Euro area monetary policy heads for a new frontier

The issue of monetary policy in the Euro area is of significance on several levels. Obviously it affects the Euro area itself but also it affects many countries around it as in a nod to the sad departure of Stephen Hawking overnight it is time to sing along with Muse.

Into the supermassive
Supermassive black hole
Supermassive black hole
Supermassive black hole
Supermassive black hole

This has been demonstrated by the way that zero and then negative interest-rates ( a deposit rate of -0.4%) in the Euro has forced others in the locale to follow suit. It was and is a factor in the -0.5% of Sweden the -0.65% certificate of deposit rate in Denmark and the -0.75% of Switzerland amongst others. It is also a factor in the UK still remaining with a Bank Rate of 0.5% after so many years have passed and not following the more traditional route of aping the moves of the US Federal Reserve.

What next?

This is the question on many lips both inside for obvious reasons but also outside the Euro area for the reasons above. Why? Well the President of the European Central Bank Mario Draghi explained this earlier today in Frankfurt.

The economy has been growing consistently above current estimates of potential growth, by more than a percentage point last year. All euro area confidence indicators are close to their highest levels since the start of monetary union, even if the latest readings came in slightly below expectations.

This as I regularly point out means that monetary policy is facing a new frontier. This is because it is procyclical where it is expansionary in an existing expansion. Mario has in fact gone further than me in one area as in his view it is even more procyclical leading to output being more than 1% above potential. If that sounds a little mad I will return to it in a moment.  But another factor in this new frontier is the way that both negative interest-rates and QE have been deployed.

We’ll open up the doors and climb into the dawn
Confess your passion your secret fear
Prepare to meet the challenge of the new frontier ( Donald Fagen)

Potential Output?

Looking at what output has been allows us to figure it out.

Over the whole year 2017, GDP rose by 2.3% in the euro area ( Eurostat)

That would mean that potential output is only 1% per annum but I suspect Mario really means the 2.7% if you compare the last quarter of 2017 with a year before so 1.5%. That is rather downbeat which is very common amongst central bankers these days as for example Governor Carney and the Bank of England used different language “speed limit” for the UK but also came to 1.5%. Due to demographic pressures the Bank of Japan is even more downbeat for Nihon at 1%.

We will see how the media treat that as they make a big deal of the UK situation but let is move onto what causes them to think this? We come to something which is genuinely troubling.

Second, the degree of slack itself is uncertain. Even if slack is now receding, estimates of the size of the output gap have to be made with caution. Strong growth may be leading to higher potential output, as crisis-induced hysteresis may be reversed in conditions of stronger demand. And the effects of past structural reforms, especially in the labour market, may now be showing up in potential output.

As you can see the certainty of earlier has gone as this clearly points out they do not know. We are back to imposing theory on reality again and even worse a failed theory as later we get this.

Phillips curve decompositions find that past low inflation dragged down wage growth from its long-term average by around 0.2 percentage points each year between 2014 and 2017.

If we step back we see that according to the Phillips Curve wages should be soaring as we are above potential output whereas in fact they are doing this.

 The unexplained residuals in the model – which in the past were sizeable – are diminishing, suggesting the link between unemployment and wages should improve.

As in there is no link visible yet but if you inhale enough hopium it will be along at some point! Also I hope you enjoyed the reference to labour market reforms from Mario as we mull the contrast between that and his policy press conferences which every time without fail have a section calling for economic reform.

More! More! More!

It is somewhat awkward when you are telling people the economy is running hot and implying it is overheating if you also say it may be about to run faster.

Non-essential purchases – which make up around 50% of household spending in the euro area – tend to be postponed during recessions and then to catch up as the business cycle advances. Such purchases are currently only 2% above their pre-crisis level, compared with 9% for essential ones. This implies that discretionary household spending still has scope to support the expansion.

So it is below potential Mario? Also an area central bankers love to see boom also seems to be below potential.

Moreover, housing investment is still 17% below its pre-crisis level and is only now starting to pick up, which will likely add an extra impulse to the recovery dynamic.

What about inflation?

This if you look at a Phillips Curve world should be on the march in both senses as wages and prices should be heading upwards and yet.

Wage growth has been trending upwards for the euro area as a whole, rising by 0.5 percentage points from the trough in mid-2016.

Not much is it? As to be fair Mario points out.

But consistent with the weakening of the relationship between slack and inflation, the adjustment of wages during the recovery has so far been atypically slow.

The trouble is the analysis seems to be based on pure hopium.

That said, our analysis suggests that, as the cycle advances, the standard wage Phillips curve should hold better for the euro area on average. The unexplained residuals in the model – which in the past were sizeable – are diminishing, suggesting the link between unemployment and wages should improve.

So when you really want it to work ( in a crisis) it fails and in calmer times it does not seem to work either. But they will continue with it anyway like someone who s stuck in the mud.


Actually I think that Mario Draghi is more intelligent than this as we see several themes come together. Back in the dim and distant days when I began Notayesmanseconomics I offered the opinion that central bankers would dither when it became time to reverse course on their stimuli. This became a bigger factor as the stimuli grew. Now we see a central banker telling us.

But we still need to see further evidence that inflation dynamics are moving in the right direction. So monetary policy will remain patient, persistent and prudent.

This works nicely for Mario as the inflation forecasts remain below the 1.97% inflation target defined by a predecessor of his ( Monsieur JC Trichet).

The latest ECB projections foresee a pickup in headline inflation from an average rate of 1.4% this year to 1.7% in 2020.

Thus as he has hinted at in past speeches which more than a few seem to have forgotten Mario Draghi may depart as ECB President without ever raising interest-rates. In fact it seems to be his plan and it is something he will leave as a “present” for whoever follows him. Another form of stimulus may have slowed but is still around as well.

The cumulative redemptions under the asset purchase programme between March 2018 and February 2019 are expected to be around EUR 167 billion. And reinvestment amounts will remain sizeable thereafter.

So now we see that policy has been decided and a theory ( Phillips Curve ) has been chosen which is convenient. Mario may not believe it either but it suits his purpose as does claiming their has been labour market reform. This is the same way that we have switched from the economic growth of the “Whatever it takes” speech to inflation now both suggest the same policy which allows Mario to give himself a round of applause.

 Considering all of the monetary measures taken between mid-2014 and October 2017, the overall impact on euro area growth and inflation is estimated, in both cases, to be around 1.9 percentage points cumulatively for the period between 2016 and 2019.

So another masterly performance from Mario Draghi but it should not cover up the many risks from advancing onto a new frontier of procyclical monetary policy.






The economy of Italy has yet to awaken from its “Girlfriend in a coma” past

The subject of Italy and its economy has been a regular feature on here as we have observed not only its troubled path in the credit crunch era but also they way that has struggled during its membership of the Euro. This will no doubt be an issue in next month’s election but the present period is one which should be a better phase for Italy. Firstly the Euro area economy is doing well overall and that should help the economy via improved exports.

Seasonally adjusted GDP rose by 0.6% in both the euro area (EA19) and in the EU28 during the fourth quarter of
2017, compared with the previous quarter……..Compared with the same quarter of the previous year, seasonally adjusted GDP rose by 2.7% in the euro area and
by 2.6% in the EU28 in the fourth quarter of 2017…….Over the whole year 2017, GDP grew by 2.5% in both zones.

The impact on the economy of Italy

If we switch now to the Italian economy we find that there has been a boost to the economy from the better economic environment. From the monthly economic report.

Italian exports keep increasing with a positive trend following world trade expansion…….Over the period September-November, foreign trade kept a positive trend
driven by the exports (+2.9%), while the imports increased at a lower pace (+0.6%).

However the breakdown was not as might be expected.

Sales to the non-EU area (+4.6%) contributed positively to the favorable trend in exports and more than the sales to the EU area (+1.5%). In 2017, trade with non-EU countries increased both exports (+8.2%) and imports (+10.8%).

So the export-led growth is stronger outside the Euro area than in it which is not what we might expect as we observe the way that the Euro has been strong as a currency. Effects in this area can be lagged so it is possible via factors such as the J-Curve that the new higher phase for the Euro has yet to kick in in terms of its impact on trade, so we will have to watch this space.


There was some good news on this front in December as the previous analysis had been this.

Taking the average values of September-November, shows that production decreased compared to the previous quarter (-0.2%, ). In the same period all the main industrial groupings recorded a decrease except durable consumer goods (+2.7% compared to the previous quarter).

As you can see that is not what might have been expected but last weeks’ data for December was more upbeat.

In December 2017 the seasonally adjusted industrial production index increased by 1.6% compared with the previous month. The percentage change of the average of the last three months with respect to the previous three months was +0.8.

This meant that the position for the year overall looked much better than the downbeat assessment above.

in the period January-December 2017 the percentage change was +3.0 compared with the same period of

If we move to the outlook for 2018 then the Markit business survey or PMI could not be much more upbeat.

Italy’s manufacturing sector enjoyed a strong start
to 2018, registering the highest growth in output
since early 2011 and one of the greatest rises in
new orders of the past 18 years.

In addition domestic demand was seen adding to the party.

but January data pointed to a growing contribution from within Italy itself.

This leads to hopes for improvement in one of the Achilles heels of the Italian economy.

The response from many manufacturers was to
bolster employment numbers, and January’s survey
indicated the second-strongest rise of employment
in the survey history.

Unemployment and the labour market

At first glance the latest data does not look entirely impressive.

In December 2017, 23.067 million persons were employed, -0.3% over November 2017. Unemployed were
2.791 million, -1.7% over the previous month.

There is a welcome fall in unemployment but employment which these days is often a leading indicator for the economy has dipped too.

Employment rate was 58.0%, -0.2 percentage points over the previous month, unemployment rate was
10.8% -0.1 percentage points over November 2017 and inactivity rate was 34.8%, +0.3 percentage points in
a month.

However if we look back we see that over the past year 173,000 more Italians have been employed and the level of unemployment has fallen by 273,000.  What we are still waiting for however is a clear drop in the unemployment rate which has been stuck around 11% for a while. We are told it has dropped to 10.8% but there has been a recent habit of revising the rate back up to 11% at a later date meaning we have been told more than a few times that it has fallen below it. Sadly much of the unemployment is concentrated at the younger end of the age spectrum.

Youth unemployment rate (aged 15-24) was 32.2%, -0.2 percentage points over the previous month.

So better than Greece but isn’t pretty much everywhere as we again wonder how many of these have never had a job and even more concerning, how many never will?

Sometimes we are told that higher unemployment rates are a consequence of better wages. But is we look at wages growth there does not seem to be much going on here.

The labor market outlook is characterized by the wage
moderation: in 2017 both the index of contractual wages per employee and that of hourly wages increased by +0.6% y-o-y.

On a nominal level that is a fair bit below even the UK but of course the main issue is in real or inflation adjusted terms.

In January 2018, according to preliminary estimates, the Italian consumer price index for the whole nation (NIC) increased by 0.2% on monthly basis and by 0.8% compared with January 2017 (it was +0.9% in December 2017).

So there was in fact a small fall in real wages in 2017 which we need to file away on two fronts. Firstly there is the apparent fact that better economic conditions in Italy are not being accompanied by real wage growth and in fact a small fall. Secondly we need to add that rather familiar message to our global database.

The banks

This is a long running story of how the banking sector carried on pretty much regardless after the credit crunch and built up a large store of non-performing assets or if you prefer bad loans. This has meant that many Italian banks are handicapped in terms of lending to help the economy and some have become zombified. From Bloomberg earlier.

Even after making reductions last year, Italian banks are still weighed down by more than 270 billion euros ($330 billion) of non-performing loans. Struggling households account for almost a fifth of that total, according to the Bank of Italy.

It is hard not to have a wry smile at a proposed solution.

The Bank of Italy says an improvement in the country’s real estate market is helping to reduce the risks for banks.

Whether that will do much good for what has become the symbol of the problem I doubt but here is the new cleaner bailed out Monte Paschi. From Bloomberg on Monday.

The bank, which is cutting about a fifth of its workforce, eliminating branches and plans to sell 28.6 billion euros of bad loans by 2021, posted 501.6 million-euro net loss in the last three months of the year.

How is the bailout going?

The shares were down 2.8 percent at 3.72 euros as of 9:55 a.m. The stock, which returned to trading Oct. 25 after an 10-month suspension, is now valued more than 43 percent below the 6.49 euros apiece paid by Italy for the rescue.

This morning it is 3.44 Euros so the beat goes on especially as we note that pre credit crunch and the various bailouts the equivalent price peak was over 8800.


This issue continues to be ongoing.

The population at 1st January 2018 is estimated to be 60,494,000; the decrease on the previous year was
around 100,000 units (-1.6 per thousand).

Driven by this.

The number of live births dropped to 464 thousand, 2% less than in 2016 and new minimun level ever.

We have seen on the news so often that there is considerable migration to Italy and if we look into the detail we see that not only is it so there is something tucked away in it.

The net international migration in 2017 amounted to +184 thousand, recording a consistent increase on the
previous year (+40 thousand).

Yet Italians themselves continued to leave in net terms as 45,000 returned but 112,000 left which is a little surprising in the circumstances. As to the demographics well here they are.

At 1 January 2018, 22.6% of the population was aged 65 or over, 64.1% was aged between 15 and 64, while
only 13.4% was under 15 years of age. The mean age of the population exceeded 45 years.

The theme is that the natural change has got worse over the past decade rising from pretty much zero to the 183,000 of 2017 but contrary to the news bulletins net immigration is lower as it approached half a million in 2007.


This morning has brought news which will be very familiar to readers of my work which is an Italian economy which seems to struggle to grow at more than around 1% per annum for any sustained period.

In the fourth quarter of 2017 the seasonally and calendar adjusted, chained volume measure of Gross
Domestic Product (GDP) increased by 0.3 per cent with respect to the third quarter of 2017 and by 1.6 per
cent in comparison with the fourth quarter of 2016.

As we note a negative official interest-rate ( -0.4%) and a large amount of balance sheet expansion from the European Central Bank the monetary taps could not be much more open. Italy’s government in particular benefits directly by being able to borrow very cheaply ( ten-year yield 2.05%) when you consider it has a national debt to annual GDP ratio of 134.1%. Thanks Mario!

Thus we return on Valentines Day to the “Girlfriend in a Coma” theme of Bill Emmott which is a shame as Italy is a lovely country. Can it change? Let us hope so and maybe the undeclared economy can be brought to task. Meanwhile if you want to take the Matrix style blue pill here is Bloomberg.

ITALY: GDP expanded by 0.3% in 4Q, a bit less than expected. Still, 2017 was the best growth year (+1.5%) since 2010. Shows how broad-based the euro-area recovery has become. A rising tide lifts all boats





What are the consequences of a weak US Dollar?

So far 2018 has seen an acceleration of a trend we saw last year which is a fall in the value of the US Dollar. The latest push was provided by the US Treasury Secretary only yesterday at Davos. From Bloomberg.

“Obviously a weaker dollar is good for us as it relates to trade and opportunities,” Mnuchin told reporters in Davos. The currency’s short term value is “not a concern of ours at all,” he said.

“Longer term, the strength of the dollar is a reflection of the strength of the U.S. economy and the fact that it is and will continue to be the primary currency in terms of the reserve currency,” he said.

The way it then fell it is probably for best its value is not a concern as the rhetoric was both plain and transparent.

A day before Trump’s scheduled arrival in the Swiss ski resort of Davos for the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin endorsed the dollar’s decline as a benefit to the American economy and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said the U.S. would fight harder to protect its exporters.

The response to the words is a pretty eloquent explanation of why policy makers have a general rule that you do not comment on the level of the exchange rate. Not only might you get something you do not want there is also the issue of being careful what you wish for! Sadly the Rolling Stones were not on the case here.

You can’t always get what you want
But if you try sometime
You’ll find
You get what you need

However you spin it we are in a phase where the US government is encouraging a weaker dollar as part of the America First strategy. It has already produced an echo of the autumn of 2010 if this from the Managing Director of the IMF is any guide.

 “It’s not time to have any kind of currency war,” Lagarde said in an interview with Bloomberg Television.

Criticising someone for rhetoric by upping the rhetoric may not be too bright. Also there are more than a few examples of countries trying to win the race to the bottom around the world.

What does a lower US Dollar do?

Back in November 2015 Stanley Fischer gave us the thoughts of the US Federal Reserve.

To gauge the quantitative effects on exports, the thick blue line in figure 2 shows the response of U.S. real exports to a 10 percent dollar appreciation that is derived from a large econometric model of U.S. trade maintained by the Federal Reserve Board staff. Real exports fall about 3 percent after a year and more than 7 percent after three years.The gradual response of exports reflects that it takes some time for households and firms in foreign countries to substitute away from the now more expensive U.S.-made goods.

Also imports are affected.

The low exchange rate pass-through helps account for the more modest estimated response of U.S. real imports to a 10 percent exchange rate appreciation shown by the thin red line in figure 2, which indicates that real imports rise only about 3-3/4 percent after three years.

This means that the overall economy is affected as shown below.

The staff’s model indicates that the direct effects on GDP through net exports are large, with GDP falling over 1-1/2 percent below baseline after three years. Moreover, the effects materialize quite gradually, with over half of the adverse effects on GDP occurring at a horizon of more than a year.

Okay we need to flip all of that around of course because we are discussing a lower US Dollar this time around. Net exports will be boosted which will raise economic output or GDP over time.

How much?

If we look at the US Dollar Index we see at 89.1 it has already fallen by more than 3% this year. The recent peak was at just over 103 as 2016 ended so we have seen a fall of a bit under 14%. The official US Federal Reserve effective exchange rate has fallen from 128.9 in late December 2016 to 116.8 at the beginning of this week so 116 now say. Conveniently that gives us a fall of the order of 10%.

So if we look up to the preceding analysis we see that via higher exports and reduced imports US GDP will be 1.5% higher in three years time than otherwise.

What about inflation?

There is a lower impact on the US because of the role of the dollar as the reserve currency and in particular as the currency used for pricing the majority of commodities.

While the Board staff uses a range of models to gauge the effect of shocks, the model employed in figure 4–as well as other models used by staff–suggests that the dollar’s large appreciation will probably depress core PCE inflation between 1/4 and 1/2 percentage point this year through this import price channel.

You may note that Stanley Fischer continues the central banking obsession with core inflation measures when major effects will come from food and energy. It would be entertaining when they sit down to luncheon to say that we are having a core day so there isn’t any! Have you ever tried eating an i-pad?

So inflation may be around 0.5% higher.

What about everybody else?

The essential problem with reducing the value of your currency to boost your economy via exports is that overall it is a zero-sum game. As you win somebody else loses.  So the gains are taken from somebody else as no doubt minds in Beijing, Tokyo and Frankfurt are thinking right now. Of course pinning an actual accusation on the United States is not easy because of its persistent trade deficits.

Furthermore the exchange-rate appreciation seen elsewhere will not be welcomed by the ECB ( European Central Bank) and particularly the Bank of Japan. The latter is pursuing an explicit Yen depreciation policy to try to generate some inflation whereas what it has instead seen is a rise towards 109 versus the US Dollar. Of course workers and consumers will have reason to thank the lower dollar as lower inflation will boost their spending power.

Later today we will see how Mario Draghi handles this at the ECB policy meeting press conference. He finds himself pursuing negative interest-rates and still substantial if tapering QE and a stronger currency. It is hard for him to be too critical of the US though when even Christine Lagarde is saying this.


Of course that takes us back to a past competitive depreciation which Germany arranged via its membership of the Euro.


There is a fair bit to consider here. As it stands it looks as though the US economy will benefit over the next 3 years (convenient for the political timetable) by around 1.5% of GDP at the cost of higher inflation of 0.5%. There are two main problems with this type of analysis of which the first is simply the gap between theory and reality. The smooth mathematical curves of econometrics are replaced in practice by businesses and consumers ignoring moves for as long as they can and then responding but by how much and when? So we see a succession of jump moves. The other issue is that exchange-rates are usually on the move and can change in an instant unlike economies leaving us wondering which exchange-rate they are responding too?

Next we have the awkward issue of a country raising interest-rates and seeing a currency depreciation. Theory predicts the reverse. I have a couple of thoughts on this and the first is about timing. In my opinion exchange-rates these days move on expectations of an event so they have already happened before it does. So the current phase of interest-rate rises was reflected in the US Dollar rise from the summer of 2014 to the spring of 2015. That works because if anything we have seen fewer rate rises than expected back then and the bond market has fallen less. As to the Federal Reserve well with the US Dollar here and inflation with a little upwards pressure it will therefore find a scenario which makes it easy for it to keep nudging interest-rates higher.

Meanwhile there are other factors which are hard to quantify but seem to happen. For example a lower dollar coming with higher commodity prices. Hard to explain and of course there are other factors in play, But it seems to have happened again.

Me on Core Finance TV



What are the economic prospects for Germany?

After looking at the strength of the Euro yesterday it is an interesting counterpoint to look at an economy which would otherwise have a much stronger exchange rate. Whilst the Euro may be in a stronger phase and overall pretty much back to where it began in trade-weighted terms ( 99.26%) it is way lower than where a Deutsche Mark would be. For Germany the Euro has ended up providing quite a competitive advantage as who knows to what level it would have soared as we suspect it would have been as attractive as the Swiss Franc. Rather than an exchange rate of around 1.20 to the US Dollar the equivalent rate would no doubt have been somewhere north of 1.50.

That means that the German economic experience of the credit crunch has seen quite a monetary stimulus if we combine a lower than otherwise exchange rate with the negative interest rate of the ECB ( European Central Bank) and of course the Quantitative Easing purchases of German sovereign bonds. If we look at the latter directly then the purchase of 449 billion Euros of German government bonds must have contributed to the German government being able to borrow more cheaply as we note that the ten-year yield is only 0.46% and that Germany is actually paid to borrow out to the 6 year maturity. This is a factor in Germany running a small but consistent budget surplus in recent times and a national debt which is declining both in absolute terms and in relative terms as at the half-way point of 2017 it had fallen to 66% of annual economic output or GDP. So it may not be too long before it passes the Growth and Stability Pact rules albeit over 20 years late! But let us move on noting a combination of monetary expansionism and fiscal conservatism.

The Euro area

Unlike some of the countries we look at and Greece and Italy come to mind particularly the Euro era has been good for the German economy. It opened in 1999 with GDP of 87.7 ( 2010 = 100)  which rose to a peak of 102.6 at the opening of 2008. Like so many countries there was a sharp fall ( 4.5% in the opening quarter of 2009) but the difference is that the economy then recovered strongly to 113.8 in the third quarter of last year. You can add on a bit for the last quarter of 2017 if you like. But the message here is that Germany has recovered pretty strongly from the effect of the credit crunch. Indeed once you start to allow for the fact that some of the economic output in 2008 was false in the sense that otherwise how did we have a bust? You could argue that it has done as well as it did before and maybe better in absolute terms although of course that depends on where you count from. In relative terms the doubt disappears.

Looking Ahead

Yesterday’s Markit PMI business survey could hardly have been much more bullish.

“2017 was a record-breaking year for the German
manufacturing sector: the PMI posted an all-time
high in December, and the current 37-month
sequence of improving business conditions
surpassed the previous record set in the run up to
the financial crisis.

Although there was an ominous tone to the latter part don’t you think?! We have also learnt to be nervous about economic all-time highs. Moving back to the report we see that the German trade surplus seems set to increase further if this is any guide.

Notably, the level of new business received from abroad
rose at the joint-fastest rate in the survey history,
with anecdotal evidence highlighting Asia, the US
and fellow European countries as strong sources of
new orders for German manufacturers.

This morning we saw official data on something that has proved fairly reliable as a leading indicator in the credit crunch era. From Destatis.

In November 2017, roughly 44.7 million persons resident in Germany were in employment according to provisional calculations of the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis). Compared with November 2016, the number of persons in employment increased by 617,000 or 1.4%.

The rise in employment has been pretty consistent over the past year signalling a “steady as she goes” rate of economic growth. It has also led to a further fall in unemployment which is also welcome.

 Adjusted for seasonal and irregular effects, the number of unemployed stood at 1.57 million. It was down by roughly 14,000 people on the previous month. The adjusted unemployment rate was 3.6% in November 2017.

Much better than the Euro area average and better than the UK and US but not Japan which is the leader of this particular pack.


The next issue is to look at wage growth which as we see so often these days seems to be stuck somewhere around 2% per annum even in countries recording a good economic performance. We have seen plenty of reports of wage growth picking up and maybe you could make a case for it rising from 2% to 2.9% over the past year or so but the catch comes if we look back a quarter as it was 2.9% then!

So real wage growth has been solid for these times in Germany since the opening of 2014 but the truth is that it has been driven by lower inflation rather than any trend to higher wages. In what we consider to be the first world wage growth these days seems to be singing along with Bob Seeger and his Silver Bullet Band.

You’re still the same
Moving game to game
Some things never change
You’re still the same

We therefore find ourselves in another quandary for economics 101 which is that economic improvement no longer seems to be accompanied by any meaningful increase in wage growth. A paradigm shift so far anyway. The official data is only up to the half-way point of last year but according to the Bundesbank “Wage growth remained moderate in the third quarter of 2017” so a good 2017 was accompanied by lower real wage growth as far as we know and this from last week will hardly help.

The inflation rate in Germany as measured by the consumer price index is expected to be 1.7% in December 2017. Compared with November 2017, consumer prices are expected to increase by 0.6%. Based on the results available so far, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that, on an annual average, the inflation rate is expected to stand at 1.8% in 2017.

On this road expansionary monetary policy has a contractionary consequence via its impact on real wages and inflation targets should be lowered. Meanwhile it will be party time at the Bundesbank towers as this is quite close to the perfect level of inflation or just below 2%.


Let us welcome the economic good news from 2017 and the apparent immediate prospects for 2018. We can throw in that the Euro era has turned out to be good for Germany overall as the lower exchange rate cushioned the effect of the credit crunch and helped it continue this.

The foreign trade balance showed a surplus of 18.9 billion euros in October 2017. In October 2016, the surplus amounted to 18.8 billion euros.

For everyone else there are two problems here. Whilst there are gains from Germany being efficient and producing products which are in worldwide demand a persistent surplus of this kind does drain demand from other countries especially if helped by an exchange rate depreciation of the sort provided by Euro area membership. It was one of the imbalances which fed into the credit crunch and which the establishment told us needed dealing with urgently. So urgent in fact that nothing has happened.

So it looks like Germany will have a good opening to 2017 and first half to the year. But that is as far as we can reasonably see these days and is an answer to those on social media who asked why I did not join the annual forecasts published ( for the UK as it happens) yesterday. If there is to be a cloud in the silver lining then it seems set to come from this.

In the third quarter of 2017, the perceptible expansion
in the broad monetary aggregate M3
continued; the annual growth rate at the end
of the quarter came to 5.1%, remaining at the
level observed over the last two and a half
years ( Bundesbank )

The old rules of thumb may not apply but where is the inflation suggested? Also there is this.

Consumer credit likewise continued to expand
substantially during the period under review,
with its annual growth rate climbing to 6.7%
by the end of September

Those are Euro area figures and the consumer credit growth seems light weight compared to the UK but that is perhaps only because we are an extreme. Moving onto German data there is some specific which seems rather Anglicised.

Once again, loans for house purchase were a
decisive driver of growth in lending to households.
However, their quarterly net increase has
already been relatively constant for several
quarters, meaning that at 3.9%, their annual
growth rate remained unchanged on the year.

The old theories of overheating risks cannot be fully applied because so far at least the wages element has disappeared but that does not mean that some of the other parts have done so. After all procyclical monetary policy usually ends in tears for someone.

The future

With the caveats expressed above this does make one stop and think.


The Euro rally has ignored the monetary policy of the ECB

Firstly let me welcome your all to 2018 and wish you a Happy New Year. Although those getting ready for the new Mifid ( ii ) rules still feel a little hungover. This bit looks good.

Brokers will be driven to move transactions in a wide range of securities onto open, regulated platforms, limiting unreported broker-to-broker deals that have been the traditional way to trade things such as commodities, bonds and energy.

This bit however begs more than a few questions.

Europe’s new rules require research to be sold and billed separately. This is very disruptive — as banks and brokers struggle to comply, fund managers rethink how they operate and analysts find themselves forced to prove their worth.

Am I alone in thinking that for more than a few this will prove to be a struggle?

The Euro

If we move to news then in financial markets our attention is attracted to thresholds and we are seeing a period of Euro strength as it rallies above 1.20 versus the US Dollar.

Of course this phase also involves a period of US Dollar weakness on the other side of the coin. This combination does pose a question for what we might call economics 101 as we saw only last month the US Federal Reserve do this.

In view of realized and expected labor market conditions and inflation, the Committee decided to raise the target range for the federal funds rate to 1-1/4 to 1-1/2 percent.

So on an interest-rate comparison basis there would be an argument for a higher US Dollar as not only is the ECB ( European Central Bank) deposit rate at -0.4% it has no  current plans to raise it and its President Mario Draghi has hinted several times that there may be no rise in his term. Also there is a difference in terms of QE ( Quantitative Easing) as the US Federal Reserve is beginning to reduce its holdings albeit very slowly whereas the ECB will continue to purchase a further 30 billion Euros a month until at least September. Thus whilst the ECB has reduced the size of its monthly purchases it remains a buyer as the Federal Reserve sells. Back in the day one of the “truths” so to speak of QE was considered to be that it would weaken a currency and yet it is hard not to have a wry smile as we observe exactly the reverse.

Trade Weighted

Actually the pattern here is very similar to that of the chart above showing the US Dollar. The recent rally started in the spring from just below 93 and now is above 99. Whilst there will be individual moves it is time for another wry smile as we note that for all the panics and shocks the Euro is very close to the 100 at which it was first measured in 1999.

As we have looked at several times before this reduces the inflation  trajectory and according to the Draghi Rule from March 2014 will have this impact.

Now, as a rule of thumb, each 10% permanent effective exchange rate appreciation lowers inflation by around 40 to 50 basis points.

This leaves us with something of a conundrum as the ECB is below its inflation target so will now presumably have to run a more easy monetary policy than expected which ordinarily should weaken the Euro, but so far we have seen the reverse.

Why is the Euro in a stronger phase?

A major strategic strength for the Euro is provided by this.

The current account of the euro area recorded a surplus of €30.8 billion in October 2017 (see Table 1). This reflected surpluses for goods (€26.2 billion), primary income(€9.8 billion) and services (€7.3 billion), which were partly offset by a deficit for secondary income (€12.5 billion). ( ECB data).

This continued a pattern which if we look further back is a song with a powerful and consistent beat.

The 12-month cumulated current account for the period ending in October 2017 recorded a surplus of €349.6 billion (3.2% of euro area GDP), compared with one of €363.4 billion (3.4% of euro area GDP) for the 12 months to October 2016.

Whilst balance of payments data remain unreliable as for example we see examples of countries who both think they have a surplus with each other! The Euro area has mostly via Germany run consistent current account surpluses providing support for the currency value.

If economic life was that simple then the Euro would only rise and of course it is not but another factor weighed in during 2017 which was the better economic performance of the Euro area.

We don’t see it as a recovery anymore, but as an expansion. The annual growth rate in the euro area is the strongest for ten years. We expect a GDP growth rate of 2.4% for 2017which by European standards is quite high. Business and consumer confidence are at their highest levels for over 17 years, according to the November reading of the European Commission’s Economic Sentiment Indicator. Seven million jobs have been created in the euro area since mid-2013. ( Benoit Coeure in Caixin General on Saturday).

Indeed he went so far as to imply this is the best period since the Euro began.

The breadth of the expansion in terms of countries and sectors is greater than at any point over the last 20 years.

The better news has been reinforced by the private sector PMI surveys published earlier this morning. From Markiteconomics.

The eurozone manufacturing sector ended 2017 on
a high note. Strong rates of expansion in output, new
orders and employment pushed the final IHS Markit
Eurozone Manufacturing PMI® to 60.6 in December,
its best level since the survey began in mid-1997.

Or as the Black-Eyed Peas would put it.

I got that boom, boom, boom
That future boom, boom, boom
Let me get it now

The outlook looks bright as well/

Forwardlooking indicators bode well for the New Year: new orders rose at a near-record pace, while purchasing
growth hit a new peak as firms readied themselves
for higher production. Meanwhile, job creation was
maintained at November’s record pace.

There was particular optimism for Germany which means the official data series will have to do quite a bit of catching up to play the same song. Also it was nice to see Greece simply recording an expansion as that has been so so rare there.


There is a fair bit to consider here but we are seeing a phase where the better economic performance of the Euro area is outweighing relative interest-rates for currency investors. The economic good news is problematic at a time of lower inflation as the ECB continues with both a negative interest-rate and monthly QE at a time of this.

The annual growth rate in the euro area is the strongest for ten years.

There have of course been better decades but even so the ECB is out on something of a limb here. They may yet regret not putting asset prices into the inflation measures and more than a few policymakers may be grateful that the higher Euro is putting a bit of a brake on things.

Meanwhile a stronger Euro is as I pointed out a little while back releasing a little of the pressure on the Swiss Franc as the exchange rate between the two at 1.17 edges its way back to the 1.20 floor of three years ago.

Does every silver lining need a cloud? Well a dark cloud is certainly provided by this from the Financial Times.

Now it says the “restatement of the financial statements of Steinhoff Investment Holdings Limited for years prior to 2015 is likely to be required and investors in Steinhoff are advised to exercise caution in relation to such statements”

The cake trolley at the Bank of Finland will no longer be arriving at the desk of whoever decided that Steinhoff was a good investment for the corporate bond QE programme.



The ECB has it successes but also plenty of problems

Let is continue the central banking season which allows us to end the week with some good news. As this week has developed there has been good news about economic growth in the Euro area.

The Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) reports that, in the third quarter of 2017, the gross domestic product (GDP) rose 0.8% on the second quarter of 2017 after adjustment for price, seasonal and calendar variations. In the first half of 2017, the GDP had also increased markedly, by 0.6% in the second quarter and 0.9% in the first quarter.

It has been a strong 2017 so far for the German economy but of course whilst analogies about it being the engine of the Euro area economy might be a bitter thinner on the ground due to dieselgate there are still elements of truth about it. But we know that a rising tide does not float all economic boats so ECB President Mario Draghi will have been pleased to see this about a perennial struggler.

In the third quarter of 2017 the seasonally and calendar adjusted, chained volume measure of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) increased by 0.5 per cent with respect to the second quarter of 2017 and by 1.8 per cent in comparison with the third quarter of 2016.

Of course Mario will be especially pleased to see better news from his home country of Italy especially at a time when more issues about the treatment of non-performing loans at its banks are emerging. Also this bank seems to be running its own version of the never-ending story, from the Financial Times.

A group of investors in the world’s oldest bank, Italy’s Monte dei Paschi di Siena, have filed a lawsuit in Luxembourg after it announced bonds would be annulled as part of a state-backed recapitalisation.

But in Mario’s terms he is likely to consider the overall numbers below to be a delivery on his “whatever it takes” speech and promise.

Seasonally adjusted GDP rose by 0.6% in the euro area…….Compared with the same quarter of the previous year, seasonally adjusted GDP rose by 2.5% in the euro


This is a more problematic area for Mario Draghi as this from his speech in this morning indicates.

According to a broad range of measures, underlying inflation has ticked up moderately since the start of this year, but it still lacks clear upward momentum.

This matters because unlike the Bank of England the ECB takes inflation targeting seriously and a past President established a rather precise estimate of it at 1.97% per annum. We seem unlikely now to ever find out how Mario Draghi would deal with above target inflation but he finds himself in what for him maybe a sort of dream. Economic growth has recovered with inflation below target so he can say this.

This recalibration of our asset purchases, supported by the sizeable stock of acquired assets and the forthcoming reinvestments, and by our forward guidance on interest rates, helps to maintain the necessary degree of accommodation and thereby to accompany the economic recovery in an appropriate way.

So we will get negative interest-rates ( -0.4%) for quite a while yet as he has hinted in the past that they may persist past the end of his term. Also of course whilst at a slower rate ( 30 billion Euros a month) the QE ( Quantitative Easing) programme continues. Even that has worked out pretty well for Mario as continuing at the previous pace seemed set to run out of German bonds to buy.


However continuing with monetary expansion into a boom is either a new frontier or something which later will have us singing along with Lyndsey Buckingham.

(I think I’m in)(Yes) I think I’m in trouble
(I think I’m in) I think I’m in trouble

Corporate Bonds

When you buy 124 billion Euros of corporate bonds in a year and a few months there are bound to be consequences.

“Tequila Tequila” indeed. What could go wrong with this.?

OK, we are officially in la la land. A BBB rated company just borrowed 500 million EUR for 3 years with a negative yield of -0.026 %. A first..  ( h/t @S_Mikhailovich )

You can take your pick whether you think that Veolia is able to issue debt at a negative interest-rate or at only 0.05% above the swaps rate is worse.

Mario Draghi explained this sort of thing earlier in a way that the Alan Parsons Project would have described as psychobabble.

By accumulating a portfolio of long-duration assets, the central bank can compress term premia by extracting duration risk from private investors. Via this “duration extraction” effect, the central bank frees up risk bearing capacity in markets, spurs a rebalancing of private portfolios toward the remaining securities, and thus lowers term premia and yields across a range of financial assets.

Moral hazard anyone?

The dangers of this sort of thing have been highlighted by what has happened to Carillion this morning.

The wages problem

It is sometimes argued in the UK that weak wage growth is a consequence of high employment and low unemployment. But we see that there are issues too in the Euro area where the latter situations whilst improved are still poorer.

A key issue here is wage growth.Since the trough in mid-2016, growth in compensation per employee has risen, recovering around half of the gap towards its historical average. But overall trends remain subdued and are not broad-based.

Indeed if we look back to late May Mario gave us a rather similar reason to what we often here in the UK as an explanation of weak wages growth.From the Financial Times.

Mr Draghi also acknowledged concerns that sinking unemployment was not leading to a recovery in well-paid permanent jobs………….Mr Draghi said he agreed. “What you say is true,” he said. “Some of this job creation is not of good quality.”

The Italian Job

As I hinted earlier in this piece there are ever more signs of trouble in the Italian banking sector. There have been many cases of can kicking in the credit crunch era but this has been something of a classic with of course a dash of Italian style and finesse. From the FT.

Mid-sized Genoan bank Carige’s future looked uncertain this week after a banking consortium pulled its support for a €560m capital increase demanded by European regulators. Shares in another mid-sized bank Credito Valtellinese fell 8.5 per cent to a market value of €144m after it announced a larger than anticipated €700m capital raising to shore up its balance sheet.

There are issues with banks elsewhere as investors holding bonds which were wiped out insist on their day in court.


As you can see there is indeed good news for Mario Draghi to celebrate as not only is the Euro area seeing solid economic growth it is expected to continue.

From the ECB’s perspective, we have increasing confidence that the recovery is robust and that this momentum will continue going forward.

The problem though is where does it go from here? Even Mario himself worries about the consequences of monetary policy which has been so easy for so long and is now pro cyclical rather than anti cyclical before of course dismissing them. But unless you believe that growth will continue forever and recessions have been banished there is the issue of how do you deal with the latter when you already have negative interest-rates and ongoing QE?

Also the inflation target problem is covered up by describing it is price stability when of course it is anything but.

Ensuring price stability is a precondition for the economy to be able to grow along a balanced path that can be sustained in the long run.

Wage growth would be improved in real terms if inflation was lower and not higher.

Also Mario has changed his tune on the fiscal situation which he used to regularly compare favourably to elsewhere.

This means actively putting our fiscal houses in order and building up buffers for the future – not just waiting for growth to gradually reduce debt. It means implementing structural reforms that will allow our economies to converge and grow at higher speeds over the long-term.

Number Crunching

This from Bloomberg seemed way too high to me.

Italy’s failure to qualify for the soccer World Cup finals for the first time in 60 years may cost the country about 1 billion euros ($1.2 billion), the former chairman of the national federation said.

Me on Core Finance






Let us continue to remember what has been inflicted on Greece

Yesterday the Financial Times revealed the results of an intriguing poll in Greece,

More than half of all Greeks agreed it was a mistake to have joined the euro. Barely a third of Greeks thought the euro wasn’t a mistake. Even among those who wanted to remain in the euro area at the end of 2015, fewer than half would have chosen to join again if given the chance to go back in time and warn their fellow citizens.

That survey took place almost two years ago. Since then, Walter finds that support for the euro has dropped by 10 percentage points.

Frankly I find it a bit of a surprise that even more Greeks do not think that joining the Euro was a mistake! But in life we see so often that some support the status quo again and again almost regardless of what it is. After all so many in the media and in my profession have sung along to Blur about Euro area membership for Greece.

There’s no other way
There’s no other way
All that you can do is watch them play

Regular readers will be aware that I have been arguing there was and indeed is another way since 2011. One of the saddest parts of this sorry saga has been the way that those who have plunged Greece into a severe economic depression accused those suggesting alternatives of heading for economic catastrophe.

If we look at the current state of play we see this.

The available seasonally adjusted data indicate that in the 2nd quarter of 2017 the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in volume terms increased by 0.5% in comparison with the 1 st quarter of 2017, while in comparison with the 2nd quarter of 2016, it increased by 0.8%.

So economic growth but not very much especially if we note that this is a good year for the Euro area in total. So far not much of that has fed through to Greece although any signs of growth are welcome. To put this in economic terms this is an L-shaped recovery as opposed to the V-shaped one in my scenario. The horizontal part of the L is the fact that growth after the drop has been weak. The vertical drop in the L is illustrated by the fact that twice during its crisis the Greek economy shrank at an annual rate of 10% leaving an economy which had quarterly GDP of 63 billion Euros as 2008 opened now has one of 46.4 billion Euros. By anyone’s standards that is quite an economic depression.

Some good news

Here I would like to switch to what used to be the objective of the International Monetary Fund or IMF which is trade. In essence it helped countries with trade deficits by suggesting programme’s involving reform, austerity and devaluation/depreciation. The French managing directors of the IMF were never going to be keen on devaluation for Greece for obvious reasons and as to reform well you hear Mario Draghi call for that at every single European Central Bank press conference which only left austerity.

This was a shame as you see there was quite a problem. From the Bank of Greece.

In 2010, the current account deficit fell by €1.8 billion or 6.9% in comparison with 2009 and came to €24.0 billion or 10.5% of GDP (2009: 11.0% of GDP).

Even the improvement back then was bad as it was caused by this.

Specifically, the import bill for goods excluding oil and ships fell by €3.9 billion or 12.6%,

The deficit improvement was caused by the economic collapse. Now let us take the TARDIS of Dr. Who and leap forwards in time to the present.

In the January-August 2017 period, the current account improved year-on-year, as the €211 million deficit turned into a €123 million surplus.

This was driven by a welcome rise in tourism to Greece.

In August 2017, the current account showed a surplus of €1.8 billion, up by €163 million year-on-year………The rise in the surplus of the services balance is due to an improvement mostly in the travel balance, since non-residents’ arrivals and the corresponding receipts increased by 14.3% and 16.4%, respectively.

The Bank of Greece is so pleased with the new state of play that it did some in-depth research to discover that it is essentially a European thing.

In January-August 2017, travel receipts increased by 9.1%, relative to the same period of 2016, to €10,524 million. This development is attributed to a 14.5% rise in receipts from within the EU28 to €7,117 million,

I am pleased to note that my country is doing its bit to help Greece which with the weaker Pound £ might not have been expected and that Germans seem both welcome and willing to go.

as did receipts from Germany, by 29.0% to €1,638 million. Receipts from the United Kingdom also increased, by 17.7% to €1,512 million.

So finally we have some better news but there are two catches sadly. The first is that it has taken so long and the second is that Greek should have a solid surplus in terms of scale after such a depression.

Money Money Money

A sign of what Taylor Swift would call “trouble,trouble,trouble” can be found in the monetary system. The media world may have moved onto pastures new but Greece is still suffering from the capital flight of 2015.

On 26 October 2017 the Governing Council of the ECB did not object to an ELA-ceiling for Greek banks of €28.6 billion, up to and including Wednesday, 8 November 2017, following a request by the Bank of Greece.

The amount of Emergency Liquidity Assistance is shrinking but it remains a presence indicating that the banking system still cannot stand on its own two feet. This means that the flow of credit is still not what it should be.

In September 2017, the annual growth rate of total credit extended to the economy stood at -1.5%, unchanged from the previous month and the monthly net flow was negative at €552 million, compared with a negative net flow of €241 million in the previous month.

Also in a country where the central bank has official interest-rates of 0% and -0.4% we see that banks remain afraid to spread the word to ordinary depositors.

The overall weighted average interest rate on all new deposits stood at 0.29%, unchanged from the previous month.

Also we learn that negative official interest-rates are not destructive to bank profits and how banks plan to recover profits in one go.

The spread* between loan and deposit rates stood at 4.26 percentage points from 4.28 points in the previous month.


There is a lot to consider here but we can see clearly that the “internal devaluation” economic model or if you prefer the suppression of real wages has been a disaster on an epic scale. Economic output collapsed as wages dropped and unemployment soared. Even now the unemployment rate is 21% and the youth unemployment is 42.8%, how many of the latter will never find employment? As for the outlook well in the positive situation that the Euro area sees overall this from Markit on Greek manufacturing prospects is a disappointment.

“The latest PMI data continue to paint a positive
picture of the Greek manufacturing sector, with the
headline PMI signalling an improvement in
business conditions for the fifth month in
succession……….There was, however, a notable slowdown in output growth, which poses a slight cause for concern
going forward.

A bit more than a slight concern I would say.

Meanwhile I note that the media emphasis has moved on as this from Bloomberg Gadfly indicates.

Greece is taking a step closer to get the respect it deserves from Europe.

It is how?

Yields on the country’s government bonds, which have already taken great strides lower this year, hit a new low last week on news the government is preparing a major debt swap.

I have no idea how the latter means the former but let us analyse the state of play. Lower bond yields for Greece are welcome but are currently irrelevant as it is essentially funded by the institutions and mostly by the European Stability Mechanism. There are in fact so few bonds to trade.

So Greece will have an opportunity to issue debt more expensively than it can fund itself via the ESM now? Why would it do that? We come back to the fact that it would get it out of the austerity programme! Not quite the Respect sung about by Aretha Franklin is it?