What is happening to house prices and rents in Ireland?

Yesterday brought us up to date with house price changes in the Euro area at least for the start of 2018. From Eurostat.

House prices, as measured by the House Price Index, rose by 4.5% in the euro area and by 4.7% in the EU in the
first quarter of 2018 compared with the same quarter of the previous year…….Compared with the fourth quarter of 2017, house prices rose by 0.6% in the euro area and by 0.7% in the EU in the first quarter of 2018.

As you might expect there are some swings from country to country but before we get there we see some interpretation of history.

House prices in the EU up 11 % since 2010

Actually they fell for a while due to the Euro area crisis and then responded to the “Whatever It Takes” measures.

Prices started growing again in 2014.

A particular disappointment to Mario Draghi must be that his home country Italy has ignored all his efforts to pump up house prices as they fell there by 0.4% over the last year and are down 15% since 2010. Meanwhile my attention was drawn to Ireland with its 12.3% rise in the latest year.

This is because the boom and then bust in Irish house prices took much of the banking system with it.  This meant via the usual privatisation of profits but socialisation of losses with respect to the banking system the Irish taxpayer found themselves in this situation described by its national debt agency NTMA.

That may bring Ireland’s high stock of debt – which at €213bn is more than four times its 2007 level – into sharp focus. Whilst our debt ratios are improving, our total nominal debt is still rising as we continue to borrow to pay interest.

This means that whilst the interest-rate or yield on Ireland’s bonds has fallen a lot mostly due to the bond buying or QE of the ECB (European Central Bank) there is a tidy bill to pay each year.

Almost irrespective of the external interest rate environment, we still expect Ireland’s annual interest bill to fall towards €5bn in the near term, from €6.1bn in 2017 and a peak of €7.5bn in 2014.

Ireland now only has an interest-rate of 0.81% on its ten-year benchmark bond so a fair bit lower than the UK which represents quite a change when we borrowed money to lend to theme to help them out.

House prices

The Irish statistics office or CSO brings us more up to date.

In the year to April, residential property prices at national level increased by 13.0%. This compares with an increase of 12.6% in the year to March and an increase of 9.5% in the twelve months to April 2017.

As you can see the pace has been picking up although it is no longer being quite so led by Dublin.

In Dublin, residential property prices increased by 12.5% in the year to April. Dublin house prices increased 11.7%. Apartments in Dublin increased 15.9% in the same period.

The reason why I raise the Dublin issue is that it has seen the widest swings as it had the biggest bubble then fell the most and then for a while picked back up more quickly. Or as it is put here.

From the trough in early 2013, prices nationally have increased by 76.0%. Dublin residential property prices have increased 90.1% from their February 2012 low, whilst residential property prices in the Rest of Ireland are 69.9% higher than the trough, which was in May 2013.

That is quite a surge is it not? Whilst the Dublin recovery started earlier nearly all of this fits with the “Whatever It Takes” policies and timing of the ECB, Of course it raises old fears as well although we are not back to where the bubble burst.

Overall, the national index is 21.1% lower than its highest level in 2007. Dublin residential property prices are 23.3% lower than their February 2007 peak, while residential property prices in the Rest of Ireland are 26.1% lower than their May 2007 peak.

Oh and maybe another issue is having an impact.

The Border region showed the least price growth, with house prices increasing 9.3%.

Rents

We can track these down via the consumer inflation numbers and we get a hint here.

Housing, Water, Electricity, Gas & Other Fuels rose mainly due to higher rents and an increase in the price of home heating oil and electricity.

Looking into the detail we see that rents have risen by 7.4% over the past year and by 0.5% in May. The larger private-sector market is currently seeing a faster rate of rise but there must have been quite a chunky rise in public-sector rents at some point in the last year as they are up by 10.6% over that period.

Mortgage Interest-Rates

I found these hard to track down as the Central Bank of Ireland changed its reporting system but the Irish Consumer Price Index gives us a guide. It must have been designed in a similar way to the UK RPI as it includes mortgage interest-rates. The index for this was 143 when Mario Draghi was giving his “Whatever It Takes” ( to reduce mortgage rates) speech whereas in May it was 99.1.

Although rather curiously the Irish Independent reports that many have not bothered to switch to lower mortgage-rates.

KBC Bank is due to tell the Oireachtas Finance Committee it has 36,000 residential customers paying variable rates, which are its most expensive home-loan option, when they could get a lower priced deal from a bank.

It comes after it emerged that more than 100,000 homeowners at Bank of Ireland and Permanent TSB are paying up to €3,000 more a year on their mortgages than they need to at the two banks.

Perhaps they do not realise they can get them as I recall Ireland having a situation where many could not switch due to the house price falls.

Comment

There is a fair bit to consider here and let me open by agreeing to some extent with Mario Draghi.

European Central Bank chief Mario Draghi has linked the current spike in Irish property prices to “the search for yield by international investors”.

Mr Draghi said the real estate market in the Republic and several other EU states was “overstretched” and vulnerable to “repricing”. ( Irish Times yesterday).

He cannot bring himself to say falls nor to acknowledge his own role in them being overstretched but he does have time to bring up the fall guy which is of course financial terrorists.

 being fuelled by cross-border financing and non-banks, and that it would be important to investigate whether new macro-prudential instruments should be introduced for non-banks, especially in relation to their commercial real estate exposures.

We can’t have banks losing profitable business can we? Speaking of macro-prudential so the 2015 measures did not work then which is not a surprise here but perhaps a suggestion from the UK might help.

Under such a target the Bank of England should aim to keep nominal house price inflation at (say)
zero per cent for an initial period – perhaps five years – to reset expectations, ( IPPR)

So the organisation which has pumped them up has the job of controlling them? Whilst the central planners would love this sadly it would not work and I say that as someone who thinks we badly need lower house prices and switching back to Ireland because of this sort of thing. From the Irish Examiner.

The scramble to find a home in the crisis-hit rental sector has led to people queuing to view a €900-a-month one-bedroom apartment on Cork’s Tuckey Street……..

Piet said last week they were the first people in a 50-person queue on MacCurtain Street and were refused the apartment because they did not have a reference letter with them.

Piet said the rental sector is a lot more expensive than it was a few years ago.

The average rental property in Cork has soared to above €1,210 a month — up almost 10% on last year.

“We pushed the boat out to €900 a month just to get somewhere nice. That is the very end of our budget,” said Piet.

Or to put it another way with both house prices and rents soaring the rentiers are quids ( Euros) in.

 

 

 

 

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