What next for the Bank of England?

Today is what used to be called Super Thursday for the Bank of England. It was one of the “improvements” of the current Governor Mark Carney which have turned out to be anything but. However he is not finished yet.

Starting on 7 November, the Bank of England Inflation Report is to become the Monetary Policy Report. The Report is also to undergo some changes to its structure and content.

These changes are part of the Bank’s ongoing efforts to improve its communications and ensure that those outside the institution have the information they need in order to understand our policy decisions and to hold us to account.

Really why is this?

The very latest changes represent the next step in the evolution of our communications.

I suppose when you tell people you are going to raise interest-rates and then end up cutting them you communication does need to evolve!

Communication let me down,
And I’m left here
Communication let me down,
And I’m left here, I’m left here again! ( Spandau Ballet )

The London Whale

There was so news this morning to attract the attention of a hedge fund which holds some £435 billion of UK Gilt securities as well as a clear implication for its £10 billion of Corporate Bonds. From the Financial Times.

Pimco, one of the world’s largest bond investors, is giving UK government debt a wide berth, reflecting concerns that a post-election borrowing binge promised by all the major political parties could add to pressure on prices. Andrew Balls, Pimco’s chief investment officer for global fixed income, said the measly yields on offer from gilts already makes them one of Pimco’s “least favourite” markets. The prospect of increased sales of gilts to fund more government spending makes the current high prices even less attractive, he said, forecasting that the cost of UK government borrowing would rise.

Yes Andrew Balls is the brother of Ed and he went further.

“Gilt yields look too low in general. If you don’t need to own them it makes sense to be underweight,” he told the Financial Times.

Actually pretty much every bond market looks like that at the moment. Also as I pointed out only yesterday bond markets have retraced a bit recently.

The cost of financing UK government debt has been rising over the past month. The 10-year gilt yield has reached 0.76 per cent, from 0.42 per cent in early October. That remains unattractive compared with the 1.84 per cent yield available on the equivalent US government bond, according to Mr Balls,

Mind you there is a double-play here which goes as follows. If you were a large holder of Gilts you might be pleased that Pimco are bearish because before one of the biggest rallies of all time they told us this.

Bond king Bill Gross has highlighted the countries investors should be wary of in 2010, singling out the UK in particular as a ‘must avoid’, with its gilts resting ‘on a bed of nitroglycerine.’ ( CityWire in 2010 ).

Also there is the fact that the biggest driver of UK Gilt yields is the Bank of England itself with prospects of future buying eclipsing even the impact of its current large holding.

House Prices

As the Bank of England under Mark Carney is the very model of a modern central banker a chill will have run down its spine this morning.

Average house prices continued to slow in October, with a modest rise of 0.9% over the past year. While
this is the lowest growth seen in 2019, it again extends the largely flat trend which has taken hold over
recent months ( Halifax)

Indeed I suggest that whoever has to tell Governor Carney this at the morning meeting has made sure his espresso is double-strength.

On a monthly basis, house prices fell by 0.1%

This is the new reformed Halifax price index as it was ploughing rather a lonely furrow before. We of course think that this is good news as it gives us another signal that wages are gaining ground relative to house prices whereas the Bank of England has a view similar to that of Donald Trump.

Stock Markets (all three) hit another ALL TIME & HISTORIC HIGH yesterday! You are sooo lucky to have me as your President (just kidding!). Spend your money well!

The Economy

This is an awkward one for the Bank of England as we are on the road to a General Election and the economy is only growing slowly. Indeed according to the Markit PMI business survey may not be growing at all.

The October reading is historically consistent with GDP
declining at a quarterly rate of 0.1%, similar to the pace
of contraction in GDP signalled by the surveys in the third
quarter

Although even Markit have had to face up to the fact that they have been missing the target in recent times.

While official data may indicate more robust growth
in the third quarter, the PMI warns that some of this could
merely reflect a pay-back from a steeper decline than
signalled by the surveys in the second quarter, and that the
underlying business trend remains one of stagnation at
best.

The actual data we have will be updated on Monday but for now we have this.

Rolling three-month growth was 0.3% in August 2019.

So we have some growth or did until August.

The international environment is far from inspiring as this just released by the European Commission highlights.

Euro area gross domestic product (GDP) is now forecast to expand by 1.1% in 2019 and by 1.2% in 2020 and 2021. Compared to the Summer 2019 Economic Forecast (published in July), the growth forecast has been downgraded by 0.1 percentage point in 2019 (from 1.2%) and 0.2 percentage points in 2020 (from 1.4%).

The idea that they can forecast to 0.1% is of course laughable so it is the direction of travel that is the main message here.

Comment

If we move on from the shuffling of deckchairs at the Bank of England we see that its Forward Guidance remains a mess. From the September Minutes.

In the event of greater clarity that the economy is on a path to a smooth Brexit, and assuming some recovery in global growth, a significant margin of excess demand is likely to build in the medium term. Were that to occur, the Committee judges that increases in interest rates, at a gradual pace and to a limited extent, would be appropriate to return inflation sustainably to the 2% target.

Does anybody actually believe they will raise interest-rates? If we move to investors so from talk to action we see that in spite of the recent fall in the Gilt market the five-year yield is 0.53% so it continues to suggest a cut not a rise.

More specifically there was a road to a Bank of England rate cut today as this from the 28th of September from Michael Saunders highlights and the emphasis is minr.

In such a scenario – not a no-deal Brexit, but persistently high uncertainty – it probably will be
appropriate to maintain an expansionary monetary policy stance and perhaps to loosen further.

He was an and maybe the only advocate for higher interest-rates so now is a categorised as a flip-flopper. But it suggested a turn in the view of the Bank in general such that this was suggested yesterday by @CNBCJou.

Looking forward to the BOE tomorrow where the new MONETARY POLICY REPORT will be presented (not to be confused with the now defunct INFLATION REPORT). A giant leap for central banking. * pro tip: watch out for dovish dissenters (Saunders, Vlieghe?) $GBP

The election is of course what has stymied the road to a return to the emergency Bank Rate of 0.5% as we wait to see how the Bank of England twists and turns today. Dire Straits anyone

I’m a twisting fool
Just twisting, yeah, twisting
Twisting by the pool

The Investing Channel

 

 

The central banks are losing their grip as well as the plot

The last 24 hours have shown an instance of a central bank losing its grip and another losing the plot. This is significant because central banks have been like our overlords in the credit crunch era as they slashed interest-rates and when that did not work expanded their balance sheets using QE and when that did not work cut interest-rates again and did more QE. This made Limahl look rather prescient.

Neverending story
Ah
Neverending story
Ah
Neverending story
Ah

Also in terms of timing we have today the last policy meeting of ECB President Mario Draghi who has been one of the main central banking overlords especially after his “What ever it takes ( to save the Euro) ” speech. Next month he will be replaced by Christine Lagarde who has given an interview to 60 Minutes in the US.

Christine Lagarde shows John Dickerson how she fakes drinking wine at global gatherings.

US Repo Problems

Regular readers will recall that we looked at the words of US Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell on the 9th of this month.

To counter these pressures, we began conducting temporary open market operations. These operations have kept the federal funds rate in the target range and alleviated money market strains more generally.

This involved various moves as the overnight Repos found this added too.

Term repo operations will generally be conducted twice per week, initially in an offering amount of at least $35 billion per operation.

These have been for a fortnight and added to this was a purchase programme for Treasury Bills.

In accordance with this directive, the Desk plans to purchase Treasury bills at an initial pace of approximately $60 billion per month, starting with the period from mid-October to mid-November.

Regular readers will recall that I described this as a new version of QE and it has turned out that the Treasury Bill purchases will be larger than the early estimates by at least double.

This theme of “More! More! More!” continued yesterday with this announcement from the New York Federal Reserve.

Consistent with the most recent FOMC directive, to ensure that the supply of reserves remains ample even during periods of sharp increases in non-reserve liabilities, and to mitigate the risk of money market pressures that could adversely affect policy implementation, the amount offered in overnight repo operations will increase to at least $120 billion starting Thursday, October 24, 2019.  The amount offered for the term repo operations scheduled for Thursday, October 24 and Tuesday, October 29, 2019, which span October month end, will increase to at least $45 billion.

Apologies for their wordy opening sentence but I have put it in because it contradicts the original statement from Jerome Powell. Because the “strains” seem to be requiring ever larger interventions. Or as Brad Huston puts it on Twitter.

9/17: We’re doing repos today and tomorrow.

9/19: We’re extending repos until 10/10. $75B overnight, $30B term

10/4: We’re extending repos until 11/4

10/11:We’re extending repos until Jan 2020

10/23:We’re expanding overnight repo offering to $120B, $45B term

This reinforces the point that I believe is behind this as I pointed out on the 25th of September

The question to my mind going forwards is will we see a reversal in the QT or Quantitative Tightening era? The supply of US Dollars is now being reduced by it and we wait to see what the consequences are.

This added to the US Dollar shortage we have been looking at for the past couple of years or so. It would seem that the US Federal Reserve is worried about a shortage at the end of this month which makes me wonder what they state of play will be at the year end when many books are squared? Also in terms if timing we will get the latest repo announcement at pretty much the same time as Mario Draghi starts his final ECB press conference.

The Riksbank of Sweden

It has made this announcement today.

In line with the forecast from September, the Executive Board has therefore decided to leave the repo rate unchanged at –0.25 per cent. As before, the forecast indicates that the interest rate will most probably be raised in December to zero percent.

I will come to my critique of this in a moment but we only have to progress another sentence or two to find that the Riksbank has provided its own critique.

The forecast for the repo rate has therefore been revised downwards and indicates that the interest rate will be unchanged for a prolonged period after the expected rise in December.

That is really quite a mess because we are supposed to take notice of central bank Forward Guidance which is now for lower interest-rates which will be achieved by raising them! Time for a reminder of their track record on this front.

As you can see their Forward Guidance has had a 100% failure rate. You do well by doing the reverse of what they say. As for now well you really could not make the bit below up!

If the prospects were to change, monetary policy may need to be adjusted going forward. Improved prospects would justify a higher interest rate. If the economy were instead to develop less favourably, the Executive Board could cut the repo rate or make monetary policy more expansionary in some other way.

QE

Well that never seems to go away does it?

In accordance with the decision from April 2019, the Riksbank is purchasing government bonds for a nominal total amount of SEK 45 billion, with effect from July 2019 to December 2020.

The central bank will keep the government sweet by making sure it can borrow very cheaply. The ten-year yield is negative albeit only just ( -0.03%) although in an undercut Sweden is running a fiscal surplus. That becomes really rather odd when we look at the next bit.

The Economy

I have criticised the Riksbank for pro-cyclical monetary policy and it seems set to do so again.

after several years of good growth and
strong economic activity, the Swedish economy is now growing more slowly.

So they have cut interest-rates in the good times and now seem set to raise them in weaker times.

Next comes this.

As economic activity has entered a phase of lower growth in
2019, the labour market has also cooled down. Unemployment is deemed to have increased slightly during the year.

If we switch to last week’s release from Sweden Statistics we see something of a challenge to the “increased slightly” claim.

In September 2019 there were 5 110 000 employed persons. The unemployment rate was 7.1 percent, an increase of 1.1 percentage points compared with September 2018……In September 2019, there were 391 000 unemployed persons aged 15─74, not seasonally adjusted, an increase of 62 000 compared with September 2018.

If we move to manufacturing then the world outlook seemed to hit Sweden in pretty much one go in September according to Swedbank.

The PMI dropped by 5.5 points in September to 46.3 from a downward revision of 51.8 in August. This is the largest monthly decline since autumn 2008 and was part of the reason why the PMI fell in the third quarter to the lowest level since early 2013.

Comment

The US Federal Reserve is the world’s central bank of last resort and currently that is not going especially well. So far it has added around US $200 billion to its balance sheet and seems set to push it back over US $4 trillion. Yet the problem seems to be hanging around rather than going away as it feels like a plaster is being applied to a broken leg. A gear or two is grinding in the banking system.

Moving to Sweden we see a case of a central bank adopting pro-cyclical monetary policy and now finds itself planning to raise interest-rates in a recession. Yet the rise seems to make interest-rates lower in the future! I am afraid the Riksbank has really rather jumped the shark here. It now looks as if it has decided that negative interest-rates are a bad idea which I have a lot of sympathy with but as I have argued many times the boom was the time to end it.

Sweden has economic growth of 4% with an interest-rate of -0.5% ( 28th of July 2017)

The Investing Channel

There are major problems brewing in the Pacific for the world economy

It has been something of an economic tenet for a while now that the most dynamic part of the world economy is to be found in the Pacific region. However the credit crunch era has thrown up all sorts of challenges to what were established ideas and it is doing so again right now. The particular issue is what was supposed to be a strength which is trade and we saw another worrying sign on Wednesday.

The Monetary Policy Board of the Bank of Korea decided today to lower the Base Rate by 25 basis points, from 1.50% to 1.25%.

That is South Korea as we continue our journey past 750 interest-rate cuts in the credit crunch era. Here is their answer to Carly Simon’s famous question, why?

Economic growth in Korea has continued to slow. Private consumption has slowed somewhat, while investment has remained weak. Exports have sustained their sluggish trend as the export prices of semiconductors, petroleum products and chemicals have continued to fall amid the weakening of global trade.

So we see that the economy has been hit by trade issues and that unsurprisingly this has hit investment but also that it has fed through into domestic consumption. Next we got further confirmation that they are blaming trade as we wonder what is Korean for Johnny Foreigner?

Affected mainly by worsening global economic conditions, the growth of the Korean economy is expected to fall back below the July projection…….. The downside risks include a spread of  global trade disputes, a heightening of geopolitical risks and a deepening global
economic slowdown.

We also see that the Korean government has already acted.

Among the upside risks to the growth outlook are an improvement in domestic demand thanks to a strengthening of government policies to shore up the economy and progress in US-China trade negotiations.

 

Quarterly economic growth has been erratic so far this year but Xinhuanet gives us an idea of the trend.

From a year earlier, the real GDP grew 2 percent in the second quarter. It was lower than an increase of 2.8 percent for the same quarter of 2017 and a growth of 2.9 percent for the same quarter of 2018.

Singapore

On the one hand the outlook is supposed to be bright.

Singapore has knocked the United States out of the top spot in the World Economic Forum’s annual competitiveness report. The index, published on Wednesday, takes stock of an economy’s competitive landscape, measuring factors such as macroeconomic stability, infrastructure, the labor market and innovation capability. ( CNN )

The good cheer was not repeated in this from the Monetary Authority of Singapore on Monday.

According to the Advance Estimates released by the Ministry of Trade and Industry today, the Singapore economy grew by 0.1% year-on-year in Q3 2019, similar to the preceding quarter. In the last six months, the drag on GDP growth exerted by the manufacturing sector has intensified, reflecting the ongoing downturn in the global electronics cycle as well as the pullback in investment spending, caused in part by the uncertainty in US-China relations.

They are very sharp with the GDP number perhaps helped by being a City state. The future does not look too bright either if we look through the rhetoric.

On the whole, Singapore’s GDP growth is projected to come in at around the mid-point of the 0–1% forecast range in 2019 and improve modestly in 2020.

The Straits Times has fone a heroic job trying to make the data below look positive.

Non-oil domestic exports (Nodx) fell by 8.1 per cent in September, a somewhat better showing than the 9 percent fall in August, according to data released by Enterprise Singapore on Thursday (Oct 17).

This was the third month in a row where shipments improved, and the August figure – revised downwards from the 8.9 per cent fall previously reported – also marked a return to single-digit territory after five consecutive months of double-digit declines.

But many eyes will have turned to this bit.

Electronics products weighed down Nodx, shrinking 24.8 per cent year-on-year in September, following a 25.9 per cent contraction in August.

China

This morning has brought the news we were pretty much expecting.

China’s economic growth slowed in the third quarter amid weak demand at home and as the trade war with the U.S. drags on exports.

Gross domestic product rose 6% in the July-September period from a year ago, the slowest pace since the early 1990s and weaker than the consensus forecast of 6.1%. Factory output rose 5.8% in September, retail sales expanded 7.8%, while investment gained 5.4% in the first nine months of the year. ( Bloomberg ).

Back on the 21st of January I pointed out this.

The M1 money supply statistics show us that growth was a mere 1.5% over 2018 which is a lot lower than the other economic numbers coming out of China and meaning that we can expect more slowing in the early part of 2019. No wonder we have seen some policy easing and I would not be surprised if there was more of it.

The numbers have been slipping away ever since although Bloomberg tries to put a brave face on it. After all you fo not want to upset the Chinese as you might find yourself like the NBA.

Even with the slowdown, year to date growth of 6.2% suggests the government can hit its 6% and 6.5% for 2019.

Actually M1 money supply growth picked up after January to as high as 4.4% but has now fallen back to 3.4%. So the easing has helped and we are not looking at an “end of the world as we know it” scenario in domestic terms but rather caution.

Before I move on let me point out the consequences of the African swine fever outbreak in the pig industry.

Of which, livestock meat price up by 46.9 percent, affecting nearly 2.03 percentage points increase in the CPI (price of pork was up by 69.3 percent, affecting nearly 1.65 percentage points increase in the CPI), poultry meat up by 14.7 percent, affecting nearly 0.18 percentage point increase in the CPI. ( China Bureau of Statistics )

Japan

Overnight the Cabinet Office has informed us that the Bank of Japan is getting ever further away from its inflation target.

  The consumer price index for Japan in September 2019 was 101.9 (2015=100), up 0.2% over the year before seasonal adjustment, and the same level as  the previous month on a seasonally adjusted basis.

They will of course torture the numbers to find any flicker so if you here about furniture and household utensils ( up 2.7%) that will be why.

Next month the issue will be solved by the Consumption Tax rise but of course that takes money out of workers and consumers pockets at a time of economic trouble. What could go wrong?

Comment

As you can see there are plenty of signs of economic trouble in the Pacific region. Many of these countries are used to much higher rates of economic growth than us in the west. According to Bloomberg Indonesia is worried too.

Indonesia‘s central bank has room to cut interest rates further, perhaps as soon as next week, says its deputy governor

Then of course there is the Reserve Bank of Australia which is cutting interest-rates at a rapid rate. In fact Deputy Governor Debelle gave a speech in Sydney updating us on his priority.

The housing market has a pervasive impact on the Australian economy. It is the popular topic of any number of conversations around barbeques and dinner tables. It generates reams of newspaper stories and reality TV shows. You could be forgiven for thinking that the housing market is the Australian economy.[1] That clearly is not the case. But at the same time, developments in the housing market, both the established market and housing construction, have a broader impact than the simple numbers would suggest.

 

 

What next in terms of interest-rates from the Bank of England?

There is much to engage the Bank of England at this time. There is the pretty much world wide manufacturing recession that affected the UK as shown below in the latest data.

The three-monthly fall in manufacturing of 1.1% is because of widespread weakness with 11 of the 13 subsectors decreasing; this was led by food, beverages and tobacco (2.0%) and computer, electronic and optical products (3.5%).

The recent declines have in fact reminded us that if all the monetary easing was for manufacturing it has not worked because it was at 105.1 at the previous peak in February 2018 ( 2015 = 100) as opposed to 101.4 this August if we look at a rolling three monthly measure. Or to put it another way we have seen a long-lasting depression just deepen again.

Also at the end of last week there was quite a bounce back by the value of the UK Pound £. Much of that has remained so far this morning as we are at 1.142 versus the Euro. Unfortunately the Bank of England has been somewhat tardy in updating its effective exchange rate index but using its old rule of thumb I estimate that the move was equivalent to a 0.75% rise in interest-rates. Actually there was another influence as the Gilt market fell at the same time with the ten-year yield rising to 0.7% on Friday.

Enter Dave Ramsden

I note that Sir David Ramsden CBE is now Dave but more important for me is the way that like all Deputy Governors these days he is a HM Treasury alumni.

Before joining the Bank, Dave was Chief Economic Adviser to the Treasury and Head of the Government Economic Service from 2007 – 2017.

On a conceptual level there seems little point in making the Bank of England independent from the Treasury and then filling it with Treasury insiders. So the word independent needs to be in my financial lexicon for these times.

However Dave is in the news because he has been interviewed by the Daily Telegraph. So let us examine what he has said.

The UK’s “speed limit” for growth has been so damaged by uncertainty over Brexit that it could hamper the Bank of England’s ability to help a weak economy with lower interest rates, deputy Governor Sir Dave Ramsden warned today.

There are several issues raised already. For example the “speed limit” follows quite a few failures for the Bank of England Ivory Tower, There was the output gap failure and the Phillips Curve but all pale into insignificance compared to the unemployment rate where 4.25% is the new 7%. As to the “speed limit” of 1.5% for GDP growth then as we were at 1.3% at the end of the second quarter in spite of the quarterly decline of 0.2% seen Dave seems to be whistling in the wind a bit.

Also the issue of the Bank of England helping the economy with lower interest-rates has two issues. The first is that interest-rates were slashed but we are where we are. Next the responsibility for Bank Rate being at 0.75% is of course with Dave and his colleagues. That is also inconsistent with the claims of Governor Mark Carney that the 0.25% interest-rate cut and Sledgehammer QE of August 2016 saved 250,000 jobs.

Productivity

Dave’s main concern was this.

He said he was more cautious over the economy’s growth potential thanks to consistent disappointments on productivity, which sank at its fastest pace for five years in the three months to June.

For those who have not seen the official data here it is.

Labour productivity, as measured on an output per hour basis, fell by 0.5% compared with Quarter 2 (Apr to June) 2018. This follows two consecutive quarters of zero growth.

The problem with this type of thinking is that it ignores the switch to services which has been taking place for decades as they are areas where productivity is often hard to measure and sometimes you would not want at all. After my knee operation I had some 30 minute physio sessions and would not have been pleased if I was paying the same amount for twenty minutes!

Next comes the issue of the present contraction in manufacturing which will be making productivity worse. This is before we get to the issue that some of the claimed productivity gains pre credit crunch were an illusion as the banking sector inflated rather than grew.

Wages

Dave does not seem to be especially keen on the improvement in wage growth that has seen it rise to an annual rate of above 4%.

The critical economic ingredient has lagged since the crisis as businesses cut back investment spending, dampening the UK’s ability to produce more, fund sustainable pay rises and be internationally competitive. Company wage costs “are picking up quite significantly, which will drive domestic inflationary pressure”, he added.

Not much fun there for those whose real wages are still below the previous peak.We get dome further thoughts via the usual buzz phrase bingo central bankers so love.

From my perspective, I also think spare capacity might not have opened up that much despite that weakness in underlying growth, because I think supply potential, the speed limit of the economy, is also slowing through this period. That comes through for me pretty clearly in the latest productivity numbers.

News of the Ivory Tower theoretical conceptual failure does not seem to have arrived at Dave’s door.

Policy Prescription

In a world of “entrenched uncertainty” – a likely temporary extension to the UK’s membership if the Prime Minister complies with the Benn Act – “I see less of a case for a more accommodative monetary position,” Sir Dave said.

Also taking him away from an interest-rate cut was this.

Sir Dave – who refused to comment on whether he had applied to replace outgoing Governor Mark Carney – said the MPC would also have to take account of the recent £13.4bn surge in public spending unveiled by Chancellor Sajid Javid in last month’s spending review. The Bank estimates that will add 0.4 percentage point to growth.

Comment

In the past Dave has tried to make it look as though he is an expert in financial markets perhaps in an attempt to justify his role as Deputy Governor for that area. Unfortunately for him that has gone rather awry. If he looked at the rise in the UK ten-year Gilt yield form 0.45% to 0.71% at the end of last week or the three point fall in the Gilt future Fave may have thought that his speech would be well timed. Sadly for him that has gone all wrong this morning as the Gilt market has U-Turned and as the Gilt future has rallied a point the ten-year yield has fallen to 0.62%

So it would appear he may even have negative credibility in the markets. Perhaps they have picked up on the tendency of Bank of England policymakers to vote in a “I agree with Mark ( Carney)” fashion. His credibility took quite a knock back in May 2016 when he described consumer credit growth of 8.6% like this.

Bank Of England’s Ramsden Says Weak Consumer Credit Data Was Another Factor That Made Me Fear UK Consumption Growth Could Slow Further, Need To Wait And See ( @LiveSquawk )

In terms of PR though should Sir Dave vote for an interest-rate cut he can present it as something he did not want to do. After all so much central banking policy making comes down to PR these days.

Podcast

 

 

 

A new era of US QE starts with it being renamed Reserve Management

Last night saw something of an epoch making event as all eyes turned to Denver Colorado. This time it was not for the famous “hurry up offence” of John Elway in the NFL but instead there was a speech by Jerome Powell the Chair of the US Federal Reserve. In it he confirmed something I have been writing about on here for some time and the emphasis is mine.

Reserve balances are one among several items on the liability side of the Federal Reserve’s balance sheet, and demand for these liabilities—notably, currency in circulation—grows over time. Hence, increasing the supply of reserves or even maintaining a given level over time requires us to increase the size of our balance sheet. As we indicated in our March statement on balance sheet normalization, at some point, we will begin increasing our securities holdings to maintain an appropriate level of reserves. That time is now upon us.

This of course raises my QE ( Quantitative Easing) to infinity theme. I also note Chair Powell raises the issue of the balance sheet so let us look at that. It peaked at around US $4.5 trillion as we moved into 2015 and stayed there until October 2017 when the era of QT ( Quantitative Tightening) or reverse QE began and it began to shrink. Over the last year it shrank from US $4.17 trillion to US $3.76 trillion before the repo crisis struck.

In mid-September, an important channel in the transmission process—wholesale funding markets—exhibited unexpectedly intense volatility. Payments to meet corporate tax obligations and to purchase Treasury securities triggered notable liquidity pressures in money markets. Overnight interest rates spiked, and the effective federal funds rate briefly moved above the FOMC’s target range. To counter these pressures, we began conducting temporary open market operations. These operations have kept the federal funds rate in the target range and alleviated money market strains more generally.

What this misses out is that US Dollar liquidity has been singing along with Queen for some time.

Pressure: pushing down on me,
Pressing down on you, no man ask for.
Under pressure that burns a building down,
Splits a family in two,
Puts people on streets.

Here I am from the 25th of September last year.

The question to my mind going forwards is will we see a reversal in the QT or Quantitative Tightening era? The supply of US Dollars is now being reduced by it and we wait to see what the consequences are.

As you can see the phrase “unexpectedly intense volatility” is not true of anyone who is a follower of my work. One way of looking at this is that forwards pricing of the US Dollar has been in the wrong place for theory. This is one of the reasons why German bond yields have gone so negative ( as I type this the benchmark ten-year yield is -0.58%) because if you try to switch to US Treasury Bonds to gain the 1.54% or 2% higher yield you find that exchange rates take away the gain. To get a higher yield you have to take an exchange rate risk. Returning to the Chair Powell statement we see that it is more realistic to say we were hovering near an edge and then slipped over it.

If we return to the balance sheet we see that it has risen to US $3.95 trillion for a rise of the order of 190 billion in response to the repo crisis. The exact amount varies daily with the individual repo operations and also fortnightly as we now have those too. Just as an example the difference between the operations on Monday and yesterday was some US $9.55 billion lower. I point this out as some places have been claiming you add the repo operations up which is really rather odd when most so far only have the lifespan of a Mayfly.

Those who analyse events via the prism of bank reserves should be happy with this bit.

Indeed, my colleagues and I will soon announce measures to add to the supply of reserves over time. Consistent with a decision we made in January, our goal is to provide an ample supply of reserves to ensure that control of the federal funds rate and other short-term interest rates is exercised primarily by setting our administered rates and not through frequent market interventions.

An official denial

By now you should all know how to treat this.

I want to emphasize that growth of our balance sheet for reserve management purposes should in no way be confused with the large-scale asset purchase programs that we deployed after the financial crisis.

Indeed the next part is simply untrue or if you are less kind a lie.

Neither the recent technical issues nor the purchases of Treasury bills we are contemplating to resolve them should materially affect the stance of monetary policy, to which I now turn.

One of the roles of a central bank is setting interest-rates as part of monetary policy. Those who follow my podcasts will know I defined it as there second role after the existence and provision of a currency, in this case the US Dollar. Briefly monetary policy was affected as overnight interest-rates went outside the official range as described below by the Financial Times.

the pressures that bubbled up in September and sent the cost of borrowing cash overnight via repurchase, or repo, agreements as high as 10 per cent.

That is not as large as you might think as the impact is only for each day but it was way outside the official range. Also there were times when the role of a central bank was in setting the interest-rate for overnight money in terms of its monetary policy. The credit crunch moved events along as that did not have the hoped for impact on the real economy ( and hence we got QE) but the underlying principle remains.

Comment

So we find that the new version of Quantitative Easing or what will no doubt be called QE4 had the champagne bottle smashed on it last night by Jerome Powell as it got ready to go down to the slipway. It remains for it to be fully fitted out as I do not believe it will stop here.

making the case instead for the Fed to buy anywhere from $200bn to more than $300bn of shorter-dated Treasury bills over the next six months. ( Financial Times)

As you can see the lower estimate pretty much coincides with the change in the balance sheet do far with the repo operations. The larger amount perhaps aims for some sort of margin.

The difference between this and the QE we have seen so far is the term of the assets purchased. Treasury Bills last for up to a year whereas Treasury Bonds are for longer periods of time with what is called the long bond being for thirty-years. Also bills do not pay interest as you pay less for them to allow for that.

So there are minor differences with past QE efforts but the direction of travel is the same. Let me put it another way with this from the US Federal Reserve,

Total assets of the Federal Reserve have increased significantly from $870 billion on August 8th, 2007

They have indeed as we wonder how long it will be before we get back to the previous peak of US $4.5 trillion and presumably beyond.

If QE really worked it would not need so many new names would it? Japan now calls it QQE and now the US calls it reserve management. Perhaps Governor Carney will call it climate-related QE.

 

 

 

The story of India, its banks and five interest-rate cuts in a year

This morning has brought us a reminder of what has become one of the certainties of life. Oh for the time when we thought they were simply death and taxes whereas now we can add interest-rate cuts to this list. So without further ado let me look to thw sub-continent and had you over to the Reserve Bank of India,

On the basis of an assessment of the current and evolving macroeconomic situation, the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) at its meeting today (October 4, 2019) decided to: reduce the policy repo rate under the liquidity adjustment facility (LAF) by 25 basis points to 5.15 per cent from 5.40 per cent with immediate effect.
Consequently, the reverse repo rate under the LAF stands reduced to 4.90 per cent, and the marginal standing facility (MSF) rate and the Bank Rate to 5.40 per cent.
The MPC also decided to continue with an accommodative stance as long as it is necessary to revive growth, while ensuring that inflation remains within the target.

As you can see the 0.25% interest-rate cut has been accompanied by some Forward Guidance of more being on the way. This is another reminder of my point earlier this week that central bankers are pack animals as to any impartial observer the whole concept of Forward Guidance has not worked or we would not be where we are. Still it does flatter central banking egos and make them feel important. After all it was only on the 4th of April I was pointing out they were telling us this.

The MPC also decided to maintain the neutral monetary policy stance.

Now I do not know about you but five interest-rate cuts in a year only three-quarters finished does not especially look neutral to me. So they were certainly not singing along with the Who.

I can see for miles and miles
I can see for miles and miles
I can see for miles and miles and miles and miles and miles
Oh yeah

Indeed there was dissent back then about the rate cut.

This time around the vote was again 4-2 so there is a reasonable amount of dissent about this at the RBI.

Furthermore it is worse than this because when I have contact with central bankers and point this out I do get the reply that it does not matter if Forward Guidance is wrong. This proves that the thin air up in top of their Ivory Towers does affect the brain.

What has caused this?

We have another reminder of central bankers being pack animals. What is Indian for Johnny Foreigner anyway?

Since the MPC’s last meeting in August 2019, global economic activity has weakened further……..The macroeconomic performance of major emerging market economies (EMEs) was weighed down by a deteriorating global environment in Q3…….worsening global growth prospects.

You could circle the world via central bankers doing this but would then be reminded of the wisdom of Maxine Nightingale.

Ooh, and it’s alright and it’s coming along
We gotta get right back to where we started from

In terms of the domestic economy there was this.

On the domestic front, growth in gross domestic product (GDP) slumped to 5.0 per cent in Q1:2019-20, extending a sequential deceleration to the fifth consecutive quarter.

So we are reminded of a couple of things. In addition to the slowing growth we have the fact that 5% GDP growth is considered slow in India. Oh and they mean second quarter as it is slightly unusual to present the numbers in a fiscal year style.

Now the central banking Johnny Foreigner facade crumbles away.

Of its constituents, private final consumption expenditure (PFCE) slowed down to an 18-quarter low.

So the weakness was mostly domestic after all. Perhaps they were hoping no-one would read this far down the report.

You will not be surprised to learn that there was also an issue here.

Industrial activity, measured by the index of industrial production (IIP), weakened in July 2019 (y-o-y), weighed down mainly by moderation in manufacturing. In terms of uses, the production of capital goods and consumer durables contracted……… The Reserve Bank’s business assessment index (BAI) fell in Q2:2019-20 due to a decline in new orders, contraction in production, lower capacity utilisation and fall in profit margins of the surveyed firms.

Also this is hardly hopeful.

The sales of commercial vehicles, a key indicator for the transportation sector, contracted by double digits in July-August.

Meanwhile as this is India there is also a reflection on the Monsoon season.

Abundant rains in August and September have led to improved soil moisture conditions in most parts of the country, particularly central India, compared to the corresponding period of the last year. Overall, the prospects of agriculture have brightened considerably, positioning it favourably for regenerating employment and income, and the revival of domestic demand.

Some Perspective

The Statistics Times has crunched some numbers so let us start with a perspective on what the growth rate was only recently.

Real GDP or Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at constant (2011-12) prices in the year 2018-19 is estimated at ₹140.78 lakh crore showing a growth rate of 6.81 percent over First Revised Estimates of GDP for the year 2017-18 of ₹131.80 lakh crore.

I often get asked about GNP, well as GNI is the new GNP.

GNI (Gross National Income)  ₹139.32 lakh crore

If we look further back.

In new series, figures are available since 2004-05. GDP of India has expanded by 2.57 times from 2004-05 to 2018-19.

According to IMF World Economic Outlook (April-2019), GDP (nominal ) of India in 2019 at current prices is projected at $2,972 billion. India contributes 3.36% of total world’s GDP in exchange rate basis. India shares 17.5 percent of the total world population and 2.4 percent of the world surface area. This projection would make India as 5th largest economy of the world.

Trouble,Trouble Trouble

One of my earliest themes as a blogger was that central banks have lost control of real world interest-rates.

Monetary transmission has remained staggered and incomplete. As against the cumulative policy repo rate reduction of 110 bps during February-August 2019, the weighted average lending rate (WALR) on fresh rupee loans of commercial banks declined by 29 bps. However, the WALR on outstanding rupee loans increased by 7 bps during the same period.

In terms of economic theory this is along the lines of what was called Liquidity Preference Theory at least in terms of principles. It is why I think interest-rate cuts below around 1.5% are ineffective and at times can make things worse and not better. We now have a new nuance that due to its unique circumstances India has some features of this at interest-rates of around 5%.

Comment

If we start with an international perspective then we have another week where Australia and India have cut interest-rates. This means that the number of interest-rate cuts in the credit crunch era must be pushing past 750 confirming my view of them being one of the new certainties of life.

Next comes the issue of “The Precious! The Precious!” which I have avoided so far explicitly although of course regular readers of my work will have spotted the implicit reference via the transmission of interest-rate cuts. Let me make me point with this from the RBI on the 26th of September.

Rumours are being circulated in sections of social media about operations of banks to create panic among the public. All are advised not to fall prey to such baseless and false rumours.

And Tuesday.

There are rumours in some locations about certain banks including cooperative banks, resulting in anxiety among the depositors. RBI would like to assure the general public that Indian banking system is safe and stable and there is no need to panic on the basis of such rumours.

The trigger for this is described by @fayedsouza

The RBI must communicate with depositors 1. When will they get access to their money? 2. How did the bank fraud go unnoticed for a decade? 3. Which other bank fraud have you missed while napping over the last 10 years? #PMCBankScam

 

Bank of England Forward Guidance keeps flip-flopping

One of the long-running themes of my work is that central bankers run in a pack or if you are feeling harsh have a job-share on the same brain cell. In my interview with RethinkingTheDollar.com earlier this week I described them as being like Stepford Wives. So you can imagine I was expecting to hear from the Bank of England which has been pretty quiet through a phase where we have seen interest-rate cuts from the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank of ECB amongst others. Indeed according to the Wall Street Journal the Bank of Japan is on the case as well.

Bank of Japan Gov. Haruhiko Kuroda said Tuesday cutting short-term interest rates would be effective in buoying the economy, confirming that the option remains on the table despite a backlash from the financial sector.

So enter Michael Saunders of the Bank of England who is giving a speech in Barnsley and he set out his stall early.

With persistently high Brexit uncertainties and softer global growth, the UK economy has weakened markedly in recent quarters, opening up a modest amount of spare capacity.

Although it is only one sentence there are already two problems with this. The first is that the Brexit uncertainty strengthened the UK economy in the first quarter with GDP growth of 0.5%. Also we can see that he is back to the Ivory Tower view of events where “spare capacity” is based on the output gap. As a reminder the following sequence of events would be comical if they were not so serious. But we were guided towards an unemployment rate of 7% then to “equilibrium” unemployment rates of 6.5%, 6%,5,5%, 4.5% and well you have the idea. In essence and this is another theme their so-called theory in fact simply chases reality after a delay.

Next we get a bit of a standard Bank of England statement.

The economy could follow very different paths depending on Brexit developments. But in my view,
even assuming that the UK avoids a no-deal Brexit, persistently high Brexit uncertainties seem likely
to continue to depress UK growth below potential for some time, especially if global growth remains disappointing.

Here he seems to be mixing two concepts as he meshes the Brexit issue with the global situation. Sadly he is ploughing on with the output gap theory and I am sorry to say he is embarrasing himself as the tweet below from Nicola Duke shows.

When BoE Saunders voted hikes in 2017: Wages 2.3%  CPI 3.1%  GDP 1.7%  Unemployment 4.7%

 

Today he wants cuts: Wages 3.9%  CPI 1.7%  GDP 1.8% Unemployment 3.8%

 

These people are paid to do this. I’m not an economist but my common sense tells me they don’t do a very good at their job.

As you can see the idea of using the labour market as a signal for an Ivory Tower style output gap falls flat on its face here. Wage growth is now much better and the unemployment rate is a fair bit lower.

So what is the prescription from Dr Saunders? The emphasis is mine

In such a scenario – not a no-deal Brexit, but persistently high uncertainty – it probably will be
appropriate to maintain an expansionary monetary policy stance and perhaps to loosen further. Of course, the monetary policy response to Brexit developments will also take into account other factors
including, in particular, changes in the exchange rate and fiscal policy.

Forward Guidance

Let me now link all this to the title of my piece today and look at the latest version of Bank of England Forward Guidance from last week’s Minutes.

In the event of greater clarity that the economy is on a path to a smooth Brexit, and assuming some recovery in global growth, a significant margin of excess demand is likely to build in the medium term. Were that to occur, the Committee judges that increases in interest rates, at a gradual pace and to a limited extent, would be appropriate to return inflation sustainably to the 2% target.

That didn’t last long did it? If we consider the theory it is yet another disaster for the output gap theory of the Bank of England’s Ivory Tower as the “significant margin of excess demand” lasted for all of one week!

As for Micheal I am afraid it is even worse because as recently as the 10th of June he was telling us this. The emphasis is mine

To sum up, in my view, the output gap is probably closed and, assuming a smooth Brexit (as well as the
asset prices prevailing at the time of the May Inflation Report), risks to consumer spending probably lie to the
upside of the latest IR forecast. This would push the economy even further into excess demand than the
central projection in the latest IR, with the jobless rate likely to reach new lows. In turn, this would be likely to
reinforce upward pressure on domestic cost growth and inflation over the next 2-3 years. In this case, Bank
Rate will probably need to rise further over the forecast period than implied by the market path used in the May Inflation Report to keep inflation on target over time.

Indeed he claimed he was keen to get on with it.

But there would be costs if we delay tightening until all the potential warning signs across pay, capacity and prices are flashing red. Such an approach would make it less likely
that tightening would be limited and gradual, and more likely that the economy would face a painful
adjustment.

What has caused this?

Reading the speech Michael Saunders has been reading the economic surveys but seems not to have read then all as this bit illustrates.

In particular, economic growth has
slowed much more here than in the US and EA, even though the rise in global trade tensions has not led to
any actual or threatened hikes in tariffs on UK exports.

Now let me remind you of Tuesday’s Markit PMI report for the Euro area.

The survey data indicate that GDP looks set to rise
by just 0.1% in the third quarter, with momentum
weakening as the quarter closed.

The actual data for the UK is that GDP grew by 0.3% in July which wiped out the drop in the second quarter so as it stands “slowed much more here” seems rather odd.

Next we find that he is absolutely committed to his output gap theory until it does not suit.

As a result, capacity pressures are no longer increasing and may be starting to ease. To be sure, the jobless rate (3.8%) remains slightly below the MPC’s estimate of equilibrium (4¼%). But taken as a whole, business surveys suggest that capacity use in firms has fallen below average.

Oh hang on it’s now back.

In my view, the economy now (end of Q3) probably has an output gap of perhaps ⅓% or ½% of GDP or so.

Comment

A lot of this is very damning for both the Bank of England and Micheal Saunders who seems determined to live up to the unreliable boyfriend moniker applied to his boss Mark Carney. But there are other issues here and is starts well as at times like these there is much to welcome about some honesty.

For a monetary policymaker, an extra complexity is that it may well be unclear for some time which scenario
is likely to unfold.

But then look where it takes him.

However, this is not necessarily a recipe for policy inertia.

He seems to want to splash around in the dark.

I would prefer to be nimble, adjusting policy if it appears necessary to keep the economy on track, and accepting that it may be necessary to change course if the outlook changes
significantly….

Also we have learned to be very afraid of statements like this.

BoE’s Saunders says he is not a fan of negative interest rates, adding that the floor for UK interest rates is close to zero, marginally positive ( @DailyFXTeam )

This is because such statements are PR in case he does vote for native interest-rates he can present it as something he did not want. So why does he feel the need to point that out?

Just for clarity “the floor for UK interest-rates” is considered by the Bank of England to be 0.1%. This replaced the 0.5% that Governor Carney kept telling us about round about the time he cut to 0.25%. Will Britney be on the Bank of England loudspeakers?

Oops, I did it again
I played with your heart
Got lost in the game

Even worse is the possibility that Michael Saunders is simply chasing the markets because as regular readers will be aware UK Gilt yields have been predicting an interest-rate cut for some time.

Number Crunching.

Here is a reply I sent to Bloomberg in response to their social media reports on the UK Pound £

In a week where use of language is being challenged how about “woes have multiplied” for a fall of all of 0.3% as I type this?