growth.

But this time around it was using the words of Andrew Gold much less of a lonely boy.

The production and construction sectors also had positive contributions, with rolling three-month growths of 0.3% and 1.2%, respectively.

If we start with the construction sector then this time around we start to wonder how some of the outsourcing companies we looked at above seemed to have done so badly at a time of apparent boom? Moving on to production.

Rolling three-month growth in the production industries was 0.3%, while in manufacturing industries growth was flat. Production growth was driven by broad-based increases within the sector.

Peering into the transport sector we get a rather chilling reminder of the past.

Three-months on a year ago growth for manufacture of transport equipment was negative 0.9%, the lowest growth rate since November 2009.

Returning to services we get a reminder that the transport sector can pop up here too.

 with a softening in services sector growth mainly due to a fall in car sales.

On the other side of the coin there were these areas.

Accounting contributed 0.08 percentage points to headline GDP growth, while computer programming contributed 0.07 percentage points.

Comment

We see that considering the international outlook the data so far shows the UK to be doing relatively well. An example of a comparison was the Bank of France reducing its estimate for quarterly GDP growth to 0.2% this morning. Sticking with the official mantra we have slowed overall but saw a small rebound in October. So far so good.

Less reassuring is the simply woeful state of the outsourcing sector which looks a shambles. Also there was something troubling in the revisions and updates to the trade figures which included this.

Removing the effect of inflation, the total trade deficit widened £3.0 billion in the three months to October 2018.

So we did well to show any growth at all in October but there was more.

The total trade deficit widened £5.4 billion in the 12 months to October 2018 due mainly to a £5.1 billion narrowing in the trade in services surplus.

It is nice of our official statisticians to confirm my long-running theme that we have at best a patchy knowledge of what is going on in terms of services trade, but not in a good way in terms of direction. This especially impacted in the quarter just gone.

In Quarter 3 2018, the total trade balance was revised downwards by £6.9 billion, due mainly to exports, which were revised down £5.9 billion; imports were revised up by £1.0 billion.

The goods deficit was revised downwards by £3.1 billion in Quarter 3 2018 as exports of goods were revised downwards by £2.0 billion and imports revised upwards by £1.1 billion.

This would be a rather large factor pushing us from growth to contraction but for two factors. One may wash out to some extent in other parts of the national accounts.

A large component of the revision to trade in goods in the most recent quarter was revisions to unspecified goods (including non-monetary gold).

You would think that movements in gold would be easy to account for. Silly me! Also we now get into the geek section which is that trade is in the expenditure version of the national accounts and it is the output version which is officially assumed to be the correct one. So numbers which suggest the UK may have contracted in Q3 are likely to perhaps drag growth slightly lower to 0.5% or 0.4% on the grounds that you cannot ignore them entirely as we sing along to Genesis one more time.

Too many men, there’s too many people
Making too many problems
And not much love to go round
Can’t you see this is a land of confusion ?

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The UK economy puts on an economic growth spurt

Today brings us to a pretty full data set on the UK economy with the headline no doubt the monthly GDP ( Gross Domestic Product) number. This week has brought news on a sector which is often quite near to me and has been a strength we have been regularly noting. From the Financial Times.

Tax relief for UK-made movies, television series and video games is fuelling a production boom that has transformed Britain into a global hub of filmed entertainment, according to a report by the creative industries. The tax incentives have sparked a rush of inward investment as Hollywood studios and other international production companies cash in on British talent — the latest Star Wars movie was made in the UK, alongside top television series such as The Crown and Poldark.

So we should try to be nice to any luvvies that we meet as whilst they are prone to ridiculous statements they are providing a much-needed economic boost. Here is some more detail on the numbers.

The new report commissioned by the British Film Institute found that an estimated £632m in UK tax relief for the creative industries in 2016 led to £3.16bn in production spending on films, TV programmes, animation and video games — a 17 per cent increase on 2015. The industries’ “overall economic contribution” to Britain came to £7.9bn in 2016, which included £2bn in tax revenues.

Since 2016 the numbers have boomed further and the local reference is due to the fact that Battersea Park in particular is regularly used by the film industry. Much of this is a gain as I recall one cold Sunday night when the filming must have disturbed very few. However it is not all gravy as there is also a tendency to use it as a lorry and caravan park for work going on elsewhere.

Bank of England and Number Crunching

There was some numerical bingo from the Financial Policy Committee yesterday. The headline was that the UK has some £69 trillion of financial contracts with European Union counterparties which need some sort of deal for next March.Or if you prefer a derivatives book of the size of Deutsche Bank.

Also we for the assertion that debt has fallen since 2008 which looked better on their chart via comparing it ( a stock) with annual GDP (a flow). They seem to have forgotten public debt which has risen and more latterly even their data poses a question.

Borrowing by UK companies from UK banks has also been subdued, rising by just 2.7% in the past year……. household mortgage borrowing increased by only 3.1% in the year to August, broadly in line with household disposable income growth.

Both are growing a fair bit faster than the economy and of course much faster than real wages.Mind you someone has probably got promoted for finding an income number which has grown as fast, or a lifetime free pass to the cake and tea trolley.Would it be rude to point out they seem to have forgotten unsecured credit is rising at an annual rate of 8%+ as they seem to have missed it out?

UK economic growth

The number released today backed up quite a multitude of my themes. There was the evidence of a growth spurt for the UK economy, various examples of monthly GDP data being so unreliable that you have to question its introduction, and finally even evidence that the monetary slow down has hit the economy! Let us open with the latter.

The month-on-month growth rate was flat in August 2018. (UK GDP)

That looked rather grim until it was combined with something that was much better news.

Rolling three-month growth increased by 0.7% in August 2018, the same rate of growth as in July 2018. These were the highest growth rates since February 2017. The growth continued to pick up from the negative growth in April 2018,

Suddenly the picture looked very different as we got confirmation that it was a long hot summer for the UK in economic as well as weather terms. Some of that was literal as the utility industry saw rises in electricity consumption which looks to have been driven by the use of air conditioning in the unusual heat. If we look at the breakdown we see something familiar in that the major part was the services sector (0.42%), we got some production growth (0.1%) and the construction sector was on a bit of a tear (0.18%),

If we return to the travails and troubles of the monthly series we see this.

Growth rates in June and July 2018 were both revised up by 0.1 percentage points to 0.2% and 0.4%, respectively.

That opens a can of worms. Because whilst you can argue compared to the total number for GDP the changes are minor the catch is that these numbers are presented not as totals but first and second derivatives or speed and acceleration. At these levels the situation becomes a mess and let me illustrate by switching to the American style of presentation. UK GDP rose at an annualised rate of 4.8% in July followed by annualised rate of growth of 0% in August, does anybody outside the Office for National Statistics actually believe that?

Putting it another way we can see a clear issue in the main player which is services I think.

The Index of Services was flat between July 2018 and August 2018…………The 0.7% increase in the three months to July 2018 is the strongest services growth since the three months to December 2016.

So it went from full steam ahead to nothing? The recent strength has been driven by computer programming so let us hope that has been at the banks especially TSB.

Production

This had some welcome snippets.

The rise of 0.7% in total production output for the three months to August 2018, compared with the three months to May 2018, is due primarily to a rise of 0.8% in manufacturing, which displays widespread strength throughout the sector with 10 of the 13 sub-sectors increasing.

As so often we find that the ebbs and flows are driven by the chemicals and pharmaceuticals sector which had a good quarter followed by a decline in August.

Construction

The official data seems to have caught up with crane-ometer ( 40 between Battersea Dogs Home and Vauxhall) although it too supposedly hit trouble in August.

Construction output increased by 2.9% in the three months to August 2018, as the industry continues to recover following a weak start to the year………Construction output declined by 0.7% between July and August 2018, driven by falls in both repair and maintenance and all new work which decreased by 0.6% and 0.8% respectively.

Comment

We see that the UK economy had a remarkably good summer. Actually it seems sensible to smooth it out a bit and shift some of it into August but if we were to see quarterly growth of 0.5% or so that is pretty solid in the circumstances. We are managing that in spite of weak monetary data and disappointing growth from some of our neighbours, although if the recent IMF forecasts are any guide France is in a surge.

Speaking of surges Andy Haldane of the Bank of England has given a speech today and yet again pay growth is just around the corner. Pretty much like it has been since he became Bank of England Chief Economist . You might have thought his consistent record of failure would have meant he was a bad choice as the new UK productivity czar but of course in Yes Prime Minister terms he is the perfect choice.

Sir Humphrey Well, what is he interested in? Does he watch television?
Jim Hacker: He hasn’t even got a set.
Sir Humphrey: Fine, make him a Governor of the BBC.

Meanwhile his own words.

That is quite sobering if, like me, you have never moved job

The Bank of England is struggling badly on the subject of the impact of QE

This week has brought us more opinions from the Bank of England.Yesterday saw the man who Time magazine decided was one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2014. Sadly it has been rather a slippery slope since then for the Bank of England’s Chief Economist Andy Haldane who did at least offer some variety on the apochryphal story about the two-handed economist. From Reuters.

Bank of England Chief Economist Andy Haldane said on Thursday that the central bank could decide to raise interest rates or to cut them if there was a disorderly, no-deal Brexit.

Although much more of a clue was given in the follow-up detail.

“on the balance of factors such as a fall in the value of the pound and the reduction in supply………just as it did pre-referendum,”

If we assume he has confused the word pre and post we see he is signalling us towards a fall in the pound £ he ignored and the way he panicked and demanded a cut in interest-rates as well as more QE. Also according to @LiveSquawk he told the audience this.

BoE Haldane: Impact Of Rate Hikes So Far Modest

That might be because in net terns there has only been one as the move in November simply reversed the 2016 mistake.

I note these days that those who tell us how intelligent he is, seem to have disappeared, and even the Reuters piece is accompanied by a picture of him looking a bit wild-eyed. The mainstream view that he is/was a deep thinker has been replaced by the view he is deep in something else. As to his campaign to be the next Governor of the Bank of England? You find out all you need to know by the way he was at Symonds College on Monday. His idea of a Grand Tour around the country to a chorus of acclaim has morphed into giving talks to sixth-form colleges and please do not misunderstand me I mean no offence to the students of Winchester. However I do suggest they ignore the failed output gap theory that he keeps trotting out.

QE

Earlier this week Gertjan Vlieghe was more revealing than I think he intended about QE and its effects. Let me illustrate with his view on how it works.  First he tells us that unwinding QE is no big deal.

This view of how QE works implies that unwinding QE need not have a material impact on the shape of the yield curve, or indeed on the economy, if properly communicated and done gradually.

There is an obvious problem here which is that if taking it away does not have a material effect on the economy then how did applying it have a positive effect? Also if it is so easy to do there is the issue of why the Bank of England has not done any? Let us see how he thinks it works.

I argue against the view that QE works primarily by pushing down long-term interest-rates directly, through compressing the term premium  ( the portfolio balance channel)……..my view that QE works primarily via expectations, with powerful additional liquidity effects which are temporary and mainly relevant during periods of market stress.

We note immediate;y that he downplays the most obvious effect it has had with is the lowering of many bond yields around the world to what have been unprecedented levels. Odd when that was so clearly in play when Gertjan applied QE in August 2016 and the UK ten-year Gilt yield plunged to an extraordinary 0.5% and some yields in the short to medium range went negative for a while. No doubt economic historians will call that “Haldane’s heights” or the “Carney peak” for Gilt prices because unless the Bank of England has another go at impersonating a headless chicken such levels are extremely unlikely to be seen again.

Rather than the route above where bond yields fall and have an impact via lower fixed rate mortgage and company borrowing costs he seems to prefer the expectations fairy. Here individuals and companies are supposed to respond positively to something the vast majority do not understand and more than a few either have not heard of or do not care. This sort of thinking has been notable in the rise of Forward Guidance where central bankers seem to believe or at least be willing to claim and imply that the population hangs on their every word.

The view on liquidity is interesting as it is another clear area where there is an impact as money is indeed created in electronic form and the money supply raised. This particularly affects narrow measures of the money supply as for example in Japan an initial target was to double the amount of base money.  The problem comes when we try to follow the trail of where the liquidity created went? In the early days of Bank of England QE much of it seemed to get deposited straight back to the Bank itself. But over time we can spot clear signs of its impact on the financial system in two ways. The first is the impact on asset prices and especially house prices with London in the van. But even that is complicated as credit easing most recently in the form of the £126 billion or so of the Term Funding Scheme was also required. Next is the way that the Bank of England so often denies any such impact these days which relies on us forgetting the research produced by it around 2012.

Also you note that Gertjan seems to have forgotten the meaning of the word temporary as in “liquidity effects” as not one penny of the £435 billion of Bank of England QE has ever been withdrawn. So on the state of play so far it has been permanent and furthermore there is no apparent plan to change that.

Comment

As we note yet more attempts from the Bank of England to tell us that up is the new down another issue has popped up this morning that they will have hoped we have forgotten. Here is Ben Broadbent on the first quarter of 2018 from the May Inflation Report press conference.

they’re nonetheless consistent with growth much stronger than 0.1%………do not point to anything like as weak as 0.1%

Next here is the announcement this morning from the Office for National Statistics.

This follows a soft patch earlier in the year, where the UK economy grew by a revised 0.1% in Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2018.

So we have seen a downwards revision to 0.1% meaning that the antennae of Ben Broadbent now have a 100% failure rate. So it is way past time for him to stop relying on surveys which keep misleading him. Actually if we look at the source of the change we see that the ONS is also finding itself in quicksand.

Construction output fell by a revised 1.6% in Quarter 1 2018, marking its weakest quarterly growth since mid- 2012. It was previously highlighted that the adverse weather conditions earlier in the year had some impact on the construction industry.

I guess they are hoping we have forgotten that they told us the weather was not much of a factor! More serious is the fact that for the past 4/5 years their measurement of construction output has been a complete mess. The have told us it was in recession ( now revised) and then that it was doing much better ( which also seems to have now been revised). Along the way we have had a large company switched from services to construction and modifications to the deflation measure of inflation. I can tell you that my Nine Elms crane index is still at its peak of 40.

So there have been much better days for both the ONS and the Bank of England. Returning to the issue of QE I would like to remind you of Wednesday’s article on the drawbacks from it which look rather more concrete than the claimed gains. As for Governor Carney he has been too busy this week flying to North America and back so he can lecture people on the dangers of climate change.

 

 

The UK economy boomed in July

Today brings us a raft of data on the UK economy including something relatively new which is the monthly update or economic growth or GDP (Gross Domestic Product). This is part of the new structure where we get the quarterly numbers a couple of weeks later than we used to, which is a good development in terms of them being based on more hard data. But it is not clear to me that having monthly GDP adds an enormous amount to what we know with the data of it being somewhat erratic and perhaps plain wrong.

Anyway we will be able to compare the number for July with the business surveys we have which in the case of the Markit PMI have told us this.

No change is expected at Threadneedle Street on Thursday when the Bank of England meets to set interest rates. The resilient pace of growth signalled by recent PMI surveys will have come as some relief after the August rate hike, but it seems likely that the Monetary Policy Committee will await further news on the economy amid the intensifying Brexit process before tightening again. Rates could rise sooner than March of next year if clarity on the Brexit deal comes earlier, however this seems an unlikely scenario.

Actually they have omitted to point out that they believe the UK economy will grow by 0.4% in this quarter although the jury is out as to whether that is resilient. Compared to the weak monetary data it is but they are not followers of it. Also is there anyone who believes the Bank of England might raise interest-rates at its policy meeting on Wednesday/Thursday? Frankly the list of people who believe it will raise any time soon might not stretch much beyond Markit.

If we stay with the Bank of England its Governor Mark Carney will have smiled at this from the economics editor of the Financial Times over the weekend.

The gambit worked. Britain soon regained economic stability.

Yes he apparently single-handedly restored the UK economy after the EU Leave vote a view I find simply breath-taking. But wait there was more.

The weeks after the referendum defined the reputation of the Canadian at the helm of the BoE and have now earned him two extra years in the post.

Yet later came rather a list of problems which exemplify the phrase “unreliable boyfriend”.

Too often his predictions have proved false. He promised to serve only five years because there are limits to the time anyone can cope with such a punishing job, but will now stay for seven; he said a Leave vote risked a recession that has not materialised, and wrongly predicted that the first rise in UK interest rates above 0.5 per cent was looking likely at the end of 2014.

A more rational and composed assessment would be that yes he did his job on the day after the EU Leave vote but that there is a much longer list of failures. Also I note that the FT has omitted pumping up house prices as one of his failures. Added to that a failing that he was also criticised for in his time at the Bank of Canada is presented as a strength.

It is rare to find central bankers as willing to take a brave stance on important political questions.

Also it is nice of the FT to admittedly very belatedly confirm my long-standing view on his real objectives.

Having agreed to extend his term at Threadneedle Street, Mr Carney need not worry about the merry-go-round of international top jobs.

Did we miss the news that he had extended his term? If so someone needs to inform the Bank of England website.

Mr Carney has announced that he will serve to 30 June 2019

Good news for the UK economy

This morning has brought some sunshine for the UK economy.

Rolling three-month growth in July 2018 was the highest since August 2017, when it was also 0.6%. This continued a pickup from flat growth seen in April 2018.

As is regularly the case this was driven by the services sector.

with a rolling three-month growth of 0.6% in the services industries resulting in a large positive contribution. Production industries had growth of negative 0.5%, dragging on GDP growth. However, construction had a larger contribution to GDP growth than last month, with a large rolling three-month growth of 3.3%.

The strong construction performance rather nicely coincides with my own measure where I count the cranes along Nine Elms between Battersea Dogs and Cats home and Vauxhall Cross. This has risen to a record of 40 which does not count the 2 just before the Dog’s home nor the 6 the other side of Vauxhall Bridge.

Putting it chronologically this was driven by a strong performance in the month of July.

The month-on-month gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate was 0.3% in May 2018, 0.1% in June and 0.3% in July.

Whilst welcome this to my mind highlights a problem with monthly data. Do we really believe that as a pattern where we have two really good months and a poor one? The problems with highlighting monthly data are shown by an area which is a strength of the UK economy.

Within this industry, architectural and engineering activities was the largest contributor with a monthly growth of 4.4%, although this follows a month-on-month growth rate of negative 2.6% in June.

As you can see the June data was rather poor whereas if we take some perspective we note this.

 This industry has shown substantial growth over the past two years.

There is another area where a local guide is performing well as I note the Movie Makers vans and lorries currently residing in Battersea Park.

motion pictures, which increased by 4.1%, contributing 0.04 percentage points

Let us move on with only one cloud in our sunny skies.

Rolling three-month manufacturing growth to July was negative for the fifth consecutive rolling period at negative 0.1%.

Trade Wars

We advance on this data with some trepidation as it is a perennial problem for the UK.

The total UK trade deficit (goods and services) narrowed £1.4 billion to £3.4 billion in the three months to July 2018. Removing the effect of inflation, the total trade deficit narrowed £2.0 billion to £2.5 billion in the three months to July 2018.

If we look at this in terms of the good, the bad, and the ugly we see the following.

The total UK trade deficit (goods and services) narrowed £13.8 billion to £17.0 billion in the 12 months to July 2018. ………The main driver was the trade in services surplus, which widened £8.4 billion to £117.1 billion in the 12 months to July 2018; services exports rose £10.7 billion compared with £2.3 billion for imports………The goods deficit narrowed £5.4 billion to £134.1 billion in the 12 months to July 2018; exports of goods increased £20.2 billion, while imports of goods rose by a lesser £14.8 billion.

The good is plain to see via the improvements seen but that also illustrates the bad as even with good news we still have a deficit. The ugly part comes in when we note that our deficits have lasted not only for years but also for decades.

Comment

Today has brought good news on the UK economy and we should consider how much it changes our view on economic events. To my mind only a little as at least some of this is if you like a “catch-up” from the weak weather related data seen around the end of the first quarter. The overall view of around 0.4% quarterly growth still holds true as we wait to see what happens to the monetary data. As to the trade figures any improvement is welcome although I have ongoing doubts about their accuracy.

Moving to the Bank of England the GDP data will put a positive gloss on its August Bank Rate rise although of course it is supposed to look forwards and not backwards, as today’s data precedes it. Also I note an example of what the French call plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose. Remember this?

I have therefore decided that pre-release access to ONS statistics will stop with effect from 1 July
2017. ( National Statistician John Pullinger)

Whereas rather than being officially told they are now unofficially told or something like that.

, exceptional pre-release access for the Bank of England has been granted for this release.

Okay why?

would only be considered in exceptional circumstances, where denying such access would significantly impede the taking of action in the public interest.

As the policy meeting is this week I can see no such exceptional circumstances.

UK GDP growth accelerates past France and Italy

Today brings us the latest data on the UK economy or to be more specific the economic growth or Gross Domestic Product number for the second quarter of this year. If you are thinking that this is later than usual you are correct. The system changed this summer such that we now get monthly updates as well as quarterly ones. So a month ago we were told this.

The monthly GDP growth rate was flat in March, followed by a growth of 0.2% in April. Overall GDP growth was 0.3% in May.

So we knew the position for April and May earlier than normal (~17 days) but missing from that was June. We get the data for June today which completes the second quarter. As it happens extra attention has been attracted by the fact that the UK economy has appeared to be picking-up extra momentum. The monthly GDP numbers showed a rising trend but since then other data has suggested an improved picture too. For example the monetary trends seem to have stabilised a bit after falls and the Markit PMI business survey told us this.

UK points to a 0.4% rise in Q2 tomorrow, but that still makes the Bank of England’s recent rate rise look odd, even with the supposed reduced speed limit for the economy. Prior to the GFC, 56.5 was the all-sector PMI ‘trigger’ for rate hikes. July 2018 PMI was just 53.8 ( @WilliamsonChris _

As you can see they are a bit bemused by the behaviour of the Bank of England as well. If we look ahead then the next issue to face is the weaker level of the UK Pound £ against the US Dollar as we have dipped below US $1.28 today. This time it is dollar strength which has done this as the Euro has gone below 1.15 (1.145) but from the point of view of inflation prospects this does not matter as many commodities are priced in US Dollars. I do not expect the impact to be as strong as last time as some prices did not fall but via the impact of higher inflation on real wages this will be a brake on the UK economy as we head forwards.

Looking Ahead

Yesterday evening the Guardian published this.

Interest rates will stay low for 20 years, says Bank of England expert

Outgoing MPC member Ian McCafferty predicts rates below 5% and wages up 4%

The bubble was rather punctured though by simpleeconomics in the comments section.

Considering the BoE track record on forecasting I think we should take this with a massive pinch of salt. They often get the next quarter wrong so no hope for 20 years time.

The data

As ever we should not place too much importance on each 0.1% but the number was welcome news.

UK GDP grew by 0.4% in Quarter 2 (April to June) 2018.The rate of quarterly GDP growth picked up from growth of 0.2% in Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2018.

As normal if there was any major rebalancing it was towards the services sector.

Services industries had robust growth of 0.5% in Quarter 2 (Apr to June) 2018, which contributed 0.42 percentage points to overall gross domestic product (GDP) growth.

The areas which did particularly low are shown below.

 Retail and wholesale trade were the largest contributors to growth, at 0.11 percentage points and 0.05 percentage points respectively. Computer programming had a growth of 1.9%, contributing 0.05 percentage points to headline gross domestic product (GDP).

There was also some much better news from the construction sector and even some rebalancing towards it.

Growth of 0.9% in construction also contributed positively to GDP growth.

Although of course these numbers have been in disarray demonstrated by the fact that the latest set of “improvements” are replacing the “improvements” of a couple of years or so ago. Perhaps they have switched a business from the services sector to construction again ( sorry that;s now 3 improvements).So Definitely Maybe. Anyway I can tell you that there are now 40 cranes between Battersea Dogs Home and Vauxhall replacing the 25 when I first counted them.

Today’s sort of humour for the weekend comes from the area to which according to Baron King of Lothbury we have been rebalancing towards.

However, contraction of 0.8% in the production industries contributed negatively to headline GDP growth…….

Manufacturing fell by 0.9% although there is more to this as I will come to in a moment.

Monthly GDP

You might have assumed that the June number would be a good one but in fact it was not.

GDP increased by 0.1% in June 2018

If we look into the detail we see that contrary to expectations there was no services growth at all in June. Such growth as there was come from the other sectors and construction had a good month increasing by 1.4%. I did say I would look at manufacturing again and it increased by 0.4% in June which follows a 0.6% increase in May. So we have an apparent pick-up in the monthly data as the quarterly ones show that it is in a recession with two drops in a row. Thus it looks as if the dog days of earlier this year may be over,

This leaves us with the problem of recording zero services growth in June. The sectors responsible for pulling the number lower are shown below.

The professional, scientific and technical activities sector decreased by 1.0% and contributed negative 0.10 percentage points. ……The other notable sector fall was wholesale, retail and motor trades, which decreased by 0.6% and contributed negative 0.08 percentage points.

The decline of the retail trade whilst the football world cup was on seems odd. Also there overall number completely contradicts the PMI survey for June which at 55.1 was strong. So only time will tell except Bank of England Governor Mark Carney may need its barman to mix his Martini early today as he mulls the possibility that he has just raised interest-rates into a service-sector slow down.

One consistent strong point in the numbers in recent times has carried on at least.

There was also a rise in motion pictures, increasing by 5.8% and contributing 0.05 percentage points.

So we should all do our best to be nice to any luvvies we come across.

Comment

We should welcome the improved quarterly numbers as GDP growth of 0.4% is double that of both France and Italy and is double the previous quarter. However whilst the monthly numbers do provide some extra insight into manufacturing as the recessionary quarterly data looks like a dip which is already recovering the services numbers are odd. I fear that one of my warnings about monthly GDP numbers are coming true as it seems inconsistent with other numbers to say we picked up well in May but slowed down in June. If we look at the services sector alone and go back to February 2017 we are told this happened in the subsequent months, -0.1%,0.3%-0.1%,0.3% which I think speaks for itself.

We also got an update on the trade figures which have a good and a bad component so here is the good.

The total UK trade deficit (goods and services) narrowed £6.2 billion to £25.0 billion in the 12 months to June 2018. The improvement was driven by both exports of goods and services increasing by more than their respective imports.

Next the bad.

The total UK trade deficit widened £4.7 billion to £8.6 billion in the three months to June 2018, due mainly to falling goods exports and rising goods imports.

If you want a one word summary of out recorded trade position then it is simply deficit. Although currently we are looking rather like France in terms of patterns as a reminder that some trends are more than domestic.

 

UK GDP growth continues to rebalance towards services

Today has brought a new adventure in UK economic statistics. This is because we have moved to a new system where we get monthly GDP releases whilst the quarterly ones have been delayed. In terms of detail here is the change in the quarterly schedule.

The new model will see the publication of two quarterly GDP releases rather than three. The new First quarterly GDP estimate will be published approximately 40 days after the end of the quarter to which it refers. The new first estimate will have much higher data content for the output approach than the current preliminary estimate. It will also contain data from the income and expenditure approaches,

In general I welcome this as under the old model the last of the three months in question had rather a shortage of actual data and quite a lot of projections. The UK has in essence produced its numbers too quickly in the past and now they should be more reliable. There is a catch to this in that the Bank of England will have its August policy meeting without the GDP data. This has a consequence in that traditionally it is more likely to act once it has it and another in that will it get a sort of “early wire”? That sort of thing was officially stopped by seems to have unofficially started again. I also welcome the use of income and expenditure numbers as long as it is not an excuse to further increase the role of fantasy numbers such as imputed rent. Back in the day Chancellor Nigel Lawson downgraded the use of the income and expenditure GDP data and I think that was a mistake as for example in the US the income GDP numbers worked better than the normal ( output)ones at times.

The services numbers will be sped up so that this can happen.

Taken together, these releases provide enough information to produce a monthly estimate of GDP, as data on almost the entire economy will now be available.

This has two problems. Firstly the arrival of the services data has been sped up by a fortnight which can only make it less reliable. The second is that these theme days overrun us with data as we will not only be getting 2 GDP numbers we will also be getting production, construction and trade numbers. Frankly it is all too much and some if not much of it will be ignored.

Today’s Numbers

The headline is as follows.

UK GDP grew by 0.2% in the three months to May.Growth in the three months to May was higher than growth in the three months to April, which was flat. The weakness in growth in the three months to April was largely due to a negative drag on GDP from construction.

There was something familiar about this which may make Baron King of Lothbury reach for the key to the sherry cabinet.

Growth of 0.4% in the services industries in the three months to May had the biggest contribution to GDP growth.

Yes we “rebalanced” towards services yet again as we mull whether he was ennobled due to his apparently ability to claim the reverse of reality so often? As it happens the growth was driven by a sector which has seen troubled times.

Growth in consumer-facing industries (for example retail, hotels, restaurants) has been slowing over the past year. However, in the three months to May growth in these industries picked up, particularly in wholesale and retail trade.

This industry grew by 0.9% in the three months to May and contributed 0.1 percentage points to headline GDP.

If we move to the monthly data we note this.

The monthly GDP growth rate was flat in March, followed by a growth of 0.2% in April. Overall GDP growth was 0.3% in May.

This in so far as it is reliable confirms my suggestion that the UK economy is edging forwards at about 0.3% per quarter. Oh and if the output on social media is any guide best of luck with this.

The monthly growth rate for GDP is volatile and therefore it should be used with caution and alongside other measures such as the three-month growth rate when looking for an indicator of the long-term trend of the economy.

Production

It was disappointing to see a drop here although maybe this was something international as France also saw a drop earlier in the day.

In May 2018, total production was estimated to have decreased by 0.4% compared with April 2018, led by falls in energy supply of 3.2% and mining and quarrying of 4.6%.

There were two ameliorating factors at play as we start with mining.

 due to unplanned maintenance on the Sullom Voe oil and gas terminal.

Also the falls in manufacturing seem to have stopped.

Manufacturing output rose by 0.4% and is the first increase in this sector since December 2017……..due mainly to widespread growth across the sector, with 9 of the 13 sub-sectors increasing.

The leading sectors were as follows.

Pharmaceutical products and transport equipment provide the largest contributions to monthly growth, increasing by 2.4% and 1.1% respectively.

It would appear that yet again it is time for ” I am the urban spaceman baby” which younger readers may need to look up!

Within the transport equipment sub-sector, the aircraft, spacecraft and related machinery industry performed strongly, increasing by 3.3%, supported by an increase in nominal export turnover growth of 10.9%.

Those areas are still seeing export growth whereas more generally for manufacturing the boost from the lower Pound £ seems to be over. Or if you prefer the effects of the J-Curve and Reverse J-Curve have come and gone.

Trade

The picture here has been one of improvement and on an annual comparison that remains true.

The total UK trade deficit (goods and services) narrowed £3.9 billion to £26.5 billion in the 12 months to May 2018. An improvement in the trade in services balance was the main factor, as the UK’s trade in services surplus widened £4.1 billion to £111.5 billion.

However the quarterly numbers also suggest that the boost from the lower UK Pound £ has been and gone.

The total UK trade deficit widened £5.0 billion to £8.3 billion in the three months to May 2018, mainly due to falling goods exports and rising goods imports. Falling exports of cars and rising imports of unspecified goods were mostly responsible for the £5.0 billion widening of the total trade deficit in the three months to May 2018.

Tucked away in this was a rare event for the UK.

There was a small overall trade surplus on the month to February 2018, mainly due to falling goods imports;

Comment

We find that today’s data confirms our thoughts that after a soft patch the UK economy has picked up a bit. There are reasons to suspect this continued in June. For example the monetary data picked up in May so may no longer be as strong a break and the PMI business surveys for June were stronger.

The survey data indicate that the economy likely
grew by 0.4% in the second quarter, up from 0.2%
in the opening quarter of 2018.

That poses a question for the Bank of England and its Governor. That rate of growth is above the “speed limit” that its Ivory Tower has calculated although the model used has been a consistent failure. Should the boyfriend prove to be unreliable yet again then subsequent votes will be without one of the policymakers keen to raise interest-rates. I remain to be convinced they will take the plunge.

Moving onto a past Bank of England staple which is rebalancing we see us moving towards a strength which we do not seem to like. As services seemed to be left out of the Chequers Brexit plan which seemed really odd to me. Especially if we note that other areas are in relative and sometimes absolute decline.

Production and manufacturing output have risen but remain 6.2% and 2.5% lower, respectively, in the three months to May 2018 than the pre-downturn gross domestic product (GDP) peak in Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2008.

I have left out the construction numbers for May as we wait for any sort of reliability from them.

 

 

 

 

 

UK construction has been growing rather than being in recession. Ouch!

This morning brings us more on what has become the troubled construction sector in the UK. Or to be more specific what we have been told by our official statisticians is troubled. Regular readers will be aware that I found some of this bemusing partly due to geographical location as there is an enormous amount of building work going on at Nine Elms around the new US Embassy. The last time I counted there were 32 cranes in the stretch between Battersea Dogs and Cats Home and Vauxhall. Also there have been problems with the official construction data series of which more later going back some years which have led to me cautioning that the numbers may need to be taken with the whole salt-cellar rather than just a pinch of salt.

What happened last week?

I pointed out on Friday that there had been ch-ch-changes.

This has been driven by revised construction estimates, with its output growth revised up by 1.9 percentage points to negative 0.8%

This was the road on which total UK GDP growth was revised up from 0.1% to 0.2%. It takes quite a lot for something which is only 6.1% of total output to do that but as it was originally reported at -3.3% then -2.7% and now -0.8% you can see that the original number was way off. This is a familiar pattern albeit not usually on this scale and does pose a systemic question. After all if you are struggling to measure something which is mostly very tangible such as a building and the associated economic output how can you measure the more intangible outputs of the services sector?

Actually there was more as the reformist wave spread across the data for 2017 as well.

While the 0.8% fall in Quarter 1 marks the largest quarterly decline since Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2012, it is now estimated that this is the first fall since Quarter 3 2015 – earlier estimates had recorded falling output through much of 2017.

This does alter the narrative as we had been given numbers indicating a recession and at the worst hinting at a possible start of a depression, so it is hard to overstate this. Let us drill down into the detail.

Today’s new construction estimates show a much stronger growth profile throughout 2017, with upward revisions recorded in each quarter except Quarter 3

The major shift numerically is in the first half of 2017  as the first quarter goes from growth of 2.4% to 3.2% and the second from -0.4% to 0.4% . However in terms of impression and mood the last quarter may have hit the hardest as after previous doom it had the gloom of -0.1% whereas in fact it grew by 0.3%, Adding it all up gives us this.

Construction output is now estimated to have increased by 7.1% in 2017, up from 5.7%

What has changed?

Reality is of course unchanged by the way that it has been officially measured has seen these changes.

As part of the wider improvement programme for construction statistics, ONS has introduced significant improvements to the method for imputing data for businesses that have not yet returned their ONS survey responses.

Oh! That rather sends a chill down the spine as in essence we are back to fantasy numbers yet again and yet again they are in the housing sector. I am willing to give them a chance but can we really not get a grip on the actual numbers? Also I note that things in terms of actual measurement seem to be getting worse rather than better and the emphasis is mine.

Quarter 1 2018 is affected to a greater extent than Quarter 1 2017 due to the higher number of imputations in more recent periods due to lower response rates, as well as the inclusion of the bias adjustment.

In addition there has been a change to the seasonal adjustment which I take as an admittal of the problem I have highlighted before with the first quarter of the year which has been a serial underperformer. The combination of the changes has seen the beginning of the last two years revised up by 0.8% in construction terms so maybe this is some help with this issue.

Where are we now?

Let us take Kylie’s advice and Step Back in Time to 2016 about which we were told this.

The value of construction new work in Great Britain continued to rise in 2016, reaching its highest level on record at £99,266 million; driven by continued growth in the private sector.

Just for clarity this is far from all being new work as shown below.

Aside from all new work, all repair and maintenance equated to £52,223 million in 2016. This is an increase of £1,679 million compared with 2015.

There was a common factor in both new and maintenance work in 2016 in that the growth was essentially in the private-sector.

That number represented quite a boom. The nadir for the construction sector had been unsurprisingly in 2009 at the height of the credit crunch impact when output was £65.9 billion. Things got better but then there was something of a double-dip in 2012 when it fell back to £69.7 billion. As you can see from the 2016 number it was then a case off pretty much up,up and away from then.

The numbers above are in current prices rather than the usual deflated version which reminds us again that the deflator has been singing along to Lyndsey Buckingham.

I think I’m in trouble
I think I’m in trouble

Comment

Today’s update and if you like revisionism represents quite a change. Previously 2017 had seen the UK construction industry behave like one of those cartoon characters who are going so fast they do not spot the edge of a cliff but even when they go over it carry on briefly before they drop like a stone. On the road we were in a recession with flashes of a depression. Now we see that it was a year which opened very strongly but then slowed which is very different. Annual growth of 7.1% does not to say the least fit well with a depression scenario.

Now we see that we are being told the same for 2018.

Construction output continued its recent decline in the three-month on three-month series, falling by 3.4% in April 2018; the biggest fall seen in this series since August 2012.

Sound familiar? Well Kelis would offer this view.

Mght trick me once
I won’t let you trick me twice
No I won’t let you trick me twice

This really is quite a mess and regular readers will be aware it has been going on for some years. There was an attempt at an ongoing fix by “improving” the inflation measure called the deflator. Then there was an attempted “quick-fix” by switching a services company into construction. Plainly they did not work and frankly the idea of having these construction numbers as part of the monthly GDP numbers we get next week is embarassing. They are simply not up to it.

As to where we are now the Agents of the Bank of England offer a view.

Construction output remained little changed on a year ago, and contacts were cautious about the short-term outlook .

So now some 3% lower then? Also the Markit survey has its doubts.

June data revealed a solid expansion of overall
construction activity, underpinned by greater
residential work and a faster upturn in commercial
building

Indeed it was quite upbeat.

There were also positive signs regarding
the near-term outlook for growth, as signalled by the
strongest rise in new orders since May 2017 and the
largest upturn in input buying for two-and-a-half
years.

So apologies for reporting official data which has turned out not to be worth the paper it was printed on. However strategically I think it is correct to follow the official data whilst also expressing doubts about systemic issues. Next week when we get the monthly GDP number we will return to a media bubble analysing each 0.1% which needs to be looked through the lens of a sector which has just been revised by 2,5%.