Will the economy of France shrink again?

The pandemic era has thrown up so many economic questions, but now we seem to be entering a new phase. Over the past day or two it has been La Belle France which has been exhibiting this. I have pointed out more than a few times that the tendency for forecasters official and otherwise to assume a strong economic bounce back in 2021 and 2022 was based on little more than Hopium, as we are still less than certain about 2020. An example of the issues facing this year came from the BBC a couple of days ago.

Paris will shut all bars completely from Tuesday after the French government raised the city’s coronavirus alert to maximum following a period of high infection rates.
Bars, gyms and swimming pools will all be closed for two weeks in a bid to curb the spread of the virus, the city’s police chief said.

But restaurants will remain open if strict hygiene rules are in place.

On Sunday France reported 12,565 cases of Covid-19.

France24 added to the theme only yesterday.

Covid-19: France records new all-time high of nearly 19,000 cases in 24 hours.

As it goes onto point out there are economic consequences as it highlights a French tradition.

They form part of a centuries-old tradition and are an iconic feature of the French capital, but Paris’s historic riverside booksellers, known as ‘bouquinistes’ are under threat. Like many other businesses that rely on tourism, Covid-19 has taken a devastating toll on their income.
A total of 227 bouquinistes, who sell second-hand books as well as sometimes souvenirs, line the embankment of the River Seine.

This returns us to a point we looked at when the pandemic began which is the impact of such an event on economies which rely on a lot of tourism.

The Economic Situation

France’s official statistical body Insee has tried to allow for the changing situation.

Alongside “barrier gestures”, more restrictive containment measures which more directly affect economic activity (closures of bars, restaurants, sports halls, etc.) are, at this stage, more targeted territorially and sectorally than in the spring. Air passenger transport remains severely affected, as it has since the start of the health crisis.

We have seen an example of the latter issue in the news today with Easyjet suggesting it will lose more than £800 million this year with passenger numbers halved.

Their analysis leads to a change in their view and the emphasis is mine.

In September, the continued improvement in the business climate in France is mainly due, in most sectors, to improved judgment on past production, while the business outlook for the next three months is down. , according to business leaders interviewed in business surveys.

Below is where they think we are.

After the sharp rebound associated with deconfinement (+ 16% expected in the third quarter, after – 13.8% in the second and – 5.9% in the first), economic activity could thus slow down at the end of the year under the effect of the resurgence of the epidemic.

What might slow down? Again the emphasis is mine.

In a scenario where, in the fourth quarter, the most affected services (hotels and restaurants, transport services, recreational and leisure activities) would return, after an improvement during the summer, to their level of activity of last June and where investment should remain, by a wait-and-see policy, at a level close to that of the third quarter, growth would be zero at the end of the year.

That is more than a little uncomfortable for the official predictions for 2021 as we should be rebounding rather than flat-lining. In terms of numbers we have this.

In this scenario, French GDP would remain, at the end of the year, 5% below its pre-crisis level, as on average during the summer……..In total for the year 2020, the forecast of GDP contraction remains in the order of -9%.

The swing factor here is consumption. We will see stellar levels of growth for the third quarter based on the numbers we know. But like in A Question of Sport the real issue is what happens next?

The continuation of these restrictions,
and the dissipation of catch-up effects by
elsewhere, would lead in the fourth quarter to
consumption slightly lower than
in the previous quarter. On the whole of
the year, consumption would decrease by 7%
compared to 2019.

It has been an extraordinary year with normal incomes hammered but government intervention leading to this.

With the rebound in consumption – even attenuated at the end of the year – the household savings rate, which had almost doubled in the second quarter (due to forced savings), should come back to around 17% in the second half, a level slightly higher than before the crisis.

At some point this will end and then consumption will face the consequences of this.

The unemployment rate should jump in the third quarter and reach 9.7% at the end of the year.

Bank of France

It has joined the fray this morning with this.

According to the business leaders interviewed, activity is, as expected a month ago, stable in September in
industry as in services and construction. It remains overall below its previous level
crisis, but still with a strong heterogeneity between sectors. Outlook for the month of October
also show a relative stability of activity in industry, services and construction.

It points out that there is a wide disparity in sectors but at least in some areas it suggests falls last month.

The production capacity utilization rate slipped slightly to 73% on average in September after 75% in August (and 79% before the crisis). It is on the rise in the chemical industry but falls significantly in the aeronautics and other transport sector.

Comment

If we take a look at the position it is not the overall situation that is the issue it is the structure. The 9% fall in GDP is well within the margin of error at a time like this from the Europa summer forecast.

but the forecast for 2020 has been revised down to about –
10 ½% from close to -8 ¼% in the spring.

The issue is the direction of travel which began hopefully with a strong recovery push. But now we see that rather than recovering towards the end of the year we may see stagnation or if the latest numbers are any guide a further decline. This poses quite a challenge to the next part of the summer forecast.

The projected economic recovery is set to remain on track in 2021, with GDP expanding by some 7 ½%.

We should of course have realised via the use of the phrase “on track” which meant anything but in the Greek crisis. In terms of specifics as we have noted today this part is being questioned.

After sinking in the first half of the year, private consumption is projected to gather momentum from the second half onwards.

If we now switch to what this means? We have two major consequences. The first is that the depression starting in 2020 looks set to be longer than expected just like wars which invariably are predicted to be over by Christmas. Sadly that means more people will be unemployed for longer.Should the French economy contract again it will be four out of the latest five. Also it means that there will be no end in sight to central bank intervention and we may see even more negative interest-rates and QE bond buying.

 

Even if this quarter sees economic growth of 7% Germany has gone back in time to 2015

Today has brought the economic engine of the Euro ares into focus as we digest a barrage of data from and about Germany. We find that the second effort at producing economic output figures for the second quarter has produced a small improvement.

WIESBADEN – The gross domestic product (GDP) fell sharply by 9.7% in the 2nd quarter of 2020 on the 1st quarter of 2020 after adjustment for price, seasonal and calendar variations. According to the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis), the GDP drop in the 2nd quarter of 2020 was not quite as steep as reported in the first release of 30 July 2020 (-10.1%).

This means that the comparison with last year improved as well.

11.3% on the same quarter a year earlier (price-adjusted)

The last figure is revealing in that it reminds us that the German economy had been in something of a go-slow even before the Covid-19 pandemic hit. Also we note that the hit was in broad terms double that of the credit crunch.

The slump in the German economy was thus much larger than during the financial and economic crisis of 2008/2009 (-4.7% in the 1st quarter of 2009) and the sharpest decline since quarterly GDP calculations for Germany started in 1970.

The Details

With a lockdown in place for a fair bit of the quarter this was hardly a surprise.

As a consequence of the ongoing corona pandemic and the restrictions related with it, household final consumption expenditure fell sharply by 10.9% in the 2nd quarter of 2020.

What is normally considered to be a German strength fell off the edge of a cliff as investment plunged.

Gross fixed capital formation in machinery and equipment even dropped by as much as 19.6%.

Which made the annual picture this.

 Gross fixed capital formation in machinery and equipment fell sharply by 27.9% after already dropped considerably by 9.5% in the 1st quarter.

Also a platoon of PhD’s from the ECB will be on their way to work out what has gone on here?

Gross fixed capital formation in construction also declined markedly (-4.2%) in the 2nd quarter, which was due in particular to the exceptionally strong 1st quarter (+5.1%).

The ECB PhD’s may be able to write a working paper describing what their bosses would consider a triumph. Or at least, something described as a triumph on the crib sheet provided to ECB President Christine Lagarde.

Gross fixed capital formation in construction, which was 1.4% higher than in the 2nd quarter of 2019, also had a supporting effect year on year.

Looking at the annual comparison it has not been a good year for net exporters.

Foreign trade fell dramatically also compared with a year earlier. Exports of goods and services fell by 22.2% (price-adjusted) in the 2nd quarter of 2020 year on year. Imports did not drop as strongly (-17.3%) over that period.

Something else which you might reasonably consider to be not very Germanic has been in play.

Only final consumption expenditure of general government had a stabilising effect; it was 1.5% higher than in the previous quarter and prevented an even larger GDP decrease………( and the annual data)  In contrast, an additional 3.8% in government final consumption expenditure prevented the economy from crashing even more.

We know that the unemployment numbers have been actively misleading in the pandemic but I note that the hours worked data gives a similar picture to GDP.

The labour volume of the overall economy, which is the total number of hours worked by all persons in employment, declined even more sharply by 10.0% over the same period.

This had an inevitable consequence for productivity.

Labour productivity per person in employment slumped by as much as 10.2% compared with the 2nd quarter of 2019.

Savings

I thought I would pick this out as it is a clear development in the Covid era.

The relatively stable incomes, on the one hand, and consumer reticence, on the other, resulted in a substantial rise in household saving. According to provisional calculations, the savings ratio nearly doubled to 20.1% in the 2nd quarter of 2020 year on year (2nd quarter 2019: 10.2%).

Looking Ahead

This morning’s IFO release tells us this.

Sentiment among German business leaders is continuing to improve. The ifo Business Climate Index rose from 90.4 points (seasonally adjusted)  in July  to 92.6 points in August. Companies assessed their current business situation markedly more positively than last month. Their expectations were also slightly more optimistic. The German economy is on the road to recovery.

Although a somewhat different context was provided by this.

In manufacturing, the business climate improved considerably. Companies’ assessments of their current situation jumped higher. Nevertheless, many industrial companies still consider their current business to be poor. The outlook for the coming months was again more optimistic. Order books are filling once more.

That showed a welcome improvement but only to a level considered to be poor so it is hardly surprising they are optimistic relative to that. Indeed trade seems to have engaged reverse gear.

In trade, the upward trend in the business climate flattened noticeably. Companies were somewhat more satisfied with their current situation. However, their pessimism regarding the coming months was almost unchanged. In wholesale, the business climate in fact fell back.

Perhaps they are getting a little more like us in the UK as the services sector seems to be on the road to recovery.

In the service sector, the Business Climate Index rose strongly. Service providers were decidedly happier with their current business situation. Their outlook for the coming six months also improved further.

Considering the GDP numbers you might think that construction would be more upbeat.

In construction, the business climate continues to improve. Construction companies were again happier with their current situation. However, their expectations are still pessimistic, albeit less so than last month.

Comment

If we take the example below where would that leave Germany?

Germany IFO expects GDP growth of around 7% in Q3 ( DailyFX.com )

If we take the unadjusted figure of 93.46 for the second quarter then we will rise to 100 or if you prefer we will have stepped back in time to 2015. So the “Euro boom” and all the ECB backslapping will have been wiped out. The 7% economic growth recorded over the period will be ground that will have to be re-taken. That will be not so easy as we see renewed but hopefully more minor Covid-19 outbreaks in other parts of the Euro area.

I am a little unclear how @Economist_Kat gets to this.

#Germany: #ifo survey results for August are consistent with the economy moving into Boom territory.

Perhaps too much kool-aid. According to a @LiveSquawk the official view is that things can only get better.

German FinMin Scholz: Economy Developing Better Than Expected

Meanwhile official policy has the pedal to the metal with an official interest-rate for banks at -1% and two QE bond buying schemes running at once. We also have fiscal policy being deployed on a grand scale, especially for Germany. There is little scope for it to do more.

 

 

 

 

 

UK Retail Sales surge in June

The Covid-19 pandemic has brought about all sorts of economic events. Yesterday evening I went for a stroll in Battersea Park and it was quite noticeable how the number of people going for a picnic there has increased. We do not know how permanent that will be but I suspect at least some of it will be as people discover that the same bottle of wine is so much cheaper than at a wine bar or pub. Oh yes and some seem to forget the food part of the picnic! I can see that BBC Breakfast have put their own spin on it.

9-year-old Sky had this message on #BBCBreakfast for people dropping litter in parks and open spaces

Yes more people have created more litter. Kudos to @PolemicPaine who pointed out ahead of a flurry of such media reports that it would happen. Some people’s behaviour is bad but in recent years the cleanliness of Battersea Park has improved a lot and thank you to the workers there.

Retail Sales

These are the numbers which were likely to be harbingers of change in the trajectory of the UK economy. So this morning’s news was rather welcome.

In June 2020, the volume of retail sales increased by 13.9% when compared with May 2020 as non-food and fuel stores continue their recovery from the sharp falls experienced since the start of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

That was quite a surge and means this.

The two monthly increases in the volume of retail sales in May and June 2020 have brought total sales to a similar level as before the coronavirus pandemic; however, there is a mixed picture in different store types.

There is another way of looking at this.

In June, total retail sales continued to increase to reach similar levels as before the pandemic, with a fall of just 0.6% when compared with February.

So is it in modern language, like well over? Not quite as the text is a little reticent in pointing this out but volumes were some 1.6% lower than last June. Whilst growth had been slowing we usually have some so perhaps 3% lower than we might usually expect. However these are strong numbers in the circumstances and will have come as an especial shock to readers of the Financial Times with the economics editor reporting this. I have highlighted the bit which applies to June.

The latest numbers on card payments and bank account transactions from Fable Data show that in the week to July 19, total spending in the UK was 25 per cent down on the same week in 2019, a deterioration from a 13 per cent decline four weeks earlier.

As you can see whilst consumption is a larger category than Retail Sales there is quite a difference in the numbers here. According to the report by the economics editor of the FT a bad June was followed by a woeful July.

The latest indications from unofficial data on spending patterns in the UK suggests the economic recovery that began in late April has stalled — and possibly even moved backwards in July. Separate figures from the Bank of England’s payment system and from card payments collected by Fable Data show a worse picture for spending in mid-July than at the start of the month.

More on this later.

The Breakdown

Whilst the overall picture is pretty much back to February there have been some ch-ch-changes in the pattern.

In June, while non-food stores and fuel sales show strong monthly growths in the volume of sales at 45.5% and 21.5% respectively, levels have still not recovered from the sharp falls experienced in March and April.

My personal fuel sales shot up as I bought some diesel and went to visit an aunt and my mother;s house at the end of June but on a more serious level traffic in Battersea picked up noticeably. This is in spite of the official effort to discourage driving just after telling people to drive! Anyway switching sectors this is interesting.

Following this peak, sales returned to a level higher than before the pandemic. In June 2020, despite a small monthly decline of 0.1% in volume sales, food stores remained 5.3% higher than in February 2020.

I say that because of this.

Feedback from food retailers had suggested that consumers were panic buying in preparation for the impending lockdown.

If they were we would expect a dip going ahead. On a personal level I did put some extra stuff in my freezer in case I had to quarantine ( it was 7 days then) and bought some more tinned food. But collectively the other side of that has not been seen so far. Maybe it is because the June numbers do not see the opening of restaurants and the like which began on July 4th.

I doubt anyone is going to be surprised by this.

Non-store retailing has reached a new high level in June 2020, with continued growth during the pandemic and a 53.6% increase in volume sales when compared with February 2020.

Let me now give you the two polar opposites starting with the bad.

Textile, clothing and footwear stores show the sharpest decline in total sales at negative 34.9%. This was because of a combination of a large fall within stores at negative 50.8% along with a slower uptake in online sales, with a 26.8% increase from February.

Now the up,up and away.

Household goods stores, as the only store type to show an increase since the start of the pandemic, has a large uptake in online sales, increasing by 103.2%. In addition, household goods stores saw the smallest decline in store sales when compared with other non-food stores, at negative 15.2%.

I am glad to see my friend who has been painting his garage door and some windows pop up in the figures.

In June, electrical household appliances, hardware, paints and glass, and furniture stores all returned to similar levels as before the pandemic.

Comment

This is welcome news for the UK economy and it provides another piece of evidence for one of my themes. For newer readers I argued back in January 2015 that lower prices boost the economy ( the opposite of the Bank of England view) and we see that lower prices in retail have led us to getting right back to where we started from. I am sure that some PhD’s at the Bank of England are being instructed to sufficiently torture the numbers to disprove this already.

Actually the Bank of England is in disarray as in response to the FT data above one of its members seems to have switched to analysing health.

Jonathan Haskel, an external member of the BoE’s Monetary Policy Committee, said the evidence was beginning to show that household concerns about health were more likely to drive spending than government lockdown rules.

Oh well. Also this made me laugh, after all who provided all the liquidity?

“The need for more equity finance creates a case for authorities to be ambitious in reforming the financial system to remove any biases against the patience that’s needed for many equity investments,” he said.

“Even investors who should have the longest horizons seem to have a fetish for liquidity and an aversion to really illiquid growth capital assets.” he said. ( Reuters)

I do hope somebody pointed out to Alex Brazier, the BoE’s Executive Director for Financial Stability Strategy and Risk that the speech should be given to his own colleagues who have been singing along to Elvis Costello.

Pump it up, until you can feel it
Pump it up, when you don’t really need it

Let me finish by pointing out that these retail numbers are imprecise in normal times and will be worse now. So we have seen quite an upwards shift of say around 10%. Moving onto numbers which are even more unreliable there was more good news but regular readers will know to splash some salt around these.

At 57.1 in July, up from 47.7 in June, the headline seasonally
adjusted IHS Markit / CIPS Flash UK Composite Output Index – which is based on approximately 85% of usual monthly replies – registered above the 50.0 no-change value for the first time since February.

The ECB bails out the banks yet again, the Euro area economy not so much

One of the battles in economics is between getting data which is timely and it being accurate and reliable. Actually we struggle with the latter points full stop but especially if we try to produce numbers quickly. As regular readers will be aware we have been observing this problem in relation to the Markit Purchasing Manager Indices for several years now. They produce numbers which if this was a London gangster movie would be called “sharpish” but have missed the target on more than a few occasions and in he case of the Irish pharmaceutical cliff their arrow not only missed the target but the whole field as well.

Things start well as we note this.

The eurozone economic downturn eased markedly
for a second successive month in June as
lockdowns to prevent the spread of the coronavirus
disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak were further
relaxed, according to provisional PMI® survey data.
The month also saw a continued strong
improvement in business expectations for the year
ahead.

As it is from the 12th to the 22nd of this month it is timely as well but then things go rather wrong.

The flash IHS Markit Eurozone Composite PMI rose
further from an all-time low of 13.6 seen back in
April, surging to 47.5 in June from 31.9 in May. The
15.6-point rise was by far the largest in the survey
history with the exception of May’s record increase.
The latest gain took the PMI to its highest since
February, though still indicated an overall decline in
business output.

Actually these numbers if we note the Financial Times wrong-footed more than a few it would appear.

The rise in the eurozone flash Composite PMI in June confirms that economic output in the region is recovering rapidly from April’s nadir as restrictions are progressively eased. ( Capital Economics )

Today’s PMI numbers provide further evidence of what initially looks like a textbook V-shaped recovery. As much as more than a month of (full) lockdowns had sent economies into a standstill, the gradual reopenings of the last two months have led to a sharp rebound in activity. ( ING Di-Ba)

The latter is an extraordinary effort as a number below 50 indicates a further contraction albeit with a number of 47.5 a minor one. So we have gone enormous contraction , what would have been called an enormous contraction if they one before had not taken place and now a minor one. But the number now has to be over 50 as the economy picks up and this below is not true.

Output fell again in both manufacturing and
services, the latter showing the slightly steeper rate
of decline

On a monthly basis output rose as it probably did at the end of last month, it is just that it is doing so after a large fall. The one number which was positive was still way too low.

Flash France Composite Output Index) at 51.3
in June (32.1 in May), four-month high.

For what it is worth the overall view is as follows.

We therefore continue to expect GDP to slump by over 8% in 2020 and, while the recovery may start in the third quarter, momentum could soon fade meaning it will likely
take up to three years before the eurozone regains
its pre-pandemic level of GDP.

Actual Data

From Statistics Netherlands.

In May 2020, prices of owner-occupied dwellings (excluding new constructions) were on average 7.7 percent up on the same month last year. This price increase is higher than in the previous months.

Well that will cheer the European Central Bank or ECB. Indeed ECB President Lagarde may have a glass of champagne in response to this.

 In May 2020, house prices reached the highest level ever. Compared to the low in June 2013, house prices were up by 47.8 percent on average in that month.

Staying with the Netherlands and switching to the real economy we see this.

According to figures released by Statistics Netherlands (CBS), in April 2020 consumers spent 17.4 percent less than in April 2019. This is by far the largest contraction in domestic household consumption which has ever been recorded by CBS. Consumers mainly spent less on services, durable goods and motor fuels; on the other hand, they spent more on food, beverages and tobacco.

If we try to bring that up to date we see that if sentiment is any guide things have improved but are still weak.

At -27, the consumer confidence indicator in June stands far below its long-term average over the past two decades (-5). The indicator reached an all-time high (36) in January 2000 and an all-time low (-41) in March 2013.

Moving south to France we were told this earlier today.

In June 2020, the business climate has recovered very clearly, in connection with the acceleration of the lockdown exit. The indicator that synthesizes it, calculated from the responses of business managers from the main market sectors, has gained 18 points, its largest monthly increase since the start of the series (1980).

The jump is good news for the French economy although the rhetoric above does not match the detail.

At 78, the business climate has exceeded the low point reached in March 2009 (70), but remains far below its long-term average (100).

The situation is even worse for employment.

At 66, the employment climate still remains far below its May 2009 low (73), and, a fortiori, its long-term average (100).

Oh and staying with France I know some of you like to note these numbers.

At the end of Q1 2020, Maastricht’s debt reached €2,438.5 billion, a €58.4 billion increase in comparison to Q4 2019. It accounted for 101.2% of gross domestic product (GDP), 3.1 points higher than last quarter, the highest increase since Q2 2019.

Just as a reminder the UK measuring rod is different and tends to be around 4% of GDP lower. But of course both measures will be rising quickly in both France and the UK.

Comment

Let me now switch to a speech given earlier today by Philip Lane of the ECB.

 Euro area output contracted by a record 3.6 percent in the first quarter of the year and is projected to decline by a further 13 percent in the second quarter. While growth will partially rebound in the second half of this year, output is projected to return to the level prevailing at the end of 2019 only at the end of 2022.

In fact all of that is open to doubt as the first quarter numbers will be revised over time and as discussed above we do not know where we are right now. The forecasts are not realistic but manufactured to make other criteria such as the debt metrics look better than otherwise.

Also there is a real problem with the rhetoric below which is the cause of the policy change which was the Euro area economy slowing.

Thanks to the recalibration of our monetary policy measures announced in September 2019 – namely the cut in our deposit facility rate, enhanced forward guidance, the resumption of net asset purchases under the asset purchase programme (APP) and the easing of TLTRO III pricing – sizeable monetary accommodation was already in place when Europe was confronted with the COVID-19 shock.

As that was before this phase he is trying to hide the problem of having a gun from which nearly all the bullets have been fired. If we cut through the waffle what we are seeing are yet more banking subsidies.

The TLTRO programme complements our asset purchases and negative interest rate policy by ensuring the smooth transmission of the monetary policy stance through banks.

How much well here was @fwred last week.

ECB’s TLTRO-III.4 : €1308bn The Largest Longer Term Refinancing Operation ever………Banks look set to benefit, big time. All TLTRO-III will have an interest rate as low as -1% between Jun-20 and Jun-21, resulting in a gross transfer to banks of around €15bn. Most banks should qualify. Add tiering and here you are: from NIRP to a net transfer to banks!

So the banks get what they want which is interest-rate cuts to boost amongst other things their mortgage books which is going rather well in the Netherlands. Then when they overdose on negative interest-rates they are bailed out, unlike consumers and businesses. Another sign we live in a bankocracy.

Apparently the economy will win though says the judge,jury and er the defence and witness rather like in Blackadder.

An illustrative counterfactual exercise by ECB staff suggests that the TLTRO support in removing tail risk would be in the order of three percentage points of euro area real GDP growth in cumulative terms over 2020-22.

Austria

I nearly forgot to add that Austria is issuing another century bond today and yes I do mean 100 years. Even more extraordinary is that the yield looks set to be around 0.9%.

The Investing Channel

 

 

Economic growth German style has hit the buffers

Today gives us the opportunity to look at the conventional and the unconventional so let us crack on via the German statistics office.

WIESBADEN – The corona pandemic hits the German economy hard. Although the spread of the coronavirus did not have a major effect on the economic performance in January and February, the impact of the pandemic is serious for the 1st quarter of 2020. The gross domestic product (GDP) was down by 2.2% on the 4th quarter of 2019 upon price, seasonal and calendar adjustment. That was the largest decrease since the global financial and economic crisis of 2008/2009 and the second largest decrease since German unification. A larger quarter-on-quarter decline was recorded only for the 1st quarter of 2009 (-4.7%).

So we start with a similar pattern to the UK as frankly a 0.2% difference at this time does not mean a lot. Also we see that this is essentially what we might call an Ides of March thing as that is when things headed south fast. However some care is needed because of this.

The recalculation for the 4th quarter of 2019 has resulted in a price-, seasonally and calendar-adjusted GDP decrease of 0.1% on the previous quarter (previous result: 0.0%).

For newer readers this brings two of my themes into play. The first is that I struggled to see how Germany came up with a 0% number at the time ( and this has implications for the Euro area GDP numbers too). If they were trying to dodge the recession definition things have rather backfired. The second is that Germany saw its economy turn down in early 2018 which is quite different to how many have presented it. Some of the news came from later downwards revisions which is obviously awkward if you only read page one, but also should bring a tinge of humility as even in more stable times we know less than we might think we do.

Switching now to the context there are various ways of looking at this and I have chosen to omit the seasonal adjustment as right now it will have failed which gives us this.

a calendar-adjusted 2.3%, on a year earlier.

No big change but it means in context that the economy of Germany has grown by 4% since 2015 or if you prefer returned to early 2017.

In terms of detail we start with a familiar pattern.

Household final consumption expenditure fell sharply in the 1st quarter of 2020. Gross fixed capital formation in machinery and equipment decreased considerably, too.

But then get something more unfamiliar when we not we are looking at Germany.

However, final consumption expenditure of general government and gross fixed capital formation in construction had a stabilising effect and prevented a larger GDP decrease.

So the German government was already spending more although yesterday brought some context into this.

GERMAN FINANCE MIN. SCHOLZ: OUR FISCAL STIMULUS MEASURES WILL BE TIMELY, TARGETED, TEMPORARY AND TRANSFORMATIVE. ( @FinancialJuice )

As he was talking about June I added this bit.

and late…….he forgot late….

Actually they have already agreed this or we were told that.

Germany has approved an initial rescue package worth over 750 billion euros to mitigate the impact of the coronavirus outbreak, with the government taking on new debt for the first time since 2013.

The first package agreed in March comprises a debt-financed supplementary budget of 156 billion euros and a stabilisation fund worth 600 billion euros for loans to struggling businesses and direct stakes in companies. ( Reuters )

Warnings

There is this about which we get very little detail.

Both exports and imports saw a strong decline on the 4th quarter of 2019.

If we switch to the trade figures it looks as though they were a drag on the numbers.

WIESBADEN – Germany exported goods to the value of 108.9 billion euros and imported goods to the value of 91.6 billion euros in March 2020. Based on provisional data, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that exports declined by 7.9% and imports by 4.5% in March 2020 year on year.

Ironically this gives us something many wanted which is a lower German trade surplus but of course not in a good way. A factor in this will be the numbers below which Google Translate has allowed me to take from the German version.

Passenger car production (including motorhomes) was compared to March 2019
by more than a third (-37%) and compared to February 2020 by more than a quarter (-27%)
around 285,000 pieces back.

The caveats I pointed out for the UK about seasonality, inflation and the (in)ability to collect many of the numbers will be at play here.

Looking Ahead

The Federal Statistics Office has been trying to innovate and has been looking at private-sector loan deals.

The preliminary low was the week after Easter (16th calendar week from April 13th to 19th) with 36.7% fewer new personal loan contracts than achieved in the previous week. Since then, the new loan agreements have ranged from around 30% to 35% below the same period in the previous year.

That provides food for thought for the ECB and Christine Lagarde to say the least.

Also in an era of dissatisfaction with conventional GDP and the rise of nowcasting we have been noting this.

KÖLN/WIESBADEN – The Federal Office for Goods Transport (BAG) and the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) report that the mileage covered by trucks with four or more axles, which are subject to toll charges, on German motorways decreased a seasonally adjusted 10.9% in April 2020 compared with March 2020. This was an even stronger decline on the previous month than in March 2020, when a decrease of -5.8% on February 2020 had been recorded, until then the largest month-on-month decline since truck toll was introduced in 2005.

That is quite a drop and leaves us expecting a 10%+ drop for GDP in Germany this quarter especially as we note that many service industries have been hit even harder.

Comment

I promised you something unconventional so let me start with this.

Covid-19 has uncovered weaknesses in France’s pharmaceutical sector. With 80 percent of medicines manufactured in Asia, France remains highly dependent on China and India. Entrepreneurs are now determined to bring France’s laboratories back to Europe. ( France24 )

I expect this to be a trend now and will be true in much of the western world. But this ball bounces around like Federer versus Nadal. Why? Well I immediately thought of Ireland which via its tax regime has ended up with a large pharmaceutical sector which others may now be noting. Regular readers will recall the times we have looked at the “pharmaceutical cliff” there when a drug has lost its patent and gone full generic so to speak. That might seem odd but remember there were issues about things like paracetamol in the UK for a bit.

That is before we get to China and the obvious issues in may things have effectively been outsourced to it. Some will be brought within national borders which for Germany will be a gain. But the idea of trade having a reversal is not good for an exporter like Germany as the ball continues to be hit. Perhaps it realises this hence the German Constitutional Court decision but that risks upsetting a world where Germany is paid to borrow and of course a new Mark would surge against any past Euro value.

 

What has happened to the UK consumer?

One of the apparent certainties of economic life is that the British consumer will take the advice of the Pools winner from many years ago and “Spend! Spend! Spend!”. This has led to another feature of our economic life because it seems to have been forgotten by many economists but before the credit crunch there were calculations that out marginal propensity to import from this was of the order of 40%. So there was a clear link to the trade deficit as well. Oh and for millennials reading this the Pools was gambling before there was a lottery, mostly in my experience by older people as for example my grandfather did but my father did not.

However last month provided a counterpoint to such certainty as the slowing in growth that we saw in the latter part of 2019 turned into something more.

In the three months to December 2019, the quantity bought in retail sales decreased by 1.0% when compared with the previous three months……..The quantity bought in December 2019 fell by 0.6% when compared with the previous month; the fifth consecutive month of no growth.

There was still some annual growth just not much of it ( 0.9%). This led to some sill headlines across the media as they used the British Retail Consortium claim that we had seen the worst year since 1995 for retail sales as click bait. That ignored the fact that its numbers are invariably much weaker than the official ones suggesting it id wedded to the bricks and mortar style retail sales which we know is troubled and not enough of the online world. Indeed there was far less reporting of this month’s effort from the BRC as the equivalent of tourists saw fewer easy pickings.

On a Total basis, sales increased by 0.4% in January, against an increase of 2.2% in January 2019. This is above both the 3-month and 12-month average declines of 0.4% and 0.2% respectively.

So weaker than last year but up and should it continue would end the decline in the averages. Actually we now know that the BRC was confused in this area as the inflation numbers did not pick this up.

We have to remember, this semi-positive performance will also be the result of aggressive discounts and consumers’ preoccupation with bagging a bargain.

Labour Market

This brings a contrasting theme as it should be supporting retail sales just as growth has faded away.

Between October to December 2018 and October to December 2019, the level of employment increased by 336,000 (or 1.0%) to a record high of 32.93 million.

There was also some real wage growth over the year just not as much as reported.

In the year to December 2019, nominal total pay (not adjusted for change in prices) grew by 2.9% to £544. Nominal regular pay grew by 3.2% to £512 over the same period. The recorded growth rates show that wage growth is decelerating.

Sadly many places fell for the real regular wages are back to the pre crisis peak spinning of our official statisticians as they cherry-picked from the very top of the tree. But even using more realistic inflation measures than the official imputed rent driven CPIH we still had some real wage growth.

Payment Protection Insurance

I have long argued this has been like a form of QE for the consumer and retail sales so this caught my eye earlier.

The bill for PPI claims in 2019 would be about £2.5bn, but Lloyds said no further provisions were needed as it had already set aside enough money.

It brings the total paid out by Lloyds over the mis-selling saga to £21.9bn. ( BBC )

Today’s Data

As suggested above we had a better month in January.

Retail volumes increased by 0.9% in January 2020, recovering from the falls in the previous two months; the increase was mainly because of moderate growth in both food stores (1.7%) and non-food stores (1.3%).

Actually if we look into the detail the underlying position is stronger and I am pleased to report that my main theme in this area was clearly in play.

Fuel saw a large fall of 5.7% in the quantity bought in January 2020 when compared with December 2019, which coincides with a rise in fuel prices of 2.3 pence per litre between December and January.

For newer readers I first wrote on the 29th of January 2015 that lower inflation boosted retail sales growth which you may note is not only true but the opposite of what central bankers keep telling us. I was involved in a debate with Danske Bank yesterday on this subject and in the end they agreed with me although that last sentence!

Higher than expected inflation makes people worse off, as it means people’s real wage growth is not as high as expected. That is why stable and predictable inflation is so important. Whether the target is 0%, 1% or 2% is less important.

Anyway returning to the data we see a corollary of my theme which is that higher prices should led to lower consumption which seems to be in play. It is probably also true that we are seeing the impact of the switch towards electric vehicles.

Perspective

The better number for January although it may not initially look like it helped the three month average.

In the three months to January 2020, both the amount spent and the quantity bought in the retail industry fell by 0.5% and 0.8% respectively when compared with the previous three months.

This is because November and December were so weak that even a better January was unlikely to fix it. The Underlying index was 108.5 in October then went 107.7 and 107.1 before now rising to 108.1. The index was set at 100 in 2016 so we see this area has seen more growth than others.

On an annual basis we have some growth just not very much of it.

When compared with a year earlier, both measures reported growth at 2.1% for the amount spent and 0.8% for the quantity bought.

Comment

Today gives an opportunity to look at how economics applies in real world events. Having just lost all readers from the Ivory Towers let me apologise to anyone who was disturbed by any screaming from them! They may have just have been able to laugh off the idea that higher inflation is bad but the next bit is too much. You see we have a favourable employment situation especially with real wage growth being added to employment growth but we are losing two factors.

The first is the impact of the PPI claim repayment money which looks as though much of it went straight to the retail sales bottom line. Next there is this from the Bank of England.

The annual growth rate of consumer credit rose to 6.1% in December, having ticked down to 5.9% in November. The growth rate for consumer credit has been close to this level since May 2019. Prior to this it had fallen steadily from an average of 10.3% in 2017.

Whilst it is still the fastest growing area of the economy I can think of my point is that growth has slowed and that seems to be affecting retail sales. A particular area must be what is going on with car sales and a few months back the Bank of England said that but since then it has decided that silence is golden on this subject. For fans of official denials there was of course this from Governor Carney back in the day.

This is not a debt fuelled expansion

 

Japan sees quite a GDP contraction in spite of the Bank of Japan buying 8% of the equity market

Overnight the agenda for today was set by news out of the land of the rising sun or Nihon. Oh and I do not mean the effort to reproduce the plot line of the film Alien ( Gaijin) for those poor passengers on that quarantined cruise ship. It was this reported by the Asahi Shimbun.

Gross domestic product declined by a seasonally adjusted 1.6 percent in the quarter from the previous three months, or an annualized 6.3 percent, the Cabinet Office figures showed.

The contraction of 6.3 percent was far worse than expectations of many private-sector economists, who predicted a shrinkage of 4 percent or so.

Just to clarify the quarterly fall was 1.6% or using the Japanese style 6.3% in annualised terms. What they do not tell us is that this means that the Japanese economy was 0.4% smaller at the end of 2019 than it was at the end of 2018. So quite a reverse on the previous trend in 2019 which was for the annual rate of growth to pock up.

The Cause

Let me take you back to October 7th last year.

After twice being postponed by the administration of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, the consumption tax on Tuesday will rise to 10 percent from 8 percent, with the government maintaining that the increased burden on consumers is essential to boost social welfare programs and reduce the swelling national debt. ( The Japan Times )

I pointed out back then that I feared what the impact of this would be.

This is an odd move when we note the current malaise in the world economy which just gets worse as we note the fact that the Pacific region in particular is suffering. We looked at one facet of this last week as Australia cut interest-rates for the third time since the beginning of the summer.

As you can see this was a risky move and it came with something of an official denial of the economic impact.

 about a quarter of the ¥8 trillion cost of the 2014 hike, according to the government and the Bank of Japan.

The 2014 rise in the Consumption Tax ( in rough terms the equivalent of VAT in the UK and Europe) had hit the Japanese economy hard, so the official claim of that the new impact would be a quarter was something I doubted. Now let us return to the Asahi Shimbun this morning.

Japan’s economy shrank in the October-December period for the first time in five quarters, as the sales tax hike and natural disasters pummeled personal consumption, according to preliminary figures released on Feb. 17.

The exact numbers are below.

Personal consumption, which accounts for more than half of Japan’s GDP, grew by 0.5 percent in the July-September period.

But the figure plunged to minus 2.9 percent for the three months from October, when the government raised the consumption tax rate to 10 percent from 8 percent.

We had previously looked at the boost to consumption before the tax rise as electrical appliances in particular were purchased. This will have flattered the economic data for the third quarter of last year and raised the GDP growth rate. But as you can see the party has had quite a hangover. On its own this would have led to a 2.2% decline in quarterly GDP.

The spinning has continued apace.

Yasutoshi Nishimura, minister in charge of economic revitalization, gave a positive outlook for personal consumption in a statement released on Feb. 17.

“The margin of decline in personal consumption is likely to shrink,” he said.

As John Lennon points out in the song Getting Better.

It can’t get no worse

As ever there is a familiar scapegoat which is the weather.

Destructive typhoons that hit eastern Japan and the warmer winter also fueled the slowdown in personal spending, such as purchases of winter clothes.

Although as @Priapus has pointed out there was an impact on the Rugby World Cup and the Japanese Grand Prix.

Investment and Exports

These will be on people’s minds as we try to look forwards. According to the Asahi Shimbun the situation for investment is also poor.

Investment in equipment by businesses, for example, shrank by 3.7 percent, a sharp decline from a rise of 0.5 percent in the preceding quarter, while housing investment tumbled 3.7 percent from an increase of 1.2 percent.

New housing starts have also been waning since the tax hike.

Many companies’ business performances are deteriorating, particularly in the manufacturing sector.

The business investment fall was presumably in response to the trade war and the deteriorating conditions in the Pacific economy we looked at in the latter part of 2019 and of course predates the Corona Virus. By contrast the Bank of Japan like all central banks will be more concerned about the housing market.

Switching to trade itself the position appears brighter.

In contrast, external demand pushed up GDP by 0.5 percentage point.

But in fact this was due to imports falling by 2.6% so a negative and exports fell too albeit by a mere 0.1%. That pattern was repeated for the annual comparison as exports were 2.2% lower than a year before and imports 4.3% lower. It is one of the quirks of the way GDP is calculated that a fall in imports larger than a fall in exports boosts GDP in this instance by 0.4%. Thus the annual comparison would have been -0.8% without it.

Comment

Sometimes the numbers are eloquent in themselves. If we look at the pattern for private consumption in Japan we see that it fell from 306.2 trillion Yen to 291.6 trillion in the first half of 2014 as the first tax rise hit. Well on the same seasonally adjusted basis and 2011 basis it was 294 trillion Yen in the last quarter of 2019. If we allow for the fact that 2014 saw a tax based boost then decline then consumption in 2019 had barely exceeded what it was before the first tax rise before being knocked on the head again. Or if you prefer it has been groundhog day for consumption in Japan since 2013. That is awkward on two counts. Firstly the Japanese trade surplus was one of the economic world’s imbalances pre credit crunch and expanding consumption so that it imported more was the positive way out of it. Instead we are doing the reverse. Also one of the “lost decade” issues for Japan was weak consumption growth which has just got weaker.

This leaves the Japanese establishment in quite a pickle. The government has already announced one stimulus programme and is suggesting it may begin another. The catch is that you are then throwing away the gains to the fiscal position from the Consumption Tax rise. This poses a challenge to the whole Abenomics programme which intended to improve the fiscal position by fiscal stimulus leading to economic growth. I am sure you have spotted the problem here.

Next comes the Bank of Japan which may want to respond but how? For newer readers it has already introduced negative interest-rates ( -0.1%) and bought Japanese Government Bonds like it is a powered up Pac-Man to quote the Kaiser Chiefs, But the extent of its monetary expansionism is best highlighted by this from Etf Stream earlier.

According to the BoJ funds flow report for Q3 2019, the bank now owns some 8% of the entire Japanese equity market, mostly through the current ETF-buying programme.

Hence the nickname of The Tokyo Whale.They think the rate of buying has slowed but I think that’s an illusion because it buys on down days and as The Donald so regularly tweets equity markets are rallying. Just this morning the German Dax index has hit another all-time high. But what do they do next? They cannot buy that many more ETFs because they have bought so many already. As you can see they are already a material player in the equity market and they run the Japanese Government Bond market as that is what Yield Curve Control means. Ironically the latter has seen higher yields at times in an example of how water could run uphill rather than down if the Bank of Japan was in charge of it. It will be wondering how the Japanese Yen has pretty much ignored today’s news.

Also as a final point. More and more countries are finding it hard to raise taxes aren’t they?

Podcast

 

 

 

Since the first quarter of 2018 the GDP of Germany has grown by a mere 1%

This morning has brought what has become pretty much a set piece event as we finally got the full report on economic growth in Germany in 2019.

WIESBADEN – The gross domestic product (GDP) did not continue to rise in the fourth quarter of 2019 compared with the third quarter of 2019 after adjustment for price, seasonal and calendar variations.

Regular readers of my work will have been expecting that although it did create a small stir in itself. This is because many mainstream economists had forecast 0.1% meaning that they had declare the number was below expectations, when only the highest Ivory Tower could have missed what was happening. After all it was only last Friday we looked at the weak production and manufacturing data for December.

Annual Problems

One quarterly GDP number may not tell us much but the present German problem is highlighted if we look back as well.

In a year-on-year comparison, economic growth decelerated towards the end of the year. In the fourth quarter of 2019, the price adjusted GDP rose by 0.3% on the fourth quarter of 2018 (calendar-adjusted: +0.4%). A higher year-on-year increase of 1.1% had been recorded in the third quarter of 2019 (calendar-adjusted: +0.6%).

As you can see the year on year GDP growth rate has fallen to 0.4%. The preceding number had been flattered by the fall in the same period in 2018. Indeed if we look at the pattern for the year we see that even some good news via an upwards revision left us with a weak number.

After a dynamic start in the first quarter (+0.5%) and a decline in the second quarter (-0.2%) there had been a slight recovery in the third quarter of the year (+0.2%). According to the latest calculations based on new statistical information, that recovery was 0.1 percentage points stronger than had been communicated in November 2019.

If we switch to the half year we see growth was only 0.2% which is how the running level of year on year growth is below the average for the year as a whole.

The Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that the resulting GDP growth was 0.6% for the year 2019 (both price and seasonally adjusted).

Analysing the latest quarter

Trade

We can open with something that fits neatly with the trade war theme, and the emphasis is mine.

The development of foreign trade slowed down the economic activity in the fourth quarter. According to provisional calculations, exports were slightly down on the third quarter after price, seasonal and calendar adjustment, while imports of goods and services increased.

There is something of an irony here. This is because the German trade surplus was one of the imbalances in the world economy in the run-up to the credit crunch. So more imports by Germany have been called for which would also help the Euro area economy. Actually if we look back to last week’s trade release this may have been in play for a while now.

Based on provisional data, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that exports were up 0.8% from 2018. Imports rose by 1.4%. In 2018, exports increased by 3.0% and imports by 5.6% compared with the previous year. In 2017, exports were 6.2% and imports 8.0% higher than a year earlier.

Those numbers also show a clear trade growth deceleration and for those who like an idea of scale.

in 2019, Germany exported goods to the value of 1,327.6 billion euros and imported goods to the value of 1,104.1 billion euros.

Domestic Demand

There was something extra in the report which leapt off the page a bit.

 After a very strong third quarter, the final consumption expenditure of both households and government slowed down markedly.

That will change the pattern for the German economy if it should persist and it somewhat contradicts the rhetoric of ECB President Lagarde from earlier this week.

support the resilience of the domestic economy

I did point out at the time that the use of resilience by central bankers is worrying. This is because their meaning of the word frequently turns out to be the opposite of that which can be found in a dictionary.

If we switch to investment then they seem to be adopting the British model of prioritising housing.

Trends diverged for fixed capital formation. While gross fixed capital formation in machinery and equipment was down considerably compared to the third quarter, fixed capital formation in construction and other fixed assets continued to increase.

Ch-Ch-Changes

Yesterday the European Commission released its winter forecasts for the German economy. So let us go back a year and see what they forecast for this one.

Overall, real GDP growth is expected to strengthen to 2.3% in 2018 and remain above 2% in 2019.

In fact the message was let’s party.

Economic sentiment continues to improve across sectors, suggesting continued expansion in the coming quarters. Survey data show expectations of improving orders, higher output and greater demand.

Whereas in fact the punch bowl disappeared as growth faded from view.

Yesterday they told us this.

Overall, real GDP growth is forecast to rebound
somewhat to 1.1% in 2020, helped by a strong
calendar effect (0.4 pps.).

That is pretty optimistic in the circumstances perhaps driven by this, where they disagree with what the German statistics office told us earlier today.

Resilient domestic demand supported growth.
Private consumption increased robustly amid
record high employment and strong wage growth.

All rather Lennon-McCartney

Yesterday,
All my troubles seemed so far away,
Now it looks as though they’re here to stay
Oh I believe in yesterday.

Comment

From the detailed numbers one can get a small positive spin as GDP increased by 0.03% in the final quarter of 2019. But the catch is that in doing so you note that the 107.19 of the index is below the 107.21 of the first quarter. Care is needed because we are pinpointing below the margin of error but if we look further back we see that the index was 106.18 at the end of the first quarter of 2018.

There are three main perspectives from that of which the obvious is that growth since then has been only very marginally above 1%. So the European Commission forecasts were simply up in the clouds. But we have another problem which is that looking forwards from then the Markit business surveys ( PMIs) were predicting “Boom! Boom! Boom!” in the high 50s as the economy turned down. They later picked up the trend but missed the turning point. Or if you prefer looked backwards rather than forwards at the most crucial time.

Now we await the impact of the Corona Virus in this quarter. Let me leave you with one more issue which is productivity because if yearly output is only rising by 0.4% then we get a broad brush guide by comparing with this.

The economic performance in the fourth quarter of 2019 was achieved by 45.5 million persons in employment, which was an increase of roughly 300,000, or 0.7%, on a year earlier.

The Investing Channel

Germany escapes recession for now but what happens next?

This morning has brought the economics equivalent of a cliffhanger as we waiting to see if Germany was now in recession or had dodged it. The numbers were always going to be tight. so without further ado let me hand you over to Destatis.

WIESBADEN – In the third quarter of 2019, the price-adjusted gross domestic product in Germany increased by 0.1% on the second quarter of 2019, after adjustment for seasonal and calendar variations.

So Germany has avoided what has become called the technical definition of recession which is two quarters of contraction in a row. However there was a catch.

According to the most recent calculations, taking into account newly available statistical information, the GDP was down 0.2% in the second quarter of 2019, which is 0.1 percentage points more than first published.

So like the UK the German economy shrank by 0.2% in the second quarter which means that over the half-year the economy was 0.1% smaller. Putting it another way the economy was at 107.20 at the end of the first quarter and at 107.03 at the end of the third quarter.

Just to add to the statistical party the first quarter saw growth revised higher to 0.5% so we have a pattern similar to the UK just weaker. As to the detail for the latest quarter we are told this.

positive contributions in the third quarter of 2019 mainly came from consumption, according to provisional calculations. Compared with the second quarter of 2019, household final consumption expenditure increased, and so did government final consumption expenditure. Exports rose, while imports remained roughly at the level of the previous quarter. Also, gross fixed capital formation in construction was up on the previous quarter. Gross fixed capital formation in machinery and equipment, however, was lower than in the previous quarter.

As you can see it was consumption which did the job which was presumably driven by the employment figures which remain strong.

Compared with September 2018, the number of persons in employment increased by 0.7% (+327,000). The year-on-year change rate had been 1.2% in December 2018, 1.1% in January 2019 and 0.8% in August 2019.

So rising employment albeit at a slowing rate and with it looks as though there has been solid real wage growth too.

 In calendar adjusted terms, the costs of gross earnings in the second quarter of 2019 rose by 3.2% year on year,

At that point inflation had slowed to 1.5% so as far as we know there has been both employment and real wage growth. So we might have expected consumption growth to be higher than it has been.

We are in awkward territory with the mention of exports because they do not count in the output version of GDP as they are sales hence they go in the expenditure version. So we look at production for overseas sales which is problematic as shown below.

Based on provisional data, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that German exports increased by 4.6% and imports by 2.3% in September 2019 year on year. After calendar and seasonal adjustment, exports were up 1.5% and imports 1.3% compared with August 2019.

But whilst that is good GDP counts this.

In September 2019, production in industry was down by 0.6% on the previous month and -4.3% on the same month a year earlier (price and calendar adjusted)

Now production is not the only source for exports as services are not in it but services will have had to had been booming so we need more information I think.

Statistical Humility

The analysis of GDP numbers to 0.1% is something I have warned about before. Let me illustrate with this from Sweden Statistics earlier.

Statistics Sweden is publishing revised statistics on the Labour Force Surveys (LFS) for the period July 2018 to September 2019, in which only half of the sample is used, due to an earlier identification of quality deficiencies……..this increases the uncertainty, particularly at a more disaggregated level.

You can say that again! Or to put it another way the unemployment rate of 7.4% in September is now reported as 6.6%. Now we all make mistakes and honesty is the best policy but an error of this size begs so many questions. It reminds me of the mistake made in Japan over the measurement of real wages which was in the same direction although of course had the opposite implication for the economy.

Whilst neither example was about GDP the same principles hold and in the case of Sweden I think the mistake is worse because unemployment is a much simpler concept.

Looking Ahead

This could not have been much more negative.

Business confidence across the German private sector
has slipped to the lowest since the global financial crisis,
according to the latest IHS Markit Global Business
Outlook survey. Output of goods and services is on
average expected to fall slightly over the next 12 months,
while firms have signalled their intention to cut
workforce numbers for the first time in ten years.
Concerns about future profits are meanwhile reflected
in a negative outlook for capital spending (capex).

Now Markit have not had a good run on Germany as they have signalled growth when there has not been any so I am not sure where this takes us? Where there might be some traction is in this bit as we have noted already that employment growth is slowing.

now these latest figures point to private sector workforce numbers actually falling over the coming year.

As to other areas the example is mixed. For now the news seems bad and you will have probably guessed the area.

“By the end of 2022, Mercedes-Benz Cars plans to save more than 1 billion euros in personnel costs. To this end, jobs are to be reduced,” the company said in a statement.

“The expanded range of plug-in hybrids and all-electric vehicles is leading to cost increases that will have a negative impact on Mercedes-Benz Cars’ return on sales,” it added. ( thelocal.de )

Looking further ahead there is potentially some better news on the horizon.

Tesla’s chief executive, Elon Musk, has said Berlin will be the site of its first major European factory as the carmaker’s expansion plans power ahead.

“Berlin rocks,” Mr Musk said, adding Tesla would build an engineering and design centre in the German capital.

Tesla previously said it aimed to start production in Europe in 2021.

The moves come as the firm, which has also invested heavily in a Chinese factory, faces intensifying competition in the electric vehicle industry.

Comment

Let me start with this just released by the Financial Times.

Learning to love negative interest rates……..As evidence accumulates the naysayers case becomes less convincing.

So Germany should be booming right? After all it not only has an official deposit rate of -0.5% but it also has a benchmark bond yield of -0.3%. Yet the economy had a burst of growth and has now pretty much stagnated for a year. So actually it is the case for negative interest-rates which has got weaker. No doubt more of the same “medicine” will be prescribed.

We find ourselves observing what has become a two-speed economy where the services sector is struggling to make up for the declines in the manufacturing sector or if you like they are turning British. There are deeper questions here as for example how much manufacturing will remain in the West?

Also the money supply situation which has been helpful so far in 2019 may be turning lower for the Euro area as a whole.

Annual growth rate of narrower monetary aggregate M1, comprising currency in circulation and overnight deposits, decreased to 7.9% in September from 8.5% in August.

So for now there is not much sign of a turn for the better and if we stick to annual GDP growth as our measure that will be focused on the first quarter next year as there is a 0.5% reading to be replaced.  Germany must have its fingers crossed for the end of the trade war.

The Investing Channel

 

 

What just happened to the GDP and economy of France?

Sometimes reality catches up with you quite quickly so this morning Mario Draghi may not want a copy of any French newspapers on holiday. This is because on the way to one of the shorter and maybe shortest policy meeting press conferences we were told this.

The latest economic indicators and survey results have stabilised and continue to point to ongoing solid and broad-based economic growth, in line with the June 2018 Eurosystem staff macroeconomic projections for the euro area.

As you can see below Mario did drift away from this at one point but then returned to it in the next sentence.

Some sluggishness in the first quarter is continuing in the second quarter. But I would say almost all indicators have now stabilised at levels that are above historical averages.

Then we got what in these times was perhaps the most bullish perspective of all.

Now, one positive development is the nominal wage performance where, you remember, we’ve seen a pickup in nominal wage growth across the eurozone. Until recently this pickup was mostly produced by wage drift, while now we are seeing that there is a component, which is the negotiated wage component, which is now – right now the main driver of the growth in nominal wages.

Most countries have a sustained pick up in wage growth as a sort of economic Holy Grail right now. So we were presented with a bright picture overall and as I pointed out yesterday Mario is the master of these events as he was even able to make a mistake about economic reforms by saying there had been some, realise he had just contradicted what is his core message and engage reverse  gear apparently unnoticed by the press corps.

France

This morning brought us to the economic growth news from France which we might have been expecting to be solid and broad-based and this is what we got.

In Q2 2018, GDP in volume terms* rose at the same pace as in Q1: +0.2%

Now that is not really solid especially if we recall it is supposed to be above historical averages so let us also investigate if it is broad-based?

Household consumption expenditure faltered slightly in Q1 2018 (−0.1% after +0.2%): consumption of goods declined again (−0.3% after −0.1%) and that of services slowed down sharply (+0.1% after +0.4%).

The latter slowdown is concerning as we note that estimates put the services sector at just under 79% of the French economy. We also might expect better consumption data as whilst it may be a bit early for Mario’s wages growth claims to be at play household disposable income rose by 2.7% in 2017. However such metrics seem to have dropped a fair bit so far this year as household purchasing power was estimated to have fallen by 0.6% in the opening quarter of this year. So if anything is broad-based here it is the warning about a slowdown we got a few months ago and not the newer more upbeat version.

Trade

This was a drag on growth but not in the way you might expect. The easy view would be that French car exports would have been affected by the trade wars developments. But whilst there nay be elements of that it was not exports which were the problem.

Imports recovered sharply in Q2 2018 (+1.7% after −0.3%) after the decrease observed in Q1. Exports also bounced back but to a lesser extent (+0.6% after −0.4%). All in all, foreign trade balance contributed negatively to GDP growth: −0.3 points after a neutral contribution in the previous quarter.

That is a bit like the UK in the first quarter and we await developments as even quarterly trade figures can be unreliable.

Production

Production in goods and services barely accelerated in Q2 2018 (+0.2% after +0.1%)………….Output in manufactured goods fell back again (−0.2% after −1.0%). Production in refinery stepped back (−9.9% after −1.6%) due to technical maintenance; production in electricity and gas dropped too (−1.7% after +1.9%). However, construction bounced back (+0.6% after −0.3%).

As you can see there is not a lot to cheer here as construction may just be correcting the weather effect in the first quarter. There was better news from investment though.

In Q2 2018, total GFCF recovered sharply (+0.7% after +0.1% in Q1 2018), especially because of the upsurge in corporate investment (+1.1% after +0.1%). It was mainly due to the upswing in manufactured goods (+1.2% after −1.1%)

As there was not much of a sign of a manufacturing upswing lets us hope that the optimism ends up being fulfilled as other wise we seem set to see more of this.

Conversely, changes in inventories drove GDP on (+0.3 points after 0.0 points).

The Outlook

We of course are now keen to know how the third quarter has started and what we can expect next? From the official survey published on Tuesday.

The balances of industrialists’ opinion on overall and
foreign demand in the last three months have dropped
again sharply in July – they had reached at the beginning of the year their highest level in seven years, before dropping back in the April survey. Business managers are also less optimistic about overall and foreign demand over the next three months;

If we look at the survey index level the number remains positive overall but the direction of travel is south, not as bad as the credit crunch impact but more like how the Euro area crisis impacted which is odd. Let us now switch to the services sector.

According to business managers surveyed in July
2018, the business climate remains stable in services.
The composite indicator which measures it has stood at
104 since May 2018, above its long-term average
(100).

Is stable the new contraction? Perhaps if we allow for the rail strikes in the second quarter but the direction of travel has again been south. If we step back and look at the overall survey which has a long record we see that it recorded a pick up early in 2013 which had some ebbs and flows but the trend was higher and now we are seeing the first turn and indeed sustained fall.

I cannot find anything from the Markit PMI business surveys on this today as presumably they are mulling how they seem now to be a lagging indicator as opposed to a leading one.

Comment

The rhetoric of only yesterday has faded quite a bit as we mull these numbers from France. It is the second biggest economy in the Euro area and the story that if we use a rowing metaphor it caught a crab at the beginning of the year now seems untrue. It may even have under performed the UK which is supposed to be on a troubled trajectory of its own. Under the new structure we do not have the official numbers for June in the UK. The surveys quoted above do not seem especially optimistic apart from the Markit ones which of course have been through this phase.

A more optimistic view comes from the monetary data which as I analysed on Wednesday has stopped getting worse and strengthened in terms of broad money and credit. Let me give a nod to the masterful way Mario Draghi presented the narrow money numbers.

The narrow monetary aggregate M1 remained the main contributor to broad money growth. ( It fell…)

So the outlook should be a little better and the year on course for the 1.3% suggested by the average number calculated today. But 0.7%,0.7% to 0.2%,0.2% is quite a lurch.

In other news let me congratulate France on being the football World Cup winners. Frankly they have quite a team there. But in the language world cup there is only one winner as Mario Draghi went to some pains to point out yesterday.

Let me clear: the only version that conveys the policy message is the English version. We conduct our Governing Council in English and agree on an English text, so that’s what we have to look at.

Or as someone amusingly replied to me Irish……