The economy of China is not seeing a V-Shaped recovery

This morning has seen a does of economic news from the epicentre of the current pandemic and hence crisis which is China. This is keenly awaited as we see how the economy responds to the pandemic. Sadly we seem already to be charging into what might be described as Fake News so let us take a look.

BEIJING, March 31 (Xinhua) — The purchasing managers’ index (PMI) for China’s manufacturing sector firmed up to 52 in March from 35.7 in February, the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said Tuesday.
A reading above 50 indicates expansion, while a reading below reflects contraction.
The rebound came as the country’s arduous efforts in coordinating epidemic control and economic and social development have generally filtered through, NBS senior statistician Zhao Qinghe said.

Okay now first we need to remind ourselves that this is a sentiment indicator not an actual output number although tucked away we do get some clearer  guidance.

With positive changes taking place in domestic epidemic control and prevention, 96.6 percent of China’s large and medium-sized enterprises have resumed production, up 17.7 percentage points from one month ago, NBS survey showed.
A sub-index for production, rallied 26.3 points from one month earlier to 54.1, hinting at reviving production activities.

Below we seem some sectors which we would expect to pick-up and in fact are probably flat-out. Let’s face it demand for some protective equipment may never have been as high as this.

Meanwhile, the PMI for high-tech manufacturing, equipment manufacturing and consumer goods all stood in expansion zone, signaling quickened restoration in the sectors, according to Zhao.

The twitter feed of Xinhua News also continues with the line that things are in some cases back to normal.

As the outbreak of the novel #coronavirus has been basically contained in China, the construction of Xiongan, often billed as China’s “city of the future,” has resumed in an orderly manner.

I am sure some of you have already spotted the difference between “basically contained” and contained already. But the theme is of an economic recovery.

China’s March composite PMI rose significantly to 53, up 24.1 points from February.

This has been reported as being quite a rebound as the two tweet below highlight.

Wow! Impressive V-shape recovery in #China’s Manufacturing #PMI. Up to 52 from 35.7. ( @jsblokland) 

 

So far, data seems to support China’s prospects of a V-shaped economic recovery…. Strong PMI rebound.

The second tweet is from the editor of The Spectator Fraser Nelson.

A V-shaped recovery means that you are very quickly back to where you started. This was what was promised for Greece back in the day which is of course a troubling harbinger. After all the Greek economy promptly collapsed.

The National Bureau of Statistics

It published an explainer which tells a rather different story.

The purchasing manager index is a chain index, which reflects the economic changes in this month compared with the previous month. The magnitude of the change has a great relationship with the base of the previous month.

There was more.

the manufacturing PMI, non-manufacturing business activity index, and the comprehensive PMI output index fell sharply in February, and the base rose from the previous month. These data indicate that the production and operation status of enterprises in March has significantly changed from February.

This gets reinforced here.

Taking the production index as an example, according to the answer of the enterprise purchasing manager to the question “The production volume of the main products of this month has changed from last month”,

So as you can see the situation is likely to be as follows the reading of 52 is an improvement on the 35.7 of February. so for example might be 38 or 39 if we try to impose some sort of absolute moniker in this. Accordingly there has been an improvement but V-shaped?

The mire sanguine view I have expressed is much more in line with this from the South China Morning Post today.

China’s economic situation could get worse before it gets better, amid a second wave of demand shock that is set to hit both domestic and foreign trade, a Chinese government official has warned.Addressing a press conference in Beijing on Monday, the day after President Xi Jinping toured businesses in Zhejiang province, vice-minister of industry and information technology Xin Guobin delivered a candid and downbeat assessment of the economy, in a subtle break from recent optimistic rhetoric about economic recovery.

What is behind his thinking?

“With the further spread of the international epidemic, China’s foreign trade situation may further deteriorate,” Xin said. “Overseas and domestic demand are both slumping, having a significant impact on some export-oriented companies. These companies might face a struggle to survive.”

We also get a clue as to what “barely contained” in terms of the Corona Virus means.

After bringing the domestic epidemic under control, China gave the green light earlier this month for over 600 cinemas, thousands of tourism attractions and half the country’s restaurants to reopen.

But in sudden U-turn last Friday, the National Film Bureau ordered all cinemas to shut down again, without explaining why or when they might hope to reopen.

Shanghai municipal authorities also ordered a number of famous tourist attractions to close over the weekend, including the Oriental Pearl Tower and Shanghai Ocean Aquarium.

Is it back?

Hong Kong

We have looked at Hong Kong before because it had its economic troubles before this pandemic struck. However in terms of today’s subject it does give us something of a clue to what is happening in China and if so today’s Retail Sales numbers speak for themselves.

After netting out the effect of price changes over the same period, the provisional estimate of the volume of total retail sales in February 2020 decreased by 46.7% compared with a year earlier. The revised estimate of the volume of total retail sales in January 2020 decreased by 23.1% compared with a year earlier. For the first two months of 2020 taken together, the provisional estimate of the total retail sales decreased by 33.9% in volume compared with the same period in 2019.

It is not to say that some areas have not seen a boost.

 On the other hand, the value of sales of commodities in supermarkets increased by 11.1% in the first two months of 2020 over the same period a year earlier.  This was followed by sales of fuels (+6.5% in value).

The first part is no surprise but unless people were fleeing the place ( or perhaps preparing to) I am unsure about the second part.

For the other areas of retail sales it was basically the tale of woe you might expect.

Analysed by broad type of retail outlet in descending order of the provisional estimate of the value of sales and comparing the combined total sales for January and February 2020 with the same period a year earlier, the value of sales of food, alcoholic drinks and tobacco decreased by 9.3%. This was followed by sales of jewellery, watches and clocks, and valuable gifts (-58.6% in value); other consumer goods, not elsewhere classified (-21.9%); electrical goods and other consumer durable goods, not elsewhere classified (-25.1%); medicines and cosmetics (-42.7%); commodities in department stores (-41.4%); wearing apparel (-49.9%); motor vehicles and parts (-24.2%); footwear, allied products and other clothing accessories (-43.1%); furniture and fixtures (-19.6%); Chinese drugs and herbs (-23.7%); books, newspapers, stationery and gifts (-35.0%); and optical shops (-28.6%).

Comment

These are highly charged times both in terms of the pandemic and the subsequent economic outlook. As you can see the reports of China bouncing back are in fact beyond optimistic. Indeed even Xhinua News made the point.

However, Zhao said the single-month rise does not necessarily mean the production has been back to pre-outbreak levels, noting that more data should be observed. The upturn of economy, Zhao said, only comes when the PMI moves up for at least three consecutive months.

So today’s song lyrics come from Brian Ferry ( although originally written by Bob Dylan).

It’s a hard and it’s a hard and it’s a hard and it’s a hard
And it’s a hard rain’s a gonna fall

China is being hit hard by its economic virus

Today brings an opportunity to take a fresh look at the economic story of 2020 which is the impact of the Corona Virus on the Chinese and world economies. We can reverse our normal order and look at the financial market impact but before we do so I think we should also note the suffering and deaths behind this.

Jittery investors erased almost $400 billion from Chinese stocks, with the Shanghai Composite index shedding up to 8% to hit a one-year low, according to Reuters calculations.

As you can see the Reuters journalists were unable to resist the temptation of writing a large number ( $400 billion ) in spite of the fact they are using a marginal price for some to value the total. Actually but for the price limits there would have been further falls.

Stocks tumbled across the board, with nearly 3000 stock closing at limit-down price. ( YuanTalks)

Although not every share fell and I guess you will not be suprised to see who did not.

Mask producers and some medical related companies outperformed.

The traditional response to this is for the bond market to rally and it did not disappoint.

#China’s 10-year #treasury futures closed 1.37% up at the highest level in more than 3 years as investors dump risky assets. ( YuanTalks )

This meant that the benchmark ten-year yield pushed below the 3% barrier to 2.86% at the close. So heading towards the levels seen by us Western Imperialist Capitalists.

The exchange rate has a more mixed picture. Whilst the Yuan fell by more than 1% versus the US Dollar this morning and pushed through the 7 Yuan threshold it is also true that we are where we were three months ago. In the circumstances we had seen a surprising stability as whilst there had been plenty of media rhetoric a move from 6.85 to 6.92 was not a lot. So it is over playing it to say it is the dog that did nor bark it has been quiet.

People’s Bank of China

This stepped up to the plate today according to the South China Morning Post.

In the face of the “epidemic situation”, the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) said on Sunday it would “inject 1.2 trillion yuan via reverse repo operations on February 3 to ensure sufficient liquidity supply.”
“The liquidity of the overall banking system will be 900 billion yuan more than the same period of last year,” the central bank added.It is the first time that the central bank has made such an announcement and also marks the largest single-day reverse repo operation it has ever conducted.

The issue was partly caused by the fact that there were previous operations which were maturing so we need to see the net effect.

According to Reuters calculations, 1.05 trillion yuan (US$151 billion) worth of reverse repos are set to mature on Monday, meaning that 150 billion yuan in net cash will be injected.

This also came with a small interest-rate cut.

SHANGHAI (Reuters) – China’s cut to its reverse repo rate should alleviate the shock to the real economy from a virus outbreak and is a good move to stabilize expectations and restore financial market confidence, a central bank adviser said on Monday.

Ma Jun’s comments followed an unexpected decision by the central bank for a cut of 10 basis points in the interest rate on reverse repurchase agreements.

Thus we have seen the traditional central banking response to an expected equity market decline as well as a reason for today’s fall in the Yuan.

Manufacturing

This is a rather hot topic in the circumstances as we note this morning’s release.

“The Caixin China General Manufacturing PMI stood at
51.1 in January, down from 51.5 in the previous month. The
manufacturing sector expanded at the slowest pace since August, despite growing for six consecutive months, indicating a mild economic recovery.”

It is hard what to know to make of that and even more so this.

That said, business confidence continued to improve, with the gauge for future output expectations on the rise and tending to recover after two years of depression, due chiefly to the phase one trade deal between China and the U.S

Looking at the dates this gives us a snapshot just before the virus hit and perhaps we should be expecting something more like this bit going forwards.

Production growth slowed, with the output subindex posting its lowest reading since last August. The employment subindex returned to negative territory.

Whilst it also covers other sectors of the economy the official industrial data for December was somewhat downbeat.

BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s industrial firms posted their first annual decline in profits in four years in 2019, as the slowest economic growth in almost 30 years and a bruising trade war with the United States hit the country’s factories.

Official data released on Monday showed industrial profits declining 3.3% on an annual basis to 6.1996 trillion yuan ($897.96 billion) in 2019, compared with the 2.1% dip in the January-November period, the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) said on its website. It was first full-year decline since 2015 when profits fell 2.3%.

Hong Kong

This has a role as a type of offshore hybrid for the Chinese economy. Even before the Corona Virus it had been seeing economic problems due to the protests there.

According to the advance estimates, GDP decreased by 2.9% in real terms in the fourth quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, compared with the decrease of 2.8% in the third quarter of 2019. The decline of was mainly attributable to the weak performance in both domestic and external demand. For 2019 as a whole, GDP decreased by 1.2% in real terms from 2018. ( Hong Kong Statistics )

The situation is presently in flux with @fastFT announcinng this earlier.

Hong Kong closes border crossings with China

Comment

The issue here twists on the fact that the Corona Virus is new. After all a flu epidemic would be considered not that major on this scale, but it is the fear of the unknown driving this. But the quarantining response has hit the Chinese economy and is being felt around the world. For example the reduction in oil demand has led to this.

OPEC+ IS CONSIDERING FURTHER OIL OUTPUT CUT OF 500,000 BPD DUE TO VIRUS IMPACT ON DEMAND – TWO OPEC SOURCES MOST OPEC MEMBERS AGREE ON NEED TO CUT OIL OUTPUT FURTHER || OPEC+ NOW CONSIDERING MEETING ON FEB. 14-15 – OPEC SOURCE ( @FirstSquawk )

This is in reply to a price for a barrel of Brent Crude Oil which has fallen below US 57 Dollars today. Those who just follow the headlines will be a bit surprised as we have in recent times twice had headlines of it exceeding 70 US Dollars but the truth is that without something special to boost it the oil price has been slip-sliding away.

Switching to Dr. Copper then a futures price of US $2.53 suggests trouble ahead. As to Iron Ore the price falls are already impacting on the South China Territories. From Commodity News.

THE deadly coronavirus outbreak threatens to put a significant dent in Western Australia’s finances amid a plunge in the iron ore market.

Premier Mark McGowan says a 13 per cent decline in the iron ore price over the past fortnight to $US81 ($A121) per tonne is one of several concerns for a state economy heavily dependent on a lucrative trade partnership with China.

Construction has ground to a halt across China amid travel restrictions and port closures, prompting investors to dump iron ore shares.

Meanwhile if you want some positive news here is an example from planet ECB.

ECB’s De Guindos: Starting To See Signs Of Stabilisation On A Global Level. ( @LiveSquawk )

Podcast

Is Hong Kong in a recession or a depression now?

Some days an item of news just reaches out and grabs you and this morning it has come from the increasingly troubled Hong Kong. We knew that there would be economic consequences from the political protests there but maybe not this much.

The Census and Statistics Department (C&SD) released today (October 31) the advance estimates on Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for the third quarter of 2019.     According to the advance estimates, GDP decreased by 2.9% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, compared with the increase of 0.4% in the second quarter of 2019.

The commentary from a government spokesman confirmed various details.

marking the first year-on-year contraction for an individual quarter since the Great Recession of 2009, and also much weaker than the mild growth of 0.6% and 0.4% in the first and second quarters respectively. For the first three quarters as a whole, the economy contracted by 0.7% over a year earlier. On a seasonally adjusted quarter-to-quarter comparison, the fall in real GDP widened to 3.2% in the third quarter from 0.5% in the preceding quarter, indicating that the Hong Kong economy has entered a technical recession.

The concept of recession first switched to technical recession meaning a minor one ( say -0.1% or -0.2% GDP growth) but now seems to encompass what is a large fall. Time for Kylie again I guess.

I’m spinning around
Move outta my way

A clue to the change is the way that the year so far has fallen by 0.7% in GDP terms. If we look back we see that annual GDP growth of 3.8% slowed a little to 3% from 2017 to 18. But the quarterly numbers have been falling for a while. In annual terms GDP growth was 2.8% in the third quarter of 2018 but then only 1.2% in the last quarter and then going 0.6%, 0.4% and now -2.9% this year.

The Details

If we take the advice of Kylie and start breaking it down we see this.

Gross domestic fixed capital formation decreased significantly by 16.3% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, compared with the decrease of 10.8% in the second quarter.

Investment has taken quite a dive as this time last year it was increasing at an annual rate of 8.6%. Indeed the private-sector full stop took a fair hammering.

private consumption expenditure decreased by 3.5% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, as against the 1.3% growth in the second quarter.

The one bright spot was government expenditure.

     Government consumption expenditure measured in national accounts terms grew by 5.3% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 over a year earlier, after the increase of 4.0% in the second quarter.

Is it too cheeky to suggest that at least some of this will be police overtime? So far it is not increased unemployment payouts

     The number of unemployed persons (not seasonally adjusted) in July – September 2019 was 120 300, about the same as that in June – August 2019 (120 600). The number of underemployed persons in July – September 2019 was 41 500, also about the same as that in June – August 2019 (41 000).

The flickers of acknowledgement of the present troubles were in the employment not the unemployment numbers.

 Total employment decreased by around 8 200 from 3 863 600 in June – August 2019 to 3 855 400 in July – September 2019. Over the same period, the labour force also decreased by around 8 500 from 3 984 200 to 3 975 700.

Also does the labour force fall suggest some emigration?

However you spin it the commentary is grim.

As the weakening economic conditions dampened consumer sentiment, and large-scale demonstrations caused severe disruptions to the retail, catering and other consumption-related sectors, private consumption expenditure recorded its first year-on-year decline in more than ten years. The fall in overall investment expenditure steepened amid sagging economic confidence.

Trade

This added to the woes as you can see below.

Over the same period, total exports of goods measured in national accounts terms recorded a decrease of 7.0% in real terms from a year earlier, compared with the decrease of 5.4% in the second quarter. Imports of goods measured in national accounts terms fell by 11.1% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019, compared with the decline of 6.7% in the second quarter.

Ironically this looks like a boost to GDP from a tale of woe. This is because the fall in imports ( a boost to GDP) is larger than the fall in exports. This situation reverses somewhat in the services sector presumably mostly due to lower tourism revenue.

Exports of services dropped by 13.7% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, following the decline of 1.1% in the second quarter. Imports of services decreased by 3.8% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019, as against the increase of 1.3% in the second quarter.

Looking Ahead

That was then and this is now so what can we expect?

Looking ahead, with global economic growth expected to remain soft in the near term, Hong Kong’s exports are unlikely to show any visible improvement. Moreover, as the adverse impacts of the local social incidents have yet to show signs of abating, private consumption and investment sentiment will continue to be affected. The Hong Kong economy will still face notable downward pressures in the rest of the year.

If we look at the results from the latest official quarterly business survey and note what happened in the third quarter then we get a proper Halloween style chill down the spine.

 For all surveyed sectors taken together, the proportion of respondents expecting their business situation to be worse (32%) in Q4 2019 over Q3 2019 is significantly higher than that expecting it to be better (7%).  When compared with the results of the Q3 2019 survey round, the proportion of respondents expecting a worse business situation in Q4 2019 as compared with the preceding quarter has increased to 32%, against the corresponding proportion of 17% in Q3 2019.

According to the South China Morning Post then prospects for China continue to weaken.

The manufacturing purchasing managers’ index (PMI), released by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) on Thursday, stood at 49.3 in October, down from 49.8  in September.  The non-manufacturing PMI – a gauge of sentiment in the services and construction sectors – came in at 52.8 in October, below analysts’ expectations for a 53.6 reading. The figure was also down from September’s 53.7, dropping to its lowest level since February 2016.

As to Japan there seems to be little hope as the Bank of Japan just seems lost at sea now.

As for the policy rates, the Bank expects short- and long-term interest rates to remain at their present or lower levels as long as it is necessary to pay close attention to the possibility that the momentum toward achieving the price stability target will be lost.

Comment

As you can see the situation in Hing Kong is clearly recessionary and the size of it combined with the fact that it looks set to continue means it is looks depressionary as well. There has been a monetary respone but this of course only represents maintenance of the US Dollar peg.

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) announced today (Thursday) that the Base Rate was adjusted downward by 25 basis points to 2% with immediate effect according to a pre-set formula.  The decrease in the Base Rate follows the 25-basis point downward shift in the target range for the US federal funds rate on 30 October (US time).

As to the guide provided by the narrow money supply there is this.

The seasonally-adjusted Hong Kong dollar M1 decreased by 0.5% in September and by 3.4% from a year earlier, reflecting in part investment-related activities.

However you spin it people are switching from Hong Kong Dollars to other currencies.

The Investing Channel