The Mark Carney Show has misfired again

Yesterday was something of an epoch-making day for the UK but it also turned into a rather odd one. Also this morning has produced another piece of evidence for my argument that we finally got a rise in official interest-rates above the emergency 0.5% level because the Bank of England finally thought the banks have recovered enough to take it. From the Financial Times.

Royal Bank of Scotland will pay its first dividend since it was bailed out during the financial crisis, marking a major milestone on the bank’s road to recovery and paving the way for a further reduction of the government’s 62.4 per cent stake. The bank will pay an interim dividend of 2p per share after it confirms a final agreement on a recent fine with the US Department of Justice.

So even RBS has made some progress although it remains attracted to disasters like iron filings to a magnet as this seems a clear hint that it managed to be long Italian bonds into the heavy falls.

 RBS blamed “turbulence in European bond markets” for a 20 per cent drop in income at Natwest Markets.

As an aside the Italian bond market is being hit again today with the ten-year yield pushing over 3%.

Returning to the UK we also saw a 9-0 vote for a Bank Rate rise as I predicted in my podcast. This was based on my long-running theme that they are a bunch of “Carney’s Cronies” as five others suddenly changed their mind at the same moment as him, making the most popular phrase “I agree with Mark”. As some are on larger salaries added to by generous pension schemes we could make savings here.

A Space Oddity

This was provided by the currency markets which initially saw the UK Pound £ rally but then it fell back and at the time of writing it has dipped just below US$1.30. The US Dollar has been strong but at 1.122 we have not gained any ground against the Euro either at 145 we lost ground against the Japanese Yen.Why?

At first Governor Carney backed up his interest-rate rise with talk of more as in the press conference he suggested that 3 rises over the next 3 years was his central aim. Of course his aim has hardly been true but this disappeared in something of a puff of smoke when he later pointed out that he could keep interest-rates the same or even cut them. This rather brain-dead moment was reinforced by pointing out that he had cut interest-rates after the EU leave vote. This left listeners and viewers thinking will he cut next March?

Then he told Sky News this.

Mark Carney tells me is prepared to cut interest rates back again depending on how Brexit negotiations go. ( Ed Conway)

This morning he has managed to end up discussing interest-rate cuts with Francine Lacqua of Bloomberg after a brief mention of further rises. Then he added to it with this.

Mark Carney threw himself back into the thick of the Brexit debate on Friday, saying the chance of the U.K. dropping out of the European Union without a deal is “uncomfortably high.”

He also spoke to the Today programme on Radio Four which of course has its own audience troubles and here is the take away of Tom Newton Dunn of The Sun,

Blimey. Carney reveals the BoE recently ran a Brexit no deal exercise that saw property prices plummet by a third, interest rates go up to 4%, unemployment up to 9%, and a full-blown recession.

You can see from that why rather than a rally the UK Pound £ has struggled rather than rallied.  Due to his strong personal views Governor Carney keeps finding himself enmeshed in the Brexit debate which given his views on the subject will always head towards talk of interest-rate cuts. He is of course entitled to his personal views but in his professional life he keeps tripping over his own feet as just after you have raised interest-rates this is not the time for it. He could simply have said that like everyone else he is waiting for developments and will respond if necessary when events change.

Oh and we have heard this sort of thing from Governor Carney before. How did it work out last time?

interest rates go up to 4%

 

Today’s News

This has added to the theme I posited yesterday about the interest-rate increase which can be put most simply as why now?

The latest survey marked two years of sustained
new business growth across the service sector
economy. However, the rate of expansion eased
since June and was softer than seen on average
over this period. ( Markit PMI )

This followed a solid manufacturing report and a strong construction one but of course the services sector is by far the largest. This added to the report from the Euro area.

If the headline index continues to track at its current
level, quarterly GDP growth over the third quarter as
a whole would be little-changed from the softer-than expected expansion of 0.3% signalled by official
Eurostat data for quarter two.

Whilst these surveys are by no mean perfect guides there does seem to be something going on here and as I pointed out yesterday it is consistent with the weaker trajectory for money supply growth.

The UK Pound £

This did get a mention in the Minutes.

The sterling effective exchange rate had depreciated slightly since the Committee’s previous meeting and was down 2.5% relative to the 15-day average incorporated in the May Report.

This is awkward on two fronts. Firstly the fall was at least partly caused by the way Governor Carney and his colleagues clearly hinted at an interest-rate rise back then but then got cold feet in the manner of an unreliable boyfriend. Next comes the realisation that all the furore over a 0.25% interest-rate rise mostly ignores the fact that monetary conditions have eased as the currency fall is equivalent to a ~0.6% cut.

R-Star

This appeared having been newly minted in the Bank of England Ivory Tower. Or at least newly minted in £ terms as the San Francisco Fed put it like this last year.

The “natural” rate of interest, or r-star (r*), is the inflation-adjusted, short-term interest rate that is consistent
with full use of economic resources and steady inflation near the Fed’s target level.

If anyone has a perfect definition of “full use of economic resources” then please send it to every Ivory Tower you can find as they need one. Actually the Bank of England has by its actions suggested it is near to here which is rather awkward when they want to claim it is somewhere above 2%. Actually I see no reason why there is only one and in fact it seems likely to be very unstable but in many ways David Goodman of Bloomberg has nailed it.

They don’t know their r* from their elbow

Comment

This is all something of a dog’s dinner and I mean that in the poetic sense because in reality dog’s in my family  always seem to be fed pretty well. We have monetary policy being delivered by someone who looks as though he does not really believe in it. Even the traditional support from ex Bank of England staff seems to be half-hearted this time around and remember that group usually behave as if The Stepford Wives is not only their favourite film but a role-model.

If this is the best that Mark Carney can do then the extension of his term of tenure by Chancellor Hammond can be summed up by Men At Work.

It’s a mistake, it’s a mistake
It’s a mistake, it’s a mistake

 

 

 

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The Bank of England is in a mess of its own making

Today looks as if it may be something of an epoch-making day for the UK as there is finally a decent chance that the 0.5% emergency Bank Rate will be consigned into history. Actually one way or another the decision has already been made as the Monetary Policy Committee voted last night. This was a rather unwise change made by Governor Carney as it raises the risk of leaks or what is called the early wire as the official announcement is not made until midday. As you can see from the chart below the BBC seems to think that the decision is a done deal or knows it is ( h/t @Old_Grumpy_Dave ).

This provides us scope for a little reflection as any move hardly fulfils this from back in June 2014.

This has implications for the timing, pace and degree of Bank Rate increases.
There’s already great speculation about the exact timing of the first rate hike and this decision is becoming
more balanced.
It could happen sooner than markets currently expect.

This was taken at the time as a promise and markets responded accordingly as interest-rate futures surged and the UK Pound £ rallied. From time to time people challenge me on this and say it was not a promise. What that misses is that central bankers speak in a coded language and in that language  this was a clear “Tally Ho”. Of course the “sooner than markets currently expect” never happened and whilst you may or may not have sympathy for professional investors and traders it was also true that ordinary people and businesses switched to fixed-rate borrowing in response to this. The reality was that the Bank of England via its credit easing policies and then Bank Rate cut of August 2016 pushed mortgage and borrowing rates lower affecting them adversely. Such has been the record of Forward Guidance.

What about now?

There was something else in that speech which was revealing as a sentence or two later we were told this.

The ultimate decision will be data-driven

Okay so let us take the advice of Kylie and step back in time. If we do so we see that the UK economy was on a bit of a tear which of course was another reason for those who took Governor Carney at his word. In terms of GDP growth the UK economy had gone 0.6%,0.5%,0.9% and 0.5% in 2013 which was then followed by 0.9% in the first quarter of 2014. It did the same in the second quarter which he would not have known exactly but he should have known things were going well.

Let us do the same comparison for now and look at 2017 where GDP growth went 0.3%,0.2%,0.5% and 0.4% followed by 0.1% in the first quarter of this year. If you were “data driven” which sequence would have you pressing the interest-rate trigger? I think it would be a landslide victory. The MPC may not have known these exact numbers due to revisions but a 0.1% here or there changes little in the broad sweep of things.

Some might respond with the pint that he is supposed to achieve an inflation target of 2% per annum. That is true but that has not bothered the MPC much in the credit crunch era as we have just been through a phase of above target inflation which of course they not only cut Bank Rate into but promised a further cut before even they came to the realisation that their Forward Guidance had been very wrong. Also before Governor Carney took office the MPC turned a blind eye to inflation going above 5%. Whereas post the EU leave vote they rushed to ease policy in something of a panic in response to expectations of a weaker economy.

The Speed Limit

The Bank of England Ivory Tower has had a very poor credit crunch. It has clung to outdated theories rather than respected the evidence. Perhaps the most woeful effort has been around the output gap which if you recall led to it highlighting an unemployment rate of 7% which the economy blasted through ( which you might consider was yet another case for an interest-rate rise in 2014). It has clung to equilibrium unemployment rates of 6.5%,6% 5.5% and 4.5% which of course have all been by-passed by reality. Such outdated thinking has led it to all sorts of over optimism on wage growth. Yet is seems to have learned little as this illustrates.

We think our economy can only grow at a new, lower speed limit of around one-and-a-half per cent a year. We also currently think actual demand is growing close to this speed limit. This means demand can’t grow faster than at its current pace without causing prices to start rising too quickly.

This is the MPC rationale for a Bank Rate rise and the problem is that they simply do not know that. They keep trying to build theoretical scaffolding around the reality of the UK economy but seem to learn little from the way the scaffolding regularly collapses.After all we grew much faster in 2014.

The banks

As ever the precious will be at the forefront of the Bank of England’s mind. I cannot help thinking that having noted the apparent improvement shown below maybe the real reason for a change is that the banks can now take it. First Lloyds Banking Group.

Since taking over the reins in 2011, Horta-Osório has presided over a bank which has swung from an annual loss of £260mln to a profit of £3.5bn.  ( Hargreaves Landsdown).

Then Barclays.

Barclays reported pretax profit of 1.9 billion pounds ($2.49 billion) for the three months from April-June, up from 659 million pounds a year ago and higher than the 1.46 billion average of analysts’ estimates compiled by the bank. ( Reuters)

Comment

A Martian observing monetary policy in the UK might reasonably be rather confused by the course of events. He or she might wonder why now rather than in 2014? Furthermore they might wonder why a mere 0.25% change is being treated as such a big deal? After all it is only a small change and the impact of such a move on those with mortgages will be both lower and slower than in the past.

Nationwide: The vast majority of new mortgages have been extended on fixed interest rates. The share of outstanding mortgages on variable interest rates has fallen to its lowest level on record, at c.35% from a peak of 70% in 2001. ( h/t @moved_average )

So if they do move the impact will be lower than in the past which makes you wonder why they have vacillated so much and been so unreliable?

The MPC have got themselves on a road where all the indecision means that the timing is likely to be off. What I mean by that is that whilst I expect economic growth to pick-up from the first quarter this year will merely be an okay year and currently the threats seem to the downside in terms of trade for example. We do not yet know where the Trump trade tariffs will lead but we do know that the Euro area has seen economic growth fall such that the first half of 2018 was required to reach what so recently was the quarterly growth rate. Also the ongoing rhetoric of the Bank of England about Brexit prospects hardly makes a case for a Bank Rate rise now either as it would be impacting as we leave ( assuming we do leave next March).

The next issue is money supply growth which in 2018 so far has been weak and now (hopefully) has stabilised. That does not make much of a case for raising now and would lead to the MPC operating in the reverse way to monetary trends as it cut into strength in August 2016 and now would be raising into relative weakness.

So there you have it on what is an odd day all round. I think UK interest-rates should be higher but also think that timing matters and that a boat or two has sailed already without us on it. Accordingly my view would be to wait for the next one. For the reasons explained above whilst the MPC has managed to verbally box itself into a corner I still  think that there is a chance ( 1/3rd) of an unchanged vote today. It is always the same when logic points in a different direction to hints of direction.

There is also the issue of QE which rarely gets a mention. If we skip the embarrassment all round of the Corporate Bond purchases we could also have taken the chance to trim the QE package when money supply growth was strong. I remember making that case nearly five years ago in City-AM.

Me on Core Finance TV

 

 

 

“Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” says Mark Carney

Last night the Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney gave a speech which was extraordinary even for him. At the Society of Professional Economists he stood up and immediately took listeners into a parallel universe that was like the episode in Star Trek where Spock was irrational and violent.

Our guidance means that those who follow us will be better able to anticipate our actions. It will make those
actions more powerful. And it will help households and businesses consume, save, hire and invest with
confidence as the UK determines its path forward.

Just for clarity he is talking about the Forward Guidance of the Bank of England where he has promised interest-rate rises and not only not delivered them but of course ended up making a cut and adding £60 billion of Quantitative Easing. So guiding you in the wrong direction up the garden path helps? Well apparently it is most helpful when he sends you the wrong way.

Guidance is most useful at such turning points.

I was challenged on social media last night by those who claimed he has never promised interest-rate rises. I responded by taking them back to Mansion House in June 2014 when Governor Carney announced this.

There’s already great speculation about the exact timing of the first rate hike and this decision is becoming
more balanced.
It could happen sooner than markets currently expect.

This is because central bankers speak in code as Alan Greenspan of the US Federal Reserve pointed out back in the day.

 I know you think you understand what you thought I said but I’m not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

Returning to June 2014 financial markets were sure they knew what Mark Carney meant and that was that an interest-rate rise was coming soon. In response the Short Future for interest-rate expectations soared as did the UK Pound £. Here is a nuance to this which is that those who were going to be right as in nothing would happen were probably stopped out of their positions. This was added to by even David ” I can see for” Miles the easing fan writing this about interest-rate rises in the Sunday Telegraph.

But that day is coming.

Back in my days on Mindful Money I pointed this out on the 24th of June 2014.

 If we were in America then Mark Carney would be called a “flip-flopper” as we have had a lot of different types of Forward Guidance from an individual who has not yet been in office for a year. Others may be wondering at Mark Carney’s claim that he has met “thousands of businesses” in less than a year which is quite a rate!

The version according to Mark Carney

Remember this.

the MPC would not even think about tightening policy at least until the unemployment rate had fallen below 7%

Which went wrong about as fast as it could as even the Governor admits.

In the event, the unemployment rate fell far faster than we had expected, falling below 7% in February 2014

If we skip the obvious issue of Forward Guidance from an organisation making yet another large forecasting error there is a clear issue of logic. This is that a sharp fall in unemployment suggests a stronger economy and thus Bank Rate rises as it is a measure according to Governor Carney that is.

– a clear and widely understood indicator of the degree of slack

But apparently less slack meant this.

That guidance was effective. Surveys conducted in the months that followed indicated high awareness of it
among companies, with almost half reporting that they expected Bank Rate to remain at low levels for longer
than they would have done were guidance not in place

So it worked by being wrong! Of course if we switch to the real world companies were probably ignoring all the “flip-flopping” that was already evident. After all he had only been Governor for a year when this happened. From the BBC.

The Bank of England has acted like an “unreliable boyfriend” in hints over interest rate rises, according to MP Pat McFadden…………

“We’ve had a lot of different signals,” he said. “I mean it strikes me that the Bank’s behaving a bit like a sort of unreliable boyfriend.

“One day hot, one day cold, and the people on the other side of the message are left not really knowing where they stand.”

Apparently misleading is helpful

The next section was aptly described by Earth Wind and Fire.

Every man has a place
In his heart there’s a space
And the world can’t erase his fantasies

We find that according to Governor Carney being an unreliable boyfriend brings a whole raft of benefits.

The MPC’s guidance speaks first and foremost to UK households and businesses.

Okay so he is swerving away from the financial markets he has misled to take us where?

And last year, we introduced layered communications, with simpler, more accessible language and graphics to
reach the broadest possible audience.

So we have had some dumbing down and then climbed the steps to the highest Ivory Tower he could find.

It now publishes its best collective judgments on the natural rate of unemployment, the output gap, as well as the
expected growth in productivity, labour supply and potential output.

I would like to pick out just one to illustrate how lost in the clouds this particular Ivory Tower is and that is the natural rate of unemployment. Was it the 7% he first used? Er no. In fact on the 28th of June 2014 it was already in disarray.

Governor Mark Carney pointed out that some work had suggested that the equilibrium unemployment rate (the lowest rate compatible with non-accelerating inflation) may be more like 5.5% than the 6.5% previously used.

I cannot recall if it went to 5% but it did go to 4.5% and is now 4.25%. Imagine the Bank of England had used such “science” to design the Titanic. They would be able to claim that it had not hit the iceberg but only because it would have sunk before it got out of port.

Reality got most suspended here.

The interest rate expectations of households and businesses have remained in line with the MPC’s limited
and gradual guidance………Guidance has reduced the impact of economic uncertainty on short-term interest rates

No the regular hints of an interest-rate rise have increased uncertainty especially when as has so often happened the unreliable boyfriend has flip-flopped. Ironically the next bit is true but not for the reasons given.

Guidance has dampened the volatility of interest rates, consistent with the expected and actual path of policy
rates (Chart 4). Guidance has reduced the impact of economic uncertainty on short-term interest rates.

The truth is that fewer and fewer people take any notice of his pronouncements. This was highlighted last night by the way the UK Pound £ responded with a yawn to the speech. Such a development must be most hurtful to someone whose ego is such that they changed the Bank of England website to have “Latest from the Governor” on the front page.

Comment

This is provided by two responses to last night’s speech. Here is a view which is clear on one side.

Okay so the only way is up! Or perhaps not. From Reuters.

The Bank of England could pump more stimulus into Britain’s economy if this year’s Brexit negotiations result in a bad deal, BoE governor Mark Carney said on Thursday.

In the past this would have been considered to be a masterly speech from a central bank Governor but not when he/she is claiming to provide Forward Guidance. because as you can see they can claim to be right whatever happens via some selective cherry picking but the ordinary person can not.

Why might Governor Carney hint at interest-rate rises and not do them. As ever the “precious” seems to be in the mix. From @IrkHudson.

Helps banks margins

The unreliable boyfriend has tripped over his own feet again

Today brings the “unreliable boyfriend” centre stage as we come to the moment when he gave Forward Guidance that he will raise interest-rates. Of course he would not be the unreliable boyfriend if things did not look very different by the time the event arrived! Sadly that has been the history of Bank of England Forward Guidance under Governor Mark Carney which has been anything but. From the initial false start of flagging up an unemployment rate of 7% that was supposed to be like the “train in the distance” sung about by Paul Simon but actually then arrived at high-speed it has been an error strewn path. Reuters have put it like this.

The BoE governor’s guidance on the path for interest rates has repeatedly been knocked off course by surprises in the economy, hence the accusation of unreliability from a lawmaker.

Care is needed as there are always going to be surprises and in a way that is a good thing as fans of the novel Dune will know. But there are themes that can be got right and sadly Governor Carney grasped the wrong stick right from the beginning. If we think back to yesterday’s article on Japan its unemployment rate of 2.5% is relevant here as tucked away in the original Forward Guidance was the Bank of England saying the natural rate of unemployment ( which some take as the equilibrium one and others even as a guide to full employment) was 6.5% The utter hopelessness of this view is shown by looking at the UK unemployment rate or even worse the Japanese one. Or if you prefer the natural rate in the UK has been 6%,5.5% then 4.5% and more recently 4.25% which illustrates the words of Oliver Hardy.

That’s another fine mess you’ve got me into

Sadly I do see teachers on social media referring to such views at the Bank of England and fear for what their students are being taught.

Also of course the media do need to keep their place in the pecking order for questions at press conferences and interviews which I think we should keep in mind as we read this from Reuters.

Drab data show Bank of England’s Carney a ‘sensitive boyfriend’

The data view was highlighted here.

Carney’s highlighting last month of “mixed” economic signals shocked investors who had bet the BoE would raise rates to a new post-financial-crisis high of 0.75 percent on May 10.

Since then, almost all the gauges of Britain’s economy have disappointed. Financial markets now point to a less than 10 percent chance of a rate hike on Thursday, compared with 90 percent a month ago.

Britain’s economy barely grew in the first three months of 2018 and bad weather was not the only reason why, official statisticians said last month.

Today’s data

The opening salvo was again drab.

In March 2018, total production was estimated to have increased by 0.1% compared with February 2018.Manufacturing fell by 0.1% in March 2018 compared with February 2018.

Maybe the weather had an impact but not a large one according to our official statisticians. If we look for some perspective we find ourselves continuing the recent theme of a slowing down economy.

>In the three months to March 2018, the Index of Production increased by 0.6% compared with the three months to December 2017, due mainly to a rise of 2.5% in energy supply; this was supported by rises in mining and quarrying of 2.2% and manufacturing of 0.2%.

It is kind of an irony that we find a positive impact from the weather! Although of course for domestic consumers this is a cost and a likely subtraction from other output for those whose budgets are tight.

If we step back and consider the credit crunch era then unless you raise the counterfactual to heroic levels then the £435 billion of QE and an emergency interest-rate of 0.5% seem to have failed here.

Since then, both production and manufacturing output have risen but remain below their level reached in the pre-downturn gross domestic product (GDP) peak in Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2008, by 5.1% and 0.8% respectively in the three months to March 2018.

Construction

The news here was better but only in the context of not being quite as bad as we had previously thought.

Construction output continued its recent decline in the three-month on three-month series, falling by 2.7% in March 2018, the biggest fall seen in this series since August 2012.

Here there was much more likely to have been an adverse impact from the weather and the recent pattern has been grim. However the overall picture is rather different to that shown by the production sector.

Construction output peaked in December 2017, reaching a level that was 30.3% higher than the lowest point of the last five years, April 2013. Despite the month-on-month decrease in March 2018, construction output remains 22.7% above this level.

If we consider monetary policy then supporters of the QE era have a case for arguing that there was a boost here from easy monetary policy and perhaps the Funding for Lending Scheme which did so much to reduce mortgage rates. So the implicit bank bailout did help one sector perhaps. The catch comes with the slow down as it was already happening before the Bank Rate rise last November and of course the Term Funding Scheme only ended in February. Even in the wildest dreams of Mark Carney and he has had some pretty wild ones monetary policy does not act that quickly.

Trade

Here the news was ( fortunately) better.

The UK total trade deficit (goods and services) narrowed £0.7 billion to £6.9 billion in the three months to March 2018, due mainly to falling goods imports from non-EU countries.

Even data over 3 months is not entirely reliable but the longer data was better too.

In the 12 months to March 2018, the total trade deficit narrowed £13.3 billion to £26.6 billion due to 9.2% export growth exceeding 6.4% growth for imports.

There is some genuine good news for the UK economy there in the growth achieved by our exporters. Because of our long-running trade deficit we need export growth to exceed import growth for us to make any progress. Also I am pleased to point out that earlier this week news appeared that confirmed my theme that our services exports have been badly measured and if we put more effort into recording them we were likely to get some good news.

provisional revisions to the UK trade balance range from a downward revision of £1.2 billion to the total trade deficit (goods and services) in 2001 to an upward revision of £9.8 billion in 2016 (Table 1). The £9.8 billion upward revision to the total trade deficit in 2016 means the deficit has been revised from £40.7 billion to £30.9 billion

As you can see the ch-ch-changes make quite a difference. If we factor in the impact of the lower UK Pound £ since the EU leave vote the narrative shifts somewhat. My opinion is that we have had long-running deficits but they have not been as bad as the numbers produced. As ever care is needed because do we really know this even now.

The main driver of the revision in 2016 came from improvements made to methods used to estimate net spread earnings, which feed into exports of services. The net spread earnings improvement revised trade in services exports back to 2004.

Well done to the Office for National Statistics for making a new effort something I asked for in my response to the Charlie Bean review. Of course the former Bank of England Governor Mervyn King was always keen on some rebalancing although it did not happen on poor Mervyn’s watch. By poor I do not mean financially poor as I am sure Baron King of Lothbury will be enjoying the benefits of his RPI-linked pensions as well as his other work.

Comment

The simple fact is that if we look at past Forward Guidance from the Bank of England then its conventional view would be moving towards a Bank Rate cut rather than a rise today. So yet again it has tripped over its own feet. The only factor heading in the other direction is the higher price of crude oil ( Brent Crude is over US $77 as I type this) which will push inflation higher further down the line. Although of course such influences are usually described as “temporary” however long they last and thereby get ignored.

An actual cut would be silly because as I have pointed it before the drop in the UK Pound £ since the unreliable boyfriends latest public U-Turn has been the equivalent of a 0.5% Bank Rate cut as it is. You could argue that would aid a Bank Rate rise but with monetary and economic data slowing I think that now would be a case of bad timing and I am someone who wants Bank Rate back up between 1.5% and 2% to provide a better balance between savers and depositors.

I would not worry too much about Governor Carney’s future though as those at the top of the establishment have a Teflon coating. After his role in the Libor scandal you might think that ex Bank of England Governor Paul Tucker should be in obscurity if not jail and yet apparently his thoughts are valuable. From the Brookings Institute.

Paul Tucker, drawing from his 33 years as a central banker, says that Congress should be much more specific about the objectives it wants the Federal Reserve to achieve and the Fed should try harder to explain what it’s doing

Tucker’s Luck?

Me on Core Finance TV

youtu.be/GtrmZbRPTgY

The return of the unreliable boyfriend causes carnage for the Pound £

Yesterday was not one of the better days for the Bank of England. To explain why let us take the advice of Kylie Minogue and step back in time. We go back to its house journal or the economics editor of the Financial Times Chris Giles on the 22nd of March.

The Bank of England has set the stage for an interest rate rise at its meeting in May, saying that pay growth was picking up and inflation was expected to remain above its 2 per cent target.

For Chris this was an example of deja vu and another success on its way for Forward Guidance.

Michael Saunders and Ian McCafferty broke ranks and voted for an immediate increase in interest rates, in a replay of events last September, when their dissenting views foreshadowed the MPC’s policy tightening announced in November.

The hits kept coming for the rise in May and go away camp.

The remaining seven MPC members argued that while nothing had changed significantly enough since the February meeting to justify an immediate move, they still believed rates would have to rise faster than markets had expected at the last meeting.

So the view advanced that an interest-rate rise in May was pretty much a done deal and markets moved towards suggesting a 90% chance of it. This was further reinforced by a speech given by Gertjan Vlieghe which I have mentioned before. From April 6th.

But last month Gertjan Vlieghe, an external MPC member, broke ranks with his colleagues on the nine-member committee when he said that rates could rise above 2 per cent over the same period.

So the stage was set and if there was a warning from the FT it was heavily coded and looked at something else.

The Riksbank has had some difficulties with its predictions. Until last year, it had been persistently over-optimistic about its ability to raise interest rates, always expecting rates to start rising soon

A bit like the England batsman James Vince who plays some flashy eye-catching shots but then gets out in the same familiar fashion.

Yesterday

Unfortunately for Governor Carney all his troubles were not so far away and it looked as though they were about to stay. He gave an interview to the BBC.

The governor of the Bank of England has said that an interest rate rise is “likely” this year, but any increases will be gradual.
Mark Carney said major decisions had to be taken on Brexit, including on the detail of the implementation period and the shape of a final deal.

There would also be a parliamentary vote on the future relationship between Britain and rest of the EU.

All those events would weigh on how fast interest rates rises would occur.

This poses more than a few problems. Firstly there is the issue of Brexit about which of course there are opposite views. But whichever side of the fence you are on the truth is that the water has been much less choppy recently so the Governor is flying a false flag. This adds to the problem he has in this area because he has been consistently too pessimistic on this subject, From the Guardian in May 2016.

That would leave the Bank with a difficult balancing act as it decides whether to cut, hold or raise interest rates to counter opposing forces, Carney added.

Of course the difficult balancing act suddenly became cut as fast as he could with a promise of a further cut that November which was later abandoned. This contrasts in polar fashion with the pace at which interest-rate increases arrive as we are still waiting for the one promised back in the summer of 2014. From the Wall Street Journal.

Bank of England Gov. Mark Carney said Thursday that interest rates in the U.K. could rise sooner than investors expect, sending the clearest signal yet that Britain’s central bank is inching closer to calling time on five years of record-low borrowing costs.

Well not that clear as it turned out to be comfortably numb.

A distant ship, smoke on the horizon
You are only coming through in waves

This was something which created quite a disturbance in the markets as they scrambled to move interest-rate and bond futures. It is easy to forget now but the words of Governor Carney caused quite a bit of damage as the move eventually reversed. Also there was this.

And he warned the BOE intends to be vigilant over any risks to the recovery emanating from the housing market, where rising prices are stoking fears that Britons could become too indebted.

Indeed

Term Funding Scheme. Our Term Funding Scheme (TFS) provides funding to banks and building societies at rates close to Bank Rate. It is designed to encourage them to reflect cuts in Bank Rate in the interest rates faced by households and businesses.

Oh sorry not that £127 billion one nor the extra £60 billion of QE Gilt purchases. anyway as there is nothing to see here let;s move along.

How fast?

This issue is something which just gets ever more breathtaking so let me take you to the Bank of England Minutes.

All members agree that any future increases in Bank Rate are likely to be at a gradual pace and to a limited extent.

The problem here is that whilst this is repeated by the media like a mantra nobody points out that we have had years of such hints and promises now with us remaining at the “emergency” Bank Rate of 0.5%. We did of course get a panic cut in the summer of 2016 followed after what was considered to be a suitable delay to avoid embarrassment an overdue reversal but no increases at all.I am reminded of the explanation of what minutes mean by the apochryphal civil servant Sir Humphrey Appleby which was along the lines of “Whatever you want” from Status Quo, But feel that this from June 2014 was more accurate.

Part of that normalisation would be a rise in Bank
Rate at some point

The some point has never arrived but of course the hot air rhetoric carries on regardless. From Bloomberg.

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney says the U.K. should prepare for a few interest-rate increases over the next few years.

Perhaps he means after June 2019 when he leaves.

Comment

We find ourselves looking at a familiar theme which is the woeful forecasting record of the Bank of England. In this instance we see that it has changed its mid again about pay growth and inflation if we look through the Brexit inspired smokescreen. This matters because the present Governor Mark Carney has placed enormous emphasis on so-called Forward Guidance which of course has turned out to be anything but. It is a feature of his tenure that he is a dedicated follower of fashion but in his private moments he must regret following that particular central banking one. His forward guidance on climate change also has its troubles.

Carney said in the comments, made on the sidelines of the International Monetary Fund meetings in Washington.

This morning another member of the Bank of England Michael Saunders has demonstrated what a land of confusion they live in.

because the economy’s response to
changes in interest rates, especially rises, is more uncertain than usual.

Is it? Maybe one day we will find out! Also there is this rather bizarre statement and the emphasis is mine.

He also discusses why any further tightening is likely to be at a gradual pace and to a limited extent.

So there you have it. As to the decision well the Bank of England has led itself and the markets up the garden path and now is having second thoughts. The real problem is not the current view which is more realistic but why it keeps being wrong?

A new Governor?

An ability not to see anything inconvenient seems a good start and of course the ability to deny almost anything would be of great help. Some have suggested he has gone because he wants to be in Europe next season but personally I think we should remember the positive influence he brought to English football in the early days. A big change to the drinking and eating cultures for a start.

How much will interest-rates rise?

The issue of interest-rate rises has suddenly become something of a hot topic and let me open with the words of Jamie Dimon of JP Morgan. From the Financial Times.

Jamie Dimon, head of JPMorgan Chase, has warned that the US economy is at risk of overheating, raising the prospect that the Federal Reserve may soon need to slam on the brakes to prevent wages and prices from rising too quickly.

There are more than a few begged questions here but let us park them for now and carry on.

“Many people underestimate the possibility of higher inflation and wages, which means they might be underestimating the chance that the Federal Reserve may have to raise rates faster than we all think,” he wrote. “We have to deal with the possibility that, at one point, the Federal Reserve and other central banks may have to take more drastic action than they currently anticipate.”

Okay let us break this down. Firstly we are back to output gap theory again which of course has been wrong,wrong and wrong again in the credit crunch era. If there are signs of overheating then they are to be found in asset markets where we have seen booming bond prices and house prices and until recently all-time highs for equity markets. Only on Tuesday we looked at US house price growth of 6% or 7% depending which data you use.

Wages

I have picked this out because there has been quite a swerve from Jamie Dimon as for so long nearly everyone has been hoping for higher wages. Now suddenly apparently a rise is a bad thing? The Financial Times article implicitly parrots this line.

The prospect of an overheating economy has spooked the financial markets as recently as February, when stronger-than-expected US wage growth sparked the worst Wall Street sell-off in six years.

In terms of numbers a rise in average earnings growth per hour to 2.9% was hardly groundbreaking and of course it has since faded away showing the unreliable nature of one month’s data. In reality to return to old era trends we would need wages growth of 3.5%+ for a while. But in Jamie’s world that seems to be a bad thing although apparently not always. From Bloomberg.

JPMorgan Chase & Co. Chief Executive Officer Jamie Dimon received $29.5 million in total compensation for his work in 2017, an increase of 5.4 percent from a year earlier.

So we are left mulling a view where what was supposed to be good would now be bad! Although those of you who in the comments section have argued we will not see major interest-rate rises until wage rises for the ordinary person picks up are permitted a wry smile at this point.

What is expected?

From the FT article.

Prices of Fed funds futures suggest few expect the Fed to raise rates by more than three times this year, as policymakers have indicated. Longer-term market measures also indicate that investors expect inflation and bond yields to remain subdued for years to come.

I put the second sentence in because it is positively misleading. What those measures are provide a balancing of markets now and usually have very little to do with what will happen. Returning to interest-rates we got a view this week from former Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen.

At Monday’s larger forum for Jefferies clients, she expressed the view that three or four rate rises were likely this year, and that recent U.S. tax cuts and a boost in government spending posed at least some risk of running the economy hot, according to the first source, who requested anonymity. ( CNBC)

This is the awkward bit about the Jamie Dimon claim which is that the existing and likely moves in US interest-rates are a response to expected higher inflation anyway as of course as we have looked at many times it is still below the target. Back to Janet.

Later, over dinner at the Manhattan penthouse of Jefferies’ chief executive, Yellen told executives from hedge funds, private equity firms and other companies that she considered inflation to be in check and unlikely to spike, so rates would stay relatively low, according to a second person familiar with the discussion.

Take that as you will as of course we discovered in her time that she does not really understand inflation.

The Bank of England

So how will it respond as traditionally it follows the US Federal Reserve?

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Oh sorry not that one. Let us move onto its favourite publication the Financial Times.

Policymakers at the Bank of England are debating whether to be more forthcoming about their future plans for interest rates, as they gear up for a crunch vote on the cost of borrowing next month.

This is fascinating stuff because it both implies and suggests they know what their forecasts are! Let me give you an example reviewed favourably by Chris Giles the economics editor of the FT.

But last month Gertjan Vlieghe, an external MPC member, broke ranks with his colleagues on the nine-member committee when he said that rates could rise above 2 per cent over the same period.

Actually if we remove the rose-tintin ( sorry but he is Belgian) he seems an excitable chap as this from the Evening Standard in April 2016 reveals.

Vlieghe’s answer is intriguing: “Theoretically, I think interest rates could go a little bit negative.”

The long discussion on negative interest-rates that took place was clearly a hint of expected policy and means that Gertjan was wrong which poses a question over why we should listen this time? Although Chris Giles has a very different view.

Not sure it matters if people believe them.

I think it matters a lot. Oh and as the Swedish Riksbank has found it.

The Riksbank has had some difficulties with its predictions.

But to be fair Chris Giles does have a sense of humour ( I think).

But there remains concern that the BoE could undermine trust in it as an institution running an important public policy if it makes predictions about interest rates that do not come to pass.

Comment

Let me open with a rather good reply to this from GreaterFool.

Any shreds of credibility that the BoE once had disappeared into smoke after the forward guidance experiment. Telling people that you’ll raise rates after unemployment falls below 7% and then dropping them again when unemployment is below 5% will do that.

In fact the hits keep coming as though in this instance from Felix2012

There are quite a few commenters here who still take MPC seriously, unfortunately.

As to clarity well we did get that from Governor Carney back in June 2014.

There’s already great speculation about the exact timing of the first rate hike and this decision is becoming more balanced….“It could happen sooner than markets currently expect.

That was taken as a clear signal back then and the next day saw a lot of market adjustments which later led to losses as it never happened. Of course the road to a Bank Rate cut after Governor Carney hinted at it was both real and fast as we discovered 3 years later.

So what can we expect? The Bank of England has rather committed itself to a May Bank Rate rise which if you look at falling inflation and some weaker economic news looks out of touch. We have seen signs of slowing in Europe too as German industrial production has shown already today. The US Federal Reserve will no doubt carry on course unless there is a shock stateside although not everyone even thinks we need any tightening. BoI is the Bank of Italy.

 

The problems of the boy who keeps crying wolf

Yesterday saw the policy announcement of the Bank of England with quite a few familiar traits on display. However we did see something rather familiar in the press conference from its Governor Mark Carney.

The Committee judges that, given the assumptions underlying its projections, including the closure of drawdown period of the TFS and the recent prudential decisions of the FPC and PRA, some tightening of monetary policy would be required in order to achieve a sustainable
return of inflation to target.

Yes he is giving us Forward Guidance about an interest-rate rise again. In fact there was more of this later.

Specifically, if the economy follows a path broadly consistent with the August central projection, then monetary policy could need to be tightened by a somewhat greater extent over the forecast period than the path implied by the yield curve underlying those projections.

Yep not only is he promising an interest-rate rise but he is suggesting that there will be several of them. Actually that is more hype than substance because you see even if you look out to the ten-year Gilt yield you only get to 1.16% and the five-year is only 0.54% so exceeding that is really rather easy. Also as I have pointed out before Governor Carney covers all the bases by contradicting himself in the same speech.

Any increases in Bank Rate would be expected to be at a gradual pace and to a limited extent

So more suddenly becomes less or something like that.

Just like deja vu all over again

If we follow the advice of Kylie and step back in time to the Mansion House speech of 2014 we heard this from Governor Carney.

This has implications for the timing, pace and degree of Bank Rate increases.

There’s already great speculation about the exact timing of the first rate hike and this decision is becoming more balanced.

It could happen sooner than markets currently expect.

The print on the screen does not convey how this was received as such statements are taken as being from a coded language especially if you add in this bit.

Growth has been much stronger and unemployment has fallen much faster than either we or anyone else expected at last year’s Mansion House dinner.

Markets heard that growth had been better and that the Bank of England was planning a Bank Rate rise in the near future followed by a series of them. Tucked away was something which has become ever more familiar.

 we expect that eventual increases in Bank Rate will be gradual and limited

Although to be fair this bit was kind of right.

The MPC has rightly stressed that the timing of the first Bank Rate increase is less important than the path thereafter

Indeed the first Bank Rate increase was so unimportant it never took place.

Ben Broadbent

he has reinforced the new Forward Guidance this morning. Here is the Financial Times view of what he said on BBC Radio 5 live.

“There may be some possibility for interest rates to go up a little,” said Mr Broadbent.

It sounds as though Deputy Governor Broadbent is hardly convinced. This is in spite of the fact he repeated a line from the Governor that is so extraordinary the press corps should be ashamed they did not challenge it.

adding the economy was now better placed to withstand its first interest rate rise since the financial crisis…….Speaking to BBC radio, Mr Broadbent said the UK was able to handle a rate rise “a little bit” better as the economy is still growing, unemployment is at a more than 40-year low, and wages are forecast to rise.

Sadly for Ben he is acting like the absent-minded professor he so resembles. After all on that score he should have raised interest-rates last summer when growth was a fair bit higher than now.Sadly for Ben he voted to cut them! In addition to this there is a much more fundamental point which is if we are in better shape for rate rises why do we have one which is below the 0.5% that was supposed to be an emergency rate and of course was called the “lower bound” by Governor Carney?

Forecasting failures

These are in addition to the Forward Guidance debacle but if we look at the labour market we see a major cause. Although he tried to cover it in a form of Brexit wrap there was something very familiar yesterday from Governor Carney. From the Guardian.

 

We are picking up across the country that there is an element of Brexit uncertainty that is affecting wage bargaining.
Some firms, potentially a material number of firms, are less willing to give bigger pay rises given it’s not as clear what their market access will be over the next few years.

Actually the Bank of England has been over optimistic on wages time and time again including before more than a few really believed there would be a Brexit vote. This is linked to its forecasting failures on the quantity labour market numbers. Remember phase one of Forward Guidance where an unemployment rate of 7% was considered significant? That lasted about six months as the rate in a welcome move quickly dropped below it. This meant that the Ivory Tower theorists at the Bank of England immediately plugged this into their creaking antiquated models and decided that wages would rise in response. They didn’t and history since has involved the equivalent of any of us pressing repeat on our MP3 players or I-pods. As we get according to the Four Tops.

It’s the same old song
But with a different meaning

Number Crunching

This was reported across the media with what would have been described in the Yes Minister stories and TV series as the “utmost seriousness”. From the BBC.

It edged this year’s growth forecast down to 1.7% from its previous forecast of 1.9% made in May. It also cut its forecast for 2018 from 1.7% to 1.6%.

Now does anybody actually believe that the Bank of England can forecast GDP growth to 0.1%? For a start GDP in truth cannot be measured to that form of accuracy but an organisation which as I explained earlier has continuously got both wages and unemployment wrong should be near the bottom of the list as something we should rely on.

Comment

There is something else to consider about Governor Carney. I have suggested in the past that in the end Bank of England Governors have a sort of fall back position which involves a lower level for the UK Pound £. What happened after his announcements yesterday?

Sterling is now trading at just €1.106, down from €1.20 this morning, as traders respond to the Bank of England’s downgraded forecasts for growth and wages…..The pound has also dropped further against the US dollar to $1.3127, more than a cent below this morning’s eight-month high.

They got a bit excited with the Euro rate which of course had been just below 1.12 and not 1.20 but the principle of a Bank of England talking down the Pound has yet another tick in any measurement column. Somewhere Baron King of Lothbury would no doubt have been heard to chuckle. There is a particular irony in this with Deputy Governor Broadbent telling Radio 5 listeners this earlier.

BoE Broadbent: Faster Inflation Fuelled By Pound Weakness ( h/t @LiveSquawk )

Oh and I did say this was on permanent repeat.

BoE Broadbent: Expects UK Wage Growth To Pick Up In Coming Years ( h/t @LiveSquawk )

 

Oh and as someone pointed out in yesterdays comments there has been yet another Forward Guidance failure. If you look back to the first quote there is a mention of the TFS which regular readers will recognise as the Term Funding Scheme. Here are the relevant excerpts from the letter from Governor Carney to Chancellor Hammond.

I noted when the TFS was announced that total drawings would be determined by actual usage of the scheme, and could reach £100bn………. Consistent with this, I am requesting that you authorise an increase in the total size of the APF of £15bn to £560bn, in order to accommodate expected usage of the TFS by the end of the drawdown period.

Who could have possibly expected that the banks would want more of a subsidy?! Oh and the disinformation goes on as apparently they need more of it because of a “stronger economy”.

Also this seems to be something of a boys club again as my title suggests. We have had something of what Yes Minister might call a “woman overboard” problem at the Bank of England.