Can US house prices bounce?

The US housing market is seeing two tsunami style forces at once but in opposite directions. The first is the economic impact of the Covid-19 virus pandemic on both wages (down) and unemployment (up). Unfortunately the official statistics released only last week are outright misleading as you can see below.

Real average hourly earnings increased 6.5 percent, seasonally adjusted, from May 2019 to May 2020.
The change in real average hourly earnings combined with an increase of 0.9 percent in the average
workweek resulted in 7.4-percent increase in real average weekly earnings over this period.

We got a better idea to the unemployment state of play on Thursday as we note the scale of the issue.

The advance unadjusted number for persons claiming UI benefits in state programs totaled 18,919,804, a decrease of 178,671 (or -0.9 percent) from the preceding week.

The only hopeful bit is the small decline. Anyway let us advance with our own view is that we will be seeing much higher unemployment in 2020 although hopefully falling and falling real wages.

The Policy Response

The other tsunami is the policy response to the pandemic.

FISCAL STIMULUS (FEDERAL) – The U.S. House of Representatives passed a $2.2 trillion aid package – the largest in history – on March 27 including a $500 billion fund to help hard-hit industries and a comparable amount for direct payments of up to $3,000 to millions of U.S. families.

That was the Reuters summary of the policy response which has been added to in the meantime. In essence it is a response to the job losses and an attempt to resist the fall in wages.

Next comes the US Federal Reserve which has charged in like the US Cavalry. Here are their words from the report made to Congress last week.

Specifically, at two meetings in March, the FOMC lowered the target range for the federal funds rate by a total of 1-1/2 percentage points, bringing it to the current range of 0 to 1/4 percent.

That meant that they have now in this area at least nearly fulfilled the wishes of President Trump. They also pumped up their balance sheet.

The Federal Reserve swiftly took a series of policy actions to address these developments. The FOMC announced it would purchase Treasury securities and agency MBS in the amounts needed to ensure smooth market functioning and the effective transmission of monetary policy to broader financial conditions. The Open Market Desk began offering large-scale overnight and term repurchase agreement operations. The Federal Reserve coordinated with other central banks to enhance the provision of liquidity via the standing U.S. dollar liquidity swap line arrangements and announced the establishment of temporary U.S. dollar liquidity arrangements (swap lines) with additional central banks.

Their explanation is below.

 Market functioning deteriorated in many markets in late February and much of March, including the critical Treasury and agency MBS markets.

Let me use my updated version of my financial lexicon for these times. Market function deteriorated means prices fell and yields rose and this happening in the area of government and mortgage borrowing made them panic buy in response.

Mortgage Rates

It seems hard to believe now but the US ten-year opened the year at 1.9%, Whereas now after the recent fall driven by the words of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell it is 0.68%. Quite a move and it means that it has been another good year for bond market investors. The thirty-year yield is 1.41% as we note that there has been a large downwards push as we now look at mortgage rates.

Let me hand you over to CNBC from Thursday.

Mortgage rates set new record low, falling below 3%

How many times have I ended up reporting record lows for mortgage rates? Anyway we did get some more detail.

The average rate on the popular 30-year fixed mortgage hit 2.97% Thursday, according to Mortgage News Daily……..For top-tier borrowers, some lenders were quoting as low as 2.75%. Lower-tier borrowers would see higher rates.

Mortgage Amounts

CNBC noted some action here too.

Low rates have fueled a sharp and fast recovery in the housing market, especially for homebuilders. Mortgage applications to purchase a home were up 13% annually last week, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association.

According to Realtor.com the party is just getting started although I have helped out with a little emphasis.

Meanwhile, buyers who still have jobs have been descending on the market en masse, enticed by record-low mortgage interest rates. Rates fell below 3%, to hit an all-time low of 2.94% for 30-year fixed-rate loans on Thursday, according to Mortgage News Daily.

Mortgage demand is back on the rise according to them.

For the past three weeks, the number of buyers applying for purchase mortgages rose year over year, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association. Applications shot up 12.7% annually in the week ending June 5. They were also up 15% from the previous week.

Call me suspicious but I thought it best to check the supply figures as well.

Mortgage credit availability decreased in May according to the Mortgage Credit Availability Index (MCAI)………..The MCAI fell by 3.1 percent to 129.3 in May. A decline in the MCAI indicates that lending standards are tightening, while increases in the index are indicative of loosening credit.

So a decline but still a lot higher than when it was set at 100 in 2012. The recent peak at the end of last year was of the order of 185 and was plainly singing along to the Outhere Brothers.

Boom boom boom let me here you say way-ooh (way-ooh)
Me say boom boom boom now everybody say way-ooh (way-ooh)

What about prices?

As the summer home-buying season gets underway, median home prices are surging. They shot up 4.3% year over year as the number of homes for sale continued to dry up in the week ending June 6, according to a recent realtor.com® report. That’s correct: Prices are going up despite this week’s announcement that the U.S. officially entered a recession in February.

Comment

As Todd Terry sang.

Something’s goin’ on in your soul

The housing market is seeing some surprises although I counsel caution. As I read the pieces about I note that a 4.3% rise is described as “shot up” whereas this gives a better perspective.

While that’s below the typical 5% to 6% annual price appreciation this time of year, it’s nearly back to what it was before the coronavirus pandemic. Median prices were rising 4.5% in the first two weeks of March before the COVID-19 lockdowns began. Nationally, the median home list price was $330,000 in May, according to the most recent realtor.com data.

But as @mikealfred reports there is demand out there.

Did someone forget to tell residential real estate buyers about the recession? I’m helping my in-laws buy a house in Las Vegas right now. Nearly every house in their price range coming to market sees 40+ showings and 5+ offers in the first few days. Crazy demand.

Of course there is the issue as to at what price?

So there we have it. The Federal Reserve will be happy as it has created a demand to buy property. The catch is that it is like crack and if they are to keep house prices rising they will have to intervene on an ever larger scale. For the moment their policy is also being flattered by house supply being low and I doubt that will last. To me this house price rally feels like trying to levitate over the edge of a cliff.

Podcast

 

 

 

UK monthly GDP is a poor guide to where the economy stands

Today has opened with the media having a bit of a party over the economic news from the UK and they have been in such a rush they have ignored points one and two and dashed to point 3.

Monthly gross domestic product (GDP) fell by 20.4% in April 2020, the biggest monthly fall since the series began in 1997. ( Office for National Statistics)

Actually our official statisticians seem to have got themselves in a spin here which is highlighted by this bit.

Record falls were also seen across all sectors:

    • services – largest monthly fall since series began in 1997
    • production – largest monthly fall since series began in 1968
    • manufacturing – largest monthly fall since series began in 1968
    • construction – largest monthly fall since series began in 2010

As you can see they have jumped into a quagmire as suddenly we have numbers back to 1968 rather than 1997! What they originally meant was the largest number since we began monthly GDP about 18 months ago. The rest is back calculated which did not go that well when they tried it with inflation. Oh and let me put you at rest if you are worried we did not measure construction before 2010 as we did. Actually we probably measured it better than we do now as frankly the new system has been rather poor as regular readers will be aware.

Now I can post my usual warning that the monthly GDP series in the UK has been very unreliable and at times misleading even in more normal scenarios. Or as it is put officially.

The monthly growth rate for GDP is volatile. It should therefore be used with caution and alongside other measures, such as the three-month growth rate, when looking for an indicator of the longer-term trend of the economy.

So let us move on noting that the reality with data in both March and April hard to collect due to the virus pandemic is more like -15% to -25%. The 0.4% in the headline is beyond even spurious accuracy and let me remind you that I have consistently argued that the production of monthly GDP is a mistake.

Mind you it did produce quite an eye-catching chart.

Context

As we switch to a more normal quarterly perspective we are told this.

>GDP fell by 10.4% in the three months to April, as government restrictions on movement dramatically reduced economic activity

This in itself was something of a story of two halves as we went from weakness to a plunge as restrictions on movement began on the 23rd of March. There is also something of a curiosity in the detail.

The services sector fell by 9.9%, production by 9.5% and construction by 18.2%.

The one sector that did carry on to some extent in my area was construction as work on the Royal School of Art and the Curzon cinema in the King’s Road in Chelsea continued. So let us delve deeper.

Services

If we look at the lockdown effect we can see that it crippled some industries.

The dominant negative driver to monthly growth, wholesale and retail trade and repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles, contributed negative 3.5 percentage points, though falls were large and widespread throughout the services industries; notable falls occurred in air transport, which fell 92.8%, and travel and tourism, which fell 89.2%.

The annual comparison is below.

Services output decreased by 9.1% between the three months to April 2019 and the three months to April 2020, the largest contraction in three months compared with the same three months of the previous year since records began in January 1997.

Actually we get very little extra data here.

Wholesale and retail trade and repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles was the main driver of three-monthly growth, contributing negative 1.95 percentage points.

This brings me to a theme I have been pursuing for some years now. That is the fact that our knowledge about the area which represents some four-fifths of our economy is basic and limited. I did make this point to the official review led by Sir Charles Bean. But all that seems to have done is boosted his already very large retirement income, based on his RPI linked pension from the Bank of England.

Production

We follow manufacturing production carefully and it is one area where the numbers should be pretty accurate as you either produce a car or not for example.

The monthly decrease of 24.3% in manufacturing output was led by transport equipment, which fell by a record 50.2%, with motor vehicles, trailers and semi-trailers falling by a record 90.3%; of the 13 subsectors, 12 displayed downward contributions.

The annual comparison is grim especially when we note that there were already problems for manufacturing due to the ongoing trade war.

For the three months to April 2020, production output decreased by 11.9%, compared with the three months to April 2019; this was led by a fall in manufacturing of 14.0% where 12 of the 13 subsectors displayed downward contributions.

Construction

According to the official series my local experience is not a good guide.

Construction output fell by 40.1% in the month-on-month all work series in April 2020; this was driven by a 41.2% decrease in new work and a 38.1% decrease in repair and maintenance; all of these decreases were the largest monthly falls on record since the monthly records began in January 2010.

This gives us an even more dramatic chart so for those who like that sort of thing here it is.

The problem is that this series has been especially troubled as we have noted over the years. For newer readers they tried to fix it bu switching a large business from services to construction but that mostly only raised questions about how they define the difference? There was also trouble with the measure of inflation.

Anyway here is a different perspective.

Construction output fell by record 18.2% in the three months to April 2020, compared with the previous three-month period; this was driven by a 19.4% fall in new work and a 15.8% fall in repair and maintenance.

Comment

As we break down the numbers we find that they are a lot more uncertain than the headlines proclaiming a 20.4% decline or if you prefer a £30 billion fall suggest. Let me add another factor which is the inflation measure or deflator which will not only be wrong but very wrong too. The issue of using annual fixed weights to calculate an impact will be wrong and in the case of say air transport for example it would be hard for it to be more wrong in April. On the other side of the coin production of hand sanitiser and face masks would be travelling in the opposite direction.

We can switch to trying to look ahead with measures like this.

There was an average of 319 daily ship visits during the period 1 June to 7 June 2020, a slight fall compared with the previous week.

The nadir for this series was 215 on the 13th of April so we have picked up but are still below the previous 400+. . There was also a pick-up using VAT returns in May but again well below what we had come to regard as normal.

 There has been a small increase in the number of new VAT reporters between April 2020 and May 2020 from 15,250 to 16,460.

But I think the Office for National Statistics deserves credit for looking to innovate and for trying new methods here.

Meanwhile I think the Bank of England may be trying some pre weekend humour.

 

The Lebanon poses a problem for central banks and the belief they cannot fail

There is a lot going on in the Lebanon to say the least so let me open by offering my sympathy to those suffering there. My beat is economics where there is an enormous amount happening too and it links into the role of the new overlords of our time which is,of course, the central banking fraternity. They have intervened on an enormous scale and we are regularly told nothing can go wrong rather like in the way that The Titanic was supposed to be indestructible. If you like me watched Thunderbirds as a child you will know that there were few worse portents than being told nothing can go wrong.

The State of Play

The central bank summed things up in its 2019 review like this.

The Lebanese economy has moved into a state of recession in 2019 with GDP growth touching the negative territory. The International Monetary Fund projected Lebanon’s real GDP to shrink by 12% in 2020, a new double-digit contraction not seen in more than 30 years. In comparison, the IMF forecasted real GDP to contract by 3.3% in the MENA region and by 3% globally in 2020. Inflation in Lebanon recorded 2.9% in 2019, and it is expected to reach 17% in 2020, according to the IMF.

As you can see we have two double-digit measures as output falls by that as we note that the ordinary person will be hurt by double-digit inflation. This poses yet another question for output gap theory. I have to confess I am a little surprised to note that the IMF has not updated the forecasts unlike the government. From the Financial Times.

The government says the economy shrank by 6.9 per cent of GDP last year and expects a further contraction this year of 13.8 per cent — a full-blown depression with an estimated 48 per cent of people already below the poverty line.

The next feature is a currency peg to the US Dollar as we return to the Banque Du Liban.

At the monetary level, the year was marked by noticeable net conversions in favor of foreign currencies, a decline in deposit inflows, a shortage of US dollars and a lack of local currency liquidity. As a result, BDL’s assets in foreign currencies witnessed a contraction of 6% to reach $37.3 billion at end December 2019.

Troubling and a signal that if you control the price via a currency peg the risk is that you have a quantity problem which is always likely to be a shortage of US Dollars.

Well I need a dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
Hey hey
And I said I need dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
And if I share with you my story would you share your dollar with me ( Aloe Blacc)

This led to what Taylor Swift would call “trouble,trouble,trouble”

It is worth mentioning that in the last quarter of 2019, the Lebanese pound has plunged on a parallel market by nearly 50% versus an official rate of 1507.5 pounds to the dollar. The Central Bank is still maintaining the official peg in bank transactions and for critical imports such as medicine, fuel and wheat.

This leads to the sort of dual currency environment we have looked at elsewhere with Ukraine coming to mind particularly.

The present position is that the official peg is “Under Pressure” as Queen and David Bowie would say as it has been above 1500 for the whole of the last year. There was particular pressure on the 4th of May when it went to 1522. Switching to the unofficial exchange rate then Lira Rate have it at 3890/3940. I think that speaks for itself.

The official Repo rate is 10% and rise as we move away from overnight to 13.46% for three-year paper. Just as a reminder the United States has near zero interest-rates so this is another way of looking at pressure on the currency peg and invites all sorts of problems.For example the forward rate for the official Lebanese Pound will be around 10% lower for a year ahead due to the interest-rate gap. So more pressure on a rate which is from an alternative universe.

It looks like there has been some currency intervention as in the fortnight to the end of May foreign currency assets fell from 51.6 trillion Lebanese Pounds to 50.5 trillion.

Corruption

We start with the Financial Times bigging up the banking sector but even it cannot avoid the consequences of what has happened.

The banks, long the jewel in Lebanon’s economic crown, and the central bank, the Banque du Liban, are at the heart of this crisis. The banks long offered high interest rates to attract dollar deposits, especially from the far-flung Lebanese diaspora. But Riad Salameh, BdL governor since 1993, began from 2016 offering unsustainable interest returns to the banks to lend on these dollars to the government, through the central bank.

That has led to a type of economic dependency.

In sum, 70 per cent of total assets in the banking system were lent to an insolvent state. The recovery programme estimates bank losses at $83bn and “embedded losses” at the BdL at $44bn (subject to audit). Together that is well over twice the size of the shrinking economy.

One of the worst forms of corruption is where government and the banks get together. For them it is symbiotic and both have lived high on the hog but they have a parasitical relationship with the ordinary Lebanese who now find the price is inflation and an economic depression.

Bankers are protesting at government plans to force mergers and recapitalisation, through a mix of wiping out existing shareholdings; fresh capital investment for banks that wish to stay in business, especially by repatriating dividends and interest earnings; recovered illicit assets; and “haircuts” on wealthy depositors.

Or as Reuters put it.

But the banks were not responsible for the devastating waste, pillage and payroll padding in the public sector – about which this plan has little detailed to say.

Comment

We find that this sort of situation involves both war and corruption. Big business, the banks and government getting to close is another warning sign and one we see all around us. But as we review a parallel currency, an economic depression and upcoming high inflation there is also this.

The sources say the plan focuses overwhelmingly on the banks and the central bank, which together lent more than 70% of total deposits in the banking system to an insolvent state at increasingly inflated interest rates put in place by central bank governor Riad Salameh. ( Reuters)

Ordinarily we assume that a central bank cannot fold as the stereotype is of one backed by the national treasury to deal with losses. There is a nuance with the Euro area where the fact there are 19 national treasuries adds not only nuance but risk for the ECB. But in general if you control the currency you can just supply more to settle any debts.the catch is its overseas value or exchange rate as we note that Mr and Mrs Market have already voted on the Lebanese Pound. But there is more as I noted on Twitter last week.

Auditors are asking banks to take a provision of ~40% against exposure to its central bank. This has to be a first in history. ( @dan_azzi)

We have become used to that being the other way around. The next bit is rather mind boggling as we mull the moral hazard at play here.

Even funnier is that BDL is about to send a circular asking banks to take a 30% provision on their exposure to BDL.

Frankly both look too low which means for the ordinary person that there is a risk of bail ins.

Podcast

 

Economic growth German style has hit the buffers

Today gives us the opportunity to look at the conventional and the unconventional so let us crack on via the German statistics office.

WIESBADEN – The corona pandemic hits the German economy hard. Although the spread of the coronavirus did not have a major effect on the economic performance in January and February, the impact of the pandemic is serious for the 1st quarter of 2020. The gross domestic product (GDP) was down by 2.2% on the 4th quarter of 2019 upon price, seasonal and calendar adjustment. That was the largest decrease since the global financial and economic crisis of 2008/2009 and the second largest decrease since German unification. A larger quarter-on-quarter decline was recorded only for the 1st quarter of 2009 (-4.7%).

So we start with a similar pattern to the UK as frankly a 0.2% difference at this time does not mean a lot. Also we see that this is essentially what we might call an Ides of March thing as that is when things headed south fast. However some care is needed because of this.

The recalculation for the 4th quarter of 2019 has resulted in a price-, seasonally and calendar-adjusted GDP decrease of 0.1% on the previous quarter (previous result: 0.0%).

For newer readers this brings two of my themes into play. The first is that I struggled to see how Germany came up with a 0% number at the time ( and this has implications for the Euro area GDP numbers too). If they were trying to dodge the recession definition things have rather backfired. The second is that Germany saw its economy turn down in early 2018 which is quite different to how many have presented it. Some of the news came from later downwards revisions which is obviously awkward if you only read page one, but also should bring a tinge of humility as even in more stable times we know less than we might think we do.

Switching now to the context there are various ways of looking at this and I have chosen to omit the seasonal adjustment as right now it will have failed which gives us this.

a calendar-adjusted 2.3%, on a year earlier.

No big change but it means in context that the economy of Germany has grown by 4% since 2015 or if you prefer returned to early 2017.

In terms of detail we start with a familiar pattern.

Household final consumption expenditure fell sharply in the 1st quarter of 2020. Gross fixed capital formation in machinery and equipment decreased considerably, too.

But then get something more unfamiliar when we not we are looking at Germany.

However, final consumption expenditure of general government and gross fixed capital formation in construction had a stabilising effect and prevented a larger GDP decrease.

So the German government was already spending more although yesterday brought some context into this.

GERMAN FINANCE MIN. SCHOLZ: OUR FISCAL STIMULUS MEASURES WILL BE TIMELY, TARGETED, TEMPORARY AND TRANSFORMATIVE. ( @FinancialJuice )

As he was talking about June I added this bit.

and late…….he forgot late….

Actually they have already agreed this or we were told that.

Germany has approved an initial rescue package worth over 750 billion euros to mitigate the impact of the coronavirus outbreak, with the government taking on new debt for the first time since 2013.

The first package agreed in March comprises a debt-financed supplementary budget of 156 billion euros and a stabilisation fund worth 600 billion euros for loans to struggling businesses and direct stakes in companies. ( Reuters )

Warnings

There is this about which we get very little detail.

Both exports and imports saw a strong decline on the 4th quarter of 2019.

If we switch to the trade figures it looks as though they were a drag on the numbers.

WIESBADEN – Germany exported goods to the value of 108.9 billion euros and imported goods to the value of 91.6 billion euros in March 2020. Based on provisional data, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that exports declined by 7.9% and imports by 4.5% in March 2020 year on year.

Ironically this gives us something many wanted which is a lower German trade surplus but of course not in a good way. A factor in this will be the numbers below which Google Translate has allowed me to take from the German version.

Passenger car production (including motorhomes) was compared to March 2019
by more than a third (-37%) and compared to February 2020 by more than a quarter (-27%)
around 285,000 pieces back.

The caveats I pointed out for the UK about seasonality, inflation and the (in)ability to collect many of the numbers will be at play here.

Looking Ahead

The Federal Statistics Office has been trying to innovate and has been looking at private-sector loan deals.

The preliminary low was the week after Easter (16th calendar week from April 13th to 19th) with 36.7% fewer new personal loan contracts than achieved in the previous week. Since then, the new loan agreements have ranged from around 30% to 35% below the same period in the previous year.

That provides food for thought for the ECB and Christine Lagarde to say the least.

Also in an era of dissatisfaction with conventional GDP and the rise of nowcasting we have been noting this.

KÖLN/WIESBADEN – The Federal Office for Goods Transport (BAG) and the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) report that the mileage covered by trucks with four or more axles, which are subject to toll charges, on German motorways decreased a seasonally adjusted 10.9% in April 2020 compared with March 2020. This was an even stronger decline on the previous month than in March 2020, when a decrease of -5.8% on February 2020 had been recorded, until then the largest month-on-month decline since truck toll was introduced in 2005.

That is quite a drop and leaves us expecting a 10%+ drop for GDP in Germany this quarter especially as we note that many service industries have been hit even harder.

Comment

I promised you something unconventional so let me start with this.

Covid-19 has uncovered weaknesses in France’s pharmaceutical sector. With 80 percent of medicines manufactured in Asia, France remains highly dependent on China and India. Entrepreneurs are now determined to bring France’s laboratories back to Europe. ( France24 )

I expect this to be a trend now and will be true in much of the western world. But this ball bounces around like Federer versus Nadal. Why? Well I immediately thought of Ireland which via its tax regime has ended up with a large pharmaceutical sector which others may now be noting. Regular readers will recall the times we have looked at the “pharmaceutical cliff” there when a drug has lost its patent and gone full generic so to speak. That might seem odd but remember there were issues about things like paracetamol in the UK for a bit.

That is before we get to China and the obvious issues in may things have effectively been outsourced to it. Some will be brought within national borders which for Germany will be a gain. But the idea of trade having a reversal is not good for an exporter like Germany as the ball continues to be hit. Perhaps it realises this hence the German Constitutional Court decision but that risks upsetting a world where Germany is paid to borrow and of course a new Mark would surge against any past Euro value.

 

India faces hard economic times with Gold and Liquor

Early this morning we got news on a topic we have been pursuing for several years now and as has become familiar it showed quite an economic slow down.

At 27.4 in April, the seasonally adjusted IHS Markit India
Manufacturing PMI® fell from 51.8 in March. The latest reading pointed to the sharpest deterioration in business conditions across the sector since data collection began over 15 years ago.

It caught my eye also because it was the lowest of the manufacturing PMI series this morning. Although some care is needed as the decimal point is laughable and the 7 is likely to be unreliable as well. But the theme is clear I think. Of course much of this is deliberate policy.

The decline in operating conditions was partially driven by
an unprecedented contraction in output. Panellists often
attributed lower production to temporary factory closures that were triggered by restrictive measures to limit the spread of COVID-19.

So that deals with supply and here is demand.

Amid widespread business closures, demand conditions were severely hampered in April. New orders fell for the first time in two-and-a-half years and at the sharpest rate in the survey’s history, far outpacing that seen during the global financial crisis.

So there was something of a race between the two and of course external demand was heading south as well.

Total new business received little support from international markets in April, as new export orders tumbled. Following the first reduction since October 2017 during March, foreign sales fell at a quicker rate in the latest survey period. In fact, the rate of decline accelerated to the fastest since the series began over 15 years ago.

The plunges above sadly have had an inevitable impact on the labour market as well.

Deteriorating demand conditions saw manufacturers drastically cut back staff numbers in April. The reduction in employment was the quickest in the survey’s history. There was a similar trend in purchasing activity, with firms cutting input buying at a record pace.

Background and Context

We learn from noting what had already been happening in India.

Real GDP or Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at Constant (2011-12) Prices in the year 2019-20 is estimated to attain a level of ₹ 146.84 lakh crore, as against the First Revised Estimate of GDP for the year 2018-19 of ₹ 139.81 lakh crore, released on 31st January 2020. The growth in GDP during 2019-20 is estimated at 5.0 percent as compared to 6.1 percent in 2018-19. ( MOSPI )

Things had been slip-sliding away since the recent peak of 7.7% back around the opening of 2018. So without the Covid-19 pandemic we would have seen falls below 5%. In response to that the Reserve Bank of India had been cutting interest-rates. I would have in the past have typed slashed but for these times four cuts of 0.25% and one of 0.35% in 2019 do not qualify for such a description.

Before that was the Demonetisation episode of 2016 where the Indian government created a cash crunch but withdrawing 500 and 1000 Rupee notes. This was ostensibly to reduce financial crime but also created quite a bit of hardship. Later as so much of the money returned to the system it transpired that the gains were much smaller than the hardship created.

For newer readers you can find more details on these issues in my back catalogue on here.

Looking Ahead

On April 17th the Governor of the RBI tried his best to be upbeat.

 India is among the handful of countries that is projected to cling on tenuously to positive growth (at 1.9 per cent). In fact, this is the highest growth rate among the G 20 economies………For 2021, the IMF projects sizable V-shaped recoveries: close to 9 percentage points for global GDP. India is expected to post a sharp turnaround and resume its pre-COVID pre-slowdown trajectory by growing at 7.4 per cent in 2021-22.

He was of course running a risk by listening to the IMF and ignoring what the trade date was already signalling.

In the external sector, the contraction in exports in March 2020 at (-) 34.6 per cent has turned out to be much more severe than during the global financial crisis. Barring iron ore, all exporting sectors showed a decline in outbound shipments. Merchandise imports also fell by 28.7 per cent in March across the board, barring transport equipment.

On Friday the Business Standard was reporting on expectations much more in line with the trade data.

While acknowledging some downside risks from a lockdown extension in urban areas beyond 6 June, we maintain our GDP projection of 0% GDP growth for CY2020, and 0.8% for FY21,” wrote Rahul Bajoria of Barclaysin a report.

If we stay with that source then we get another hint from what caused the drop in share prices for car manufacturers today.

Shares of automobile companies declined on Monday as many firms reported nil sales in the month of April after a nationwide lockdown kept factories and showrooms shut.

At 10:11 AM, the Nifty Auto index was down 7.33 per cent as compared to 5.1 per cent decline in the Nifty50 index.

Monetary Policy

You will not be surprised to learn that the RBI acted again as the policy Repo Rate is now 4.4% and the Governor gave a summary of other actions in the speech referred to above.

 In my statement of March 27, I had indicated that together with the measures announced on March 27, the RBI’s liquidity injection was about 3.2 per cent of GDP since the February 2020 MPC meeting.

Those who follow the ECB will note he announced something rather familiar.

 it has been decided to conduct Targeted Long-Term Repo Operations (TLTRO) 2.0 at the policy repo rate for tenors up to three years for a total amount of up to ₹ 50,000 crores, to begin with, in tranches of appropriate sizes.

Oh and as we are looking at India by ECB I am referring to the central bank and not cricket.

If we switch to the money supply data we see that in the fortnight to April 10th the heat was on as M3 grew by 1.2% raising the annual rate of growth to 10.8%. But there was a counterpoint to this as there were heavy withdrawals of demand deposits with fell by 7.8% in a fortnight. We have looked before at the problems of the Indian banking sector and maybe minds were focused on this as the pandemic hit.

Gold

I am switching to this due to its importance in India and gold bugs there may be having a party as they read the Business Standard.

The sharp rise in the prices of gold —which almost doubled over the past one year —has been the only good for investors at a time when both equities and debt returns have been under pressure.

That price may be a driving factor in this.

India’s demand declined by a staggering 36 per cent during the January-March quarter, to hit the lowest quarterly figure in 11 years due to nationwide that has forced the closure of wholesale and retail showrooms.

Comment

The situation is made worse by the fact that India starts this phase as a poor country. Things are difficult to organise in such a large country as the opening of the Liquor Shops today has shown.

Long queues witnessed outside #LiquorShops in several parts of Chhattisgarh, people defy social distancing norms at many places: Officials ( Press Trust of India)

Also a problem was around before we reached the pandemic phase.

Armies of locusts swarming across continents pose a “severe risk” to India’s agriculture this year, the UN has warned, prompting the authorities to step up vigil, deploy drones to detect their movement and hold talks with Pakistan, the most likely gateway for an invasion by the insects, on ways to minimise the damage. ( Hindustan Times from March)

Now let me give you another Indian spin. The gold issue has several other impacts. No doubt the RBI is calculating the wealth effects from the price gain. However I think of it is another form of money supply as to some extent it has that function there. Also part of the gain is due to another decline in the Rupee which is at 75.6 to the US Dollar. Regular readers will recall it was a symbolic issue when it went through 70. This creates a backwash as it will make people turn to gold even more.

Let me finish with some good news which is that the much lower oil price will be welcome in energy dependent India.

Podcast

 

 

 

 

Italy faces yet more economic hardship

Italy is the country in Europe that is being most affected by the Corona Virus and according to the Football Italia website is dealing with it in Italian fashion.

In yet another change of plan, it’s reported tomorrow’s Juventus-Milan Coppa Italia semi-final will be called off due to the Corona virus outbreak.

In fact that may just be the start of it.

News agency ANSA claim the Government is considering a suspension of all sporting events in Italy for a month due to the Coronavirus outbreak, as another 27 people died over the last 24 hours.

Thus the sad human cost is being added to by disruption elsewhere which reminds us that only last week we noted that tourism represents about 13% of the Italian economy. Again sticking with recent news there cannot be much demand for Italian cars from China right now.

China has also suffered its biggest monthly drop in car sales ever, in another sign of economic pain.

New auto sales slumped by 80% year-on-year in February, the China Passenger Car Association reports. ( The Guardian )

Actually that,believe it or not is a minor improvement on what it might have been.

Astonishingly, that’s an improvement on the 92% slump recorded in the first two weeks of February. It underlines just how much economic activity has been wiped out by Beijing’s efforts to contain the coronavirus.

Backing this up was a services PMI reading of 26.5 in China and if I recall correctly even Greece only went into the low thirties.

GDP

The outlook here looks grim according to the Confederation of Italian industry.

ITALY‘S BUSINESS LOBBY CONFINDUSTRIA SEES ITALIAN GDP FALLING IN Q1, CONTRACTING MORE STRONGLY IN Q2 DUE TO CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK ( @DeltaOne )

This comes on the back of this morning’s final report on the last quarter of 2019.

In the fourth quarter of 2019, gross domestic product (GDP), expressed in chain-linked values ​​with reference year 2015, adjusted for calendar effects and seasonally adjusted, decreased by 0.3% compared to the previous quarter and increased by 0.1 % against the fourth quarter of 2018.

That is actually an improvement for the annual picture as it was previously 0% but the follow through for this year is not exactly optimistic.

The carry-over annual GDP growth for 2020 is equal to -0.2%.

That was not the only piece of bad news as the detail of the numbers is even worse than it initially appeared.

Compared to previous quarter, final consumption expenditure decreased by 0.2 per cent, gross fixed capital formation by 0.1 per cent and imports by 1.7 per cent, whereas exports increased by 0.3 per cent.

There is a small positive in exports rising in a trade war but the domestic numbers especially the fall in imports are really rather poor. If you crunch the numbers then the lower level of imports boosted GDP by 0.5% on a quarterly basis.

The long-term chart provided with the data is also rather chilling. It shows an Italian quarterly economic output which peaked at around 453 billion Euros in early 2008 which then fell to around 420 billion. So far so bad, but then it gets worse as Italy has just recorded 430.1 billion so nowhere near a recovery. All these are numbers chain-linked to 2015.

Markit Business Survey

This feels like something from a place far, far away but this is what they have reported this morning.

Italian services firms recorded a further increase in business activity during February, extending the current sequence of growth to nine months. Moreover, the expansion was the quickest since October last year, as order book volumes rose at the fastest rate for four months. Signs of improved demand led firms to take on more staff and job creation accelerated to a moderate pace.

They go further with this.

The Composite Output Index* posted 50.7 in February, up
from 50.4 in January, to signal a back-to-back expansion in
Italian private sector output. The reading signalled a modest monthly increase in business activity.

Mind you even they seem rather unsure about it all.

“Nonetheless, Italian private sector growth remains
historically subdued”

You mean a number which has been “historically subdued” is now a sort of historically subdued squared?

ECB

This is rather stuck between a rock and a hard place. It has already cut interest-rates to -0.5% and is doing some 20 billion Euros of QE bond buying a month. Thus it has little scope to respond which is presumably why there are reports it did not discuss monetary policy on its emergency conference call yesterday. In spite of that there are expectations of a cut to -0.6% at its meeting next week.

Has it come to this? ( The Streets)

As you can see this would be an example of to coin a phrase fiddling while Rome Burns. Does anybody seriously believe a 0.1% interest-rate cut would really make any difference when we have had so many much larger cuts already? Indeed if they do as CNBC has just suggested they will look even sillier as why did they not join the US Federal Reserve yesterday?

ECB and BOE expected to take immediate policy action on coronavirus impact.

Those in charge of the Euro area must so regret leaving the ECB in the hands of two politicians. No doubt it seemed clever at the time with Mario Draghi essentially setting policy for them. But now things have changed.

Fiscal Policy

This is the new toy for central bankers and there is a new Euro area vibe for this.

French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire says the euro-area must prepare fiscal stimulus to use if the economic situation deteriorates due to the coronavirus outbreak ( Bloomberg)

That is a case of suggesting what you are doing because as we have previously noted France had a fiscal stimulus of around 1% of GDP last year. But of course back when she was the French Finance Minister Christine Lagarde was an enthusiast “shock and awe” for exactly the reverse being applied to Greece and others.

The ECB has already oiled the wheels for some fiscal expansionism by the way its QE bond buying has reduced bond yields. It could expand its monthly purchases again but would run into “trouble,trouble,trouble” in Germany and the Netherlands, pretty quickly.

Comment

If we return to a purely Italian perspective we see some of the policy elements are already in play. For example the ten-year yield is a mere 0.94% although things get more awkward as the period over which it has fallen has also seen a fall in economic growth. The fiscal policy change below is relatively minor.

Italy is planning to hike its 2020 budget deficit target to 2.4% of its GDP from 2.2% to provide the economy with the funds it needs to battle the impact of coronavirus outbreak, Reuters reported on Monday, citing senior officials familiar with the matter.

By contrast according to CNBC the Corona Virus situation continues to deteriorate.

Italy is now the worst-affected country from the coronavirus outside Asia, overtaking Iran in terms of the number of deaths and infections from the virus.

The death toll in Italy jumped to 79 on Tuesday, up from an official total of 52 on Monday. As of Wednesday morning, there are 2,502 cases of the virus in Italy, according to Italian media reports that are updated ahead of the daily official count, published by Italy’s Civil Protection Agency every evening.

Now what about a regular topic the Italian banks? From Axa.

and banks such as Unicredit and Intesa have offered “payment holidays” to some of their affected borrowers.

Italy continues to see features of an economic depression

Today gives us an opportunity to compare economic and financial market developments in Italy as this week has brought some which are really rather extraordinary. Let us start with the economics and look at the IMF ( International Monetary Fund ) mission statement yesterday.

Real GDP growth in 2019 is estimated at 0.2 percent, down from a 10-year high of 1.7 percent in 2017.

As you can see they are agreeing with my theme that Italy struggles to sustain any rate of economic growth above 1% per annum. Then they also agree with my “Girlfriend in a Coma” theme as well.

 Real personal incomes remain about 7 percent below the pre-crisis (2007) peak and continue to fall behind euro area peers. Despite record employment rates, unemployment is high at close to 10 percent, with much higher rates in the South and among the youth. Female workforce participation is the lowest in the EU.

The real income situation is particularly damning of the economic position especially if we note that unemployment has continued to be elevated. That brings us back to the economic growth not getting above 1% for long enough for unemployment to fall faster.

What about now?

The IMF has a go at saying things will get better but then lapses into the classic quote of a two-handed economist.

The economic situation is projected to improve modestly but is subject to downside risks.

So let us see if the detail does better than it might go up or down?

Real GDP growth is forecast at ½ percent in 2020 and 0.6-0.7 percent thereafter. These forecasts are the lowest in the EU, reflecting weak potential growth. Materialization of adverse shocks, such as escalating trade tensions, a slowdown in key trading partners or geopolitical events, could lead to a much weaker outlook.

As you can see there is not much growth which frankly in measurement terms would take several years even to cover any margin of error. I also note a rather grim ending as the IMF maybe gives us its true view “could lead to a much weaker outlook.” Another slow down or recession would be a real problem as we note again that real personal incomes are 7% lower than before. If that is/was the peak then how long will this economic depression go on?

The Euro zone

If we look wider for en economic influence the news is not that good either. For example the situation from the overall flash Markit PMI business survey was this.

The ‘flash’ IHS Markit Eurozone Composite PMI®
was unchanged at 50.9 in January, signalling a
further muted increase in activity across the euro
area economy. The rate of expansion has remained
broadly stable since the start of the final quarter of
2019, running at the weakest for around six-and-ahalf years.

If we now move to my signal for near-term economic developments the ECB told us this yesterday.

Annual growth rate of narrower monetary aggregate M1, comprising currency in circulation and overnight deposits, decreased to 8.0% in December from 8.3% in November.

The money supply situation had improved in 2019 but as you can dipped at the end. So the impetus is weaker than it was. In case you are wondering we have seen this before in phases of QE which is currently 20 billion Euros a month and thus boosting the numbers. There are other influences as well.

The broader money supply had a sharper fall and represents the outlook for 2021/22.

The annual growth rate of the broad monetary aggregate M3 decreased to 5.0% in December 2019 from 5.6% in November, averaging 5.4% in the three months up to December.

We will have to see if this is a new development or just a financial market glitch.

The annual growth rate of marketable instruments (M3-M2) was -7.2% in December, compared with -1.1% in November.

Back to Italy

The troubled area across much of the world is the industrial sector and the latest we have on that is this from the Italian statistics office.

The seasonally adjusted volume turnover index (only for the manufacturing sector) remained unchanged
compared to the previous month; the average of the last three months increased by 0.3% compared to
the previous three months. The calendar adjusted volume turnover index increased by 0.2% with respect
to the same month of the previous year. ( November )

This morning there was troubling news for those of us who have noted that employment has often been a leading ( as opposed to the economics 101 view of lagging) indicator in the credit crunch era.

The estimate of employed people decreased (-0.3%, -75 thousand); the employment rate went down to
59.2% (-0.1 percentage points).
The fall of employment concerned both men and women. A rise is observed among 15-24 aged people (+6
thousand), people aged 25-49 decreased (-79 thousand), while people over 50 remained stable.

This meant that if we look for some perspective progress seems to have stopped.

In the fourth quarter 2019, in comparison with the previous one, a slight increase of employment is registered (+0.1%, +13 thousand) and it concerned only women.

We will have to see if that continues as we worry about possible implications for this.

The number of unemployed persons slightly grew (+0.1%, +2 thousand in the last month); the increase
was the result of a growth among men (+2.2%, +28 thousand) and a decrease for women (-2.2%, -27
thousand), and involved people under 50. The unemployment rate remained stable at 9.8%, as also the
youth rate, unchanged at 28.9%.

Italian bond market

If we return to the IMF statement the story starts badly.

 Italy needs credible medium-term consolidation as fiscal space remains at risk.Debt is projected to remain high at close to 135 percent of GDP over the medium term and to increase in the longer term owing to pension spending. If adverse shocks were to materialize, debt would rise sooner and faster.

Somehow in the current economic environment the IMF seems to think that more austerity would be a good idea. Amazing really!

But this week has in fact seen this.

Massive, massive move in #Italy’s 10-year bond yield from 1.44% to 0.95% now. A 50 basis point move in a matter of days party driven by a #Salvini right-wing loss in regional elections. ( @jeroenblokland ) 

These days almost whatever the fiscal arithmetic we see that investors are so desperate for yield they will buy anything and hope the central bank will step up and buy it off them for a profit. Just as a reminder back around 2012 the yield went above 7% on fears the fiscal position suggested Italy was insolvent which of course were self-fulfilling as a yield of 7% made sure it was. But apart from QE what is really different now?

Comment

The depth of the problem is highlighted by this from the IMF.

Steadfast implementation of structural reforms would unlock Italy’s potential and durably improve outcomes. Reforms to liberalize markets and decentralize wage bargaining should be prioritized. They are estimated to yield real income gains of about 6-7 percent of GDP over a decade.

That’s a convenient number isn’t it? But the real issue is that this is a repetition of the remarks at the ECB press conference which are repeated every time. Why? Nothing ever happens.

The longer the economic depression goes on then the demographics become a bigger issue.

The number of births continues to decrease: in 2018, 439,747 children were registered in the General Register Office, over 18,000 less than the previous year and almost 140,000 less than 2008.

The persistent decline in the birthrate has an impact above all on the firstborn children, who decreased to 204,883, 79 thousand less than 2008.

Italy is a lovely country but the economics is an example of keep trying to apply the things that have consistently failed.

The Investing Channel

 

 

 

Is Hong Kong in a recession or a depression now?

Some days an item of news just reaches out and grabs you and this morning it has come from the increasingly troubled Hong Kong. We knew that there would be economic consequences from the political protests there but maybe not this much.

The Census and Statistics Department (C&SD) released today (October 31) the advance estimates on Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for the third quarter of 2019.     According to the advance estimates, GDP decreased by 2.9% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, compared with the increase of 0.4% in the second quarter of 2019.

The commentary from a government spokesman confirmed various details.

marking the first year-on-year contraction for an individual quarter since the Great Recession of 2009, and also much weaker than the mild growth of 0.6% and 0.4% in the first and second quarters respectively. For the first three quarters as a whole, the economy contracted by 0.7% over a year earlier. On a seasonally adjusted quarter-to-quarter comparison, the fall in real GDP widened to 3.2% in the third quarter from 0.5% in the preceding quarter, indicating that the Hong Kong economy has entered a technical recession.

The concept of recession first switched to technical recession meaning a minor one ( say -0.1% or -0.2% GDP growth) but now seems to encompass what is a large fall. Time for Kylie again I guess.

I’m spinning around
Move outta my way

A clue to the change is the way that the year so far has fallen by 0.7% in GDP terms. If we look back we see that annual GDP growth of 3.8% slowed a little to 3% from 2017 to 18. But the quarterly numbers have been falling for a while. In annual terms GDP growth was 2.8% in the third quarter of 2018 but then only 1.2% in the last quarter and then going 0.6%, 0.4% and now -2.9% this year.

The Details

If we take the advice of Kylie and start breaking it down we see this.

Gross domestic fixed capital formation decreased significantly by 16.3% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, compared with the decrease of 10.8% in the second quarter.

Investment has taken quite a dive as this time last year it was increasing at an annual rate of 8.6%. Indeed the private-sector full stop took a fair hammering.

private consumption expenditure decreased by 3.5% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, as against the 1.3% growth in the second quarter.

The one bright spot was government expenditure.

     Government consumption expenditure measured in national accounts terms grew by 5.3% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 over a year earlier, after the increase of 4.0% in the second quarter.

Is it too cheeky to suggest that at least some of this will be police overtime? So far it is not increased unemployment payouts

     The number of unemployed persons (not seasonally adjusted) in July – September 2019 was 120 300, about the same as that in June – August 2019 (120 600). The number of underemployed persons in July – September 2019 was 41 500, also about the same as that in June – August 2019 (41 000).

The flickers of acknowledgement of the present troubles were in the employment not the unemployment numbers.

 Total employment decreased by around 8 200 from 3 863 600 in June – August 2019 to 3 855 400 in July – September 2019. Over the same period, the labour force also decreased by around 8 500 from 3 984 200 to 3 975 700.

Also does the labour force fall suggest some emigration?

However you spin it the commentary is grim.

As the weakening economic conditions dampened consumer sentiment, and large-scale demonstrations caused severe disruptions to the retail, catering and other consumption-related sectors, private consumption expenditure recorded its first year-on-year decline in more than ten years. The fall in overall investment expenditure steepened amid sagging economic confidence.

Trade

This added to the woes as you can see below.

Over the same period, total exports of goods measured in national accounts terms recorded a decrease of 7.0% in real terms from a year earlier, compared with the decrease of 5.4% in the second quarter. Imports of goods measured in national accounts terms fell by 11.1% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019, compared with the decline of 6.7% in the second quarter.

Ironically this looks like a boost to GDP from a tale of woe. This is because the fall in imports ( a boost to GDP) is larger than the fall in exports. This situation reverses somewhat in the services sector presumably mostly due to lower tourism revenue.

Exports of services dropped by 13.7% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, following the decline of 1.1% in the second quarter. Imports of services decreased by 3.8% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019, as against the increase of 1.3% in the second quarter.

Looking Ahead

That was then and this is now so what can we expect?

Looking ahead, with global economic growth expected to remain soft in the near term, Hong Kong’s exports are unlikely to show any visible improvement. Moreover, as the adverse impacts of the local social incidents have yet to show signs of abating, private consumption and investment sentiment will continue to be affected. The Hong Kong economy will still face notable downward pressures in the rest of the year.

If we look at the results from the latest official quarterly business survey and note what happened in the third quarter then we get a proper Halloween style chill down the spine.

 For all surveyed sectors taken together, the proportion of respondents expecting their business situation to be worse (32%) in Q4 2019 over Q3 2019 is significantly higher than that expecting it to be better (7%).  When compared with the results of the Q3 2019 survey round, the proportion of respondents expecting a worse business situation in Q4 2019 as compared with the preceding quarter has increased to 32%, against the corresponding proportion of 17% in Q3 2019.

According to the South China Morning Post then prospects for China continue to weaken.

The manufacturing purchasing managers’ index (PMI), released by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) on Thursday, stood at 49.3 in October, down from 49.8  in September.  The non-manufacturing PMI – a gauge of sentiment in the services and construction sectors – came in at 52.8 in October, below analysts’ expectations for a 53.6 reading. The figure was also down from September’s 53.7, dropping to its lowest level since February 2016.

As to Japan there seems to be little hope as the Bank of Japan just seems lost at sea now.

As for the policy rates, the Bank expects short- and long-term interest rates to remain at their present or lower levels as long as it is necessary to pay close attention to the possibility that the momentum toward achieving the price stability target will be lost.

Comment

As you can see the situation in Hing Kong is clearly recessionary and the size of it combined with the fact that it looks set to continue means it is looks depressionary as well. There has been a monetary respone but this of course only represents maintenance of the US Dollar peg.

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) announced today (Thursday) that the Base Rate was adjusted downward by 25 basis points to 2% with immediate effect according to a pre-set formula.  The decrease in the Base Rate follows the 25-basis point downward shift in the target range for the US federal funds rate on 30 October (US time).

As to the guide provided by the narrow money supply there is this.

The seasonally-adjusted Hong Kong dollar M1 decreased by 0.5% in September and by 3.4% from a year earlier, reflecting in part investment-related activities.

However you spin it people are switching from Hong Kong Dollars to other currencies.

The Investing Channel

 

Is this the manufacturing recession of 2019?

The year so far has seen increasing focus on a sector of the economy that has been shrinking in relative terms for quite some time. Actually in the credit crunch era it has in some places shrunk in absolute terms as this from my home country illustrates.

Production and manufacturing output have risen since then but remain 7.1% and 3.1% lower, respectively, for July 2019 than the pre-downturn peak in February 2008.

This means that it is now a little over 10% of total UK GDP and so it is completely dwarfed by the services sector which is marching on its way to 80%.Thus we have a context that the current concern about a recession is odd in the sense that we have in fact been in a depression as output more than a decade later is below the previous peak.Yet there is much less concern over that.

We learn more from the detail of the breakdown from the official analysis of the period 2008-18.

The recovery of the manufacturing sector from the 2008 recession has been heavily dependent upon four out of the 24 industries; manufacture of food, motor vehicles, other transport equipment and repair of machinery………..Without the positive impact of these four industries, the Index of Manufacturing in Quarter 4 (Oct to Dec) 2018 would still be below its lowest value during the 2008 recession.

There is always a danger in any analysis that excludes the things that went up but we do learn that there has been quite a shift. Also a lot of the sector has been in an even worse depression than the average. Then we have the situation where two of the fantastic four currently have problems to say the least.

However caution is required as I so often observe and today it is highlighted by this.

The pharmaceutical industry was a strong performer during the recession; at the industry’s highest point in April 2009 the industry had grown by 22% since Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2008. However, the industry would steadily decline from this point over the decade and would finish in Quarter 4 (Oct to Dec) 2018 23% below its Quarter 1 2008 value, though some of this decline is due to business restructuring.

Something looks wrong with that and if I was in charge I would be looking further as to whether this is/was really like for like. For newer readers I looked because in recent times the pharmaceutical sector has been a strength in the data albeit with erratic swings.

The United States

If we now switch from an underlying issue of depression in some countries to the more recent one of recession well this from the Institute of Supply Management or ISM yesterday upped the ante.

Manufacturing contracted in September, as the PMI® registered 47.8 percent, a decrease of 1.3 percentage points from the August reading of 49.1 percent. This is the lowest reading since June 2009, the last month of the Great Recession, when the index registered 46.3 percent.

This seemed to catch out quite a few people and led to some extraordinary responses like this on CNBC.

“There is no end in sight to this slowdown, the recession risk is real,” Torsten Slok, chief economist at Deutsche Bank said in a note Tuesday after the report.

I agree on the recession risk but “no end in sight”? That applies more to the problems Deutsche Bank itself faces. If we switch to the detail there are some clear things to note which is that is showed a more severe contraction and that the “Great Recession” klaxon was triggered. Furthermore the trade war influence was impossible to avoid.

ISM®’s New Export Orders Index registered 41 percent in September, 2.3 percentage points lower compared to the August reading of 43.3 percent, indicating that new export orders contracted for the third month in a row. “The index had its lowest reading since March 2009 (39.4 percent).

The news reached the Donald and his response was to sing along with “It wasn’t me ” by Shaggy.

As I predicted, Jay Powell and the Federal Reserve have allowed the Dollar to get so strong, especially relative to ALL other currencies, that our manufacturers are being negatively affected. Fed Rate too high. They are their own worst enemies, they don’t have a clue. Pathetic!

So far this has not reached the official output numbers. Here is the August announcement from the Federal Reserve.

Manufacturing production increased 0.5 percent, more than reversing its decrease in July. Factory output has increased 0.2 percent per month over the past four months after having decreased 0.5 percent per month during the first four months of the year.

Putting it another way the output level in August was 105.2 which was the same as March. So according to the official data the only impact it has picked up is an end to growth if we try to look through the monthly ebbs and flows.

The World

There is a survey conducted on behalf of JP Morgan which yesterday told us this.

National PMI data signalled deteriorations in overall business conditions in 15 of the countries covered. Among the larger industrial regions, growth was registered in both the US and China. In contrast, Japan saw further contraction while the downturn in the euro area deepened. The rate of decline in the eurozone was the fastest in almost seven years, mainly due to a sharp deterioration in the performance of Germany.

They showed a slight improvement to 49.7 but there is the issue of the US where JP Morgan thinks there has been growth whereas the ISM as we have just observed does not. Here is the Markit PMI view on a possible reason.

Divergence is possibly related to ISM membership skewed towards large multinationals. IHS Markit panel is representative mix of small, medium and large (and asks only about US operations, so excludes overseas facilities)

Financial markets hit the ISM road and were probably also influenced by this from Bloomberg.

Results were disastrous for leading Asian automakers such as Toyota Motor Corp. and Honda Motor Co., which each suffered double-digit declines that were worse than analysts expected. While a fuller picture will emerge Wednesday when General Motors Co (NYSE: GM). and Ford Motor (NYSE:F) Co. are due to report, the poor performance suggests that overall deliveries of cars and light trucks could come in worse than the 12% drop anticipated by analysts, based on six estimates.

Comment

There are various strands to this of which the first is the motor industry. In the credit crunch era it has seen a lot of support ranging from “cash for clunkers” style operations to much cheaper credit. In the UK it is often cheaper to buy via credit that to pay up front which is part of the theme that has seen this according to the Finance and Leasing Association.

 Over 91% of all private new car registrations in the UK were financed by FLA members.

That seems to be wearing off so we were due something of a dip and that has been exacerbated by the diesel crisis where buyers have understandably lost faith after the dieselgate scandal and the ongoing emissions issue.

Politicans are regularly on the case which was highlighted in the UK by the “march of the makers” claim of former Chancellor George Osbourne. Whilst there was some growth it was hardly a march and now we have President Trump pushing manufacturing as part of MAGA but more latterly giving it a downwards tug with his trade war.

Then there is the issue of green policies which have to lead to less manufacturing but get deflected onto talk of more solar panels and windmills and the like. On that road the depression theme returns.

 

Do not forget Greece is still in an economic depression

Today I intend to look at something which I and I know from your replies many of you have long feared. This is that the merest flicker of better news from Greece will be used as a way of obscuring the fact that it is still in an economic crisis. At least I think that is what we should be calling an economic depression. So let me take you straight to the Financial Times.

Today, on the face of things, the emergency is over and the outlook is bright. The authorities have lifted capital controls, imposed four years ago. Greece’s 10-year bond yield touched an all-time low in July. Consumer confidence is at its highest level since 2000. Elections in July produced a comfortable parliamentary majority for New Democracy, a conservative party committed under prime minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis to a well-designed programme of economic reform, fiscal responsibility and administrative modernisation.

Firstly let me give the FT some credit for lowering its paywall for a bit. However the latter sentence is playing politics which is an area they have got into trouble with this year on the subject of Greece but I will leave that there as I keep out of politics.

As to the economics you may note that the first 2 points cover financial markets rather than the real economy and even the first point is a sentiment measure rather than a real development. If we work our way through them it is of course welcome that capital controls have now ended although it is also true that it is troubling that they lasted for more than four years.

Switching to Greek bonds we see that they did indeed join the worldwide bond party. I am not quite sure though about the all-time July low as you see it is 1.31% as I type this compared to being around 1% higher than that in July! Perhaps he has not checked since it dipped below 2% at the end of July which is hardly reassuring. As to why this has happened other than the worldwide trend there are 2 other factors. Firstly there is the way that the European Stability Mechanism has changed the debt envelope as the quote from Karl Regling below shows.

 In total, Greece received almost €290 billion in financial support, of which €205 billion came from the EFSF and the ESM.

So the Greek bond yield is approaching what the ESM charges. Another factor is they way that it has confirmed my “To Infinity! And Beyond!” theme as the average maturity was kicked like a can to 42.5 years. Next is a factor that I looked at on the 9th of July and Klaus also notes.

The general government primary balance in programme terms last year registered a surplus of 4.3% of GDP, strongly over-performing the fiscal target of 3.5% of GDP.

This is awkward for the political theme of the article as it was achieved by the previous government. Also let me be clear that whilst this is good for bond markets there is a big issue for the actual economy as 4.3% of demand was sucked out of it which is a lot is any circumstance but more so when you are still in an economic depression.

So it is a complex issue which to my mind has seen Greek bond yields move towards what the ESM is charging which is ~1%. Maybe the ECB will add it to its QE programme as well as whilst it does not qualify in terms of investment rating it could offer a waiver.

Greek Consumer Confidence

I have to confess referring to a confidence signal does set off a warning klaxon. But let us add in this from the Greek statistics office.

The overall volume index in retail trade (i.e. turnover in retail trade at constant prices) in June 2019, increased by
2.3%, compared with the corresponding index of June 2018……..The seasonally adjusted overall volume index in June 2019, compared with the corresponding index of May 2019, increased by 2.5%.

So there has been some growth. However there is a but and it is a BUT. You might like to sit down before you read the next bit. The volume index in June was 103.5 which compares to 177.7 in March 2008 and yes you did read that right. I regularly point out that monthly retail sales numbers are erratic so let me also point out that late 2007 and early 2008 had a sequence of numbers in the 170s. Even worse this century started with a reading of 115.4 in January 2000.

So we have seen a little growth but not much since the index was set at 100 in 2015 and you can either have a depression lasting this century or quite a severe depression since 2008 take your pick. Against that some optimism now is welcome but does not really cut it in my opinion.

Economic growth

There is a reference to it.

Even before these clouds appeared on the horizon, however, Greece was not rebounding from the debt crisis with the vigour of other stricken eurozone economies such as Ireland, Portugal and Spain.

That is one way of putting a level of GDP that has fallen 18% this decade. In 2010 prices it opened this decade with a quarterly performance of just over 59 billion Euros whereas in the second quarter of this year it was 48.3 billion. I am nit sure that “clouds on the horizon” really cover an annual growth rate struggling to each 2% after such a drop. Greece should be rebounding but of course as I have already pointed out the dent means that 4.3% of economic activity was sucked out of it last year. So no wonder it is an L-shaped and not a V-shaped recovery. At the current pace Greece may not get back to its previous peak in the next decade either.

Comment

There are some references to ongoing problems in Greece as for example the banks.

A second factor is the fragility of Greece’s banks. By the middle of this year, they were burdened with about €85bn in non-performing loans. To some extent, however, liquidity conditions are now improving.

Not mentioned is the fact that according to the Bank of Greece more than another 40 billion Euros needs writing off. From January 19th.

An absolutely indicative example can assess the immediate impact of a transfer of about €40 billion of NPLs, namely all denounced loans and €7.4 billion of DTCs ( Deferred Tax Credits).

That brings us to another problem which is that the debt was supposed to fall from 2012 onwards whereas even now there are plans for it to grow. So whilst the annual cost has been cut to low levels the burden just gets larger.

Also there has been a heavy human cost in terms of suicides, hospitals not being able to afford drugs and the like. It has been a grim run to say the least. The ordinary Greek did not deserve anything like that as they were guilty of very little. The Greek political class and banks were by contrast guilty of rather a lot. The cost is an ongoing depression which looks like it will continue for quite some time yet. After all I welcome the lower unemployment rate of 17% but also recall that such a rate was considered quite a disaster on the way up.

Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy?
Caught in a landslide, no escape from reality
Open your eyes, look up to the skies and see ( Queen)