Japan and Korea have chosen a bad time to fire up their own trade war

This is a story influenced by a brewing trade war but not the one that you might think. It is between Japan and Korea and the latest phase started in July when Japan imposed restrictions on trade with Korea for 3 chemicals. This gets more significant when you realise that they are crucial for smartphones ( displays on particular) and that according to CNBC Japan is responsible for 90% of the world’s supply of them. This affects quite of bit of Korean industry with Samsung being the headliner. Them Japan dropped Korea from its whitelist of trusted trading partners making trade more difficult before Korea did the same.

According to Bloomberg Citigroup have tried to downplay this today but I note these bits of it.

Meanwhile, boycotts in South Korea have led to a plunge in sales of Japanese consumer goods and a decrease in tourists to Japan, who may have decided to travel domestically instead, according to Citi………Last month, South Korean exports to Japan fell 14 percent, while imports from Japan slid 23 percent. South Korea’s trade ministry attributed the declines to industrial factors rather than trade actions.

Ah an official denial! We know what that means.

The issue has deep roots in the past and the Japanese occupation of the Korean peninsula a century ago as well as its later use of Korean “comfort women.” That explains the Korean issue with Japan and on the other side the Japanese consider themselves superior to Koreans and in my time there were quite open about it. Whilst he initially made moves to calm the situation there was always going to be an issue with a nationalistic politician like  Shinzo Abe running Japan.But let us move on noting that both countries will be experiencing an economic brake.

Japan Economic Growth

Let me hand you over to The Japan Times which gives us the position and some perspective.

In the third quarter the world’s third-largest economy grew an annualized 0.2 percent, slowing sharply from a revised 1.8 percent expansion in April to June, according to preliminary gross domestic product data released by the government Thursday.

It fell well short of a median market forecast for a 0.8 percent gain, and marked the weakest growth since a 2.0 percent contraction in the July-September period last year.

So over the past six months Japan has grown by 0.5% and we also get an idea of the erratic nature of economic growth there.This is partly due to the way that Japan does not conform to stereotype as it has struggled more than elsewhere to measure GDP. Partly due to last year’s third quarter drop. annual growth has picked up to 1.3% but that looks like being the peak.

Why? Well the 0.2% growth was driven by a 0.9% rise in domestic demand ( both numbers are annualised) just in time for the consumption tax to be raised. Actually private consumption was up 1.4% in the quarter suggesting that purchases were being made ahead of the rise.

At the end of last month this was reinforced by this.

The Consumer Confidence Index (seasonally adjusted series) in October 2019 was 36.2, up 0.6 points from the previous month.

Yes it was up but you see the number had fallen from around 44 at the opening of 2018 and these are the lowest readings since 2011.

Korea Economic Growth

Real gross domestic product (chained volume measure of GDP) grew by 0.4 percent in the third quarter of 2019 compared to the previous quarter……Real GDP (chained volume measure of GDP) increased by 2.0 percent year on
year in the third quarter of 2019.

In a broad sweep this means that economic growth has been slowing as it was 3.2% in 2017 and 2.7% in 2018. Rather unusually Korea saw strong export growth especially of we look at what was exported.

Exports increased by 4.1 percent, as exports of goods such as motor vehicles and semiconductors expanded. Imports were up by 0.9 percent, owing to increased imports of transportation equipment.

Also manufacturing grew.

Manufacturing rose by 2.1 percent, mainly due to an increase in computer, electronic and optical products.

However the economy has been slowing and if either of those reverse will slow even more quickly. Back on the 18th of October we noted this response.

The Monetary Policy Board of the Bank of Korea decided today to lower the Base Rate by 25 basis points, from 1.50% to 1.25%.

This was more of an external rather than an internal move as last week we learnt this.

During September 2019 Narrow Money (M1, seasonally adjusted, period-average) increased by 0.6% compared to the previous month.

So whilst it had been weak as annual growth was 3.3% in June it has risen since to 5% which is slightly above the average for 2018.

However they could cut on inflation grounds as this from Korea Statistics shows.

The Consumer Price Index was 105.46(2015=100) in October 2019. The index increased 0.2 percent from the preceding  month and was unchanged from the same month of the previous year.

According to the Bank of Korea the outlook is for more of the same.

 The Producer Price Index increased by 0.1% month-on-month in September 2019 – in year-on-year terms it decreased by 0.7%.

Exchange Rate

This is at 10.68 Won to the Yen as I type this and is up over 7% over the past year. So an additional factor in the situation will be that the Korean’s have been winning the currency war. This of course, will be annoying for Shinzo Abe who’s Abenomics programme set out to weaker the Japanese Yen. As we stand Korea has an official interest-rate some 1.35% higher so there is not a lot the Bank of Japan can do about this.

Comment

As we stand it initially looks as if Korea will be the relative winner here.

“Domestic demand had made up for some of the weakness in external demand, but we can’t count on this to continue,” said Taro Saito, executive research fellow at NLI Research Institute.

“A contraction in October-December GDP is a done deal. The economy may rebound early next year, but will lack momentum.” ( Japan Times)

But the argument it is in a stronger position weakens somewhat if we switch to its Gross National Income.

Real gross domestic income (GDI) increased by 0.1 percent compared to the previous quarter.

Over the past year it has gone on a quarterly basis -0.3%,0.2%,-0.7% and now 0.1%.

Korea is looking to use fiscal policy to stimulate its economy which sets it in the opposite direction to the consumption tax rise in Japan. But as they use a time of trouble to posture and scrap let us look at something that they share.

Korea’s potential output growth is expected to fall further in the long term, as the productive population declines in line with population aging and the low fertility rate……In addition, it is necessary to slow down the decline in labor supply resulting from population aging and the low birth rate, through policy efforts including encouraging women and young people to participate in economic activities and coping actively with the low birth rate. ( Bank of Korea Working Paper )

I wonder what the latter bit really means?

Meanwhile this is the last thing Japan needs right now.

(Reuters) – Japan’s Nissan Motor Co Ltd (7201.T) has said it is recalling 394,025 cars in the United States over a braking system defect, causing concerns that a brake fluid leak could potentially lead to a fire.

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What is the outlook for the US economy?

We see plenty of rhetoric about challenges and changes but the two biggest players in the world economy are the United States and the US Dollar. So it is time for us to peer under the bonnet again and let me open with the result from the third quarter.

Real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 1.9 percent in the third quarter of 2019 , according to the “advance” estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the second quarter, real GDP increased 2.0 percent. ( BEA )

There are several implications here of which the first is simply that this is better than we are seeing in most places with Germany and Japan reporting growth rates much lower in the last 24 hours. In general this is , however, weaker than last year although the last quarter of 2018 was particularly weak.

A supporting element for the US has been a strong labour market.

 Real disposable personal income increased 2.9 percent, compared with an increase of 2.4 percent.

Has the easier fiscal policy of President Trump been a factor? Yes but we simply get told this.

federal government spending,

If we shift to a potential consequence which is rising debt well actually the ability of the US to repay it looks strong too.

Current dollar GDP increased 3.5 percent, or $185.6 billion, in the third quarter to a level of $21.53 trillion. In the second quarter, GDP increased 4.7 percent, or $241.4 billion.

As you can see there has been an element of inflating away the debt in there.

What happens next?

The now cast system uses the latest official data to look ahead and just like last year it looks like being a weak end to the year.

The New York Fed Staff Nowcast stands at 0.7% for 2019:Q4.

News from this week’s data releases decreased the nowcast for 2019:Q4 by 0.1 percentage point.

Negative surprises from lower than expected exports and imports data accounted for most of the decrease.

Another factor in play is that the labour market is not providing the push it was.

Earnings growth is still below late 2018 levels……Payroll growth was moderate in October, but remained solid year-to-date.

Money Supply

Back on the 22nd February I posted my concerns about the prospects for 2019.

So we can expect a slowing economic effect from it as we note that some of the decline will be due to the QT programme…….So we move on with noting that a monetary brake for say the first half of 2019 has been applied to the economy.

Of course that was then and this is now as the reference to the now ended QT programme. For example this happened at the end of last month.

the Committee decided to lower the target range for the federal funds rate to 1-1/2 to 1-3/4 percent.

Yesterday saw Repo operations from the New York Fed which provided some US $73.6 billion of overnight liquidity and US $30.7 billion of 13 day liquidity. Thus the cash is flowing rather than being reduced and like so many things what was presented as temporary seems to keep going.

In accordance with the most recent FOMC directive, the Desk will continue to offer at least $35 billion in two-week term repo operations twice per week and at least $120 billion in daily overnight repo operations.

The Desk will also offer three additional term repo operations during this calendar period with longer maturities that extend past the end of 2019.  ( NY Fed )

That is for the next month and there will be more to come as they catch up with something we have been looking at for a couple of years now which is the year end demand for US Dollars.

These additional operations are intended to help offset the reserve effects of sharp increases in non-reserve liabilities later this year and ensure that the supply of reserves remains ample during the period through year end.

Returning to the money supply data you will not be surprised to read that the numbers have improved considerably. The outright fall of US $42 billion in the narrow money measure in March has been replaced by growth and indeed strong growth as both the last 3 months and 6 months have seen growth at an annual rate of the order of 8%. Back in February I noted that cash growth was strong and it was demand deposits which were weak and it is really the latter which have turned around. Demand deposits totalled US $1.45 trillion in March but had risen to US $1.57 trillion at the end of October.

Talk of the demise of what Stevie V called

Dirty cash I want you, dirty cash I need you, woh-oh
Money talks, money talks
Dirty cash I want you, dirty cash I need you, woh-oh

continues which is rather the opposite of official rhetoric.

Thus a monetary stimulus has been applied and for those of you who like to look at this in real terms might now that the inflation measures in GDP have faded making the impetus stronger for say the opening and spring of 2020.

Have the Repo operations influenced this? If you look at the September data I think that they have. But this comes with a cautionary note as QE operations do not flow into the monetary data as obviously as you might think and at times in the Euro area for example have perhaps taken quite a while.

Credit

By contrast a bit of a brake was applied in September.

Consumer credit increased at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5 percent during the third quarter. Revolving credit increased at an annual rate of 2-1/4 percent, while nonrevolving credit increased at an annual rate of 6 percent. In September, consumer credit increased at an annual rate of 2-3/4 percent.

Those sort of levels would have the Bank of England at panic stations. It makes me wonder if fears over the financial intermediation of the banks was a factor in the starting of Repo operations?

If you are wondering if car loans are a factor here we only get quarterly data and as of the end of the third quarter the annual rate of growth was 4.3% so definitely, maybe.

The US Dollar

The official view is expressed like this.

NEW YORK (Reuters) – President Donald Trump on Tuesday renewed his criticism of the Federal Reserve’s raising and then cutting of interest rates, saying the central bank had put the United States at a competitive disadvantage with other countries and calling for negative interest rates.

He wants lower interest-rates and a lower US Dollar. What we have seen is a trade-weighted index which has risen from 116 in February of last year to above 129 as I type this. So not much luck for the Donald

Comment

As you can see things are better than some doom mongers would have us believe. The monetary situation has picked up albeit with weaker consumer credit and there is the fiscal stimulus. But that is too late for this quarter and there are ongoing issues highlighted by the weak data we have seen out of China this week which the New York Fed summarises like this.

China’s monthly economic activity data is steady at a lower level.

Then there is the ongoing sequence of interest-rate cuts around the world which rose by 2 yesterday as Mexico and Egypt got on the bandwagon. That makes 770 for the credit crunch era now.

Meanwhile for those who have equities the Donald thinks that life is good.

Hit New Stock Market record again yesterday, the 20th time this year, with GREAT potential for the future. USA is where the action is. Companies and jobs are coming back like never before!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Germany escapes recession for now but what happens next?

This morning has brought the economics equivalent of a cliffhanger as we waiting to see if Germany was now in recession or had dodged it. The numbers were always going to be tight. so without further ado let me hand you over to Destatis.

WIESBADEN – In the third quarter of 2019, the price-adjusted gross domestic product in Germany increased by 0.1% on the second quarter of 2019, after adjustment for seasonal and calendar variations.

So Germany has avoided what has become called the technical definition of recession which is two quarters of contraction in a row. However there was a catch.

According to the most recent calculations, taking into account newly available statistical information, the GDP was down 0.2% in the second quarter of 2019, which is 0.1 percentage points more than first published.

So like the UK the German economy shrank by 0.2% in the second quarter which means that over the half-year the economy was 0.1% smaller. Putting it another way the economy was at 107.20 at the end of the first quarter and at 107.03 at the end of the third quarter.

Just to add to the statistical party the first quarter saw growth revised higher to 0.5% so we have a pattern similar to the UK just weaker. As to the detail for the latest quarter we are told this.

positive contributions in the third quarter of 2019 mainly came from consumption, according to provisional calculations. Compared with the second quarter of 2019, household final consumption expenditure increased, and so did government final consumption expenditure. Exports rose, while imports remained roughly at the level of the previous quarter. Also, gross fixed capital formation in construction was up on the previous quarter. Gross fixed capital formation in machinery and equipment, however, was lower than in the previous quarter.

As you can see it was consumption which did the job which was presumably driven by the employment figures which remain strong.

Compared with September 2018, the number of persons in employment increased by 0.7% (+327,000). The year-on-year change rate had been 1.2% in December 2018, 1.1% in January 2019 and 0.8% in August 2019.

So rising employment albeit at a slowing rate and with it looks as though there has been solid real wage growth too.

 In calendar adjusted terms, the costs of gross earnings in the second quarter of 2019 rose by 3.2% year on year,

At that point inflation had slowed to 1.5% so as far as we know there has been both employment and real wage growth. So we might have expected consumption growth to be higher than it has been.

We are in awkward territory with the mention of exports because they do not count in the output version of GDP as they are sales hence they go in the expenditure version. So we look at production for overseas sales which is problematic as shown below.

Based on provisional data, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that German exports increased by 4.6% and imports by 2.3% in September 2019 year on year. After calendar and seasonal adjustment, exports were up 1.5% and imports 1.3% compared with August 2019.

But whilst that is good GDP counts this.

In September 2019, production in industry was down by 0.6% on the previous month and -4.3% on the same month a year earlier (price and calendar adjusted)

Now production is not the only source for exports as services are not in it but services will have had to had been booming so we need more information I think.

Statistical Humility

The analysis of GDP numbers to 0.1% is something I have warned about before. Let me illustrate with this from Sweden Statistics earlier.

Statistics Sweden is publishing revised statistics on the Labour Force Surveys (LFS) for the period July 2018 to September 2019, in which only half of the sample is used, due to an earlier identification of quality deficiencies……..this increases the uncertainty, particularly at a more disaggregated level.

You can say that again! Or to put it another way the unemployment rate of 7.4% in September is now reported as 6.6%. Now we all make mistakes and honesty is the best policy but an error of this size begs so many questions. It reminds me of the mistake made in Japan over the measurement of real wages which was in the same direction although of course had the opposite implication for the economy.

Whilst neither example was about GDP the same principles hold and in the case of Sweden I think the mistake is worse because unemployment is a much simpler concept.

Looking Ahead

This could not have been much more negative.

Business confidence across the German private sector
has slipped to the lowest since the global financial crisis,
according to the latest IHS Markit Global Business
Outlook survey. Output of goods and services is on
average expected to fall slightly over the next 12 months,
while firms have signalled their intention to cut
workforce numbers for the first time in ten years.
Concerns about future profits are meanwhile reflected
in a negative outlook for capital spending (capex).

Now Markit have not had a good run on Germany as they have signalled growth when there has not been any so I am not sure where this takes us? Where there might be some traction is in this bit as we have noted already that employment growth is slowing.

now these latest figures point to private sector workforce numbers actually falling over the coming year.

As to other areas the example is mixed. For now the news seems bad and you will have probably guessed the area.

“By the end of 2022, Mercedes-Benz Cars plans to save more than 1 billion euros in personnel costs. To this end, jobs are to be reduced,” the company said in a statement.

“The expanded range of plug-in hybrids and all-electric vehicles is leading to cost increases that will have a negative impact on Mercedes-Benz Cars’ return on sales,” it added. ( thelocal.de )

Looking further ahead there is potentially some better news on the horizon.

Tesla’s chief executive, Elon Musk, has said Berlin will be the site of its first major European factory as the carmaker’s expansion plans power ahead.

“Berlin rocks,” Mr Musk said, adding Tesla would build an engineering and design centre in the German capital.

Tesla previously said it aimed to start production in Europe in 2021.

The moves come as the firm, which has also invested heavily in a Chinese factory, faces intensifying competition in the electric vehicle industry.

Comment

Let me start with this just released by the Financial Times.

Learning to love negative interest rates……..As evidence accumulates the naysayers case becomes less convincing.

So Germany should be booming right? After all it not only has an official deposit rate of -0.5% but it also has a benchmark bond yield of -0.3%. Yet the economy had a burst of growth and has now pretty much stagnated for a year. So actually it is the case for negative interest-rates which has got weaker. No doubt more of the same “medicine” will be prescribed.

We find ourselves observing what has become a two-speed economy where the services sector is struggling to make up for the declines in the manufacturing sector or if you like they are turning British. There are deeper questions here as for example how much manufacturing will remain in the West?

Also the money supply situation which has been helpful so far in 2019 may be turning lower for the Euro area as a whole.

Annual growth rate of narrower monetary aggregate M1, comprising currency in circulation and overnight deposits, decreased to 7.9% in September from 8.5% in August.

So for now there is not much sign of a turn for the better and if we stick to annual GDP growth as our measure that will be focused on the first quarter next year as there is a 0.5% reading to be replaced.  Germany must have its fingers crossed for the end of the trade war.

The Investing Channel

 

 

Where will Christine Lagarde lead the ECB?

We find ourselves in a new era for monetary policy in the Euro area and it comes in two forms. The first is the way that the pause in adding to expansionary monetary policy which lasted for all of ten months is now over. It has been replaced by an extra 20 billion Euros a month of QE bond purchases and tiering of interest-rates for the banking sector. The next is the way that technocrats have been replaced by politicians as we note that not only is the President Christine Lagarde the former Finance Minister of France the Vice-President Luis de Guindos is the former Economy Minister of Spain. So much for the much vaunted independence!

Monetary Policy

In addition to the new deposit rate of -0.5% Mario Draghi’s last policy move was this.

The Governing Council decided to restart net purchases under each constituent programme of the asset purchase programme (APP), i.e. the public sector purchase programme (PSPP), the asset-backed securities purchase programme (ABSPP), the third covered bond purchase programme (CBPP3) and the corporate sector purchase programme (CSPP), at a monthly pace of €20 billion as from 1 November 2019.

It is the online equivalent of a bit of a mouthful and has had a by now familiar effect in financial markets. Regular readers will recall mt pointing out that the main impact comes before it happens and we have seen that again. If we use the German ten-year yield as our measure we saw it fall below -0.7% in August and September as hopes/expectations of QE rose but the reality of it now sees the yield at -0.3%. So bond markets have retreated after the pre-announcement hype.

As to reducing the deposit rate from -0.4% to -0.5% was hardly going to have much impact so let us move into the tiering which is a way of helping the banks as described by @fwred of Bank Pictet.

reduces the cost of negative rates from €8.7bn to €5.0bn (though it will increase in 2020) – creates €35bn in arbitrage opportunities for Italian banks – no signs of major disruption in repo, so far.

Oh and there will be another liquidity effort or TLTRO-III but that will be in December.

There is of course ebb and flow in financial markets but as we stand things have gone backwards except for the banks.

The Euro

If we switch to that we need to note first that the economics 101 theory that QE leads to currency depreciation has had at best a patchy credit crunch era. But over this phase we see that the Euro has weakened as its trade weighted index was 98.7 in mid-August compared to the 96.9 of yesterday. As ever the issue is complex because for example my home country the UK has seen a better phase for the UK Pound £ moving from 0.93 in early August to 0.86 now if we quote it the financial market way.

The Economy

The economic growth situation has been this.

Seasonally adjusted GDP rose by 0.2% in the euro area (EA19…….Compared with the same quarter of the previous year, seasonally adjusted GDP rose by 1.1% in the euro area in the third quarter of 2019 ( Eurostat)

As you can see annual economic growth has weakened and if we update to this morning we were told this by the Markit PMI business survey.

The IHS Markit Eurozone PMI® Composite
Output Index improved during October, but
remained close to the crucial 50.0 no-change mark.
The index recorded 50.6, up from 50.1 in
September and slightly better than the earlier flash
reading of 50.2, but still signalling a rate of growth
that was amongst the weakest seen in the past six and-a-half years.

As you can see there was a small improvement but that relies on you believing that the measure is accurate to 0.5 in reality. The Markit conclusion was this.

The euro area remained close to stagnation in
October, with falling order books suggesting that
risks are currently tilted towards contraction in the
fourth quarter. While the October PMI is consistent
with quarterly GDP rising by 0.1%, the forward looking data points to a possible decline in economic output in the fourth quarter.

As you can see this is not entirely hopeful because the possible 0.1% GDP growth looks set to disappear raising the risk of a contraction.

I doubt anyone will be surprised to see the sectoral breakdown.

There remained a divergence between the
manufacturing and service sectors during October.
Whereas manufacturing firms recorded a ninth
successive month of declining production, service
sector companies indicated further growth, albeit at
the second-weakest rate since January.

Retail Sales

According to Eurostat there was some good news here.

In September 2019 compared with August 2019, the seasonally adjusted volume of retail trade increased by 0.1% in the euro area (EA19). In September 2019 compared with September 2018, the calendar adjusted retail sales index increased by 3.1% in the euro area .

The geographical position is rather widespread from the 5.2% annual growth of Ireland to the -2.7% of Slovakia. This is an area which has been influenced by the better money supply growth figures of 2019. This has been an awkward area as they have often been a really good indicator but have been swamped this year by the trade and motor industry problems which are outside their orbit. Also the better picture may now be fading.

Annual growth rate of narrower monetary aggregate M1, comprising currency in circulation and overnight deposits, decreased to 7.9% in September from 8.5% in August.

In theory it should rally due to the monthly QE but in reality it is far from that simple as M1 growth picked up after the last phase of QE stopped.

Comment

As you can see there are a lot of challenges on the horizon for the ECB just at the time its leadership is most ill-equipped to deal with them. A sign of that was this from President Lagarde back in September.

“The ECB is supporting the development of such a taxonomy,” Lagarde said. “Once it is agreed, in my view it will facilitate the incorporation of environmental considerations in central bank portfolios.” ( Politico EU)

Fans of climate change policies should be upset if they look at the success record of central banks and indeed Madame Lagarde. More prosaically the ECB would be like a bull in a China shop assuming it can define them in the first place.

More recently President Lagarde made what even for her was an extraordinary speech.

There are few who have done so much for Europe, over so long a period, as you, Wolfgang.

This was for the former German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schauble. Was it the ongoing German current account surplus she was cheering or the heading towards a fiscal one as well? Perhaps the punishment regime for Greece?

As to the banks there were some odd rumours circulating yesterday about Deutsche Bank. We know it has a long list of problems but as far as I can tell it was no more bankrupt yesterday than a month ago. Yet there was this.

Mind you perhaps this is why Germany seems to be warming towards a European banking union…..

Trouble is brewing at the ECB

Sometimes what are presented as events in the news cycle that are unrelated are in fact significant. So let me draw to your attention some tweets from Bloomberg yesterday evening.

BREAKING: Sabine Lautenschlaeger resigned from the ECB Executive Board more than 2 years before the official end of her term.

This is a significant event in several ways. Firstly why leave such a prestigious job? Also in the structure of the ECB an executive board member is more powerful than a central bank governor. This is because they vote at every policy meeting whereas central bank governors now rotate For example I quoted from a speech yesterday from the Governor of the Bank of France Francois Villeroy where he declared his views on the recent policy change at the ECB. But whilst he was present at the meeting he did not have a vote. One of the quirks of the 2019 calendar is that the President of the Bundesbank will not be voting at three meetings but the Governor of the Bank of Malta will vote at all but one.

If you think about it the power of the President of the ECB was raised by the rotation of voting rights of central bank Governors as he or as it will soon be she can choose when to bring a vote.

Moving back to Sabine Bloomberg carried on.

MORE: The shock move that comes amid the biggest dissent over monetary policy in Mario Draghi’s tenure. The German policymaker is stepping down on Oct. 31 and the ECB gave no reason for her decision.

Then they tried to put some more meat on that particular bone.

Latest: Sabine Lautenschlaeger’s surprise exit from the ECB follows a trend of early exits by German policy makers. Her move echos the frustrations of the savings-oriented nation with loose policies by the central bank.

Missing from that description is the fact that Sabine will be resigning just as Christine Lagarde starts. I do not know about you but that seems rather significant. Whilst it seems likely that Sabine has not agreed with some and maybe many of the policies of Mario Draghi it is noticeable that she is serving his full term and departing before the arrival of Lagarde. Something that those who have been accusing her of flouncing out of the ECB might do well to consider.

A German Issue

There is of course a long-running one which bond vigilantes on Twitter have highlighted this morning.

Headlines in Munich this morning: German savings banks (Sparkassen) are closing client accounts as they can’t afford to pay interest on them with negative @ecb  rates.

 

Money Supply

These numbers should be welcomed at the Frankfurt towers of the ECB but I suspect it may well follow the phrase used on BBC TV of “look away now”.

Annual growth rate of narrower monetary aggregate M1, comprising currency in circulation and overnight deposits, increased to 8.4% in August from 7.8% in July.

So my signal for short-term monetary trends is looking stronger which continues the pattern we have seen this year so far. For newer readers narrow money changes tend to impact the economy some 3-6 months ahead. Putting it another way we have gone back to February 2018 as that is when annual growth was last at this level.

If we look back to the “Euro boom” we see that M1 growth peaked at 11.7% in July 2015 as the impacts of large-scale QE and negative interest-rates arrived and then faded away to single digits of 8% and 9%. So we are at the bottom of that range. This of course poses a real question for the change of ECB policy and makes me wonder again about the resignation above.

Broad Money

We saw a similar drumbeat from these numbers earlier.

Annual growth rate of broad monetary aggregate M3, increased to 5.7% in August 2019 from 5.1% in July (revised from 5.2%).

There is a similar pattern here of improving numbers in 2019 and we are quite some distance away from the recent low which was 3.5% in August 2018. But there is a further twist as we note that the number is now higher than at any phase in the “Euro boom” phase.

As to the detail it is M1 dominated as you might expect.

The annual growth rate of the broad monetary aggregate M3 increased to 5.7% in August 2019 from 5.1% in July, averaging 5.1% in the three months up to August. The components of M3 showed the following developments. The annual growth rate of the narrower aggregate M1, which comprises currency in circulation and overnight deposits, increased to 8.4% in August from 7.8% in July. The annual growth rate of short-term deposits other than overnight deposits (M2-M1) increased to 1.0% in August from 0.1% in July. The annual growth rate of marketable instruments (M3-M2) was -2.9% in August, compared with -1.6% in July.

We have some growth as we move broader but not much and we see that the widest part fell. So there is a fly in the ointment but it is also true that there was a large wadge of ointment this month.

There is another way of looking at the numbers and let me first state that using such analysis in the UK went dreadfully wrong a couple of decades or so ago.

 the annual growth rate of M3 in August 2019 can be broken down as follows: credit to the private sector contributed 3.4 percentage points (up from 3.2 percentage points in July), net external assets contributed 3.0 percentage points (up from 2.9 percentage points), credit to general government contributed -0.2 percentage point (as in the previous month), longer-term financial liabilities contributed -1.0 percentage point (up from -1.1 percentage points), and the remaining counterparts of M3 contributed 0.5 percentage point (up from 0.3 percentage point).

The concern in this area is the contribution of money flows from abroad to the growth seen.

The Euro

This is drifting lower at the moment and is 1.093 versus the US Dollar as I type this. Much of this is a phase of “Holla Dolla(r)” because it has been rising generally but that suits the ECB, Putting it another way there has been very little movement this week versus the UK Pound as I set a benchmark at 1.131 before the Supreme Court decision in the UK as opposed to the 1.126 as I type this.

Comment

When I see the monetary numbers today and think of the recent move by the ECB I am reminded of this from Cypress Hill.

Insane in the membrane
Insane in the brain!
Insane in the membrane
Insane in the brain!

There is a perfectly valid question which goes as follows. Why with money supply growth like this do prospects look so weak? The first part of the answer is that narrow money looks around 6 months ahead and broad 18/24 months ahead so ot is yet to come. The next is that no measure tells us everything and good monetary prospects tell us about domestic inputs and impetus in the Euro area but very little about exports of cars to China for example.Then there is another catch. It is a choice how much notice you take of money supply data but to my mind a central bank must follow it and if it things it is misleading explain why it thinks so? Because we have just seen policies to improve money supply growth when in the case of broad money it is in fact stronger than in the “Euro boom”. The August numbers may be a one month fluke but the trend is not. But as we stand the polices just implemented are pretty much irrelevant for a trade war driven slow down signalled by this from Markit earlier this week.

Flash Eurozone Manufacturing PMI Output
Index(4) at 46.0 (47.9 in August). 81-month low.

So a manufacturer can maybe borrow a bit cheaper which is good in itself but if they still cannot export to China then it is of not much use.

Me on The Investing Channel

What are the prospects for the US economy?

We find ourselves in a curious situation as we wait for ( or for readers over the weekend) mull the speech of Fed Chair Jerome Powell at Jackson Hole. There are several reasons for this and let me start with the pressure being applied by President Trump.

Germany sells 30 year bonds offering negative yields. Germany competes with the USA. Our Federal Reserve does not allow us to do what we must do. They put us at a disadvantage against our competition. Strong Dollar, No Inflation! They move like quicksand. Fight or go home!…….The Economy is doing really well. The Federal Reserve can easily make it Record Setting! The question is being asked, why are we paying much more in interest than Germany and certain other countries? Be early (for a change), not late. Let America win big, rather than just win!

We can see that The Donald has spotted that the US Dollar is strong with reports that the broad trade-weighted index is at an all time high. Care is needed with that as it starts in 1995 and the Dolllar peak was a decade before it, but the basic premise holds. But the real issue here is of course calling for interest-rate cuts when you are saying that the economy is strong! Is it?

Nowcasting

Let me hand you over to the Atlanta Fed.

The GDPNow model estimate for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the third quarter of 2019 is 2.2 percent on August 16, unchanged from August 15 after rounding. After this morning’s new residential construction report from the U.S. Census Bureau, the nowcast of third-quarter real residential investment growth increased from -1.2 percent to 0.7 percent.

That is not appreciably different to the New York Fed which has estimated 1.8%. So let us go forwards with 2% as an average. In terms of past definitions from President Trump ( 3%-4%) that is not doing really well but is hardly a call for an interest-rate cut.

Business Surveys

Something caught the eye yesterday in the Markit PMI survey.

The seasonally adjusted IHS Markit Flash U.S.
Manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index™
(PMI™) registered 49.9 in August, down from 50.4
in July and below the neutral 50.0 threshold for the
first time since September 2009.

The eye-catching elements were it going below the neutral threshold and the fact this is the lowest reading for nearly a decade. Some of this is symbolism as the PMI is not accurate to anything like 0.1 but there is also the downwards direction of travel. Also it had a consequence as we look wider.

August’s survey data provides a clear signal that
economic growth has continued to soften in the third
quarter. The PMIs for manufacturing and services
remain much weaker than at the beginning of 2019
and collectively point to annualized GDP growth of
around 1.5%

So we started with ~2% and now are at 1.5%.Prospects look none too bright either.

The past isn’t what we thought it was

Earlier this week we saw quite a revision affecting employment trends.

For national CES employment series, the annual benchmark revisions over the last 10 years have averaged plus or minus two-tenths of one percent of total nonfarm employment. The preliminary estimate of the benchmark revision indicates a downward adjustment to March 2019 total nonfarm employment of -501,000 (-0.3 percent).

This begs several questions as it means the monthly non-farm payroll numbers were too high in the year to March by more than 40,000 a month. The worst problem areas were retailing,,professional and business services and leisure and hospitality.

The change in the picture is covered by MarketWatch.

“This makes some sense, as the 223,000 average monthly increase in 2018 seemed too good to be true in light of how tight the labor market has become and how much trouble firms are said to be having finding qualified workers,” said chief economist Stephen Stanley of Amherst Pierpont Securities

In a sense that is both good and bad as he implies the economy might be at a literal version of full employment, at least in some areas. The bad is that growth was weaker than thought.

Money Supply

Back on the eighth of May I posted this warning.

The narrow measure of the money supply or M1 in the United States saw a fall of just over forty billion dollars in March. That catches the eye because it does not fit at all with an economy growing at an annual rate of 3.2%. Indeed we see now that over the three months to March M1 money supply contracted by 2.7%. That means that the annual rate of growth has been reduced to 1.9%. Thus we see that it has fallen below the rate of economic growth recorded which is a clear warning sign. Indeed a warning sign which has worked very well elsewhere.

That has played out and whilst it is a coincidence that the annual rate of economic growth seems now to be what narrow money supply growth was the broad sweep has worked. However that was then and this is now because M1 has been on something of a tear and the last three months have seen annualised growth of 8% pulling the actual annual rate of growth to 4.8%.

Will it be “Boom!Boom! Boom!” a la the Black-Eyed Peas? Well thank you to @RV3003 on twitter who drew my attention to this from Hosington.

First, Treasury deposits at the Fed, which
are not included in M2, fell dramatically as a
result of special measures taken to avoid hitting
the debt ceiling, thus giving M2 a large boost as
Treasury deposits moved to the private sector.
Once the debt ceiling is raised, Treasury deposits
will rebound, reversing the process and slowing
M2 growth.

Did this affect M1? Well maybe as demand deposits have risen by US $75 billion since the March and since the debt ceiling was raised they have fallen back by US $14 billion.

As you can imagine I will be tapping my foot waiting for the next monthly update. Fake money supply growth?

Comment

We can see that the US economy has slowed but if the money supply data is any guide is simply slowing for a bit and may then pick up. That scenario does not fit with the way that bond markets have surged expecting more interest-rate cuts. In fact bond market analysts are arguing that the Federal Reserve needs to cut interest-rates to keep up and avoid losing control, although they are not entirely clear what it would be losing control of.

So I have a lot of sympathy with Jerome Powell who has a very difficult speech to give today. The picture is murky and I would wait for more money supply data before giving any hints of what I would do next. In short I would be willing to be sacked rather than bowing to Presidential pressure.

 

 

Will this be the final easing countdown for Europe and the ECB?

We find ourselves in the economic equivalent of the Phoney War period of the Second World War as we wait for tomorrow’s policy announcement from the European Central Bank. But it is also a period where events are moving quite quickly. Here is the IMF from yesterday.

In our July update of the World Economic Outlook we are revising downward our projection for global growth to 3.2 percent in 2019 and 3.5 percent in 2020. While this is a modest revision of 0.1 percentage points for both years relative to our projections in April, it comes on top of previous significant downward revisions.

It is not the numbers that bother me as the IMF is far from the best forecaster but the direction of travel where it has found itself revising the outlook downwards. Also there was a curious additional part to this IMF output as the quite below shows.

Financial conditions in the United States and the euro area have further eased, as the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank adopted a more accommodative monetary policy stance.

I think they mean are expected to do so. Ironically this came with rumours that the ECB will not act tomorrow and will instead guide us to what it will do in September.

Business Surveys

After this mornings Purchasing Managers Indices the ECB view will be more like definitely maybe on a delay. It was only yesterday that I was pointing out that France had been doing better than its peers.

Modest growth was driven by the service sector,
which posted an expansion in business activity for
the fourth month in a row. However, the rate of
increase decelerated from June and was moderate
overall. Meanwhile, manufacturing output slipped
back into contraction territory, following a first rise for
four months in June. That said, the decline was only
marginal.

So according to this survey the rate of growth is slowing in France and you will not be surprised to see what is the driving force of this.

New export business was broadly stagnant at the
start of the third quarter, with a contraction in
international sales at manufacturers broadly
offsetting a modest rise at services firms.

A few minutes later the news from Germany was also downbeat.

The health of German manufacturing went from
bad to worse in July, according to the flash PMI
data, raising the risk of the euro area’s largest
member state entering a mild technical recession.
“The performance from Germany’s goods
producers in July is the worst recorded by the
survey in seven years, with the renewed weakness
mainly stemming from an accelerated drop in
export orders – the most marked seen in over a
decade.

We have got used to weak readings for this sector in 2019 but the 43.1 for July so far was the weakest we have seen. The services sector is doing better but even it is now slowing.

Still solid growth in the service sector means that
the German economy is just about keeping its head
above water for now, but even here there are signs
of increased worries among companies as
optimism hit a three-and-a-half year low

If we sweep all that up and look at the total Euro area we were told this.

The eurozone economy relapsed in July, with the
PMI giving up the gains seen in May and June to
signal one of the weakest expansions seen over the
past six years. The pace of GDP growth looks set
to weaken from the 0.2% rate indicated for the
second quarter closer to 0.1% in the third quarter.

That will get the attention of the ECB. We know that these PMI surveys are far from always correct but central bankers like them and the ECB will be very concerned about the Euro economy continuing to slow. It will not agree with it all as we know the German Bundesbank thinks that the German economy contracted in the second quarter whereas Markit is more positive. But that means it starts from a weaker position.

Money Supply

The opening salvo here did buck the bad news trend.

Annual growth rate of narrower monetary aggregate M1, comprising currency in circulation and overnight deposits, stood at 7.2% in June, unchanged from previous month.

That is better than the 6.2% with which 2019 opened and gave us another hint that it was going to be a rough first half to 2019 for the Euro area. The situation has improved in monetary terms but that has collided with the trade war.

However the wider measure was not good.

The annual growth rate of the broad monetary aggregate M3 decreased to 4.5% in June 2019 from 4.8% in May, averaging 4.7% in the three months up to June.

If we break it down we see this.

Looking at the components contributions to the annual growth rate of M3, the narrower aggregate M1 contributed 4.8 percentage points (as in the previous month),

So the slowing was in the bread money components represented by M2 and M3. Also if we look at the other components some of this is coming externally.

net external assets contributed 2.4 percentage points (as in the previous month)

I am always cautious about over analysing the components as I have seen that go very wrong in the past but it would be preferable if the growth was domestic. Especially as the ECB bank survey released yesterday suggested that credit was becoming harder to find.

According to the July 2019 bank lending survey, credit standards tightened in the second quarter of 2019 for loans to enterprises, marking the end of the net easing
period started in 2014, as concerns about the economic outlook and increased risk aversion translated into tighter internal guidelines and loan approval criteria despite
favourable funding conditions. Credit standards also tightened for consumer credit, in line with developments in the previous quarter…..

 

Comment

The situation here comes out of the deepest fears of the ECB. What I mean by that is that we have not yet had 7 full months from when the last easing programme ended. Firstly that poses deep question such as what good did it do and why can’t the Euro area grow without stimulus? But in terms of the ECB meeting and policy they are likely to be ignored. Instead it will focus on factors such as its own claim ( Mario Draghi) that the QE programme and a -0.4% deposit rate contributed 1.5% of GDP growth to the Euro area.

Also any proper credit flow relies on the banks and they continue to look thoroughly zombified. From CNBC.

German lender Deutsche Bank reported a weaker-than-expected net loss of 3.15 billion euros ($3.51 billion) for the second quarter of 2019.

Analysts polled by research firm Refinitiv had estimated a net loss of 1.7 billion euros for the period, due to the bank’s massive restructuring program announced earlier this month. The German bank itself had previously said it expected to report a net loss of 2.8 billion euros for the quarter.

The share price has fallen 4% this morning and back below 7 Euros in response to the news that things are even worse than we were told earlier this month. Next via Reuters there was this.

Italy’s biggest bank by assets UniCredit (CRDI.MI) is considering cutting around 10,000 jobs, or 10% of its global workforce, as part of a new business plan to be unveiled in December, two sources close to the matter said on Monday.

It is not my purpose today to look at those two banks individually but more to use them of examples of a banking system that is troubled if not broken. If we switch to Spain which has been the best performing of the main Euro area economies in the Euro boom I note that many of its banks have share prices hitting new lows.

Thus after all tomorrow for the ECB may yet sing along to this from Europe.

The final countdown
It’s the final countdown
The final countdown
The final countdown (final countdown)
Ohhh. It’s the final countdown