Australia cuts interest-rates for the third time in five months

This morning has brought news that we were expecting so let me hand you over to the Reserve Bank of Australia or RBA.

At its meeting today, the Board decided to lower the cash rate by 25 basis points to 0.75 per cent.

This means that the RBA has cut three times since the fifth of June. Thus those who travel in a land down under are seeing a central bank in panic mode as it has halved the official interest-rate in this period. It means that they have joined the central bankers headbangers club who rush to slash interest-rates blindly ignoring the fact that those who have already done so are singing along with Coldplay.

Oh no I see
A spider web it’s tangled up with me
And I lost my head
And thought of all the stupid things I said
Oh no what’s this
A spider web and I’m caught in the middle
So I turned to run
The thought of all the stupid things I’ve done.

If we look at the statement we get a reminder of our South China Territories theme.

The US–China trade and technology disputes are affecting international trade flows and investment as businesses scale back spending plans because of the increased uncertainty. At the same time, in most advanced economies, unemployment rates are low and wages growth has picked up, although inflation remains low. In China, the authorities have taken further steps to support the economy, while continuing to address risks in the financial system.

We can cut to the nub of this by looking at what the RBA also released this morning.

Preliminary estimates for September indicate that the index decreased by 2.7 per cent (on a monthly average basis) in SDR terms, after decreasing by 4.6 per cent in August (revised). The non-rural and rural subindices decreased in the month, while the base metals subindex increased. In Australian dollar terms, the index decreased by 3.5 per cent in September.

So the benefit from Australia’s enormous commodity resources has faded although it is still just above the level last year.

Over the past year, the index has increased by 1.8 per cent in SDR terms, led by higher iron ore, gold and beef & veal prices. The index has increased by 5.2 per cent in Australian dollar terms.

Aussie Dollar

The index above makes me think of this and here is a view from DailyFX.

Australian Dollar price action has remained subdued throughout most of 2019 with spot AUDUSD trading slightly above multi-year lows.

As I type this an Aussie Dollar buys 0.67 of a US Dollar which is down by 6.6% over the past year. The trade-weighted index has been in decline also having been 65.1 at the opening of 2018 as opposed to the 58.9 of this morning’s calculation.

So along with the interest-rate cuts we have seen a mild currency depreciation or devaluation. But so far President Trump has not turned his attention to Australia.

Also if we stay with DailyFX I find the statement below simply extraordinary.

 if the central bank continues to favor a firm monetary policy stance since announcing back-to-back rate cuts.

A firm monetary stance?

Back to the RBA Statement

Apparently in case you have not spotted it everybody else is doing it.

Interest rates are very low around the world and further monetary easing is widely expected, as central banks respond to the persistent downside risks to the global economy and subdued inflation.

As central bankers are pack animals ( the idea of going solo wakes them up in a cold sweat) this is very important to them.

Then we got a bit of a “hang on a bit moment” with this.

The Australian economy expanded by 1.4 per cent over the year to the June quarter, which was a weaker-than-expected outcome. A gentle turning point, however, appears to have been reached with economic growth a little higher over the first half of this year than over the second half of 2018.

Now if you believe that things are turning for the better an obvious problem is created. Having cut interest-rates twice in short order why not wait for more of the effect before acting again as the full impact is not reached for 18/24 months and we have barely made four?

Mind you if you look at the opening of the statement and the index of commodity prices you may well be wondering how that fits with this?

a brighter outlook for the resources sector should all support growth.

Indeed the next bit questions why you need three interest-rate cuts in short order as well.

Employment has continued to grow strongly and labour force participation is at a record high.

With that situation this is hardly a surprise as it is only to be expected.

Forward-looking indicators of labour demand indicate that employment growth is likely to slow from its recent fast rate.

The higher participation rate makes this hard to read and analyse.

Taken together, recent outcomes suggest that the Australian economy can sustain lower rates of unemployment and underemployment.

Moving to inflation the RBA seems quite happy.

Inflation pressures remain subdued and this is likely to be the case for some time yet. In both headline and underlying terms, inflation is expected to be a little under 2 per cent over 2020 and a little above 2 per cent over 2021.

It does not seem to bother them much that if wage growth remains weak trying to boost inflation is a bad idea. Also if they look at China there is an issue brewing especially as the Swine Fever outbreak seems to be continuing to spread.

Pork prices have surged more than 70% this year in China due to swine fever, and “people are panicking.”

( Bloomberg)

House Prices

These are always in there and we start with an upbeat message.

There are further signs of a turnaround in established housing markets, especially in Sydney and Melbourne.

Yet the foundations quickly crumble.

In contrast, new dwelling activity has weakened and growth in housing credit remains low. Demand for credit by investors is subdued and credit conditions, especially for small and medium-sized businesses, remain tight.

Comment

A complete capitulation by the RBA is in progress.

It is reasonable to expect that an extended period of low interest rates will be required in Australia to reach full employment and achieve the inflation target. The Board will continue to monitor developments, including in the labour market, and is prepared to ease monetary policy further if needed to support sustainable growth in the economy, full employment and the achievement of the inflation target over time.

They like their other central banking colleagues around the word fear for the consequences so they are getting their retaliation in early.

The Board also took account of the forces leading to the trend to lower interest rates globally and the effects this trend is having on the Australian economy and inflation outcomes.

This is referring to the use of what is called r* or the “natural” rate of interest which of course is anything but. You see in this Ivory Tower fantasy it is r* which is cutting interest-rates and not their votes for cuts. In fact it is nothing at all to do with them really unless by some fluke it works in which case the credit is 100% theirs.

Sweet fantasy (sweet sweet)
In my fantasy
Sweet fantasy
Sweet, sweet fantasy ( Mariah Carey )

 

 

Australia cuts interest-rates to another record low

This morning eyes turned to a land down under to see what the Reserve Bank of Australia would do. It will have been no great surprise to regular readers as this hit the newswires.

At its meeting today, the Board decided to lower the cash rate by 25 basis points to 1.00 per cent. This follows a similar reduction at the Board’s June meeting.

There are a lot of perspectives here but let me start with the point that it is getting ever harder to find any country with any sort of positive interest-rate. Even Australia with an economy cushioned by its enormous commodity resources cannot escape the trend to ever lower interest-rates that looks ever more like this.

Glaciers melting in the dead of night
And the superstars sucked into the super massive
Super massive black hole
Super massive black hole
Super massive black hole ( Muse)

There was a time that Australia was able to stand apart from this trend due to its ability to essentially dig money out of the ground. Actually if we take a look at The West Australian we can see that in fact this continues to boom.

Australia’s commodity exports earned a record $275 billion over the past 12 months, and another record is tipped next year.

Officials are scrambling to adjust their forecasts to account for the unexpected boom, with high iron ore prices driving the strong figures.

So a setback here was not the cause of the double cut in interest-rates and in case you are wondering why Iron Ore prices are booming as the world economy slows it has been caused by this.

The impact of the tailings dam collapse at one of Vale’s iron ore mines in Brazil this year, which led to a sharp fall in Brazilian iron ore exports, looks set to last at least two years.

This means that the situation in this area is not only rosy for Australia but looks set to be so.

It means the seaborne iron ore market is likely to remain tight, and prices elevated, at least until 2021, and Australia is the main beneficiary.

Official forecasts for resource and energy commodity earnings in 2019-20 have now been revised up by $12.9 billion to $285 billion, which would be another record.

What does the RBA say?

As we find so often the statement accompanying the announcement is somewhat contradictory. Let me show with this.

This easing of monetary policy will support employment growth and provide greater confidence that inflation will be consistent with the medium-term target.

But why does employment need supporting when later we are told this?

Employment growth has continued to be strong. Labour force participation is at a record level, the vacancy rate remains high and there are reports of skills shortages in some areas.

But wait there is more.

The strong employment growth over the past year or so has led to a pick-up in wages growth in the private sector, although overall wages growth remains low. A further gradual lift in wages growth is still expected and this would be a welcome development.

Back in the day central banks explained interest-rate increases like this! The situation gets even more bizarre as we note this.

Taken together, these labour market outcomes suggest that the Australian economy can sustain lower rates of unemployment and underemployment.

If we look at the latest data from Australia Statistics we are told this.

Employment increased 28,400 to 12,856,600 persons

It’s chart shows us that this has risen from just over 11.5 million five years ago. Over the same period the unemployment rate has fallen from 5.9% to 5.2%.

Why did they cut then?

On a superficial level there is a case from the inflation target. Here are the inflation numbers from Australia Statistics.

was flat (0.0%) this quarter, compared with a rise of 0.5% in the December quarter 2018……rose 1.3% over the twelve months to the March quarter 2019, compared with a rise of 1.8% over the twelve months to the December quarter 2018.

Except if they push it higher to 2% then as “overall wages growth remains low” they will reduce real wages and make things worse for the ordinary person. Unless of course the wages fairy turns up and we have learnt that he or she has been in rather short supply in the credit crunch era.

However there is this from the RBA.

Conditions in most housing markets remain soft, although there are some tentative signs that prices are now stabilising in Sydney and Melbourne. Growth in housing credit has also stabilised recently.

This is typical central banker speak as we note they invariably avoid any mention of pries falling or declining so we get euphemisms like “soft” and “stabilised”. The subject is obviously too painful for them. If we look at the situation then Australia Statistics gave us some insight on Thursday.

Residential real estate experienced its fifth consecutive quarter of real holding losses.

This has led to this.

The ratio of mortgage debt to residential real estate assets was 29.0, up from 28.1 in the previous quarter, indicating that mortgage debt grew faster than the value of residential real estate owned by households. The rise reflects falling residential property prices rather than strong growth in mortgage debt.

If we switch to the latest house price data then you can see for yourselves about the claimed tentative stabilisation in Sydney and Melbourne.

All capital cities recorded falls in property prices in the March quarter 2019, with the larger property markets of Sydney (-3.9 per cent) and Melbourne (-3.8 per cent) continuing to observe the largest falls……..Through the year growth in property prices fell 10.3 per cent in Sydney and 9.4 per cent in Melbourne. Adelaide (0.8 per cent) and Hobart (4.6 per cent) are the only capital cities recording positive through the year growth.

As to the RBA it will have mixed views on this from the Sydney Morning Herald.

The National Australia Bank, Commonwealth Bank of Australia and Westpac will not pass on the full benefit of the latest Reserve Bank interest rate cut to all of their home loan customers.

In response to the Reserve Bank’s move to cut the cash rate from 1.25 per cent to 1 per cent on Tuesday, NAB said it would cut all of its variable home loan interest rates by 0.19 percentage points.

On the one hand not all the easing is flowing into mortgage-rates but on the other thee rest will help “The Precious”.

Comment

There are two main issues here. The first is that as Australia cuts its interest-rates to a record low it is joining a trend and theme which just builds and builds. Perhaps the maddest example of this has popped up this morning.

Italy 2 year yield falls below 0% ( @mhewson_CMC )

So being the South China Territories has bought some time but appears to have only delayed the inevitable. The catch is that if it did any real good the places that preceded Australia on this road to nowhere would have recovered by now, but they just look to cut further. Whereas I would be mulling the response of the ordinary person as highlighted by the Sydney Morning Herald.

“Two months in a row to have a drop like that, it’s just fuelling the uncertainty,” Mr Chapman said.

“It just scares me we’re going down the same road as the global financial crisis, which means chaos. And if I see chaos on the radar, I want to have enough money behind me to see me through.

If other people think that then we see a mechanism which makes things worse and not better. A case I have been making for some years now. However the Governor feels the need to hint at even more.

Given the circumstances, the Board is prepared to adjust interest rates again if needed.

Odd that as in the speech he has just given in Darwin you could think that the economy is in fact going rather well.

Second, Australia’s terms of trade have risen again, largely due to higher iron ore prices. Investment in the resources sector is also expected to increase over the next few years…..Third, the exchange rate has depreciated over the past couple of years and, on a trade-weighted basis, is at the bottom end of its range of recent times…..And fourth, we are expecting stronger growth in household disposable income over the next couple of years,

The next issue is one of timing as we were on the case last September 4th.

So there has been a clear credit crunch down under which of course is related to the housing market changes. This is further reinforced by the narrower measure M1 which has stagnated so far in 2018. Much more of that and the RBA could either cut interest-rates further or introduce some credit easing of the Funding for Lending Scheme style.

So what have they been doing for the last ten months? This is even worse when we remind ourselves that monetary policy is supposed to lead not lag events. As we see so often they seem to have leapt from complacency to panic.

Looking Ahead

As it happens the situation with M1 growth is the same one of stagnation or around 0.1% higher than a year ago. Thus I doubt this rate cut is the last and still think a Funding for Lending Scheme or something similar is on its way.

 

 

 

 

What to do with a problem like Germany? Cut interest-rates further….

Over the past year there has been something of a sea change for the economy of Germany. After a period of what in these times was strong economic growth the engine of the Euro area has stuttered and coughed. If we look at it in annual terms economic growth went from the 2.2% of 2016 and 2017 to 1.4% last year and the latter was the story of two halves as the second half saw the economic contract in the third quarter and flat line in the fourth. This fits with our subject of yesterday Deutsche Bank which has seen its share price fall by 36% over the past year as both it and its home economy have struggled. Oh and that new bad bank plan rallied the share price for a day and a bit as it is back to 6.03 Euros. So it looks like another new plan is singing along with Queen.

Another one bites the dust
Another one bites the dust
And another one gone, and another one gone
Another one bites the dust.

What Next?

The opening quarter of this year offered some relief as Germany saw the economy grow by 0.4%. However yesterday in its June report the Bundesbank pointed out that it was not convinced that this represented a genuine turn for the better. 

Special effects that contributed to a noticeable rise in gross domestic product in the first quarter are either expiring or being reversed.

Google Translate is a little clunky here but we see that it feels that the construction industry will not have boosted the economy.

So is the construction industry on a quarterly average with certain Rebound effects. Due to weather conditions, construction activity had widened considerably in the winter months.

Also it feels that the ongoing problems with sales of diesel engined cars which we see pretty much everywhere we look will impact again after flattering things as 2019 opened.

Furthermore, due to delivery difficulties as a result of the introduction of the new emissions test procedure WLTP (Worldwide Harmonized Light Vehicles Test Procedure) last fall. Deferred car purchases have been made up for the most part.

It notes that the industrial production sector had a rough April.

Industrial production decreased in the April 2019 strongly. In seasonally adjusted account it fell below the previous month’s level by 2½%. As a result, industrial production also fell sharply compared to the mean of the winter months (- 2%).

Do the business surveys back this up?

If we start with construction then here is the latest from Markit.

After a solid performance in early-spring, the German
construction sector continued to lose momentum during May, recording its weakest rise in total activity for four months……It’s been a largely positive start to the year for the sector, but a first fall in new orders in nine months points to some downside risks to the short-term outlook.

So broadly yes and maybe further slowing is ahead. 

However as we look wider Markit is more optimistic than the Bundesbank.

The Composite Output Index continued to point to a modest
pace of growth across Germany’s private sector. At 52.6, the latest reading was up from 52.2 in April and the highest in three months, but still below the long-run series average of 53.4 (since 1998).

That is interesting as central banks love to peruse PMI numbers. Mind you perhaps they had advance warning of this released this morning from the ZEW Institute.

The German ZEW headline numbers for June showed that the economic sentiment index arrived at -21.1 versus -5.9 expectations and -2.1 last. While the sub-index current conditions figure jumped to 7.8 versus 6.0 expected and 8.2 booked previously, bettering market expectations. ( FXSTREET )

There is a little irony in the present being better than expected but it is rather swamped by the collapse in expectations. The ZEW is an arcane index that is hard to get a handle on so we should not overstate its significance but the change is eye-catching.

A policy response

I was going to point out that this was going to be an influence on the policy of the European Central Bank or ECB. This comes in two forms as firstly Germany is such a bell weather for the Euro area and according to recently updated ECB capital key is 26.4% of it. Also of course there is the thought that overall ECB policy is basically set for Germany. Thus I was expecting some news or what have become called “sauces” from the ECB summer camp at Sintra which opened last night. This morning we have already learned that President Draghi packed more than his shorts, sun cream and sunglasses.

In this environment, what matters is that monetary policy remains committed to its objective and does not resign itself to too-low inflation.

Here he is setting out his stall and the emphasis is his. There is a clear hint in the way that he is pointing at “too-low inflation” as in the coded language of central bankers it leads to this.

Looking forward, the risk outlook remains tilted to the downside, and indicators for the coming quarters point to lingering softness.

So now not only do we have too-low inflation we have a weak economy too. So if we were a pot on the stove we are now gently simmering. Then Mario turns up the gas.

In the absence of improvement, such that the sustained return of inflation to our aim is threatened, additional stimulus will be required.

First though we have to wait as he continues with the dead duck that is Forward Guidance.

We remain able to enhance our forward guidance by adjusting its bias and its conditionality to account for variations in the adjustment path of inflation.

After all if it worked we would not be here would we? But then we get to boiling point.

This applies to all instruments of our monetary policy stance.

Further cuts in policy interest rates and mitigating measures to contain any side effects remain part of our tools.

And the APP still has considerable headroom.

For newer readers the APP is the Asset Purchase Programme or how it has operated what has become called Quantitative Easing or QE. This is significant because if there is a country which lacks headroom it is our subject of today Germany. This is because it has been running a fiscal surplus and reducing its national debt which combined with the existing ECB purchases means there are not so many to buy these days. Not Italy though as there are plenty of its bonds around.

Finally we get a reinforcement of the theoretical framework with this.

What matters for our policy calibration is our medium-term policy aim: an inflation rate below, but close to, 2%. That aim is symmetric, which means that, if we are to deliver that value of inflation in the medium term, inflation has to be above that level at some time in the future.

Comment

We may have seen the central banking equivalent of what is called a “one-two” in boxing. Yesterday the German Bundesbank talks of an economic contraction and today Mario Draghi is hinting that more easing  is on its way.  What this may mean is that whilst the Bundesbank is unlikely to be leading the charge for easier policy it will not stand in its way. Also if Mario Draghi is going to do this there is not a lot of time left as he departs in October, does he plan to go with a bang?

This has already impacted German financial markets as they look at the newswires and price German bonds even higher. After all if you expect a large buyer why not make them pay for it? So it is now being paid even more to borrow as the benchmark ten-year yield reaches another threshold at -0.3%. Or if you prefer the futures contract has hit all time highs in the 172s.

Of course if the easing worked we would not be here so there is an element of going through the motions about this. Also let’s face it only central bankers and their cheerleaders think low inflation is a bad idea. Sadly the media so rarely challenge them on how they will make people better off via them being poorer.

 

India is facing its own version of a credit crunch

Travel broadens the mind so they say so let us tale a trip to the sub-continent and to India in particular. There the Reserve Bank of India has announced this.

On the basis of an assessment of the current and evolving macroeconomic situation, the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) at its meeting today decided to: reduce the policy repo rate under the liquidity adjustment facility (LAF) by 25 basis points to 6.0 per cent from 6.25 per cent with immediate effect.

Consequently, the reverse repo rate under the LAF stands adjusted to 5.75 per cent, and the marginal
standing facility (MSF) rate and the Bank Rate to 6.25 per cent.

The MPC also decided to maintain the neutral monetary policy stance.

So yet another interest-rate cut to add to the multitude in the credit crunch era and it follows sharp on the heels of this.

In its February 2019 meeting, the MPC decided to
reduce the policy repo rate by 25 basis points (bps)
by a majority of 4-2 and was unanimous in voting
for switching its stance to neutral from calibrated
tightening.

This time around the vote was again 4-2 so there is a reasonable amount of dissent about this at the RBI.

What has caused this?

The formal monetary policy statement tells us this.

Taking into consideration these factors and assuming a normal monsoon in 2019,the path of CPI inflation is revised downwards to 2.4 per cent in Q4:2018-19, 2.9-3.0 per cent in H1:2019-20 and 3.5-3.8 per cent in H2:2019-20, with risks broadly balanced.

That path is below the annual inflation target of 4% (+ or – 2%) so it is in line with that.

However we know that central banks may talk about inflation targeting but supporting the economy is invariably a factor and can override the former. The Economic Times points us that way quoting the Governor’s words.

“The MPC notes that the output gap remains negative and the domestic economy is facing headwinds, especially on the global front,” RBI governor Shaktikanta Das said. “The need is to strengthen domestic growth impulses by spurring private investment which has remained sluggish.”

I will park for the moment the appearance of the discredited output gap theory and look at economic growth. The opener is very familiar for these times which is to blame foreigners.

Since the last MPC meeting in February 2019, global economic activity has been losing pace……The monetary policy stances of the US Fed and central banks in other major advanced economies (AEs) have turned dovish.

I would ask what is Indian for “Johnny Foreigner”? But of course more than a few might say it in English. But if we switch to the Indian economy we are told this in the formal report.

Since the release of the Monetary Policy Report (MPR)
of October 2018, the macroeconomic setting for the
conduct of monetary policy has undergone significant
shifts. After averaging close to 8 per cent through
Q3:2017-18 to Q1:2018-19, domestic economic
activity lost speed.

So a slowing economy which is specified in the announcement statement.

GDP growth for 2019-20 is projected at 7.2 per cent – in the range of 6.8-7.1 per cent in H1:2019-20 and 7.3-7.4 per cent in H2 – with risks evenly balanced.

That is more likely to be the real reason for the move and the Markit PMI released this morning backs it up.

The slowdown in service sector growth was
matched by a cooling manufacturing industry.
Following strong readings previously in this quarter,
the disappointing figures for March meant that the
quarterly figure for the combined Composite Output
Index at the end of FY 2018 was down from Q3.

The actual reading was 52.7 but we also need to note that this is in an economy expecting annual economic growth of around 7% so we need to recalibrate. On that road we see a decline for the mid 54s which backs up the slowing theme.

Forward Guidance

We regularly find ourselves observing problems with this and the truth is that as a concept it is deeply flawed and yet again it has turned out to be actively misleading. Here is the RBI version.

The MPC maintained status quo on the policy repo rate in its October 2018 meeting (with a majority of 5-1) but switched stance from neutral to calibrated tightening.

So it led people to expect interest-rate rises and confirmed this in December. I am not sure it could have gone much more than cutting at the next two policy meetings. That is even worse than Mark Carney and the Bank of England.

Output Gap

Regular readers know my views on this concept which in practice has turned out to be meaningless and here is the RBI version. From the latter period of last year.

the virtual closing of the output
gap.

Whereas now.

The MPC notes that the output gap remains negative and the domestic economy is facing
headwinds, especially on the global front. The need is to strengthen domestic growth impulses by
spurring private investment which has remained sluggish

Yet economic growth has been at around 7% per annum. I hope that they get called out on this.

The banks

We have looked before at India’s troubled banking sector and since then there has been more aid and nationalisations. Here is CNBC summing up some of it yesterday.

Over the last several years, a banking sector crisis in India has left many lenders hamstrung and impeded their ability to issue loans. Banks and financial institutions, a key source of funding for Indian companies, hold over $146 billion of bad debt, according to Reuters.

That may be more of a troubled road as India’s courts block part of the RBI plan for this.

But such things do impact monetary transmission.

Analysts said the transmission of the previous rate cut in February did not materialise as liquidity remained tight. Despite the central bank’s continued open market operations and the dollar-rupee swap, systemic liquidity as of March-end was in deficit at Rs 40,000 crore.

The tightness in liquidity was visible in high credit-deposit ratios and elevated corporate bond spreads.  ( Economic Times)

Putting it another way.

What is holding them back is higher interest rate on deposits and competition from the government for small savings.

The RBI is worried about this and reasonably so as it would be more embarrassing if they ignore this rate cut too.

Underlining the importance of transmission of RBI rate cuts by banks to consumers, Governor Shaktikanta Das on Thursday said the central bank may come out with guidelines on the same.

“We hope to come out with guidelines for rate cut transmission by banks,” Das said, interacting with the media after the monetary policy committee (MPC) meet.

 

Comment
There is a fair bit here that will be familiar to students of the development of the credit crunch in the west. I think one of my first posts as Notayesmanseconomics was about the way that official interest-rates had diverged from actual ones. Also we have a banking sector that is troubled. Next we have quick-fire interest-rate cuts following a period when rises were promised. So there are more than a few ticks on the list.
As to money supply growth it is hard to read because of the ongoing effects of the currency demonetisation in late 2016. So I will merely note as a market that broad money growth was 10.4% in February which is pretty much what it was a year ago.