Central banks are increasingly entering the world of politics

Yesterday brought a barrage of central banking news. So let us start with something rather remarkable from the head of the world’s number one which is the US Federal Reserve. The crucial part of the speech given by Jerome Powell to the National Association for Business Economists is below.

The expansion is still far from complete. At this early stage, I would argue that the risks of policy intervention are still asymmetric. Too little support would lead to a weak recovery, creating unnecessary hardship for households and businesses. Over time, household insolvencies and business bankruptcies would rise, harming the productive capacity of the economy, and holding back wage growth. By contrast, the risks of overdoing it seem, for now, to be smaller. Even if policy actions ultimately prove to be greater than needed, they will not go to waste. The recovery will be stronger and move faster if monetary policy and fiscal policy continue to work side by side to provide support to the economy until it is clearly out of the woods.

Some of the economics is really rather dubious. But the main driver is that he is interfering in a political decision which is fiscal policy in the middle of an election campaign. It used to be considered the the Federal Reserve would go into a type of purdah during an election campaign but apparently not now. In the past that would usually mean a period where interest-rates would not be changed.The situation is somewhat different now as interest-rates have already been reduced so close to 0% so the weapon of choice would be more QE bond buying but the principle is the same.

The Economics

The claim that the risk of overdoing policy actions is small is familiar territory for central bankers. But this is really rather extraordinary.

Even if policy actions ultimately prove to be greater than needed, they will not go to waste.

Such a situation would be likely to be one exhibiting inflation. The inflation would be most likely to be in house and other asset prices but none the less would be there, albeit it would be ignored by the main consumer inflation measures.

Also if we look at the opening speech we see some familiar cheerleading for policy.

As the coronavirus spread across the globe, the U.S. economy was in its 128th month of expansion—the longest in our recorded history—and was generally in a strong position.

So strong in fact that “Moderate growth” is considered to be “slightly above-trend”

We travel a similar journey if we look at his view of the recovery which is quite a success.

After rising to 14.7 percent in April, the unemployment rate is back to 7.9 percent, clearly a significant and rapid rebound.

But then there is quite a bit of slip-sliding away.

A broader measure that better captures current labor market conditions—by adjusting for mistaken characterizations of job status, and for the decline in labor force participation since February—is running around 11 percent.

I have pointed out more than a few times how and why the international definition of unemployment has failed us in this pandemic. So it is more than disappointing to see a central banker who should know better using it. In a familiar theme that is the behaviour of a politician.

Meanwhile if we switch to actual politicians the fiscal stimulus call had a bit of trouble with The Donald.

Nancy Pelosi is asking for $2.4 Trillion Dollars to bailout poorly run, high crime, Democrat States, money that is in no way related to COVID-19. We made a very generous offer of $1.6 Trillion Dollars and, as usual, she is not negotiating in good faith. I am rejecting their request, and looking to the future of our Country.

Top of the Class

The ECB decided to issue a career enhancing discussion paper yesterday.

Despite this renewed debate, traditional indices of central bank independence do not suggest a deterioration in central banks’ de jure independence after the GFC. ( GFC = Global Financial Crisis)

Lewis Carroll would be proud. Although there is a brief flash of insight.

The benefits of central bank independence are currently not obvious for many citizens,

Really?! However we return to a place “far,far,away” in the section on the ECB itself.

There have been no visible changes in either the de jure or actual independence of the ECB. The legal frameworks protecting the ECB’s independence have been tested,
and have served to establish its independence more firmly.

Meanwhile back on the ranch the ECB has a President who is a politician and former French Finance Minister and a Vice-President who is the former Economy Minister of Spain. So independence from political control has been established by er, putting politicians in charge! It does at least explain this bit.

Comments by euro area governments on the ECB’s policy decisions are unusual.

Why would then when it is doing their bidding? After all if monetary policy was more overtly under the control of politicians how much more could they have done?

If we switch to the Bank of Russia we get a laugh out loud section. We are assured this.

Central bank independence seems to be observed in Russia, although it was not tested in a controversy with the government in the analysed period.

The idea of independence under Vladimir Putin seems not far off insane which somewhat bizarrely they then confess.

In January 2015, the head of monetary policy was reportedly replaced by a person more acceptable to
bankers, who had called for lower interest rates.

Seems to be a similar model to Roman Abramovich at Chelsea football club albeit no manager there survives for that long.

Interest-Rate Cuts

Just when you though that this game might be over there is an early premonition of Halloween. From the Wall Street Journal.

European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde said the bank is ready to inject fresh monetary stimulus to support the eurozone’s stuttering economic recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic, including by cutting a key interest rate further below zero.

Just as a reminder the Deposit Rate and the Current Account Rate are already -0.5%. Last time this came up for discussion ( about a year ago) it was about a move to -0.6%. Does anybody believe a 0.1% move would make any difference right now?

Insane in the membrane
Insane in the brain!
Insane in the membrane
Insane in the brain! ( Cypress Hill )

There are three issues with this. The first is simply that the evidence is that this does not work as otherwise why so we need ever more doses of it? This leads her to an official denial and we know what to do with them.

ECB hasn’t yet reached the point where a fresh interest-rate cut would do more harm than good, known to economists as the reversal rate. ( WSJ)

Next comes the international impact as another interest-rate cut would affect countries which explicitly ( Denmark) and implicitly (Switzerland) set their interest-rates against the Euro exchange-rate. Thirdly we are pretty much back to trying to devalue the Euro which relates to the point before.

Comment

The problem here is that central banks have found themselves behaving like politicians.The move towards independence did not last long as the various establishments shifted towards appointing people who were and are “one of us”. That is most explicit at the ECB where an actual politician in Christine Lagarde is President. In the United States we have seen a different tack where Jerome Powell was seemingly pressurised by President Trump to do his bidding and cut interest-rates. Neither looks especially independent. As to fiscal policy in the US President Trump may already be switching his tune.

If I am sent a Stand Alone Bill for Stimulus Checks ($1,200), they will go out to our great people IMMEDIATELY. I am ready to sign right now. Are you listening Nancy?

That is the problem with playing politics as it can change daily and indeed hourly but the economy cannot.

Rather ironically a day which started with Jerome Powell calling for more like Oliver Twist and the President saying what? just like The Master in the story had another turn. Until then US bond yields were rising ( 30 year at 1.6%) meaning that we might actually see some of the promised Yield Curve Control. But the Trump Tweet ended that at least for now.

Is the US economy slowing again?

Yesterday brought news that upset something of a sacred cow of these times. And no I do not mean the fact that Lionel Messi not only still has in his possession but actually uses a fax machine. That perhaps trumps even his transfer request. Across the Atlantic came news which challenged the growing consensus about economies soaring up, up and away after the Covid-19 pandemic. So let me hand you over to the Conference Board.

The Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index® decreased in August, after declining in July. The Index now stands at 84.8 (1985=100), down from 91.7 in July. The Present Situation Index – based on consumers’ assessment of current business and labor market conditions – decreased sharply from 95.9 to 84.2. The Expectations Index – based on consumers’ short-term outlook for income, business, and labor market conditions – declined from 88.9 in July to 85.2 this month.

As the consumer is a large part of the US economy a further decline in August poses a question for the recovery we are being promised. Indeed those promising such a recovery forecast it would be 93 so they seem to be inhabiting a different universe. They managed to miss consumers reporting that things had got substantially worse in August. The expectations index decline was more minor but it is on the back of a much lower current reading.

The accompanying explanation put some more meat on the bones.

“Consumer Confidence declined in August for the second consecutive month,” said Lynn Franco, Senior Director of Economic Indicators at The Conference Board. “The Present Situation Index decreased sharply, with consumers stating that both business and employment conditions had deteriorated over the past month. Consumers’ optimism about the short-term outlook, and their financial prospects, also declined and continues on a downward path. Consumer spending has rebounded in recent months but increasing concerns amongst consumers about the economic outlook and their financial well-being will likely cause spending to cool in the months ahead.”

That made me look into the detail for the jobs market which confirmed why consumers think that things have got worse.

Consumers’ appraisal of the job market was also less favorable. The percentage of consumers saying jobs are “plentiful” declined from 22.3 percent to 21.5 percent, while those claiming jobs are “hard to get” increased from 20.1 percent to 25.2 percent.

The change in the “plentiful” number is within the margin of error but the “hard to get” shift is noticeable. There was a similar shift in business conditions where there was what seems a significant increase in the “bad” category.

The percentage of consumers claiming business conditions are “good” declined from 17.5 percent to 16.4 percent, while those claiming business conditions are “bad” increased from 38.9 percent to 43.6 percent.

As you can see below this is a long-running series and so it comes with some credibility.

In 1967, The Conference Board began the Consumer Confidence Survey (CCS) as a mail survey
conducted every two months; in June 1977, the CCS began monthly collection and publication. The CCS
has maintained consistent concepts, definitions, questions, and mail survey operations since its
inception.

The alternative view was provided by MarketWatch.

What they are saying? “I have to admit that I do not take this latest reading at face value,” said chief economist Stephen Stanley of Amherst Pierpont Securities. “If you believe the number, then consumers are feeling worse in August than they were in the depths of the lockdown. I can’t imagine that anyone believes that.”

Perhaps he was one of those who thought it would be 93.

The Housing Market

We can now shift to a look at the market which will have every telescope at the US Federal Reserve pointing at it.

Sales of new single-family houses in July 2020 were at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 901,000, according to
estimates released jointly today by the U.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
This is 13.9 percent (±20.0 percent)* above the revised June rate of 791,000 and is 36.3 percent (±27.4 percent)
above the July 2019 estimate of 661,000.

There may well have been a cheer at the Fed as the news was released. In absolute terms the main rise was in the south but in percentage terms it was the Mid-West that led with a more than 50% rise on the previous average for this year.

However there is a catch.

For Sale Inventory and Months’ Supply
The seasonally-adjusted estimate of new houses for sale at the end of July was 299,000. This represents a supply of
4.0 months at the current sales rate.

That does not add up until we remind ourselves that like the GDP data the numbers are annualised. If you check the actual data sales rose from 75,000 in June to 78,000 in July compared to a nadir of 52,000 in April.

So we see that for all the hype actual new homes sales rose by around 40,000 in response to this reported by Yahoo Finance.

The weekly average rates for new mortgages as of 20th August were quoted by Freddie Mac to be:

  • 30-year fixed rates increased by 3 basis points to 2.99% in the week. Rates were down from 3.56% from a year ago. The average fee remained unchanged at 0.8 points.
  • 15-year fixed rates rose by 8 basis points to 2.54% in the week. Year-on-year, rates were down from 3.03%. The average fee fell from 0.8 points to 0.7 points.
  • 5-year fixed rates increased from 2.90% to 2.91% in the week. Rates were down by 41 points from last year’s 3.32%. The average fee fell from 0.4 points to 0.3 points.

House Prices

Our central bankers would also be scanning for house price data.

The S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller U.S. National Home Price NSA Index, covering all nine U.S. census divisions, reported a 4.3% annual gain in June, no change from the previous month.

Actually it is a 3 month average so if you prefer it is a second quarter number so apparently as the economy plunged house prices rose. Some detail as to what happened where is below.

“June’s gains were quite broad-based. Prices increased in all 19 cities for which we have data, accelerating in five of them. Phoenix retains the top spot for the 13th consecutive month, with a gain of 9.0% for June. Home prices in Seattle rose by 6.5%, followed by Tampa at 5.9% and Charlotte at 5.7%. As has been the case for the last several months, prices were particularly strong in the Southeast and West, and comparatively weak in the Midwest and (especially) Northeast.

Comment

The consensus view is along the lines of this from the end of last week.

  • The New York Fed Staff Nowcast stands at 14.6% for 2020:Q3.
  • News from this week’s data releases decreased the nowcast for 2020:Q3 by 0.2 percentage point.
  • Negative surprises from the Empire State Manufacturing survey and housing starts data drove most of the decrease.

A strong rebound in the economy is the expectation but the consumer confidence report poses a question about some of that. Then we note that the housing data looks less positive once we allow for the annualisation and indeed seasonal adjustment in a year which is anything but normal.

That provides some food for thought for the US Federal Reserve as it gets ready to host its annual “Jackson Hole” symposium. I have put it in quote because this year the trip is virtual rather than real. Should they announce as they have been hinting that the new policy will be to target average inflation – which will be a loosening as the measure of official inflation is below target – we are left wondering one more time if Newt from the film Aliens will be right again?

It wont make any difference

The Investing Channel

The fraudsters want to raise the US inflation target

Today brings us a new variation on an old theme. This is the issue of what is the right level for an inflation target and sometimes we go as far as to whether there should be one at all? This begins with something of a fluke or happenstance. This is the reality that inflation targets are usually set at 2% per annum following the lead set by New Zealand back in the day. This has become something of a Holy Grail for central banksters in spite of the fact that it had no theoretical backing as this from the Riksbank of Sweden explains.

There was no relevant academic research from which to draw support; instead, the New Zealand authorities had to launch the new regime more or less as an “experiment” and quite simply see how well it worked in practice.

In fact it was as we see so often a case of trying to fit later theory to earlier practice.

This shows that it does not seem to be until the mid-1990s, i.e. about five years after its introduction in practice, that inflation targeting began to attract any significant interest in the academic research.

Basocally it was from a different world where inflation was higher and they wanted something of an anchor and an achievable objective.

Also there is another swerve as other time the central bankster preference for theory over reality has led to claims that it provides price stability when it does not. Let me illustrate from the European Central Bank or ECB.

 The ECB has defined price stability as a year-on-year increase in the Harmonised Index of Consumer Prices (HICP) for the euro area of below 2%.

The truth is in some ways in the “as defined” bit because if we return to the real world it simply isn’t. Also the inflation measure ignores owner-occupied housing an area where we often find inflation. It was relative price stability when inflation was higher but was never updated with the times leaving central bankers aping first world war generals and fighting the previous war.

What about now?

Here is CNBC from earlier this month.

Recent statements from Fed officials and analysis from market veterans and economists point to a move to “average inflation” targeting in which inflation above the central bank’s usual 2% target would be tolerated and even desired.

Actually then CNBC became refreshingly honest.

To achieve that goal, officials would pledge not to raise interest rates until both the inflation and employment targets are hit. With inflation now closer to 1% and the jobless rate higher than it’s been since the Great Depression, the likelihood is that the Fed could need years to hit its targets.

Not fully honest though because we only need to look back to yesterday and the Japanese experience which has gone on for (lost) decades. This theme was added to last week by an Economic Letter from the San Francisco Fed.

Average-inflation targeting is one approach policymakers could use to help address these challenges. Taking into account previous periods of below-target inflation, average-inflation targeting overshoots to bring the average rate back to target over time. If the public perceives it to be credible, average-inflation targeting can help solidify inflation expectations at the 2% inflation target by providing a better inflation anchor and thus maintain space for potential interest rate cuts. It importantly can help lessen the constraint from the effective lower bound in recessions by inducing policymakers to overshoot the inflation target and provide more accommodation in the future.

I have helped out by highlighting the bits which exhibit extreme Ivory Tower style thinking. In general people think inflation is under recorded and would be more sure of this id they knew that housing inflation is either ignored or in the case of the US fantasy rents which are never paid are used to estimate it. It turns into something the Arctic Monkeys dang about.

Fake tales of San Francisco
Echo through the room

Yesterday Bloomberg suggested such a policy was on its way but got itself in something of a mess.

But the Fed’s preferred measure of inflation has consistently fallen short, averaging just 1.4% since the target’s introduction.

The preferred measure PCE ( Personal Consumption Expenditure) was chosen because it gives a lower reading than the more commonly known CPI in the US. This is a familiar tactic by central banksters and if we add in the gap which is often around 0.4% we see things change. Next apparently things move in response to what the Fed is thinking as opposed to the interest-rate cuts, bond buying and credit easing.

“Rising inflation expectations are, in part, indicative of the market beginning to price in the Fed’s shift,” said Bill Merz, senior portfolio strategist and head of fixed-income research at U.S. Bank Wealth Management in Minneapolis.

Rising inflation expectations are presented as a good thing whereas back in the real world the old concept of “sticky wages” is back and in more than a few cases involves wage cuts.

Comment

There is an air of unreality about this which is extreme even for the Ivory Towers of economic theory. After all the last decade has given them everything they could dream of in terms of zero and sometimes negative interest-rates and bond buying on a scale they could not have even dreamt of. If we go back a decade they believed it would work and by that I mean hit the 2% inflation target and rescue the economy. But they have turned out to be the equivalent of snake-oil sales(wo)man where the next bottle will always cure you and even has “Drink Me” written on it in big friendly letters.

But it did not work and even worse like a poor general they left a flank open which is that by having no exit strategy they were exposed to any future downturn. So the Covid pandemic was unlucky in severity but not the event itself as something was always going to come along. To my mind the policy failure has been that central banksters got caught up in the here and now and forgot they had defined a fair bit of inflation away. So they did not realise the  real choice was to lower the target to 1.5% or 1% or to put in a measure of housing inflation that represents inflation reality rather than a non-existent fantasy.

Take a ride in the sky, on our ship fantasii
All your dreams will come true, right away ( Earth Wind & Fire)

Thus they have ended up on a road to nowhere where in their land of confusion they have ended up financing government deficits. This rather than inflation targeting is the new role. Next up they look to support the economy but the truth is that we see another area where they have seen failure. Keynes explained that well I think in that you can shift expectations or trick people for a while but in the end Kelis was right.

Seen it in your one to many times
Said you might trick me once
I won’t let you trick me twice.

So whether they end up targeting average inflation or simply raise the target does not matter in the way it once did. The real issue now is getting politicians weaned off central banks financing their deficits for them. Good luck with that…….

The Investing Channel

More QE will be on the agenda of the US Federal Reserve

Later today the policymakers of what is effectively the world’s central bank meet up to deliberate before making their policy announcement tomorrow evening UK time. Although there is a catch in my description because the US Federal Reserve goes through sustained periods when it effectively ignores the rest of the world and becomes like the US itself can do, rather isolationist. The Financial Times puts it like this.

US coronavirus surge to dominate Federal Reserve meeting…..Central bank policymakers face delicate decision on best way to deliver more monetary support.

As it happens the coronavirus numbers look a little better today. But there are clearly domestic issues at hand which is a switch on the initial situation where on the middle of March the US Federal Reserve intervened to help the rest of the world with foreign exchange liquidity swaps. We were ahead of that game on March 16th. Anyway, that was then and now we see the US $446 billion that they rose to is now US $118 billion and falling.

The US Dollar

There has been a shift of emphasis with Aloe Blacc mulling a dip in royalties from this.

I need a dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
Hey hey
Well I need a dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
Hey hey
And I said I need dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
And if I share with you my story would you share your dollar with me

This was represented back in the spring not only by a Dollar rally that especially hit the Emerging Market currencies but the Fed response I looked at above. Since then we have gone from slip-sliding away to the Fallin’ of Alicia Keys. Putting that into numbers the peak of 103.6 for September Dollar Index futures on March 19th has been replaced by 93.9 this morning.

If we look at the Euro it fell to 1.06 versus the Dollar and a warning signal flashed as the parity calls began. They had their usual impact as it is now at 1.17. Actually there were some parity calls for the UK Pound $ too so you will not be surprised to see it above US $1.28 as I type this. In terms of economic policy perhaps the most significant is the Japanese Yen at 105.50 because the Bank of Japan has made an enormous effort to weaken it and looks increasingly like King Canute.

There are economic efforts from this as I recall the words of the then Vice-Chair Stanley Fischer from 2015.

Figure 3 uses these results to gauge how a 10 percent dollar appreciation would reduce U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) through the net export channels we have just discussed. The staff’s model indicates that the direct effects on GDP through net exports are large, with GDP falling over 1-1/2 percent below baseline after three years.

We have seen the reverse of that so a rise in GDP of 1.5%. Of course such moves seem smaller right now and they need the move to be sustained but a welcome development none the less.

Whilst the US economy is less affected in terms of inflation than others due to the role of the US Dollar as the reserve currency in which commodities are prices there still is an impact.

This particular model implies that core PCE inflation dips about 0.5 percent in the two quarters following the appreciation before gradually returning to baseline, which is consistent with a four-quarter decline in core PCE inflation of about 0.3 percent in the first year following the shock.

Again this impact is the other way so inflation will rise. For those unaware PCE means Personal Consumption Expenditures and as so familiar for an official choice leads to a lower inflation reading than the more widely known CPI alternative.

Back Home

Interest-Rates

This is a troubled area for the US Federal Reserve which resembles the shambles of General Custer at Little Big Horn. We we being signposted to a “normalisation” where the new interest-rate would be of the order of 3%+ or what was called r*. I am pleased to report I called it out at the time as the reality was that the underpinnings of this particular Ivory Tower crumbled as the eye of Trump turned on it. The pandemic in this sense provided cover for the US Federal Reserve to cut to around 0.1% ( strictly 0% to 0.25%).

Back on March 16th I noted this and you know my view in official denials.

#BREAKING Fed’s Powell says negative interest rates not likely to be appropriate ( @AFP )

I also not this from Reuters yesterday,

With U.S. central bank officials resisting negative interest rates,

How are they resisting them? They could hardly have cut much quicker! This feels like a PR campaign ahead of applying them at some future date.

Yield Curve Control

This is the new way of explaining that the central bank is funding government policy. Although not on the scale some are claiming.

Foreigners have levelled off buying US Debt. Federal Reserve buying has gone parabolic. This tells us all this additional debt the govt is issuing by running HUGE budget deficits is being purchased by directly the Fed. That is what they do in “banana republics”. #monetizethedebt

That was from Ben Rickert on Twitter and is the number one tweet if you look for the US Federal Reserve. Sadly for someone who calls himself The Mentor actual purchases of US government bonds have declined substantially.

the Desk plans to continue to increase SOMA holdings of Treasury securities at that pace, which is the equivalent of approximately $80 billion per month.  ( New York Fed.)

That is less in a month than it was buying some days as I recall a period when it was US £125 billion a day.

If Ben had not ramped up his rhetoric he would be on the scent because Yield Curve Control is where the central bank implicitly rather than explicitly finances the government. Regular readers will have noted my updates on the Bank of Japan doing this and there have been several variations but the sum is that the benchmark ten-year yield has been kept in a range between -0.1% and 0.1%.

There is an obvious issue with the US ten-year yield being around 0.6% and we may see tomorrow the beginning of the process of getting it lower. On the tenth of this month I pointed out that some US bond yields could go negative and if we are to see a Japanese style YCC then the Fed needs to get on with it for the reasons I will note below.

Comment

As the battleground for the US Federal Reserve now seems to be bond yields it has a problem.

INSKEEP: Senator, our time is short. I’ve got a couple of quick questions here. Is there a limit to how much the United States can borrow? Granting the emergency, its another trillion dollars here. ( NPR)

Even in these inflated times that is a lot and the Democrat opposition want treble that. With an election around the corner we are likely to see more grand spending schemes. But returning to the Fed that is a lot to fund and $80 billion a month looks rather thin in response. So somewhere on this yellow brick road I am expecting more QE.

Oh and if you look at Japan if it has done any good it is well hidden. But that seems not to bother policymakers much these days. Also another example of Turning Japanese is provided by giving QE  new name. After all successes do not need one do they?

Still at least the researchers at the Kansas City Fed have kept their sense of humour.

Based on the FOMC’s past use of forward guidance, we argue that date-based forward guidance has the potential to deliver much, though not all, of the accommodation of yield curve control.

Can US house prices bounce?

The US housing market is seeing two tsunami style forces at once but in opposite directions. The first is the economic impact of the Covid-19 virus pandemic on both wages (down) and unemployment (up). Unfortunately the official statistics released only last week are outright misleading as you can see below.

Real average hourly earnings increased 6.5 percent, seasonally adjusted, from May 2019 to May 2020.
The change in real average hourly earnings combined with an increase of 0.9 percent in the average
workweek resulted in 7.4-percent increase in real average weekly earnings over this period.

We got a better idea to the unemployment state of play on Thursday as we note the scale of the issue.

The advance unadjusted number for persons claiming UI benefits in state programs totaled 18,919,804, a decrease of 178,671 (or -0.9 percent) from the preceding week.

The only hopeful bit is the small decline. Anyway let us advance with our own view is that we will be seeing much higher unemployment in 2020 although hopefully falling and falling real wages.

The Policy Response

The other tsunami is the policy response to the pandemic.

FISCAL STIMULUS (FEDERAL) – The U.S. House of Representatives passed a $2.2 trillion aid package – the largest in history – on March 27 including a $500 billion fund to help hard-hit industries and a comparable amount for direct payments of up to $3,000 to millions of U.S. families.

That was the Reuters summary of the policy response which has been added to in the meantime. In essence it is a response to the job losses and an attempt to resist the fall in wages.

Next comes the US Federal Reserve which has charged in like the US Cavalry. Here are their words from the report made to Congress last week.

Specifically, at two meetings in March, the FOMC lowered the target range for the federal funds rate by a total of 1-1/2 percentage points, bringing it to the current range of 0 to 1/4 percent.

That meant that they have now in this area at least nearly fulfilled the wishes of President Trump. They also pumped up their balance sheet.

The Federal Reserve swiftly took a series of policy actions to address these developments. The FOMC announced it would purchase Treasury securities and agency MBS in the amounts needed to ensure smooth market functioning and the effective transmission of monetary policy to broader financial conditions. The Open Market Desk began offering large-scale overnight and term repurchase agreement operations. The Federal Reserve coordinated with other central banks to enhance the provision of liquidity via the standing U.S. dollar liquidity swap line arrangements and announced the establishment of temporary U.S. dollar liquidity arrangements (swap lines) with additional central banks.

Their explanation is below.

 Market functioning deteriorated in many markets in late February and much of March, including the critical Treasury and agency MBS markets.

Let me use my updated version of my financial lexicon for these times. Market function deteriorated means prices fell and yields rose and this happening in the area of government and mortgage borrowing made them panic buy in response.

Mortgage Rates

It seems hard to believe now but the US ten-year opened the year at 1.9%, Whereas now after the recent fall driven by the words of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell it is 0.68%. Quite a move and it means that it has been another good year for bond market investors. The thirty-year yield is 1.41% as we note that there has been a large downwards push as we now look at mortgage rates.

Let me hand you over to CNBC from Thursday.

Mortgage rates set new record low, falling below 3%

How many times have I ended up reporting record lows for mortgage rates? Anyway we did get some more detail.

The average rate on the popular 30-year fixed mortgage hit 2.97% Thursday, according to Mortgage News Daily……..For top-tier borrowers, some lenders were quoting as low as 2.75%. Lower-tier borrowers would see higher rates.

Mortgage Amounts

CNBC noted some action here too.

Low rates have fueled a sharp and fast recovery in the housing market, especially for homebuilders. Mortgage applications to purchase a home were up 13% annually last week, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association.

According to Realtor.com the party is just getting started although I have helped out with a little emphasis.

Meanwhile, buyers who still have jobs have been descending on the market en masse, enticed by record-low mortgage interest rates. Rates fell below 3%, to hit an all-time low of 2.94% for 30-year fixed-rate loans on Thursday, according to Mortgage News Daily.

Mortgage demand is back on the rise according to them.

For the past three weeks, the number of buyers applying for purchase mortgages rose year over year, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association. Applications shot up 12.7% annually in the week ending June 5. They were also up 15% from the previous week.

Call me suspicious but I thought it best to check the supply figures as well.

Mortgage credit availability decreased in May according to the Mortgage Credit Availability Index (MCAI)………..The MCAI fell by 3.1 percent to 129.3 in May. A decline in the MCAI indicates that lending standards are tightening, while increases in the index are indicative of loosening credit.

So a decline but still a lot higher than when it was set at 100 in 2012. The recent peak at the end of last year was of the order of 185 and was plainly singing along to the Outhere Brothers.

Boom boom boom let me here you say way-ooh (way-ooh)
Me say boom boom boom now everybody say way-ooh (way-ooh)

What about prices?

As the summer home-buying season gets underway, median home prices are surging. They shot up 4.3% year over year as the number of homes for sale continued to dry up in the week ending June 6, according to a recent realtor.com® report. That’s correct: Prices are going up despite this week’s announcement that the U.S. officially entered a recession in February.

Comment

As Todd Terry sang.

Something’s goin’ on in your soul

The housing market is seeing some surprises although I counsel caution. As I read the pieces about I note that a 4.3% rise is described as “shot up” whereas this gives a better perspective.

While that’s below the typical 5% to 6% annual price appreciation this time of year, it’s nearly back to what it was before the coronavirus pandemic. Median prices were rising 4.5% in the first two weeks of March before the COVID-19 lockdowns began. Nationally, the median home list price was $330,000 in May, according to the most recent realtor.com data.

But as @mikealfred reports there is demand out there.

Did someone forget to tell residential real estate buyers about the recession? I’m helping my in-laws buy a house in Las Vegas right now. Nearly every house in their price range coming to market sees 40+ showings and 5+ offers in the first few days. Crazy demand.

Of course there is the issue as to at what price?

So there we have it. The Federal Reserve will be happy as it has created a demand to buy property. The catch is that it is like crack and if they are to keep house prices rising they will have to intervene on an ever larger scale. For the moment their policy is also being flattered by house supply being low and I doubt that will last. To me this house price rally feels like trying to levitate over the edge of a cliff.

Podcast

 

 

 

Where will all the extra US Money Supply end up?

Today brings both the US economy and monetary policy centre stage. The OECD has already weighed in on the subject this morning.

The COVID-19 outbreak has brought the longest economic expansion on record to a juddering halt. GDP
contracted by 5% in the first quarter at an annualised rate, and the unemployment rate has risen
precipitously. If there is another virus outbreak later in the year, GDP is expected to fall by over 8% in 2020
(the double-hit scenario). If, on the other hand, the virus outbreak subsides by the summer and further
lockdowns are avoided (the single-hit scenario), the impact on annual growth is estimated to be a percentage
point less.

Actually that is less than its view of many other countries. But of course we need to remind ourselves that the OECD is not a particularly good forecaster. Also we find that the official data has its quirks.

Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 2.5 million in May, and the unemployment rate
declined to 13.3 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today……In May, employment rose sharply in leisure and hospitality, construction, education and health services, and retail trade. By contrast, employment
in government continued to decline sharply……….The unemployment rate declined by 1.4 percentage points to 13.3 percent in May, and the number of unemployed persons fell by 2.1 million to 21.0 million.

Those figures not only completely wrong footed the forecasters they nutmegged them as well in one of the most spectacular examples of this genre I have seen. I forget now if they were expecting a rise in unemployment of eight or nine million but either way you get the gist. We do not know where we are let alone where we are going although the Bureau of Labor Statistics did try to add some clarity.

If the workers who were recorded as employed but absent from work due to “other  reasons” (over and above the number absent for other reasons in a typical May) had
been classified as unemployed on temporary layoff, the overall unemployment rate  would have been about 3 percentage points higher than reported (on a not seasonally  adjusted basis).

We learn more about the state of play from the New York Federal Reserve.

The New York Fed Staff Nowcast stands at -25.5% for 2020:Q2 and -12.0% for 2020:Q3. News from this week’s data releases increased the nowcast for 2020:Q2 by 10 percentage points and increased the nowcast for 2020:Q3 by 24.5 percentage points. Positive surprises from labor, survey, and international trade data drove most of the increase.

As you can see the labo(u)r market data blew their forecasts like a gale and leave us essentially with the view that there has been a large contraction but also a wide possible and indeed probable error range.

The Inflation Problem

We get the latest inflation data later after I publish this piece. But there is a problem with the mantra we are being told which is that there is no inflation. Something similar to the April reading of 0.3% is expected. So if we switch to the measure used by the US Federal Reserve which is based on Personal Consumption Expenditures the annual rate if we use our rule of thumb would in fact be slightly negative right now. On this basis Chair Powell and much of the media can say that all the monetary easing is justified.

But there are more than a few catches which change the picture. Let me start with the issues I raised concerning the Euro area yesterday where the numbers will be pushed downwards by a combination of the weights being (very) wrong, many prices being unavailable and the switch to online prices. It would seem that the ordinary person has been figuring this out for themselves.

The May 2020 Survey of Consumer Expectations shows small signs of improvement in households’ expectations compared to April. Median inflation expectations increased by 0.4 percentage point at the one-year horizon to 3.0 percent, and were unchanged at the three-year horizon at 2.6 percent. ( NY Fed Research from Monday)

It is revealing that they describe an increase in inflation that is already above target as an “improvement” is it not? But we see a complete shift as we leave the Ivory Towers and media palaces as the ordinary person surveyed expects a very different picture. Still the Ivory Towers can take some solace from the fact that inflation is in what they consider to be non-core areas.

Expected year-ahead changes in both food and gasoline prices displayed sharp increases for the second consecutive month and recorded series’ highs in May at 8.7% and 7.8%, respectively, in May.

Just for the avoidance of doubt I have turned my Irony meter beyond even the “turn up to 11” of the film Spinal Tap.

Central bankers will derive some cheer from the apparent improvement in perceptions about the housing market.

Median home price change expectations recovered slightly from its series’ low of 0% reached in April to 0.6% in May. The slight increase was driven by respondents who live in the West and Northeast Census regions.

Credit

More food for thought is provided in this area. If we switch to US Federal Reserve policy Chair Jerome Powell will tell us later that the taps are open and credit is flowing. But those surveyed have different ideas it would seem.

Perceptions of credit access compared to a year ago deteriorated for the third consecutive month, with 49.6% of respondents reporting credit to be harder to get today than a year ago (versus 32.1% in March and 48.0% in April). Expectations for year-ahead credit availability also worsened, with fewer respondents expecting credit will become easier to obtain.

Comment

I now want to shift to a subject which is not getting the attention it deserves. This is the growth in the money supply where the three monthly average for the narrow measure M1 has increased in annualised terms by 67.2% in the three months to the 25th of May. Putting that another way it has gone from a bit over US $4 trillion to over US $5 trillion over the past 3 months. That gives the monetary system quite a short-term shove the size of which we can put into context with this.

In April 2008, M1 was approximately $1.4 trillion, more than half of which consisted of currency.  ( NY Fed)

Contrary to what we keep being told about the decline of cash it has grown quite a bit over this period as there is presently a bit over US $1.8 trillion in circulation.

Moving to the wider measure M2 we see a similar picture where the most recent three months measured grew by 40.6% compared to its predecessor in annualised terms. Or if you prefer it has risen from US $15.6 billion to US $18.1 billion. Again here is the historical perspective from April 2008.

 M2 was approximately $7.7 trillion and largely consisted of savings deposits.

So here is a question for readers, where do you think all this money will go? Whilst you do so you might like to note this from the 2008 report I have quoted.

While as much as two-thirds of U.S. currency in circulation may be held outside the United States….

The Investing Channel

 

The USA will Spend! Spend! Spend! As we wonder whatever happened to the debt ceiling?

Yesterday evening there was a piece of news which created a stir even in these inflated times. So without further ado let me hand you over to the US Treasury Department.

During the April – June 2020 quarter, Treasury expects to borrow $2,999 billion in privately-held net marketable debt, assuming an end-of-June cash balance of $800 billion.  The borrowing estimate is $3,055 billion higher than announced in February 2020.

I have to confess the numbers did not look right so I checked the February release.

During the April – June 2020 quarter, Treasury expects to pay down $56 billion in privately-held net marketable debt, assuming an end-of-June cash balance of $400 billion.

This was to be quite an improvement on where it was at the time.

During the January – March 2020 quarter, Treasury expects to borrow $367 billion in privately-held net marketable debt, assuming an end-of-March cash balance of $400 billion.

So we return to the concept of some US 3 trillion dollars being borrowed in a single quarter. As to the higher cash balance which is in the process of being doubled that looks as though it is simply because the US is spending at such a rate it needs more to avoid the risk of a cash crunch. Indeed the process is well under way.

During the January – March 2020 quarter, Treasury borrowed $477 billion in privately-held net marketable debt and ended the quarter with a cash balance of $515 billion.  In February 2020, Treasury estimated privately-held net marketable borrowing of $367 billion and assumed an end-of-March cash balance of $400 billion. The $110 billion increase in borrowing resulted primarily from the higher end-of-quarter cash balance.

Where is the money going?

The US Treasury is light on some detail but the Paycheck Protection Program had spent some US $350 billion very quickly so we then saw this.

Washington (CNN)The Trump administration announced Sunday that 2.2 million small business loans worth $175 billion have been made in the second round of the Paycheck Protection Program……Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and Small Business Administration Administrator Jovita Carranza said in a joint statement that the average size of a loan made under the second iteration of the program, which began Monday, was $79,000.

The original stimulus effort was described below by CNN.

Congressional lawmakers put the finishing touches on a $2 trillion stimulus bill to respond to the coronavirus pandemic, with cash and assistance for regular Americans, Main Street businesses and hard-hit airlines and manufacturers, among others……..Key elements of the proposal are $250 billion set aside for direct payments to individuals and families, $350 billion in small business loans, $250 billion in unemployment insurance benefits and $500 billion in loans for distressed companies.

We can see that like the small business loans the numbers are likely to have been climbing higher and higher. As to the new higher employment benefits they seem to be being paid to ever higher numbers.

The advance unadjusted number for persons claiming UI benefits in state programs totaled 17,776,006, an increase of 1,498,784 (or 9.2 percent) from the preceding week. The seasonal factors had expected a decrease of 648,558 (or -4.0 percent) from the previous week. A year earlier the rate was 1.1 percent and the volume was 1,647,874 ( Department of Labor)

I think we can figure out for ourselves what has been happening to tax revenues.

Treasury Bonds and QE

In ordinary times one might have expected this market to have cratered. I have worked through times when futures markets prices limits are employed ( it was initially 2 points and then moves to 3 points). But the surge in expected borrowing has provided nothing of the sort and these days eyes turn first to the US Federal Reserve and its Quantitative Easing programme. The emphasis below is mine.

To support the flow of credit to households and businesses, the Federal Reserve will continue to purchase Treasury securities and agency residential and commercial mortgage-backed securities in the amounts needed to support smooth market functioning, thereby fostering effective transmission of monetary policy to broader financial conditions. In addition, the Open Market Desk will continue to offer large-scale overnight and term repurchase agreement operations. The Committee will closely monitor market conditions and is prepared to adjust its plans as appropriate.

That is a sort of combination of “whatever it takes” and “To Infinity! And Beyond!” in my opinion. We saw purchases of US $75 billion a day in the height of the panic and we should not forget that in the heat of the “Not QE” phase some US $60 billion of US Treasury Bills were bought a month. So we see that it now owns some US $3.97 trillion of Treasury Securities which has risen by US $1.8 trlllion on the past year.

Thus although we are now seeing a much lower daily amount of QE purchases the surge of buying has anaesthetised the market. This week only US $8 billion a day is being bought and yet we see the benchmark yield for the ten-year Treasury Note if a mere 0.67%. The long bond ( 30 year) has responded a little but at 1.33% is less than half what it was this time last year.

Foreign Holdings

There is a long wait for such numbers but here is what the US Treasury thinks that they are.

The survey measured the value of foreign portfolio holdings of U.S. securities as of end-June 2019 to be $20,534 billion, with $8,630 billion held in U.S. equities, $10,991 billion in U.S. long-term debt securities [/1] (of which $1,417 billion are holdings of asset-backed securities (ABS) [/2] and $9,575 billion are holdings of non-ABS securities), and $913 billion held in U.S. short-term debt securities.

Comment

Remember the debt ceiling?

Congress has always acted when called upon to raise the debt limit. Since 1960, Congress has acted 78 separate times to permanently raise, temporarily extend, or revise the definition of the debt limit – 49 times under Republican presidents and 29 times under Democratic presidents. Congressional leaders in both parties have recognized that this is necessary. ( US Treasury )

Anyway the total national debt was US $23.7 trillion at the end of March and is about to go on something of a tear. On the other side of the coin economic output as measured by GDP or Gross Domestic Product is about to plunge.

The WEI is currently -11.58 percent, scaled to four-quarter GDP growth, for the week ending April 25 and -10.86 percent for April 18; for reference, the WEI stood at 1.58 percent for the week ending February 29. ( New York Fed )

Or if you prefer.

The New York Fed Staff Nowcast stands at -9.3% for 2020:Q2.

Also the US Federal Reserve is about to get rather popular as we note how this trend will change in 2020.

In 2019, the Federal Reserve remitted a total of $54.9 billion to the Treasury, less than the $65.3 billion remitted in 2018, owing primarily to a decline in net income resulting from a decrease in average SOMA domestic securities holdings.

I guess both the US Federal Reserve and Treasury will be singing along with Prince for a while.

Money don’t matter to night
It sure didn’t matter yesterday
Just when you think you’ve got more than enough
That’s when it all up and flies away
That’s when you find out that you’re better off
Makin’ sure your soul’s alright
‘Cause money didn’t matter yesterday,
And it sure don’t matter to night

 

How many US Dollars are enough?

The issue of what you might call King Dollar is not one which gets the coverage it deserves. Instead the media coverage tends to highlight claims that its period of rule is on the way out with China demanding more use of the Yuan or Russia the rouble and so on. Or we get the various proclamations that we need some sort of world currency which to my mind are more like pie in the sky thinking than blue sky thinking. When we looked at the IMF on the I noted the suggestions that its SDRs ( Special Drawing Rights) could become the world currency but there are all sorts of flaws there.

So far SDR 204.2 billion (equivalent to about US$281 billion) have been allocated to members, including SDR 182.6 billion allocated in 2009 in the wake of the global financial crisis. The value of the SDR is based on a basket of five currencies—the U.S. dollar, the euro, the Chinese renminbi, the Japanese yen, and the British pound sterling.

If we look at the issues of the Euro can anybody even imagine trying to apply a fixed exchange-rate to the whole world? We would have all sorts of individual booms and busts before we even get to the idea of a joint interest-rate. That is before we get to the track record of the IMF after all can you imagine trying to get its currency accepted in Argentina and Greece.

Supply of US Dollars

It is not as if the taps have been turned off.

The numbers: The Federal Reserve’s balance sheet expanded to a record $6.6 trillion in the week ended April 22, an increase of $205 billion from the prior week, the central bank said Thursday.

What happened: Holdings of U.S. Treasurys rose by $120.5 billion to $3.9 trillion. The central bank has been purchasing Treasurys at a rapid pace in a bid to restore functioning to this key U.S. financial market. The central bank’s holdings of mortgage-backed securities rose $54 billion to $1.6 trillion. ( MarketWatch)

As you can see the balance sheet is expanding at a rapid rate and let me just add that if you really think the US Federal Reserve is buying US Treasury Bonds to “restore functioning to this key U.S. financial market.” I have a London bridge to sell you. The truth is that it is implicitly financing the US Budget Deficit as we note that the ten-year yield is a mere 0.58% and the long bond is a mere 1.17% in spite of surging expenditure.

We can now switch to the money supply for further insight because we have noted in the past that QE does not go straight into the numbers as one might assume. Looking at the ECB data has shown that what should be clear cut narrow money creation seems to sometimes go missing in action. However we are seeing quite a surge in the money supply as we note that the narrow money measure ( M1) only went through US $4 trillion as March began but by the 13th of April was already US $4.73 trillion.

I’ll be back in the high life again
All the doors I closed one time will open up again
I’ll be back in the high life again
All the eyes that watched me once will smile and take me in ( Steve Winwood )

Putting that another way the annual rate of increase is 11.6% the annualised six-monthly one is 15.7% and the quarterly one is 23.4%. You can see which way that is going and I would point out that only a month or so ago 11.6% would be considered very high.

Peering into the detail we see that the surge in narrow money is mostly deposits, There has been a rise in cold hard cash, dirty money as Stevie V would say but deposits have risen by around US $700 billion over the past couple of months.

Sending Dollars To Friends Abroad

This a subject I have covered throughout the credit crunch and NPR seem to have caught up with.

As the global economy shuts down, the U.S. Federal Reserve has begun sending billions of dollars to central banks all over the world. Last month, it opened up 14 “swap lines” to nations such as Australia, Japan, Mexico, and Norway. A “swap line” is like an emergency pipeline of dollars to countries that need them. The dollars are “swapped,” i.e., traded for the other country’s currency.

The numbers here have ballooned and are the missing link so to speak in the balance sheet data above. As of last night some US $432.3 billion have been supplied to foreign central banks. I will let that sink in and then point out that it means banks in those countries or regions either cannot get US Dollars at all or can only get them at an interest-rate which challenges their solvency.

As to the demand then we always expected it to be mainly from the following too although not always in this order. Bank of Japan US $215 billion and the ECB $142 billion. Particularly troubling from the Japanese point of view is that as well as being the leader of the pack they are needing ever more. When we note that the Bank of England has only asked for US $27.3 billion which is low when you look at the size of the UK’s banks we see the Bank of Japan needed another US $19 billion overnight.

One factor of note is that the Norges Bank requested some US $3.6 billion for 84 days yesterday. So the heat is on for at least one Norwegian bank.

Also the extension of the swaps to Emerging Markets as requested by @trinhonomics has been used. The Bank of Korea has taken US $16.6 billion, the Bank of Mexico some US $6.6 billion and the Monetary Authority of Singapore some US $5.9 billion.

Exchange Rate

In spite of the balance sheet rises and the effort to become in effect the world’s central bank by supplying US Dollars the exchange rate remains firm. We can look at it in terms of the broad index being 123.2 as opposed to the 114.7 it ended 2019 or simply that it was set at 100 in 2006.

Comment

There are plenty of influences here but one thing we can be sure of is that the US Dollar is in demand. Let me give you some examples.

Kenya shilling hits a new all-time low of 107.6500 against the US dollar according to data from @business

 

Rupee falls to all-time low of 76.87 against US dollar in early trade ( Press Trust of India from Wednesday)

 

At the start of the year, $1 bought you 4.00 Brazilian reals. It now buys you 5.53 reais. That’s a 38% rise for the dollar (27% fall for the real) in less than four months. ( @ReutersJamie )

We have looked at India before and back then going through 70 seemed significant. As to Kenya an interest-rate of 7.25% is not helping much is it? Then we have Brazil showing how the Dollar has impacted South America.

So economics 101 is having another bad phase because a massively increased supply is not pushing the price down. In come respects it may even be creating more demand because if you know there is a ready supply then you may then use it more. Ouch! After all the much lower oil price should be reducing the demand for US Dollars and indeed the negative price such as it applied should be depth-charging it.

Once I built a tower up to the sun
Brick and rivet and lime
Once I built a tower, now it’s done
Brother, can you spare a dime? ( Bing Crosby )

 

The US Federal Reserve moves nearer to bùying equities

Yesterday as the media clustered around the news from the Bank of England the real news came from the US Federal Reserve which in many respects is acting as the world’s central bank. So it has two roles right now the first is for the world’s largest economy and the second is for the rest of us.For the avoidance of doubt that is the order in which it will operate if its past track record is any guide. There was something of an irony as so many US financial commentators were looking at the Bank of England. Some of you may have spotted me pointing out to the Nobel Prize winner Paul Krugman that he was spreading an economics version of fake news.

The Trigger

This was provided by the latest weekly update on the US labour market

The latest round of coronavirus-induced layoffs and furloughs soared by another 6.6 million in the first week of April, bringing total job losses in less than a month to 16.8 million.Initial jobless claims, a rough proxy for job losses, have now posted increases of 6.6 million, 6.8 million and 3.3 million in the last three weekly readings since the middle of March.

To put these mind-boggling numbers in perspective, before the March 21 surge, the highest single weekly reading ever recorded was 695,000 in 1982,” said chief economist Joshua Shapiro of MFR Inc. ( Marketwatch )

As you can see these were really bad and came with a sub-plot that there had been so many claims that the offices processing this had been struggling to keep up. Thus the real situation was likely to be even worse.

The Federal Reserve’s Response

The US central bank came out of the blocks like a 60 metres sprinter

The Federal Reserve on Thursday took additional actions to provide up to $2.3 trillion in loans to support the economy. This funding will assist households and employers of all sizes and bolster the ability of state and local governments to deliver critical services during the coronavirus.”

Apart from the rapid response there was an immediate impact from the sum quoted as this was slightly over half the size of the pre Corona Virus peak of the Fed’s balance sheet. So in modern parlance a bazooka.

There was something rather familiar in there which was a central bank “interpreting” its mandate. Let me cover that by looking at the market response via the Financial Times.

The high-yield market, often referred to as “junk”, encompasses the debt issued by lower-rated, riskier companies that are more exposed to deteriorating economic conditions stemming from the viral outbreak and the collapse in oil prices.

In response to the Fed’s move on Thursday, the biggest high-yield bond ETF — run by Blackrock which is also administering the Fed’s bond purchases — jumped by more than 7 per cent, on course for its largest one-day move since 2008.

Therè are two points to consider here which is the expansion of the role of the Fed and the way that Blackrock seems to have surpassed the Vampire Squid Goldman Sachs. As it administers a process which sees its own fund surge! Here is the view from CNBC.

As part of its announcement, the Fed expanded its corporate lending programs to take it into an entirely new area, including ETFs of companies that are rated below investment grade. It had previously announced a program to buy investment-grade corporate debt and ETFs. It also will now accept triple-A-rated commercial mortgage-backed securities and collateralized loan obligations as part of its Term Asset-Backed Securities Lending Facility, first created in the financial crisis.

The Details

Below is the report from the Fed itself and the significant factor is how often these policies need to be underwritten by the US taxpayer.

Bolster the effectiveness of the Small Business Administration’s Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) by supplying liquidity to participating financial institutions through term financing backed by PPP loans to small businesses. The PPP provides loans to small businesses so that they can keep their workers on the payroll. The Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility (PPPLF) will extend credit to eligible financial institutions that originate PPP loans, taking the loans as collateral at face value;

 

Ensure credit flows to small and mid-sized businesses with the purchase of up to $600 billion in loans through the Main Street Lending Program. The Department of the Treasury, using funding from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) will provide $75 billion in equity to the facility;

 

Increase the flow of credit to households and businesses through capital markets, by expanding the size and scope of the Primary and Secondary Market Corporate Credit Facilities (PMCCF and SMCCF) as well as the Term Asset-Backed Securities Loan Facility (TALF). These three programs will now support up to $850 billion in credit backed by $85 billion in credit protection provided by the Treasury; and

 

Help state and local governments manage cash flow stresses caused by the coronavirus pandemic by establishing a Municipal Liquidity Facility that will offer up to $500 billion in lending to states and municipalities. The Treasury will provide $35 billion of credit protection to the Federal Reserve for the Municipal Liquidity Facility using funds appropriated by the CARES Act.

Comment

Back in the day my boss was convinced that the US authorities were buying equities when the market fell and such thoughts became what half – jokingly became called The Plunge Protection Team. That then developed into the concept of central banks providing a Put Option for equity markets via not letting them fall.The most explicit version of that is the Bank of Japan which bought over 500 billion Yen of equities this month . Hence its nickname of The Tokyo Whale.

Now we see the US Fed heading on that road and there is one bit it is copying from Japan which is the use of Exchange Traded Funds or ETFs. I guess that is to avoid having to go to any AGMs and the like. But as to the Fed buying equities well I hope by now I have taught you all what to do with these.

Mnuchin says no talks right now about potential to have fed buy stocks

In terms of monetary policy the balance sheet is already over US $6 trillion and will go much higher. In terms of the money supply the recent growth rate of narrow money was already 13.4% at the end of March and now seems set to surge.

Happy Easter and I hope you have the same weather as London today.

The Emerging Markets Problem and debt jubilees

Some familiar topics are doing the rounds and making a few headlines and today I shall use the focus of the problems of many of what are called Emerging Markets to focus in on them. So let me open with the issue of the apparent lust for US Dollars that keeps popping up and return to an issue we analysed on the 18th of March.

*Bank Indonesia Governor Says New York Fed Will Provide $60B Repo Line ( @VPatelFX )

So we see another country on its way into the US Federal Reserve liquidity swaps club so let us ask the Carly Simon question which is why?

Indonesia’s foreign exchange (forex) reserves dropped US$9.4 billion in March to $121 billion as Bank Indonesia (BI) stepped up market intervention to stabilize the rupiah exchange rate amid heavy capital outflows, according to the central bank.

Forex reserves have continued to decrease since February,  when they dropped from $131.7 billion in January, the second-highest level in the country’s history. March’s figure is enough to support seven months of imports and payments of the government’s short-term debts and is above the international adequacy standard of about three months of imports. ( Jakarta Post

Di you notice how Bank Indonesia reports its foreign currency reserves in US Dollars? That is a slap in the face for those reporting its hegemony is over and as an opening salvo confirms the issue at hand. The secondary issue is that the level of foreign exchange reserves is only $10 billion below the second highest ever and yet if not panic stations there are clear worries. Next comes something I have pointed out before when a crisis hits it is the rate of change of reserves which worries people more than the size left. So in fact only a certain percentage of reserves are what one might call “usable” in that you them have to do something else as well. Finally we get to the nub of the issue which is how long you can pay for your imports and finance your debts. Of course borrowing in US Dollars in size is something that is on our checklist of trouble as well.

The Jakarta Post goes onto point out that the heat is on.

The fear has induced capital outflow and amplified exchange rate pressures on the rupiah, especially in the second and third week of March 2020,” BI wrote in a statement on Tuesday.

The rupiah lost around 15 percent of its value against the dollar in March as investors rushed to sell riskier assets and flock to safe haven assets amid fears over COVID-19’s rapid spread.

Also on March 19th I did point out that QE ( Quantitative Easing) seems to be spreading everywhere.

The central bank has purchased Rp 172.5 trillion in government bonds, including Rp 166.2 trillion from foreign investors in the secondary market.

Indeed if we switch to Fitch Ratings this morning another response to this crisis is the beginning of what is literal printing money.

Another extraordinary measure is the decision to give Bank Indonesia (BI), the central bank, the authority to buy government securities in the primary market…….However, the move raises a number of risks, including central bank financing of the fiscal deficit (which could increase the monetary base and raise inflationary expectations), increased political interference in monetary policy decision-making and the erosion of the market’s ability to price Indonesian public debt.

As a counterpoint the extent of the crisis is shown by the fact that by one metric Indonesia has been quite conservative in economic terms.

 We believe that the fiscal loosening will push general government (GG) debt to a peak of 37% of GDP in 2022, from about 30% in 2019,

As an aside it is interesting that Bank Indonesia will be applying QE at an interest-rate of 4.5% I will be looking later at how they account for that as it is a long way from ZIRP or around 0%.

Argentina

On the 19th of March the International Monetary Fund summarised a grim situation as follows.

Since July 2019, the peso has depreciated by over 40 percent, sovereign spreads have risen by
over 2700 basis points , net international
reserves fell by half, and real GDP contracted more
than previously anticipated. As a result, gross public
debt rose to nearly 90 percent of GDP at end-2019,
13 percentage points higher than projected at the
time of the Fourth Review.

A 27% increase in sovereign spreads! This was all very different from the words of Christine Lagarde when she was managing director of the IMF.

These efforts are starting to yield results, and should lay the foundation for the return of confidence and growth.

That was then and this is now or rather the Buenos Aires Times from yesterday.

The government has issued a decree to postpone close to US$10 billion in dollar-denominated debt payments issued under local law, cancelling all such actions until the end of the year.

The move, which should relieve pressure on payments due this year, does not impact Argentina’s wider bid to restructure around US$70-billion worth of debt in foreign currency issued under international law.

So it is the dollar denominated debt which sings along with Lindsey Buckingham.

I should run on the double
I think I’m in trouble,
I think I’m in trouble.

I would have thought that reporters in Argentina would be familiar with the concept of default but apparently not.

Some experts warned that the move could be interpreted by creditors as putting Argentina in “technical default,” as it implies a change in the conditions under which those bonds were issued.

Anyway a sign of the trouble Argentina is in is show by two separate factors. Firstly how much it saves.

And by allowing the government to save some US$8.5 billion in local payments this year, it could actually be a boon for holders of foreign-law debt by freeing up cash.

Secondly it has tried to avoid affecting these foreign bonds presumably knowing that just like The Terminator “I’ll be back”

Argentina has already been unilaterally delaying payments on some peso-denominated debt, even as it kept current on overseas obligations and embarked on restructuring talks over its overseas notes.

Comment

We have looked at two different ends of the spectrum today as we see why so many what we call Emerging Markets are in trouble. There are quite a few metrics where Indonesia is strong but the US Dollar is making it creak and of course poor Argentina is at the basket case end of the spectrum. Indeed I rarely quite from Zerohedge but this is a masterpiece.

There is a saying: three things in life are certain: death, taxes and another Argentina default.

Also it reminds me of something that bemused me at the time as I note this from the 21st of May last year.

The 100 year bond is trading at 68.5, but I suppose you have 98 or so years left to get back to 100.

They still have 97 or so years to go but with a price of 28.5 now a lot further to go.

The pressure is leading to two suggestions. Firstly from DebtJubilee.

Borrower governments have it within their power to stop making debt payments but they should not suffer any penalties for doing so. All lenders should therefore agree to the immediate cancellation of debt payments falling due in 2020, with no accrual of interest and charges and no penalties.

It has its strengths but ignores what happens to those who were relying on the interest payments as you may simply be kicking the problem can elsewhere.

There is also this from the Brookings Institute.

Last week, we put forward a proposal for a major issuance of the IMF’s Special Drawing Rights (SDRs) as a key tool to attack the worldwide spread of the financial fallout. In essence, we proposed that IMF members agree to an allocation of the equivalent of at least $500 billion as part of the global response to the crisis generated by the corona virus pandemic.

The catch is that you can create money as this does. But there are two problems that immediately occur to me. If you have more money but as we stand fewer goods and services you are solving one problem by creating another ( inflation) for others. That may be asset inflation ( look at equity markets right now) more than consumer inflation. Next is the way that non elected bodies get power and distribute it, who are they responsible too?