France does not like being told higher inflation is good for it

This weekend has seen a further escalation in the Gilet Jaune or yellow jacket protest in France. This has so unsettled Bloomberg that it is running a piece suggesting it could happen in the UK perhaps as a way of mollifying the bankers it has suggested should go to Paris. However, let us dodge the politics as far as we can as there is a much simpler economic focus and it is inflation. From the Financial Times.

Mr Macron introduced the increases in fuel taxes last year, as part of a package intended to attract investment and revitalise economic growth. They were also intended to support his ambition of setting France on course to ban sales of petrol and diesel cars by 2040. The tax is rising more sharply for diesel fuel, to bring it into line with the tax on petrol, as Mr Macron’s government argues that the advantage it has enjoyed is unjustified. Since the Volkswagen emissions scandal, it has become more widely accepted that diesel vehicles do not have the advantage in environmental impact over petrol engines, although manufacturers are still defending the technology.

Let us analyse what we have been told. How do you revitalise economic growth by raising costs via higher taxes? Perhaps if that was your intention via this move you would reduce taxes on petrol instead of at least reduce petrol taxes by the same amount you raise the diesel ones. As to the point about diesel engines I agree as I am the owner of what I was told was a clean diesel but has turned out to be something polluting both my and other Londoners lungs. Not President Macron’s fault of course as that was way before he came into power and of course he is the French President. But no doubt they encouraged purchases of diesel vehicles ( by the lower tax if nothing else) as we note that when the establishment is wrong it “corrects” matters by making the ordinary person pay. This especially hits people in rural France who rely on diesel based transport.

The details of the extra tax are show by Connexions France from October 2017.

Tax on diesel will rise 2.6 cents per litre every year for the next four years, after MPs voted in favour of the government’s draft budget for 2018.

As this from the BBC shows this is as well as higher taxes on petrol.

the Macron government raised its hydrocarbon tax this year by 7.6 cents per litre on diesel and 3.9 cents on petrol, as part of a campaign for cleaner cars and fuel.

The decision to impose a further increase of 6.5 cents on diesel and 2.9 cents on petrol on 1 January 2019 was seen as the final straw.

If we look at the November CPI data for France we see that it is at 1.9% but is being pulled higher by the energy sector which has annual inflation of 11.9%. In a piece of top trolling Insee tells us this.

After seven months of consecutive rise, energy prices should fall back, in the wake of petroleum product prices.

If we look at this via my inflation theme we see that as well as energy inflation being 11.3% that food inflation is 5%. So whilst central bankers may dismiss that as non-core and wonder what is going on? We can see perhaps why the ordinary person might think otherwise. Especially if they like carrots.

 Vegetable prices rose by 15.2% over one year with prices going up for salads (+15.6%), endives (+19.5%), carrots (+76.7%) and leeks (+54.2%). In contrast, tomato prices went down by 12.3% over one year.  ( Insee October agricultural prices)

Manufacturing

This morning saw the monthly series of Markit purchasing manager’s indices on manufacturing published.

November data pointed to the softest improvement in French manufacturing operating conditions for 26 months. The latest results reflected falling new orders and job shedding…….Manufacturing output was unchanged since October. That said, the latest reading represented stabilisation following a drop in production in the previous month.

It used to be the case that Markit was downbeat on France but these days it is very cheery. If we look at the last two months then production is lower as are jobs and new orders yet we are told this is an improvement! In reality the zone 49-51 represents unchanged and 50.8 is in that, although I do note that the 53.1 of the UK is apparently “lacklustre”. Anyway here is the view of the French situation.

However, any negativity towards unchanged output could be misplaced given it represented stabilisation after October’s decline.

Moving to prices they hinted that the protests might not be about to end any time soon.

On the price front, input costs continued to rise in
November. The rate of inflation was the strongest for nine
months, following two successive accelerations. Panellists
overwhelmingly blamed higher cost burdens on increased
raw material prices.
Survey respondents noted that part of the additional cost
burden was passed onto customers, with charges rising
solidly again in November.

Official data

On Friday we saw that September seems to have seen a slow down in the French economy.

In September 2018, the sales volume in overall trade fell back sharply (−2.1%) after an increase in August (+1.8%)…..In September 2018, the turnover turned down sharply in the manufacturing industry (−2.3%) after a strong increase in August (+2.8%). It also went down in industry as a whole (−1.9% after +2.8% in August)……In September 2018, output in services was stable after a strong increase in August (+2.9%).

As you can see all measures saw weakening in September and eyes will be on the services sector. This is because whilst the national accounts do not present it like this the 1% growth for the sector was what made it a better quarter. So let us also dig into the situation further.

According to business managers surveyed in November 2018, the business climate in services is stable. At 103, it remains above its long-term average (100).

Otherwise, the indicator of October 2018 has been revised downward by two points because of late businesses’ answers that have been taken into account.

Considering this revision, the turning point indicator stands henceforth in the area indicating an unfavourable short-term economic situation.

The Bank of France remains optimistic however.

According to the monthly index of business activity (MIBA),
GDP is expected to increase by 0.4% in the fourth
quarter of 2018 (first estimate).

Comment

We often discuss the similarities between France and the UK but the ECB has this morning given us another insight, as according to its capital key France is virtually unchanged in relative terms over the past five years if we look at GDP and population combined. I will leave readers to decide for themselves if the Euro area average is good or bad as you mull the official view.

 

Switching back to France it has not been a great year economy wise even if the Bank of France is correct about this quarter. But its establishment seems to be up to the games of those elsewhere whilst is to push its policies via punishment ( higher taxes ) rather than encouragement. These days though more have seen through this and hence the current troubles.

Weekly Podcast

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Decision day and the Inflation Report arrive at the Bank of England

Today brings us to what is called Super Thursday as not only does the Bank of England announce its policy decision but we get the latest Inflation Report. Actually the Bank of England has already voted in a change decided upon by Mark Carney so that the official Minutes can be released with the decision. The problem with that comes from the issue that there is plenty of time for any decision to leak. That is on my mind this morning because markets have seen moves and activity.

Sterling extended its gains on Thursday……….

The pound jumped 0.9 percent to as high as $1.2881  sending the currency to a five-day high.

Against the euro, it rose to 88.155 pence per euro  before settling up half a percent at 88.21 pence. The gains follow a rise for sterling on Wednesday.

Now let me switch to interest-rate markets.

Short Sterling being hit in monster clips this morning 20k plus sells. ( @stewhampton)

For those unaware Short Sterling is the future contract for UK interest-rates and is somewhere where I worked back in the day in its options market. The confusing name comes I guess because they were trying to describe short-term interest-rates for sterling and it all got shortened. Anyway @stewhampton has continued.

Continuation of yesterday’s price action, all sells. Smacks of a surprise BOE vote on the hawkish side to me.

Looking at the actual movements we see that the contract for September 2019 was some 0.05 lower at the worst. For comparison an actual Bank of England move is usually 0.25%.

The Shadow MPC

The Times newspaper runs a Shadow Monetary Policy Committee so let us take a look at what it decided.

Sir John Gieve, Charles Goodhart and Andrew Sentance, all former Bank ratesetters, called on the monetary policy committee to increase rates after the £103 billion of fiscal loosening over six years unveiled in Monday’s budget.

Sir Steve Robson, a former Treasury mandarin, Geoff Dicks, a former member of the Office for Budget Responsibility, and Bronwyn Curtis, a non-executive member of the OBR, agreed. All six also cited the tight labour market, with unemployment at a 43-year low of 4 per cent, and rising wages.

On a personal note it is nice to see that Charles Goodhart is still active as he wrote a fair few of the books I read on UK monetary policy as an undergraduate. Also not many people call for a rise in interest-rates at their own semi-retirement party as Andrew Sentance did on Tuesday!

Before I move on I would also like to note that some seem to be catching up with a suggestion I first made in City-AM a bit over five years ago.

Of those who voted to hold rates, Rupert Pennant-Rea, a former deputy governor at the Bank, said that the MPC should start unwinding the £435 billion quantitative easing programme — signalling a bias on The Times panel for tighter policy.Ms Curtis and Sir Steve also called for QE to be wound down.

Decision Day

These are always rather fraught when there is the remote possibility that something may happen. Back in the day that usually meant an interest-rate change and moves were regularly larger which we returned to for a while with the cuts post credit crunch. These days it can also reflect a change in the rhetoric of the Bank of England as well as its Forward Guidance. That is of course if anyone takes much notice of the Forward Guidance which has been wrong more often than it has been right.

But you can have some humour as this from @RANSquawk shows.

Lloyds on – Prices have reversed from the 1.2660 range lows, back through 1.2850 resistance – This, along with momentum back in bull mode, supports our view for a move back towards the top of the 1.2660-1.3320 range

Yes now it has gone up the only way is up and you can guess which song has been linked to on social media.

Doubts

If we now look at the other side of the coin there have been other factors at play over the past 24 hours. First there was the announcement by Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab of progress followed this morning by this.

The UK has struck a deal with the EU on post-Brexit financial services, according to unconfirmed reports.

The Times newspaper said London had agreed in talks with Brussels to give UK financial services firms continued access to the bloc. ( BBC)

On this road we see reasons to be cheerful for the UK Pound £ and also a possible explanation for the lower short sterling. After all a Brexit deal and a likely stronger Pound £ might mean the Bank of England might raise interest-rates again at some future date. Of course we are building up something of a Fleetwood Mac style chain here as we are relying on the words of journalists about the acts of politicians influencing an unreliable boyfriend. Oh well.

House Prices

Having gone to so much effort to raise house prices for which during the tenure of Governor Carney the only way has indeed been up this will worry the Bank of England.

October saw a slowdown in annual house price growth to
1.6% from 2.0% in September. As a result, annual house
price growth moved below the narrow range of c2-3%
prevailing over the previous 12 months. Prices flat month-on-month after accounting for seasonal effects. ( Nationwide)

Reuters have implictly confirmed my point about Mark Carney’s tenure.

That was the weakest increase since May 2013, before Britain’s housing market started to throw off the after-effects of the global financial crisis.

Manufacturing

There was also a downbeat survey from Markit released at 9:30 am.

The seasonally adjusted IHS Markit/CIPS Purchasing
Managers’ Index® (PMI®) fell to a 27-month low of 51.1,
down from September’s revised reading of 53.6 (originally
published as 53.8).

Of course that 27-month low was when they got things really rather wrong after the EU Leave vote and perhaps most significantly helped trigger a Bank of England rate cut. As to factors here I think it is being driven by the automotive sector and the worries about trade generally. In some ways this measure has in fact been a sort of optimism/pessimism reading on views about Brexit.

One slightly odd feature of the report was this as we recall that a number above 50 is supposed to be an expansion and  after all they do measure down to 0.1.

At current levels, the survey indicates that factory output could contract in the fourth quarter, dropping by 0.2%

 

Comment

As you can see there is much for the Bank of England to consider this morning as they advance from a full English ( Scottish & Welsh versions are available) breakfast to morning coffee and biscuits. After all having voted last night there is not much to do until the press conference at 12:30 and less than half of them have to attend that. But as to a rate rise today I think it is time for some Oasis.

Definitely Maybe

Whilst some might say it is on the cards I think that if we add in the weak monetary data we have been watching in 2018 it would be an odd decision. After all it is promising to raise interest-rates like this.

As little by little we gave you everything you ever dreamed of
Little by little the wheels of your life have slowly fallen off
Little by little you have to give it all in all your life
And all the time I just ask myself why you’re really here?

But of course they have made odd decisions before………

Me on Core Finance TV

 

 

UK annual unsecured credit growth “slows” to 8.1%

Today brings us to the latest UK data on both the money supply and the manufacturing sector. Both of these are seeing developments. If we start with something which has boosted the UK money supply by some £445 billion there is of course the QE bond purchases of the Bank of England. Having given my thoughts on Friday here is David Smith of the Sunday Times who seems to have bought the Bank of England rhetoric hook,line and sinker. Firstly let me correct an early misconception.

At first, as in America, the process of running off QE assets is being achieved by not reinvesting the proceeds of maturing bonds.

That implies that the UK is no longer reinvesting its maturing Gilt holdings and if it were true would be a policy I support having originally suggested it some five years ago. This would, however be news to the Monetary Policy Committee.

The Committee also voted unanimously to maintain the stock of UK government bond purchases,

Moving back to how things might play out the musical theme is “Don’t Worry Be Happy” by Bobby McFerrin.

We are still, of course, some way away from the unwinding of the Bank’s £435bn of QE. It will not happen until interest rates reach 1.5%, and they are currently only half that level. It remains possible that, in the event of a rocky, no-deal Brexit, the Bank will think it is obliged to launch a further tranche of QE. But it will eventually be reversed. And there is no reason why we should be unduly worried about that.

So suddenly we are no longer reversing it, and we will not do so until Bank Rate reaches 1.5%. In case you are wondering if there is something especially significant about 1.5% there is not apart from the fact that the associated higher Gilt yields will mean a lower value for the holdings. Oh and we might get more! But don’t worry “it will eventually be reversed”  although using the strategy suggested, which of course has not started, it would not be until 2065.

As to what good it has done? We seem to just have to accept the line it has saved us.

any marginal increase in wealth inequality looks like a small price to pay for avoiding more serious economic damage and deflation.

Money Supply

This month’s data was a little bit of a curate’s egg but let us start with something that has become very familiar. From the Bank of England.

The annual growth rate of consumer credit slowed further in August, to 8.1%, reflecting weaker monthly lending flows. The annual growth rate was the lowest since August 2015, and well below the peak of 10.9% in November 2016. Within this, and consistent with lower monthly net flows over the past few months, other loans and advances growth fell to 7.7%, the lowest since December 2014. Credit card growth has been broadly stable for the past 18 months at close to 9%.

The official view can be seen quite clearly here, and if we take the £838 million of July and the £1118 million of August that is lower than the circa £1500 million previously. The catch is the annual growth rate of 8.1% as can anybody thing of anything else in the UK economy growing at that sort of rate? After all it compares with real wage growth which is somewhere around zero and an annual rate of economic growth of between 1% and 2%. Although I am reminded that Sir Dave Ramsden of the Bank of England called an annual growth rate of 8.3% “weak” earlier this year.

Also if you look at the date of the peak you see that the “Sledgehammer QE” and Bank Rate cut of August 2016 did seem to achieve something, which was a peak in unsecured borrowing. Oddly we do not see the Bank of England trying to bathe itself in this particular piece of glory…..

Mortgage Lending

This has been fairly stable for a while now. The Funding for Lending Scheme got net monthly lending positive in 2013 and since then both the banks and our central bank have been happy. At the moment we mostly see net lending of around £3 billion per month.

Lending to business

There are two clear trends here.Let me open by pointing out the impact of the Funding for Lending Scheme on the metric it was loudly proclaimed to influence.

Annual growth in lending to small and medium-sized businesses remained close to zero for the eighth consecutive month.

This has been the pattern since it began which is why the central banking version of the  nuclear deterrent or the word “counterfactual” has been deployed. It tells us that however bad things are they would have been worse otherwise, so things are in fact a success. If we look at the breakdown we see that of the £166 billion or so, some £50 billion is for real-estate as opposed to the £10 billion for manufacturing, which tells us something about the way the UK economic wind blows.

Another is that businesses are shifting away from banks which is a trend which would make my late father very happy if he was still with us.

Businesses can raise money by borrowing from banks or from financial markets (in the form of bonds, equity and commercial paper). The total amount outstanding of businesses’ borrowing from these sources increased by £3.2 billion in August. Within this, net finance raised from banks remained positive, but weak, at £1.0 billion.

Over the past six months the average raised from banks has been £1 billion but £1.5 billion has been raised from other sources of credit.

Money Supply

These are the curate’s egg part this month. This is because the actual monthly data was better.

The total amount of money held by UK households, businesses and non-intermediary other financial corporations (NIOFCs) (Broad money or M4ex) rose by £6.9 billion in August. This was above the £0.7 billion in July and the £2.6 billion average of the previous six months.

However the annual rate of M4ex fell to 2.8% which is poor and a further slowing. But if we look for perspective the problem months were July as you can see above and even more so June where it shrank by £2.6 billion. So we know the overall trend has been weak but we are a bit unsure about what is about to take place.

Manufacturing

There was some rather welcome news from this sector today as Markit published its PMI business survey.

Domestic market demand strengthened, while increased orders from North America and Europe helped new export
business stage a modest recovery from August’s
contraction. Business confidence also rose to a three-month
high.

The reading of 53.8 following an upwardly revised 53 for August shows some welcome growth and is rather different to the media perspective and coverage. Let us hope it bodes well.

Comment

The UK money supply data have been weak for a while now and on Friday we noted again that so has the economy.

Compared with the same quarter a year ago, the UK economy has grown by 1.2% – revised down slightly from the previously published 1.3%.

That makes the Bank Rate rise in August look even odder to me. Of course there is an exception which is unsecured credit which is charging along albeit not quite a fast as before. The total has now reached £214.2 billion.

We are left hoping that the better manufacturing surveys will add to the GDP data for July and give us if not the economic equivalent of the long hot summer at least some solid growth. After all clouds are gathering around at least some of Europe (Italy) if not its golfers.

Meanwhile our official statistician rather than working on known problems seem determined to produce numbers which are meaningless in my opinion.

In 2017, the UK’s real full human capital stock was £20.4 trillion, equivalent to just over 10 times the size of UK gross domestic product (GDP).

Perhaps there is a clue telling us where the author lives.

the average real human capital stock of those living in West Midlands fell the most, by 5% in 2017 to £568,168, the biggest drop in six years, reflecting negative real earnings growth. By contrast, the average real human capital stock of those living in East Midlands with a degree or higher qualification rose by 9% in 2017 to £564,790.

 

 

 

UK GDP growth accelerates past France and Italy

Today brings us the latest data on the UK economy or to be more specific the economic growth or Gross Domestic Product number for the second quarter of this year. If you are thinking that this is later than usual you are correct. The system changed this summer such that we now get monthly updates as well as quarterly ones. So a month ago we were told this.

The monthly GDP growth rate was flat in March, followed by a growth of 0.2% in April. Overall GDP growth was 0.3% in May.

So we knew the position for April and May earlier than normal (~17 days) but missing from that was June. We get the data for June today which completes the second quarter. As it happens extra attention has been attracted by the fact that the UK economy has appeared to be picking-up extra momentum. The monthly GDP numbers showed a rising trend but since then other data has suggested an improved picture too. For example the monetary trends seem to have stabilised a bit after falls and the Markit PMI business survey told us this.

UK points to a 0.4% rise in Q2 tomorrow, but that still makes the Bank of England’s recent rate rise look odd, even with the supposed reduced speed limit for the economy. Prior to the GFC, 56.5 was the all-sector PMI ‘trigger’ for rate hikes. July 2018 PMI was just 53.8 ( @WilliamsonChris _

As you can see they are a bit bemused by the behaviour of the Bank of England as well. If we look ahead then the next issue to face is the weaker level of the UK Pound £ against the US Dollar as we have dipped below US $1.28 today. This time it is dollar strength which has done this as the Euro has gone below 1.15 (1.145) but from the point of view of inflation prospects this does not matter as many commodities are priced in US Dollars. I do not expect the impact to be as strong as last time as some prices did not fall but via the impact of higher inflation on real wages this will be a brake on the UK economy as we head forwards.

Looking Ahead

Yesterday evening the Guardian published this.

Interest rates will stay low for 20 years, says Bank of England expert

Outgoing MPC member Ian McCafferty predicts rates below 5% and wages up 4%

The bubble was rather punctured though by simpleeconomics in the comments section.

Considering the BoE track record on forecasting I think we should take this with a massive pinch of salt. They often get the next quarter wrong so no hope for 20 years time.

The data

As ever we should not place too much importance on each 0.1% but the number was welcome news.

UK GDP grew by 0.4% in Quarter 2 (April to June) 2018.The rate of quarterly GDP growth picked up from growth of 0.2% in Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2018.

As normal if there was any major rebalancing it was towards the services sector.

Services industries had robust growth of 0.5% in Quarter 2 (Apr to June) 2018, which contributed 0.42 percentage points to overall gross domestic product (GDP) growth.

The areas which did particularly low are shown below.

 Retail and wholesale trade were the largest contributors to growth, at 0.11 percentage points and 0.05 percentage points respectively. Computer programming had a growth of 1.9%, contributing 0.05 percentage points to headline gross domestic product (GDP).

There was also some much better news from the construction sector and even some rebalancing towards it.

Growth of 0.9% in construction also contributed positively to GDP growth.

Although of course these numbers have been in disarray demonstrated by the fact that the latest set of “improvements” are replacing the “improvements” of a couple of years or so ago. Perhaps they have switched a business from the services sector to construction again ( sorry that;s now 3 improvements).So Definitely Maybe. Anyway I can tell you that there are now 40 cranes between Battersea Dogs Home and Vauxhall replacing the 25 when I first counted them.

Today’s sort of humour for the weekend comes from the area to which according to Baron King of Lothbury we have been rebalancing towards.

However, contraction of 0.8% in the production industries contributed negatively to headline GDP growth…….

Manufacturing fell by 0.9% although there is more to this as I will come to in a moment.

Monthly GDP

You might have assumed that the June number would be a good one but in fact it was not.

GDP increased by 0.1% in June 2018

If we look into the detail we see that contrary to expectations there was no services growth at all in June. Such growth as there was come from the other sectors and construction had a good month increasing by 1.4%. I did say I would look at manufacturing again and it increased by 0.4% in June which follows a 0.6% increase in May. So we have an apparent pick-up in the monthly data as the quarterly ones show that it is in a recession with two drops in a row. Thus it looks as if the dog days of earlier this year may be over,

This leaves us with the problem of recording zero services growth in June. The sectors responsible for pulling the number lower are shown below.

The professional, scientific and technical activities sector decreased by 1.0% and contributed negative 0.10 percentage points. ……The other notable sector fall was wholesale, retail and motor trades, which decreased by 0.6% and contributed negative 0.08 percentage points.

The decline of the retail trade whilst the football world cup was on seems odd. Also there overall number completely contradicts the PMI survey for June which at 55.1 was strong. So only time will tell except Bank of England Governor Mark Carney may need its barman to mix his Martini early today as he mulls the possibility that he has just raised interest-rates into a service-sector slow down.

One consistent strong point in the numbers in recent times has carried on at least.

There was also a rise in motion pictures, increasing by 5.8% and contributing 0.05 percentage points.

So we should all do our best to be nice to any luvvies we come across.

Comment

We should welcome the improved quarterly numbers as GDP growth of 0.4% is double that of both France and Italy and is double the previous quarter. However whilst the monthly numbers do provide some extra insight into manufacturing as the recessionary quarterly data looks like a dip which is already recovering the services numbers are odd. I fear that one of my warnings about monthly GDP numbers are coming true as it seems inconsistent with other numbers to say we picked up well in May but slowed down in June. If we look at the services sector alone and go back to February 2017 we are told this happened in the subsequent months, -0.1%,0.3%-0.1%,0.3% which I think speaks for itself.

We also got an update on the trade figures which have a good and a bad component so here is the good.

The total UK trade deficit (goods and services) narrowed £6.2 billion to £25.0 billion in the 12 months to June 2018. The improvement was driven by both exports of goods and services increasing by more than their respective imports.

Next the bad.

The total UK trade deficit widened £4.7 billion to £8.6 billion in the three months to June 2018, due mainly to falling goods exports and rising goods imports.

If you want a one word summary of out recorded trade position then it is simply deficit. Although currently we are looking rather like France in terms of patterns as a reminder that some trends are more than domestic.

 

The economy of Italy returns to its former coma status

We are in a spell where there has been a burst of economic news about Italy and the headline brings back memories of my main theme. So let us take a look at why the idea of it being like a “girlfriend in a coma” is back.

In the second quarter of 2018 the seasonally and calendar adjusted, chained volume measure of Gross
Domestic Product (GDP) increased by 0.2 per cent with respect to the first quarter of 2018 and by 1.1 per
cent in comparison with the second quarter of 2017. ( ISTAT)

Along the way I note that the statement below from only last week of European Central Bank President Mario Draghi does not seem to apply that well to his home country.

 the euro area economy is proceeding along a solid and broad-based growth path.

For newer readers my “girlfriend in a coma” theme comes from the fact that for quite some time now Italy has struggled to grow its economy at more than 1% per annum. So a fall to 1.1% reminds us of that especially as we note that annual growth only got as high as 1.7% in the “Euroboom” and since then has gone 1.6%,1.4% and now 1.1%. If we switch to the quarterly numbers then the trend is clearly not our friend as the peak of 0.5% at the end of 2016 was held in the opening quarter of 2017 but has since gone 0.4%, 0.3%,0.3%,0.3% and now 0.2%. Indeed there has also been a downgrade of the past as we had two 0.4% previously.

Perspective

The tweet below sums up the overall theme where Italy is not only still well below its pre credit crunch peak but has grown so little this century or if you prefer in the Euro era.

Also Italy has seen a fair bit of population growth meaning that the numbers on an individual or per capita basis are even worse and I have been waiting for them to rise back to where they were at the beginning of this century. Unfortunately growth has slowed to a crawl but they should be somewhere around them now.

Labour Market

We have seen in the credit crunch era that employment trends can be a leading indicator for an economy but get little solace here either.

In June 2018, 23.320 million persons were employed, -0.2% over May

The picture had been improving as the 330000 jobs gain over the past year illustrates but now the picture is not so clear. If we switch to unemployment we see that the sense of unease increases.

Unemployed were 2.866 million, +2.1% over the previous month.

This meant that the annual picture here was of only a fall of 8000 in the ranks of the unemployed. Also I have pointed out before that the unemployment rate falls below 11% to media cheers and then climbs back up to it as if it is on repeat. Well it has not yet gone back to 11% but not far off it.

unemployment rate was 10.9%, +0.2 percentage points over May 2018

The disappointing picture continues when we look at the bugbear which is youth unemployment.

Youth unemployment rate (aged 15-24) was 32.6%, +0.5 percentage points over the previous month and
youth unemployment ratio in the same age group was 8.6%, +0.2 percentage points over May 2018.

Inflation

If we switch to the other component of what used to be called the Misery Index ( where the annual rate of inflation was added to the unemployment rate) we see this.

In July 2018, according to preliminary estimates, the Italian harmonised index of consumer prices (HICP) decreased by 1.4% compared with the previous month and increased by 1.9% with respect to July 2017 (from +1.4% in June).

So the Misery Index rose to 12.8% if we use the latest figures albeit that unemployment is for June and not July. Just for clarity the HICP above is the measure we use in the UK as Italy kept the CPI moniker for its own measure. Some of the inflation rise was due to the summer sales starting a week later than in 2017.

Wages

There was better news here but it comes with a bit of a kicker. So let us start with the good news.

In June 2018 the hourly index and the per employee index increased by 0.9 per cent from last month.

Compared with June 2017 both indices increased by 2.0 per cent.

That was something of a burst and meant that there was some real wage growth and the numbers cover a lot of the economy.

At the end of June 2018 the coverage rate (share of national collective agreements in force for the wage setting aspects) was 86.8 per cent in terms of employees and 87.4 per cent in terms of the total amount of wages.

In fact wage growth for most changed very little but it rose to an annual rate of 4% in the public administration sector driven by a 6.4% rise for the military and 6.1% for the police. Well I suppose that is one way of boosting defence spending to please President Trump! But returning to the economics we see that whilst higher wages in that sector should boost areas such as retail sales the ordinary Italian taxpayer may be nervous of higher taxes to pay for it. Also is it ominous that the government is seemingly getting the police and military onside?

Looking Ahead

This mornings private-sector survey or PMI for the manufacturing sector did not start well.

Manufacturing growth eases in July to lowest since October 2016

The detail in fact questioned whether there was any growth at all.

Growth rates of both output and new orders
weakened during July to near standstills amid
reports of an ongoing slowdown in underlying
market activity. There were reports that both
domestic and external market conditions were
faltering. Indeed, new export orders rose to the
weakest degree since August 2016 according to the
latest data.

Indeed the conclusion was downbeat when we try to add this report to the overall picture.

Based on the latest set of PMI survey data, and
with worries mounting over any escalation of global
trade tensions on export trade, Italy’s industrial
base may well struggle to meaningfully contribute to
wider economic growth in the second half of 2018

Comment

There is a familiar drumbeat about all of this as we see Italy slipping back into what is normal for it. For a start there is the still very expansionary monetary policy of the ECB with its -0.4% deposit rate although the monthly QE purchases are reducing which drives the thought that even at its height Italy gained only a little. Economic growth since the beginning of 2014 totals a mere 4.5%.

Next comes the issue of Italy’s high national debt which has risen above 2.3 trillion Euros and of course now faces higher bond yields  (ten-year is 2.76%) as it looks to refinance maturing debt and raise new finance. The essential issue here has not been one of overspending but much more one of lack of economic growth.

Italy is in many ways a delightful country so let us end with something more positive which I note from the purchase of Ronaldo by the grand old club Juventus. Like all football transfers it starts not so well as it the fee is an import and subtracts from GDP but more positively the hope is that he provides a boost via Champions League success. But I spotted something else. From CNBC.

Ronaldo fans can purchase children’s jerseys with his name for €84.95 ($98.90), women’s jerseys for €94.95 ($110.60), men’s jerseys for €104.95 ($122.20) and an authentic replica of the gear worn by Juventus playersfor €137.45 ($160.10).

There is a lot of poor analysis on this sort of thing as much of the money goes nowhere near Juve but my point is there must be money in Italy if Juve can charge that much for a football shirt. Of course there will be international fans buying but also plenty of Italian ones.

 

 

 

 

The UK joins France and Germany with falling production in April

Today brings us a raft of new detail on the UK economy and as it is for April we get the beginnings of some insight as to whether the UK economy picked up after the malaise of only 0.1% GDP ( Gross Domestic Product) growth in the first quarter of this year. According to Markit PMI business survey we have in the first two months of this quarter but of course surveys are one thing and official data is another.

So far, the three PMI surveys indicate that GDP looks set to rise by 0.3-0.4% in the second quarter.

As for the manufacturing sector the same set of surveys has told us this.

The seasonally adjusted IHS Markit/CIPS Purchasing Managers’ Index® (PMI®
) rose to 54.4, up slightly from April’s
17-month low of 53.9, to signal growth for the
twenty-second straight month.

So we see that April can be looked at almost any way you like. Manufacturing has been in a better phase for a while now partly in response to the post EU leave vote fall in the UK Pound £. According to the survey we are still growing but April was the weakest month in this phase although some caution is required as I doubt whether a survey that can be in the wrong direction is accurate to anything like 0.5.

Of course the attention of Mark Carney and the Bank of England will be on a sector that it considers as and maybe more vital. From the Local Government Association.

Councils’ ability to replace homes sold under Right to Buy (RTB) will be all but eliminated within five years without major reform of the scheme, new analysis from the Local Government association reveals today.

The detail of the numbers is below.

The LGA said that, in the last six years, more than 60,000 homes have been sold off under the scheme at a price which is, on average, half the market rate, leaving councils with enough funding to build or buy just 14,000 new homes to replace them.

We sometimes discuss on here that the ultimate end of the house price friendly policies of the UK establishment will be to give people money to buy houses. Well in many ways Right To Buy does just that as those who have qualified buy on average at half-price. Also we see that one of the other supposed aims of the scheme which was to replace the property sold with new builds is failing. I guess we should not be surprised as pretty much every government plan for new builds fails.

Production and Manufacturing

These were poor numbers as you can see below.

In April 2018, total production was estimated to have decreased by 0.8% compared with March 2018, led by a fall of 1.4% in manufacturing and supported by falls in energy supply (2.0%), and water and waste (1.8%).

The fall in energy supply is predictable after the cold weather of March but the manufacturing drop much less so. If we review the Markit survey it was right about a decline but in predicting growth had the direction wrong. On a monthly basis the manufacturing fall was highest in metal products and machinery which both fell by more than 3% but the falls were widespread.

with 9 of the 13 sub-sectors falling;

If we step back to the quarterly data we see that it has seen better times as well.

In the three months to April 2018, the Index of Production increased by 0.3% compared with the three months to January 2018, due primarily to a rise of 3.2% in energy supply; this was supported by a rise in mining and quarrying of 4.3%………..The three-monthly fall to April 2018 in manufacturing of 0.5% is the largest fall since May 2017, due mainly to decreases in electrical equipment (9.4%), and basic metals and metal products (1.8%).

So on a quarterly basis we have some production growth but not much whereas manufacturing which was recently a star of our economy has lost its shine and declined. There has been a drop in trade which has impacted here.

The fall in manufacturing is supported by widespread weakness throughout the sector due to a reduction in the growth rate of both export and domestic turnover.

Actually for once the production and trade figures seem to be in concert.

Goods exports fell £3.1 billion, due mainly to falls in exports of machinery, pharmaceuticals and aircraft, while services exports also fell £2.5 billion in the three months to April 2018…….Falling volumes was the main reason for the declines in exports of machinery, pharmaceuticals and aircraft in the three months to April 2018 as price movements were relatively small.

That is welcome although the cause is not! But we see a signs of a slowing from the better trend which still looks good on an annual comparison.

In the three months to April 2018, the Index of Production increased by 2.3% compared with the same three months to April 2017, due mainly to a rise of 2.3% in manufacturing.

If we compare ourselves to France we see that it’s manufacturing production rose by 1.9% over the same period. However whilst we are ahead it is clear that our trajectory is worsening and we look set to be behind unless there is quite a swing in May. As to the Markit manufacturing PMI then its performance in the latest quarter has been so poor it has been in the wrong direction.

As we move on let me leave you with this as a possible factor at play in April.

 It should also be noted that survey response was comparatively high this month and notable weakness was due mainly to the cumulative impact of large businesses reporting decreased turnover.

Trade

We have already looked at the decline in good exports but in a way this was even more troubling.

 services exports also fell £2.5 billion in the three months to April 2018.

Regular readers will be aware that I have a theme that considering how important the services sector is to the UK economy we have very little detail about its impact on trade. As an example a 28 page statistical bulletin I read had only one page on services. I am reminded of this as this latest fall comes after our statisticians had upgraded the numbers as you see the numbers are mostly estimates.

So not a good April but the annual picture remains better.

The UK total trade deficit (goods and services) narrowed £6.7 billion to £30.8 billion in the 12 months to April 2018. An improvement to the trade in services balance was the main factor, as the trade surplus the UK has in services widened £9.9 billion to £108.7 billion. The trade in goods deficit worsened, widening £3.2 billion to £139.5 billion over the same period.

Construction

This was yet again a wild card if consistency can be that.

Construction output continued its recent decline in the three-month on three-month series, falling by 3.4% in April 2018; the biggest fall seen in this series since August 2012.

The consistency comes from yet another fall whereas the wild card element is that it got worse on this measure in spite of a small increase in April

Comment

There is a lot to consider here today but let us start with manufacturing where there are three factors at play. The money supply numbers have suggested a slow down and it would seem that they have been accurate. Next we have the issue that exports are weak and of course this is into a Euro area economy which is also slowing as for example industrial production fell by 0.5% in France and 1% in Germany in April on a monthly basis. Some are suggesting it is an early example of the UK being dropped out of European supply chains but I suspect it is a bit early for that.

Moving to construction we see that it is locked in the grip of an icy recession even in the spring. It seems hard to square with the 32 cranes between Battersea Dogs Home and Vauxhall but there you have it. I guess the failure of Carillion has had quite an effect and linking today’s stories we could of course build more social housing.

Looking forwards the UK seems as so often is the case heavily reliant on its services sector to do the economic heavy lifting, so fingers crossed.

 

 

How long will it be before the Bank of England hints at a Bank Rate cut?

After Friday’s disappointing UK GDP release this morning brings the beginnings of the first snapshot into the economy in the second quarter. Also there is in the Financial Times a reminder of the problems experienced by the Governor of the Bank of England Mark Carney.

“>Quiz: Do you have what it takes to study economics?Mark Carney wants teenagers to understand how the economy works. Do you measure up?

A laudable plan but first it would help if the Governor understood what was going on! After all it was as recently as a few months ago that he told us this. From Bloomberg.

But it was February’s Inflation Report, and Mark Carney’s statement that rates needed to rise “somewhat earlier and to a somewhat greater extent” than previously thought that really solidified investors’ view.

Only a couple of months later he fully lived up to his reputation as the “unreliable boyfriend”

That confidence soon expired when Carney used a BBC interview to damp expectations for an imminent interest-rate increase.

Mind you as recently as the 8th of April the Telegraph seemed to be in a 2013 time warp.

Mark Carney is known as the George Clooney of central banking…………have all served to reinforce what former Canadian colleagues term his “star quality”. ……The glamorous governor of the UK’s central bank will soon depart, however.  ( h/t PeterHoskinsTV )

The media seem to have a natural deference to authority as the Financial Times has had to do a screeching U-Turn from the analysis that told us the road to a May Bank Rate rise was a triumph of Forward Guidance.

The UK Pound £

One area which has kept much more up with the times has been the foreign exchanges. The UK Pound £ headed down against the US Dollar by more than a cent as soon as markets were aware of Governor Carney singing along with Luther Vandross.

But now I know
I don’t need you at all, you’re no good for me
I’ve changed my mind
I’m taking back my love

This has now been added to by the weak GDP report and we find ourselves noting that the effective exchange rate at 79.48 is a fair bit lower than the 81.24 of the 17th of April. Or to put it that is the equivalent of a 0.44% Bank Rate cut. Amazing isn’t it when we are told a 0.25% change is such a big deal?

Not all of this is Governor Carney;s fault as for example the US Dollar has rallied but the “rockstar” as he was once called got this completely wrong.

Manufacturing

This has been a bright spot for the UK economy over the past 18 months or so. However there is some food for thought in today’s Markit PMI business survey.

The upturn in the UK manufacturing sector slowed
further at the start of the second quarter. Rates of
expansion eased for output, new orders and
employment, in part reflecting a weakening in the
pace of expansion of new work from abroad.

The monthly reading did this.

fell to a 17-month low of 53.9 in April, down from 54.9 in
March. The PMI has signalled expansion in each
of the past 21 months.

Also there was news from an area of the economy that has been particularly robust.

Manufacturing employment increased in April.
The rate of job creation eased to the weakest in 14
months.

If we look for some perspective we see that UK manufacturing did not seem to pick up in April. A change from 54.9 to 53.9 may or may not mean something due to the errors in the estimates but whilst growth compared to our past history is good ( the overall average is 51.2) compared to the recent period it is not.

Inflation

The burst driven by the post EU leave vote fall in the UK Pound £ is passing us by now.

However, the rate of output charge inflation eased
for the third straight month to the slowest since
August 2017.

But the new weaker Pound £ will not help and the fact that the Sugar Tax is back in the news and Scotland now has a minimum price for alcohol reminds us of our tendency towards institutionalised inflation. Each individual change may have its merits but we can be sure we will face higher prices and inflation as a result.This is especially significant at a time of weak wage growth.

This has been added to recently by the issues in the Middle East raising the price of a barrel of Brent Crude Oil to around US $74. Although not all commodities are on the rise as this from the Reserve Bank of Australia reminded us earlier today.

Preliminary estimates for April indicate that the index decreased by 3.8 per cent (on a monthly average basis) in SDR terms, after increasing by 0.4 per cent in March (revised). Iron ore and coking coal prices led the decrease……Over the past year, the index has decreased by 1.4 per cent in SDR terms, led by lower iron ore prices.

There is an Australian bias to the commodities chosen but it does show that some are not adding to price pressure.

Unsecured Credit

This was an area that received what looked like praise from Mark Carney as the annual rate of growth pushed past 10% following his Sledgehammer QE of August 2016.

The stimulus is working

The problem is twofold. Firstly he has shifted his language to being “vigilant”. Secondly and much more importantly it has continued on something of a tear.

Consumer net credit rose by £0.3 billion in March 2018. Annual growth of consumer credit fell on the month to 8.6%

Not doubt someone will be trying out a PR release calling this a success as in annual growth shows the stimulus whilst the monthly drop is a success for vigilance. Actually the Bank of England will be worried here as they did not want a lurch downwards like this! Care is needed as the numbers are erratic but if this is an example of macroprudential policy it is also a sign of the problems as you tend to lurch from boom to bust rather than applying the brakes and slowing down.

Anyway even the 8.6% compares with wage growth that has been a bit over 2% and economic growth at 1.2%. Which number looks out of line?

Money Supply

Yesterday we noted that the growth of broad money had fallen to 3.7% in the Euro area and today we discovered that in the UK it had fallen to 3.8%. Thus both have seen a slowing which continues the theme of the last few weeks. If we look at the likely mixture between growth and inflation that currently looks worse for the UK as we start with a higher rate of inflation so lat us hope that drops and soon.

Comment

Today’s data is more fuel for the theme that the UK economy has slowed in 2018 and ironically even the news that consumer credit growth lurched downwards in March will worry the Bank of England. Be careful what you wish for is a theme of macroprudential style policies that so many seem to have forgotten. Anyway that may be a one month mirage so let us simply note that recent economic evidence would ordinarily have Mark Carney mulling a Bank Rate cut and not a rise.

We have covered the problems of his Forward Guidance many times so let us now take a different tack which is to compare it with the ECB and Mario Draghi. They face what are similar situations which is broad money growth slowing to as it happens pretty much the same rate of growth. They both will now have the occasional sleepless night wondering of the chance to change policy passed them by and that the boat sailed without them in it. But Mario will sleep better I think as whilst I am no fan of negative interest-rates and large-scale QE he had the Euro area crisis to contend with whereas Mark Carney has had at least a couple of chances to hop on the boat but in a nervous unreliable boyfriend state missed them.

Much of the stimulus in the UK was supposed to boost business borrowing, how has that been going?

Net finance raised was £0.0 billion in March

Yet if we switch to mortgages the beat goes on. If we go back to February 2016 the rate for new mortgages overall was 2.49%. So with the Bank Rate back at 0.5% since November it should be back there? Er no it is 2.04%. As we are told in the Matrix series of films “some things never change…”