Oh Italia!

Sometimes events just seem to gather their own momentum in the way that a rolling stone gathers moss so let me take you straight to the Italian Prime Minister this morning.

Italy Dep PM Di Maio: Low Growth Views `Theater Of The Absurd’: Messaggero ( @LiveSquawk )

I have to confess that after the way that the Italian economy has struggled for the last couple of decades this brought the Doobie Brothers to mind.

What a fool believes he sees
No wise man has the power to reason away
What seems to be
Is always better than nothing
And nothing at all

Then the Italian statistics office produced something of a tour de force.

In December 2018 the seasonally adjusted industrial production index decreased by 0.8% compared with
the previous month. The percentage change of the average of the last three months with respect to the
previous three months was -1.1.

As you can see these numbers are in fact worse than being just weak as they show a monthly and a quarterly fall. But they are in fact much better than the next one which is really rather shocking.

The calendar adjusted industrial production index decreased by 5.5% compared with December 2017
(calendar working days being 19 versus 18 days in December 2017); for the whole year 2018 the
percentage change was +0.8 compared with 2017.
The unadjusted industrial production index decreased by 2.5% compared with December 2017.

Just for clarity output was 2.5% lower but as there was an extra working day this year then on a like for like basis it was some 5.5% lower. I would say that was a depressionary type number except of course Italy has been in a long-standing depression.

Digging deeper into the numbers we see that on a seasonally adjusted basis there was a rally in industrial production as the 100 of 2015 nearly made 110 in November 2017, but now it has fallen back to 103.9. But even that pales compared to the calendar adjusted index which is now at 93.3. So whilst the different indices can cause some confusion the overall picture is clear. We do not get a lot of detail on manufacturing except that on a seasonally adjusted basis output was 5.5% lower in December than a year ago.

The drop is such that we could see a downwards revision to the Italian GDP data for the fourth quarter of last year which was -0.2% as it is. Actually the annual number at 0.1% looks vulnerable and might make more impact if the annual rate of growth falls back to 0%. Production in a modern economy does not have the impact it once did and Italy’s statisticians were expecting a fall but not one on this scale.

Monthly Economic Report

After the above we advance on this with trepidation.

World economic deceleration has spilled over into Q4, particularly in the industrial sector, which has
experienced a broad-based loss of momentum in many economies and a further slowing in global trade growth.
In November, according to CPB data the merchandise World trade in volume decreased 1.6%.

So it is everyone else’s fault in a familiar refrain, what is Italian for Johnny Foreigner? This is rather amusingly immediately contradicted by the data.

In Italy, real GDP fell by 0.2% in Q4 2018, following a 0.1% drop in the previous quarter. The negative result is
mainly attributable to domestic demand while the contribution of net export was positive.

So in fact it was the domestic economy causing the slow down. This thought is added to by the trade data where the fall in exports is dwarfed by the fall in imports at least in November as we only have partial data for December.

As for foreign trade, in November 2018 seasonally-adjusted data, compared to October 2018, decreased both
for exports (-0.4%) and for imports (-2.2%). Exports drop for EU countries (-1.3%) and rose for non EU
countries (+0.6%). However, according to preliminary estimates in December also exports to non-EU
countries decreased by 5.0%.

Now let me give an example of how economics can be the dismal science. Because whilst in isolation the numbers below are welcome with falling output they suggest falling productivity.

In the same month, the labour market, employment stabilized and the unemployment rate decreased only
marginally.

The future looks none too bright either,

In January 2019, the consumer confidence improved while the composite business climate
indicator decreased further. The leading indicator experienced a sharp fall suggesting a
worsening of the Italian cyclical position in the coming months.

Indeed and thank you for @liukzilla for pointing this out the Italian version does hint at some possible downgrades, Via Google Translate.

The data of industrial production amplify the tendency to reduce the rhythms of
activity started in the first few months of 2018 (-1.1% the economic variation in T4).

Also a none too bright future.

Data on industry orders also showed a negative trend, with a decrease for both markets in the September-November quarter (-1.3% and -1.0% respectively on the market).
internal and foreign).

The Consumer

Yesterday’s data provided no cheer either.

In December 2018, both value and volume of retail trade contracted by 0.7% when compared with the previous month. Year-on-year growth rate fell by 0.6% in value terms, while the quantity sold decreased by 0.5%.

Although on a quarterly basis there was a little bit assuming you think the numbers are that accurate,

In the three months to December (Quarter 4), the value of retail trade rose by 0.1%, showing a slowdown
to growth in comparison with the previous quarter (+0.4%), while the volume remained unchanged at
+0.3%.

Actually there was never much of a recovery here as the index only briefing rose to 102 if we take 2015 as 100 and now is at 101.5 according to the chart provided. Odd because you might reasonably have expected all the monetary stimulus to have impacted on consumer spending.

Population

This is now declining in spite of a fair bit of immigration.

On 1 st January 2019, the population was estimated to be 60,391,000 and the decrease on the previous year was
around 90,000 units (-1.5 per thousand)………The net international migration amounted to +190 thousand, recording a slight increase on the previous year (+188
thousand). Both immigration (349 thousand) and emigration (160 thousand) increased (+1.7% and +3.1%
respecitvely).

Bond Markets

I have pointed out many times that Italian bond yields have risen for Italy in both absolute and relative terms. Let me present another perspective on this from the thirty-year bond it issued earlier this week.

Today Italy issued 8bln 30yr BTPs. Had it issued the same bond last April, it would have received around 1.3 bilion more cash from the market. ( @gusbaratta ).

Comment

This is quite a mess in a lovely country. Also the ironies abound as for example expanding fiscal policy into an economic decline was only recently rejected by the Euro area authorities. They also have just ended some of the monetary stimulus by ending monthly QE at what appears to be exactly the wrong time. So whilst the Italian government deserves some criticism so do the Euro area authorities. For example if the ECB has the powers it claims why is it not using them?

Of course I don’t want to speculate about what contingency would call for a specific instrument but if you look at the number of instruments we have in place now, we can conclude that it’s not true that the ECB has run out of fuel or has run out of instruments. We have all our toolbox still available. ( Mario Draghi )

But just when you might have thought it cannot get any worse it has.

Me on The Investing Channel

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UK production falls but GDP is doing relatively well

Today brings us the latest official data on the UK economy as the monthly GDP number for November is announced. It comes from a weak international backdrop as we have been observing as Germany and France have already released weak numbers for that time period.

In November 2018, production in industry was down by 1.9% from the previous month on a price, seasonally and calendar adjusted basis ( Germany). In November 2018, output slipped back sharply in the manufacturing industry (−1.4% after +1.4% in October) as well as in the
whole industry (−1.3% after +1.3%)….Manufacturing output went down over the last three months (−1.0%), as well as in the whole industry (−0.9%).  ( France )

Just to add to the party this has just been released.

Italian Industrial Production (M/M) Nov: -1.60% (est -0.30% ; prev -0.10%) Italian Industrial Production WDA (Y/Y) Nov: -2.60% (est 0.40% ; prev 1.00%) (@LiveSquawk )

So the background is rather grim as the pattern for 2018 had been for a nudge higher in industrial production which is now replaced by a 2.6% year on year fall. Even a country which has been doing well like Spain has also reported a 1.5% monthly fall.

UK Production

In the circumstances described above the first response to the UK data was one of relief.

In November 2018, total production output fell by 0.4%, compared with October 2018, due to a fall of 0.3% in manufacturing, supported by falls of 1.1% electricity and gas and 1.3% in mining and quarrying. The monthly decrease in manufacturing output of 0.3% was due to 8 of the 13 sub-sectors falling; the largest downward contribution came from basic metals and metal products, falling by 3.6%.

Obviously one does not welcome falls but in relative terms those were good numbers. I have no idea how the consensus forecast was for a rise as you would need to be locked in a dark internet free cellar to think that in my opinion. However if we look for some perspective we have not escaped the global trend in this area.

In the three months to November 2018, total production output decreased by 0.9% compared with the same three months to November 2017; this is the weakest growth in total production output since November 2012 and the first time since October 2012 there has been widespread weakness across all four sectors.

If we go back to yesterday these numbers take us back to a period when the UK establishment changed tack in terms of economic policy. For example the Bank of England produced some credit easing via the Term Funding Scheme which reduced mortgage rates quite quickly by 1% and the government loosened the fiscal purse strings. Yet we are supposed to believe that the Bank of England currently plans to increase interest-rates.

If we look for causes one has become rather familiar and seems set to stay for a bit.

Providing the largest downward contribution was transport equipment, which fell by 1.1% due to a fall of 2.4% in motor vehicles, trailers and semi-trailers. The weakness was driven by the impact of shutdowns within this industry in October 2018 in addition to reduced production in November 2018.

Another factor has been the mild winter which has reduced electricity and gas output. In many ways this is a good thing as lower demand means that restrictions are unlikely but it reduces the output numbers. This also is something which has continued up until now.

There remains a chilling kicker to all of this, however. If this is another cyclical downturn then it will be from a level well below the previous peak or we are in the lost decade zone.

Production and manufacturing output have risen since then but remain 6.5% and 2.0% lower, respectively, in the three months to November 2018 than the pre-downturn gross domestic product (GDP) peak in Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2008.

UK GDP

The headline was good.

Monthly gross domestic product (GDP) growth was 0.2% in November 2018, following flat growth in September 2018 and growth of 0.1% in October 2018.

Actually I doubt anyone really believes that UK economic growth has been picking up over this period as we get a real life demonstration of why the numbers are a bad idea. They are simply too erratic. If we look deeper we get a better idea of the trajectory from this.

UK gross domestic product (GDP) grew by 0.3% in the three months to November 2018.

This gives us two themes of which the first is that in international terms with many of the main European economies flirting with recession that is a good performance. It is also true that we have not escaped the chill winds as growth has slowed since the summer. I spotted an interesting perspective the other day which suggested that the boom in areas like cars had the UK at a relative disadvantage to places like Germany and we may now be in a phase where the UK is stronger but that remains to be seen.

As so often the growth mostly came from the services sector.

The services sector rolling three-month growth to November 2018 was 0.3%. Professional and scientific activities was the largest contributor, with a contribution of 0.14 percentage points to gross domestic product (GDP) growth. Other notable contributors were information and communication, and human health activities.

Tucked away in there may be another good effort by the UK film industry so whilst “luvvies” may be annoying please be nice to them as they have been playing a blinder in economic terms recently.

Construction

There was also some good news from this sector.

Construction output recorded an all-time level high in November 2018 in the chained volume measure seasonally adjusted series; the month-on-month series grew by 0.6%, resulting in the total value of construction output exceeding £14 billion for the first time since monthly records began in 2010.

So it is now in line with my Nine Elms crane count which is now 40. But this series has been unreliable after problems with the deflator and the switching of companies between it and services. So make of it what you will.

Trade

The problem with these so-called theme days for UK statistics is that we get too much information and some bits like the trade figures get ignored. Of course that may be the plan as they continue to be in deficit!

The total trade deficit (goods and services) narrowed £0.2 billion to £7.9 billion in the three months to November 2018 as both goods and services exports each increased £0.1 billion more than their respective imports.

There is something else troubling about the data which emphasises my theme that we know much less than we should about services trade.

The total UK trade deficit (goods and services) widened £4.1 billion to £28.6 billion in the 12 months to November 2018. The widening of the trade deficit was due mainly to a £4.4 billion narrowing in the trade in services surplus; the goods deficit narrowed by a lesser £0.3 billion.

We were told that our trade position in services had improved but that has then been more quietly revised away. For newer readers I made the point to the Sir Charlie Bean review of economic statistics that our data in this area was woeful. But nothing seems to have changed.

Comment

We find ourselves at something off a turning point but not the one that the media and chattering classes have obsessed about. In terms of today’s data Brexit is still in the distance but the world economic slow down is happening and seems set to impact more over the winter and into the spring. We should be grateful I think that we have retained at least some economic growth momentum as others look like they have lost it but these sort of slow downs tend to sing along with Muse.

Into the supermassive
Supermassive black hole
Supermassive black hole
Supermassive black hole
Supermassive black hole

So let us cross our fingers.

Andy Murray

Sad news about his injuries today so let me wish him well for the future as he has been a great champion and it may be a very long time before we see his like again.

Podcast

This week provides some answers to questions I have been asked.

Trade revisions post a warning for UK GDP

This morning has shown us that the way that the UK government deals with the private-sector has issues. From Reuters.

Interserve Plc’s (L:IRV) shares sank almost 60 percent in value on Monday after the British outsourcing company announced a rescue plan that was likely to see a big part of its debt converted into new equity, potentially handing control of the company to its creditors.

Interserve, which employs 75,000 worldwide and has thousands of UK government contracts to clean hospitals and serve school meals, said on Sunday it would seek to cut its debt to 1.5 times core earnings in a plan it hopes to finalise early next year.

I am not sure that the next bit inspires much confidence either.

Interserve Chief Executive Debbie White reiterated that the company’s fundamentals were strong and that the debt reduction plan, first raised in a refinancing in April, had the support of 10 Downing Street.

This provokes echoes of this from January.

Carillion was liquidated after contract delays and a slump in business left it swamped by debt and pensions liabilities., triggering Britain’s biggest corporate failure in a decade and forced the government to step in to guarantee public services from school meals to road works.

If we switch to the Financial Times what could go wrong with this bit?

 after moving into areas in which it had no expertise, including waste from energy plants and probation services.

It is hard not to feel that this particular company is yet another zombie that will be kept alive as another failure will be too embarrassing for the establishment. The share price is understandably volatile but at the time of typing had halved to a bit over 12 pence. This compares to the around £5 as we moved into 2016.

Also according to the FT there is something of a queue forming behind it.

The crisis at Interserve is the latest to hit Britain’s troubled outsourcing sector, with Kier, Capita and Mitie also seeking to rebuild their balance sheets. Kier, another construction and support services company, launched a £264m emergency rescue rights issue last month as it warned that lenders were seeking to cut their exposure to the sector. Kier, which employs 20,000 in the UK, emphasised that it needed the “proceeds on the group’s balance sheet by December 31 . . . in light of tighter credit markets”. It said its debt had increased from £186m in June to £624m at the end of October.

I do not know about you but debt trebling in a few months is something that is in financial terms terrifying.

Monthly GDP

This morning brought the latest in the UK’s monthly GDP reports and the opening salvo was better than what we have seen recently.

Monthly growth rose to 0.1% in October 2018, following flat growth in August and September 2018.

If we look into the detail we see that yet again this was driven by the service sector which on its own produced 0.2% growth in October. Here is some detail on this.

The professional, scientific and technical activities sector made the largest contribution to the month-on-month growth, contributing 0.11 percentage points.

However as it outperformed total GDP growth there had to be issues elsewhere and we find the main one in the production sector.

In October 2018, total production output fell by 0.6%, compared with September 2018, due to a fall of 0.9% in manufacturing; this was partially offset by a 1.8% increase in mining and quarrying.

Whether that number will prove to be a general standard I do not know but we do know production in Germany fell by 0.5% in October as we looked at that only on Friday. As for more detail there is this.

The monthly decrease in manufacturing output of 0.9% was due mainly to weakness from transport equipment, falling by 3.2% and pharmaceutical products, falling by 5.0%; 5 of the 13 manufacturing subsectors increased.

Anyone who has been following the news will not be surprised to see the transport sector lower as for example there was a move to a 3 day week for at least one of the Jaguar Land Rover factories. Regular readers will be aware that the pharmaceutical sector has regular highs and lows and recently June was a high and October a low as we wait for a more general pattern to emerge.

Maybe there was also some food for thought for Interserve and the like here.

Construction output decreased by 0.2% in October 2018

Quarterly GDP

The performance was more solid than you might have expected from the monthly data.

UK gross domestic product (GDP) grew by 0.4% in the three months to October 2018.

In case you were wondering how this happened? Here is the explanation.

While the three most recent monthly growths were broadly flat, the lower level in the base period gives a comparatively strong rolling three-month growth rate.

If we move forwards to the detail we see something that is rather familiar,

Rolling three-month growth in the services sector was 0.3% in October 2018, contributing 0.23 percentage points to GDP growth.

But this time around it was using the words of Andrew Gold much less of a lonely boy.

The production and construction sectors also had positive contributions, with rolling three-month growths of 0.3% and 1.2%, respectively.

If we start with the construction sector then this time around we start to wonder how some of the outsourcing companies we looked at above seemed to have done so badly at a time of apparent boom? Moving on to production.

Rolling three-month growth in the production industries was 0.3%, while in manufacturing industries growth was flat. Production growth was driven by broad-based increases within the sector.

Peering into the transport sector we get a rather chilling reminder of the past.

Three-months on a year ago growth for manufacture of transport equipment was negative 0.9%, the lowest growth rate since November 2009.

Returning to services we get a reminder that the transport sector can pop up here too.

 with a softening in services sector growth mainly due to a fall in car sales.

On the other side of the coin there were these areas.

Accounting contributed 0.08 percentage points to headline GDP growth, while computer programming contributed 0.07 percentage points.

Comment

We see that considering the international outlook the data so far shows the UK to be doing relatively well. An example of a comparison was the Bank of France reducing its estimate for quarterly GDP growth to 0.2% this morning. Sticking with the official mantra we have slowed overall but saw a small rebound in October. So far so good.

Less reassuring is the simply woeful state of the outsourcing sector which looks a shambles. Also there was something troubling in the revisions and updates to the trade figures which included this.

Removing the effect of inflation, the total trade deficit widened £3.0 billion in the three months to October 2018.

So we did well to show any growth at all in October but there was more.

The total trade deficit widened £5.4 billion in the 12 months to October 2018 due mainly to a £5.1 billion narrowing in the trade in services surplus.

It is nice of our official statisticians to confirm my long-running theme that we have at best a patchy knowledge of what is going on in terms of services trade, but not in a good way in terms of direction. This especially impacted in the quarter just gone.

In Quarter 3 2018, the total trade balance was revised downwards by £6.9 billion, due mainly to exports, which were revised down £5.9 billion; imports were revised up by £1.0 billion.

The goods deficit was revised downwards by £3.1 billion in Quarter 3 2018 as exports of goods were revised downwards by £2.0 billion and imports revised upwards by £1.1 billion.

This would be a rather large factor pushing us from growth to contraction but for two factors. One may wash out to some extent in other parts of the national accounts.

A large component of the revision to trade in goods in the most recent quarter was revisions to unspecified goods (including non-monetary gold).

You would think that movements in gold would be easy to account for. Silly me! Also we now get into the geek section which is that trade is in the expenditure version of the national accounts and it is the output version which is officially assumed to be the correct one. So numbers which suggest the UK may have contracted in Q3 are likely to perhaps drag growth slightly lower to 0.5% or 0.4% on the grounds that you cannot ignore them entirely as we sing along to Genesis one more time.

Too many men, there’s too many people
Making too many problems
And not much love to go round
Can’t you see this is a land of confusion ?

France does not like being told higher inflation is good for it

This weekend has seen a further escalation in the Gilet Jaune or yellow jacket protest in France. This has so unsettled Bloomberg that it is running a piece suggesting it could happen in the UK perhaps as a way of mollifying the bankers it has suggested should go to Paris. However, let us dodge the politics as far as we can as there is a much simpler economic focus and it is inflation. From the Financial Times.

Mr Macron introduced the increases in fuel taxes last year, as part of a package intended to attract investment and revitalise economic growth. They were also intended to support his ambition of setting France on course to ban sales of petrol and diesel cars by 2040. The tax is rising more sharply for diesel fuel, to bring it into line with the tax on petrol, as Mr Macron’s government argues that the advantage it has enjoyed is unjustified. Since the Volkswagen emissions scandal, it has become more widely accepted that diesel vehicles do not have the advantage in environmental impact over petrol engines, although manufacturers are still defending the technology.

Let us analyse what we have been told. How do you revitalise economic growth by raising costs via higher taxes? Perhaps if that was your intention via this move you would reduce taxes on petrol instead of at least reduce petrol taxes by the same amount you raise the diesel ones. As to the point about diesel engines I agree as I am the owner of what I was told was a clean diesel but has turned out to be something polluting both my and other Londoners lungs. Not President Macron’s fault of course as that was way before he came into power and of course he is the French President. But no doubt they encouraged purchases of diesel vehicles ( by the lower tax if nothing else) as we note that when the establishment is wrong it “corrects” matters by making the ordinary person pay. This especially hits people in rural France who rely on diesel based transport.

The details of the extra tax are show by Connexions France from October 2017.

Tax on diesel will rise 2.6 cents per litre every year for the next four years, after MPs voted in favour of the government’s draft budget for 2018.

As this from the BBC shows this is as well as higher taxes on petrol.

the Macron government raised its hydrocarbon tax this year by 7.6 cents per litre on diesel and 3.9 cents on petrol, as part of a campaign for cleaner cars and fuel.

The decision to impose a further increase of 6.5 cents on diesel and 2.9 cents on petrol on 1 January 2019 was seen as the final straw.

If we look at the November CPI data for France we see that it is at 1.9% but is being pulled higher by the energy sector which has annual inflation of 11.9%. In a piece of top trolling Insee tells us this.

After seven months of consecutive rise, energy prices should fall back, in the wake of petroleum product prices.

If we look at this via my inflation theme we see that as well as energy inflation being 11.3% that food inflation is 5%. So whilst central bankers may dismiss that as non-core and wonder what is going on? We can see perhaps why the ordinary person might think otherwise. Especially if they like carrots.

 Vegetable prices rose by 15.2% over one year with prices going up for salads (+15.6%), endives (+19.5%), carrots (+76.7%) and leeks (+54.2%). In contrast, tomato prices went down by 12.3% over one year.  ( Insee October agricultural prices)

Manufacturing

This morning saw the monthly series of Markit purchasing manager’s indices on manufacturing published.

November data pointed to the softest improvement in French manufacturing operating conditions for 26 months. The latest results reflected falling new orders and job shedding…….Manufacturing output was unchanged since October. That said, the latest reading represented stabilisation following a drop in production in the previous month.

It used to be the case that Markit was downbeat on France but these days it is very cheery. If we look at the last two months then production is lower as are jobs and new orders yet we are told this is an improvement! In reality the zone 49-51 represents unchanged and 50.8 is in that, although I do note that the 53.1 of the UK is apparently “lacklustre”. Anyway here is the view of the French situation.

However, any negativity towards unchanged output could be misplaced given it represented stabilisation after October’s decline.

Moving to prices they hinted that the protests might not be about to end any time soon.

On the price front, input costs continued to rise in
November. The rate of inflation was the strongest for nine
months, following two successive accelerations. Panellists
overwhelmingly blamed higher cost burdens on increased
raw material prices.
Survey respondents noted that part of the additional cost
burden was passed onto customers, with charges rising
solidly again in November.

Official data

On Friday we saw that September seems to have seen a slow down in the French economy.

In September 2018, the sales volume in overall trade fell back sharply (−2.1%) after an increase in August (+1.8%)…..In September 2018, the turnover turned down sharply in the manufacturing industry (−2.3%) after a strong increase in August (+2.8%). It also went down in industry as a whole (−1.9% after +2.8% in August)……In September 2018, output in services was stable after a strong increase in August (+2.9%).

As you can see all measures saw weakening in September and eyes will be on the services sector. This is because whilst the national accounts do not present it like this the 1% growth for the sector was what made it a better quarter. So let us also dig into the situation further.

According to business managers surveyed in November 2018, the business climate in services is stable. At 103, it remains above its long-term average (100).

Otherwise, the indicator of October 2018 has been revised downward by two points because of late businesses’ answers that have been taken into account.

Considering this revision, the turning point indicator stands henceforth in the area indicating an unfavourable short-term economic situation.

The Bank of France remains optimistic however.

According to the monthly index of business activity (MIBA),
GDP is expected to increase by 0.4% in the fourth
quarter of 2018 (first estimate).

Comment

We often discuss the similarities between France and the UK but the ECB has this morning given us another insight, as according to its capital key France is virtually unchanged in relative terms over the past five years if we look at GDP and population combined. I will leave readers to decide for themselves if the Euro area average is good or bad as you mull the official view.

 

Switching back to France it has not been a great year economy wise even if the Bank of France is correct about this quarter. But its establishment seems to be up to the games of those elsewhere whilst is to push its policies via punishment ( higher taxes ) rather than encouragement. These days though more have seen through this and hence the current troubles.

Weekly Podcast

Decision day and the Inflation Report arrive at the Bank of England

Today brings us to what is called Super Thursday as not only does the Bank of England announce its policy decision but we get the latest Inflation Report. Actually the Bank of England has already voted in a change decided upon by Mark Carney so that the official Minutes can be released with the decision. The problem with that comes from the issue that there is plenty of time for any decision to leak. That is on my mind this morning because markets have seen moves and activity.

Sterling extended its gains on Thursday……….

The pound jumped 0.9 percent to as high as $1.2881  sending the currency to a five-day high.

Against the euro, it rose to 88.155 pence per euro  before settling up half a percent at 88.21 pence. The gains follow a rise for sterling on Wednesday.

Now let me switch to interest-rate markets.

Short Sterling being hit in monster clips this morning 20k plus sells. ( @stewhampton)

For those unaware Short Sterling is the future contract for UK interest-rates and is somewhere where I worked back in the day in its options market. The confusing name comes I guess because they were trying to describe short-term interest-rates for sterling and it all got shortened. Anyway @stewhampton has continued.

Continuation of yesterday’s price action, all sells. Smacks of a surprise BOE vote on the hawkish side to me.

Looking at the actual movements we see that the contract for September 2019 was some 0.05 lower at the worst. For comparison an actual Bank of England move is usually 0.25%.

The Shadow MPC

The Times newspaper runs a Shadow Monetary Policy Committee so let us take a look at what it decided.

Sir John Gieve, Charles Goodhart and Andrew Sentance, all former Bank ratesetters, called on the monetary policy committee to increase rates after the £103 billion of fiscal loosening over six years unveiled in Monday’s budget.

Sir Steve Robson, a former Treasury mandarin, Geoff Dicks, a former member of the Office for Budget Responsibility, and Bronwyn Curtis, a non-executive member of the OBR, agreed. All six also cited the tight labour market, with unemployment at a 43-year low of 4 per cent, and rising wages.

On a personal note it is nice to see that Charles Goodhart is still active as he wrote a fair few of the books I read on UK monetary policy as an undergraduate. Also not many people call for a rise in interest-rates at their own semi-retirement party as Andrew Sentance did on Tuesday!

Before I move on I would also like to note that some seem to be catching up with a suggestion I first made in City-AM a bit over five years ago.

Of those who voted to hold rates, Rupert Pennant-Rea, a former deputy governor at the Bank, said that the MPC should start unwinding the £435 billion quantitative easing programme — signalling a bias on The Times panel for tighter policy.Ms Curtis and Sir Steve also called for QE to be wound down.

Decision Day

These are always rather fraught when there is the remote possibility that something may happen. Back in the day that usually meant an interest-rate change and moves were regularly larger which we returned to for a while with the cuts post credit crunch. These days it can also reflect a change in the rhetoric of the Bank of England as well as its Forward Guidance. That is of course if anyone takes much notice of the Forward Guidance which has been wrong more often than it has been right.

But you can have some humour as this from @RANSquawk shows.

Lloyds on – Prices have reversed from the 1.2660 range lows, back through 1.2850 resistance – This, along with momentum back in bull mode, supports our view for a move back towards the top of the 1.2660-1.3320 range

Yes now it has gone up the only way is up and you can guess which song has been linked to on social media.

Doubts

If we now look at the other side of the coin there have been other factors at play over the past 24 hours. First there was the announcement by Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab of progress followed this morning by this.

The UK has struck a deal with the EU on post-Brexit financial services, according to unconfirmed reports.

The Times newspaper said London had agreed in talks with Brussels to give UK financial services firms continued access to the bloc. ( BBC)

On this road we see reasons to be cheerful for the UK Pound £ and also a possible explanation for the lower short sterling. After all a Brexit deal and a likely stronger Pound £ might mean the Bank of England might raise interest-rates again at some future date. Of course we are building up something of a Fleetwood Mac style chain here as we are relying on the words of journalists about the acts of politicians influencing an unreliable boyfriend. Oh well.

House Prices

Having gone to so much effort to raise house prices for which during the tenure of Governor Carney the only way has indeed been up this will worry the Bank of England.

October saw a slowdown in annual house price growth to
1.6% from 2.0% in September. As a result, annual house
price growth moved below the narrow range of c2-3%
prevailing over the previous 12 months. Prices flat month-on-month after accounting for seasonal effects. ( Nationwide)

Reuters have implictly confirmed my point about Mark Carney’s tenure.

That was the weakest increase since May 2013, before Britain’s housing market started to throw off the after-effects of the global financial crisis.

Manufacturing

There was also a downbeat survey from Markit released at 9:30 am.

The seasonally adjusted IHS Markit/CIPS Purchasing
Managers’ Index® (PMI®) fell to a 27-month low of 51.1,
down from September’s revised reading of 53.6 (originally
published as 53.8).

Of course that 27-month low was when they got things really rather wrong after the EU Leave vote and perhaps most significantly helped trigger a Bank of England rate cut. As to factors here I think it is being driven by the automotive sector and the worries about trade generally. In some ways this measure has in fact been a sort of optimism/pessimism reading on views about Brexit.

One slightly odd feature of the report was this as we recall that a number above 50 is supposed to be an expansion and  after all they do measure down to 0.1.

At current levels, the survey indicates that factory output could contract in the fourth quarter, dropping by 0.2%

 

Comment

As you can see there is much for the Bank of England to consider this morning as they advance from a full English ( Scottish & Welsh versions are available) breakfast to morning coffee and biscuits. After all having voted last night there is not much to do until the press conference at 12:30 and less than half of them have to attend that. But as to a rate rise today I think it is time for some Oasis.

Definitely Maybe

Whilst some might say it is on the cards I think that if we add in the weak monetary data we have been watching in 2018 it would be an odd decision. After all it is promising to raise interest-rates like this.

As little by little we gave you everything you ever dreamed of
Little by little the wheels of your life have slowly fallen off
Little by little you have to give it all in all your life
And all the time I just ask myself why you’re really here?

But of course they have made odd decisions before………

Me on Core Finance TV

 

 

UK annual unsecured credit growth “slows” to 8.1%

Today brings us to the latest UK data on both the money supply and the manufacturing sector. Both of these are seeing developments. If we start with something which has boosted the UK money supply by some £445 billion there is of course the QE bond purchases of the Bank of England. Having given my thoughts on Friday here is David Smith of the Sunday Times who seems to have bought the Bank of England rhetoric hook,line and sinker. Firstly let me correct an early misconception.

At first, as in America, the process of running off QE assets is being achieved by not reinvesting the proceeds of maturing bonds.

That implies that the UK is no longer reinvesting its maturing Gilt holdings and if it were true would be a policy I support having originally suggested it some five years ago. This would, however be news to the Monetary Policy Committee.

The Committee also voted unanimously to maintain the stock of UK government bond purchases,

Moving back to how things might play out the musical theme is “Don’t Worry Be Happy” by Bobby McFerrin.

We are still, of course, some way away from the unwinding of the Bank’s £435bn of QE. It will not happen until interest rates reach 1.5%, and they are currently only half that level. It remains possible that, in the event of a rocky, no-deal Brexit, the Bank will think it is obliged to launch a further tranche of QE. But it will eventually be reversed. And there is no reason why we should be unduly worried about that.

So suddenly we are no longer reversing it, and we will not do so until Bank Rate reaches 1.5%. In case you are wondering if there is something especially significant about 1.5% there is not apart from the fact that the associated higher Gilt yields will mean a lower value for the holdings. Oh and we might get more! But don’t worry “it will eventually be reversed”  although using the strategy suggested, which of course has not started, it would not be until 2065.

As to what good it has done? We seem to just have to accept the line it has saved us.

any marginal increase in wealth inequality looks like a small price to pay for avoiding more serious economic damage and deflation.

Money Supply

This month’s data was a little bit of a curate’s egg but let us start with something that has become very familiar. From the Bank of England.

The annual growth rate of consumer credit slowed further in August, to 8.1%, reflecting weaker monthly lending flows. The annual growth rate was the lowest since August 2015, and well below the peak of 10.9% in November 2016. Within this, and consistent with lower monthly net flows over the past few months, other loans and advances growth fell to 7.7%, the lowest since December 2014. Credit card growth has been broadly stable for the past 18 months at close to 9%.

The official view can be seen quite clearly here, and if we take the £838 million of July and the £1118 million of August that is lower than the circa £1500 million previously. The catch is the annual growth rate of 8.1% as can anybody thing of anything else in the UK economy growing at that sort of rate? After all it compares with real wage growth which is somewhere around zero and an annual rate of economic growth of between 1% and 2%. Although I am reminded that Sir Dave Ramsden of the Bank of England called an annual growth rate of 8.3% “weak” earlier this year.

Also if you look at the date of the peak you see that the “Sledgehammer QE” and Bank Rate cut of August 2016 did seem to achieve something, which was a peak in unsecured borrowing. Oddly we do not see the Bank of England trying to bathe itself in this particular piece of glory…..

Mortgage Lending

This has been fairly stable for a while now. The Funding for Lending Scheme got net monthly lending positive in 2013 and since then both the banks and our central bank have been happy. At the moment we mostly see net lending of around £3 billion per month.

Lending to business

There are two clear trends here.Let me open by pointing out the impact of the Funding for Lending Scheme on the metric it was loudly proclaimed to influence.

Annual growth in lending to small and medium-sized businesses remained close to zero for the eighth consecutive month.

This has been the pattern since it began which is why the central banking version of the  nuclear deterrent or the word “counterfactual” has been deployed. It tells us that however bad things are they would have been worse otherwise, so things are in fact a success. If we look at the breakdown we see that of the £166 billion or so, some £50 billion is for real-estate as opposed to the £10 billion for manufacturing, which tells us something about the way the UK economic wind blows.

Another is that businesses are shifting away from banks which is a trend which would make my late father very happy if he was still with us.

Businesses can raise money by borrowing from banks or from financial markets (in the form of bonds, equity and commercial paper). The total amount outstanding of businesses’ borrowing from these sources increased by £3.2 billion in August. Within this, net finance raised from banks remained positive, but weak, at £1.0 billion.

Over the past six months the average raised from banks has been £1 billion but £1.5 billion has been raised from other sources of credit.

Money Supply

These are the curate’s egg part this month. This is because the actual monthly data was better.

The total amount of money held by UK households, businesses and non-intermediary other financial corporations (NIOFCs) (Broad money or M4ex) rose by £6.9 billion in August. This was above the £0.7 billion in July and the £2.6 billion average of the previous six months.

However the annual rate of M4ex fell to 2.8% which is poor and a further slowing. But if we look for perspective the problem months were July as you can see above and even more so June where it shrank by £2.6 billion. So we know the overall trend has been weak but we are a bit unsure about what is about to take place.

Manufacturing

There was some rather welcome news from this sector today as Markit published its PMI business survey.

Domestic market demand strengthened, while increased orders from North America and Europe helped new export
business stage a modest recovery from August’s
contraction. Business confidence also rose to a three-month
high.

The reading of 53.8 following an upwardly revised 53 for August shows some welcome growth and is rather different to the media perspective and coverage. Let us hope it bodes well.

Comment

The UK money supply data have been weak for a while now and on Friday we noted again that so has the economy.

Compared with the same quarter a year ago, the UK economy has grown by 1.2% – revised down slightly from the previously published 1.3%.

That makes the Bank Rate rise in August look even odder to me. Of course there is an exception which is unsecured credit which is charging along albeit not quite a fast as before. The total has now reached £214.2 billion.

We are left hoping that the better manufacturing surveys will add to the GDP data for July and give us if not the economic equivalent of the long hot summer at least some solid growth. After all clouds are gathering around at least some of Europe (Italy) if not its golfers.

Meanwhile our official statistician rather than working on known problems seem determined to produce numbers which are meaningless in my opinion.

In 2017, the UK’s real full human capital stock was £20.4 trillion, equivalent to just over 10 times the size of UK gross domestic product (GDP).

Perhaps there is a clue telling us where the author lives.

the average real human capital stock of those living in West Midlands fell the most, by 5% in 2017 to £568,168, the biggest drop in six years, reflecting negative real earnings growth. By contrast, the average real human capital stock of those living in East Midlands with a degree or higher qualification rose by 9% in 2017 to £564,790.

 

 

 

UK GDP growth accelerates past France and Italy

Today brings us the latest data on the UK economy or to be more specific the economic growth or Gross Domestic Product number for the second quarter of this year. If you are thinking that this is later than usual you are correct. The system changed this summer such that we now get monthly updates as well as quarterly ones. So a month ago we were told this.

The monthly GDP growth rate was flat in March, followed by a growth of 0.2% in April. Overall GDP growth was 0.3% in May.

So we knew the position for April and May earlier than normal (~17 days) but missing from that was June. We get the data for June today which completes the second quarter. As it happens extra attention has been attracted by the fact that the UK economy has appeared to be picking-up extra momentum. The monthly GDP numbers showed a rising trend but since then other data has suggested an improved picture too. For example the monetary trends seem to have stabilised a bit after falls and the Markit PMI business survey told us this.

UK points to a 0.4% rise in Q2 tomorrow, but that still makes the Bank of England’s recent rate rise look odd, even with the supposed reduced speed limit for the economy. Prior to the GFC, 56.5 was the all-sector PMI ‘trigger’ for rate hikes. July 2018 PMI was just 53.8 ( @WilliamsonChris _

As you can see they are a bit bemused by the behaviour of the Bank of England as well. If we look ahead then the next issue to face is the weaker level of the UK Pound £ against the US Dollar as we have dipped below US $1.28 today. This time it is dollar strength which has done this as the Euro has gone below 1.15 (1.145) but from the point of view of inflation prospects this does not matter as many commodities are priced in US Dollars. I do not expect the impact to be as strong as last time as some prices did not fall but via the impact of higher inflation on real wages this will be a brake on the UK economy as we head forwards.

Looking Ahead

Yesterday evening the Guardian published this.

Interest rates will stay low for 20 years, says Bank of England expert

Outgoing MPC member Ian McCafferty predicts rates below 5% and wages up 4%

The bubble was rather punctured though by simpleeconomics in the comments section.

Considering the BoE track record on forecasting I think we should take this with a massive pinch of salt. They often get the next quarter wrong so no hope for 20 years time.

The data

As ever we should not place too much importance on each 0.1% but the number was welcome news.

UK GDP grew by 0.4% in Quarter 2 (April to June) 2018.The rate of quarterly GDP growth picked up from growth of 0.2% in Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2018.

As normal if there was any major rebalancing it was towards the services sector.

Services industries had robust growth of 0.5% in Quarter 2 (Apr to June) 2018, which contributed 0.42 percentage points to overall gross domestic product (GDP) growth.

The areas which did particularly low are shown below.

 Retail and wholesale trade were the largest contributors to growth, at 0.11 percentage points and 0.05 percentage points respectively. Computer programming had a growth of 1.9%, contributing 0.05 percentage points to headline gross domestic product (GDP).

There was also some much better news from the construction sector and even some rebalancing towards it.

Growth of 0.9% in construction also contributed positively to GDP growth.

Although of course these numbers have been in disarray demonstrated by the fact that the latest set of “improvements” are replacing the “improvements” of a couple of years or so ago. Perhaps they have switched a business from the services sector to construction again ( sorry that;s now 3 improvements).So Definitely Maybe. Anyway I can tell you that there are now 40 cranes between Battersea Dogs Home and Vauxhall replacing the 25 when I first counted them.

Today’s sort of humour for the weekend comes from the area to which according to Baron King of Lothbury we have been rebalancing towards.

However, contraction of 0.8% in the production industries contributed negatively to headline GDP growth…….

Manufacturing fell by 0.9% although there is more to this as I will come to in a moment.

Monthly GDP

You might have assumed that the June number would be a good one but in fact it was not.

GDP increased by 0.1% in June 2018

If we look into the detail we see that contrary to expectations there was no services growth at all in June. Such growth as there was come from the other sectors and construction had a good month increasing by 1.4%. I did say I would look at manufacturing again and it increased by 0.4% in June which follows a 0.6% increase in May. So we have an apparent pick-up in the monthly data as the quarterly ones show that it is in a recession with two drops in a row. Thus it looks as if the dog days of earlier this year may be over,

This leaves us with the problem of recording zero services growth in June. The sectors responsible for pulling the number lower are shown below.

The professional, scientific and technical activities sector decreased by 1.0% and contributed negative 0.10 percentage points. ……The other notable sector fall was wholesale, retail and motor trades, which decreased by 0.6% and contributed negative 0.08 percentage points.

The decline of the retail trade whilst the football world cup was on seems odd. Also there overall number completely contradicts the PMI survey for June which at 55.1 was strong. So only time will tell except Bank of England Governor Mark Carney may need its barman to mix his Martini early today as he mulls the possibility that he has just raised interest-rates into a service-sector slow down.

One consistent strong point in the numbers in recent times has carried on at least.

There was also a rise in motion pictures, increasing by 5.8% and contributing 0.05 percentage points.

So we should all do our best to be nice to any luvvies we come across.

Comment

We should welcome the improved quarterly numbers as GDP growth of 0.4% is double that of both France and Italy and is double the previous quarter. However whilst the monthly numbers do provide some extra insight into manufacturing as the recessionary quarterly data looks like a dip which is already recovering the services numbers are odd. I fear that one of my warnings about monthly GDP numbers are coming true as it seems inconsistent with other numbers to say we picked up well in May but slowed down in June. If we look at the services sector alone and go back to February 2017 we are told this happened in the subsequent months, -0.1%,0.3%-0.1%,0.3% which I think speaks for itself.

We also got an update on the trade figures which have a good and a bad component so here is the good.

The total UK trade deficit (goods and services) narrowed £6.2 billion to £25.0 billion in the 12 months to June 2018. The improvement was driven by both exports of goods and services increasing by more than their respective imports.

Next the bad.

The total UK trade deficit widened £4.7 billion to £8.6 billion in the three months to June 2018, due mainly to falling goods exports and rising goods imports.

If you want a one word summary of out recorded trade position then it is simply deficit. Although currently we are looking rather like France in terms of patterns as a reminder that some trends are more than domestic.