Spain continues to see a strong economic recovery

At the moment we could do with some good news. Saturday night’s dreadful terror attack was at a place I know well beginning from childhood as one set of grandparents lived near to Borough Market. A place that has found some economic good news in the past couple of years or so has been Spain. This followed something of a double whammy as the initial impact of the credit crunch was then followed by the Euro area crisis. As I look back it feels a little strange to see its ten-year bond yield above 7% as it was in July of 2012 when the latter crisis was raging. Of course those with the courage and foresight to buy Spanish government bonds back then were well rewarded if they held onto the position.

Today’s business survey

From Markit:

The recent strong growth rates generated by the
Spanish service sector continued in May. Further
sharp increases were recorded in business activity
and new orders. With workloads rising, and the
prospect of new projects in future, companies took
on extra staff again. Meanwhile, inflationary
pressures moderated during the month.

As you can see there are several points to not here. For example the situation looking ahead is strong.

Moreover, sentiment picked up to the highest in 26
months. More than 55% of respondents predict
output to be higher in 12 months’ time than current
levels.

Also we see that employment is on the rise which is welcome considering the still troubled unemployment picture.

Spanish service providers increased their staffing
levels during May, with new hires needed to work
on current and future projects. The rate of job
creation was solid and only slightly weaker than
April’s nine-month high.

Added to this is a decline in inflationary pressure which starts to make this look rather like a situation where Goldilocks porridge is at exactly the right temperature.

Inflationary pressures showed signs of easing in the
sector during May, with both input costs and output
charges rising at weaker rates than recorded in April.

At the end Markit are very bullish on GDP growth this quarter.

with nearly 1% being signalled for Spain

Should that prove to be true then the forecasts of the Bank of Spain will start to look a little pessimistic.

Based on our estimates, GDP could rise by 2.8% this year, before slipping to more moderate growth rates of 2.3% and 2.1%, respectively, in 2018 and 2019.

Although to be fair it was expecting a growth spurt based on something you do not often hear or read associated with the Euro area.

the expansionary fiscal policy

Official GDP growth

The first quarter of this year was a good one for economic activity in Spain according to its statistics office.

The Spanish economy registers a quarterly growth of 0.8% in the first quarter of 2017. This rate was one tenth higher than that registered in the fourth quarter of 2016.  The growth compared to the same quarter last year stands at 3.0%, the same rate as that recorded the previous quarter.

A phrase so beloved of economists can be deployed which is, export-led growth.

The contribution of net foreign demand of the Spanish economy to annual growth of the quarterly GDP was 0.8 points………Goods and services exports accelerated its rate of growth, increasing from 4.4% to 8.4%

This morning has brought more good news on this front. From Spanish statistics via Google Translate.

The total expenditure of international tourists who visit Spain in April increases by 19.7% compared to the same month of 2016. Average daily spending stands at 137 euros, 5.5% more than in April 2016……..During the first four months of 2017 the total expenditure of international tourists increased by 15.3% compared to the same period of the previous year, reaching 20,394 millions of euros.

Actually Spain was also a good global citizen in that it shared some of the benefits around too.

Imports of goods and services experienced an increase of 4.1 points, from 2.3% to 6.4%

As well as export-led growth there was also investment led growth.

Gross fixed capital formation registered a growth rate of 3.8%, indicating an increase of 1.6 points as compared with the previous quarter.

Unemployment

This is the achilles heel of the Spanish economy as the latest official quarterly survey informs us. Via Google Translate.

The unemployment rate stands at 18.75%, which is 12 cents higher than in the Previous quarter. In the last year this rate has fallen by 2.25 points.

The problem is shown by the fact that even after 3 good years for economic growth unemployment is still at a rate of 18.75% meaning that 4,255,000 Spaniards are recorded as unemployed. The good news is that until this quarter the rate has been falling and with the rate of economic growth the increase seems strange. As does the quarterly fall in employment of 69.800 which tells a different story to the GDP report.

Employment of the economy in terms of jobs equivalent to full-time employment registered a quarterly variation of 0.7%, three tenths higher than that registered in the previous quarter.

Over the past year we see that the two roads give similar answers ( 408k versus 435k) so if pressed one would say that the fall in employment from the labour market survey seems most suspect here. Maybe the 65,000 households surveyed had seen a particularly poor phase.

Monetary policy

This is a little awkward for Spain as the very expansionary policy does not go well with the economic strength we have looked at above. If we look for any sign of the “punch bowl” being taken away as the party gets started we see only a reduction in monthly ECB bond purchases to 60 billion Euros a month from 80 billion. The deposit rate at the ECB remains at -0.4% and helped by some 182.5 billion Euros of buying by the ECB the Spanish government can borrow at negative interest-rates on short-dated bonds and only 0.06% for five year ones. A little bit of a brake will have been applied by the rise in the Euro to around 1.12 versus the US Dollar.

Accordingly policy could not be much looser and it is hard to think of an economy in the past that has tried this sort of experiment in terms of expansionary monetary policy in such a boom.

House prices

So far we are not getting much of a clue from the various indices which tell us that they may be going up or down! This was interesting via Spanish property insight.

The outlier is the 7.74% increase reported by the registrars, using their repeat sales methodology that only looks at the price of property that has sold twice in the period of study.

The catch is that it must be a rather small sample size. Spanish statistics has the annual increase at 4.5%. So is this a case of once bitten twice shy? The index provided by Spanish notaries was set at 100 in 2007 and  was 70.7 at the end of 2016. Mind you for PropertyEU up seems to be the new down or something like that.

Looking at property performance returns in Europe in the last 10 years, Spain is second on the list after Sweden with a 13% return, followed by Ireland and then Portugal with 12 per cent.

Some of the gap can perhaps be provided by rents where as I reported on the 27th of January there has been a boom. From RTN online.

THE AVERAGE price of rental housing in Spain rose 8.8 per cent in the first quarter of 2017 due to increasing demand, according to the rental price evolution report published on Wednesday by Idealista.

Comment

The good news theme coming out of Spain was reinforced by Real Madrid retaining the football Champions League trophy on Saturday evening. The dangers for now seem to be a combination of monetary policy which if we allow for the fact that policy changes take 18 months or so to operate seems way too lax and the way that if a housing boom is underway it is in the rental sector this time around.

Also there is still some ground to be gained as even the really good growth of the last few years has only just got Spain back to its previous peak. With 2010 set as 100 that was the 104.4 of the second quarter of 2008 which if the releases above are accurate should now have been regained. Whichever way you look at that it remains odd that Banco Popular has hit trouble now I think.

Economists letters

In spite of the track record of such events it would appear that some are not deterred.

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2017/jun/03/the-big-issue-labour-manifesto-what-economy-needs