The Mark Carney Show has misfired again

Yesterday was something of an epoch-making day for the UK but it also turned into a rather odd one. Also this morning has produced another piece of evidence for my argument that we finally got a rise in official interest-rates above the emergency 0.5% level because the Bank of England finally thought the banks have recovered enough to take it. From the Financial Times.

Royal Bank of Scotland will pay its first dividend since it was bailed out during the financial crisis, marking a major milestone on the bank’s road to recovery and paving the way for a further reduction of the government’s 62.4 per cent stake. The bank will pay an interim dividend of 2p per share after it confirms a final agreement on a recent fine with the US Department of Justice.

So even RBS has made some progress although it remains attracted to disasters like iron filings to a magnet as this seems a clear hint that it managed to be long Italian bonds into the heavy falls.

 RBS blamed “turbulence in European bond markets” for a 20 per cent drop in income at Natwest Markets.

As an aside the Italian bond market is being hit again today with the ten-year yield pushing over 3%.

Returning to the UK we also saw a 9-0 vote for a Bank Rate rise as I predicted in my podcast. This was based on my long-running theme that they are a bunch of “Carney’s Cronies” as five others suddenly changed their mind at the same moment as him, making the most popular phrase “I agree with Mark”. As some are on larger salaries added to by generous pension schemes we could make savings here.

A Space Oddity

This was provided by the currency markets which initially saw the UK Pound £ rally but then it fell back and at the time of writing it has dipped just below US$1.30. The US Dollar has been strong but at 1.122 we have not gained any ground against the Euro either at 145 we lost ground against the Japanese Yen.Why?

At first Governor Carney backed up his interest-rate rise with talk of more as in the press conference he suggested that 3 rises over the next 3 years was his central aim. Of course his aim has hardly been true but this disappeared in something of a puff of smoke when he later pointed out that he could keep interest-rates the same or even cut them. This rather brain-dead moment was reinforced by pointing out that he had cut interest-rates after the EU leave vote. This left listeners and viewers thinking will he cut next March?

Then he told Sky News this.

Mark Carney tells me is prepared to cut interest rates back again depending on how Brexit negotiations go. ( Ed Conway)

This morning he has managed to end up discussing interest-rate cuts with Francine Lacqua of Bloomberg after a brief mention of further rises. Then he added to it with this.

Mark Carney threw himself back into the thick of the Brexit debate on Friday, saying the chance of the U.K. dropping out of the European Union without a deal is “uncomfortably high.”

He also spoke to the Today programme on Radio Four which of course has its own audience troubles and here is the take away of Tom Newton Dunn of The Sun,

Blimey. Carney reveals the BoE recently ran a Brexit no deal exercise that saw property prices plummet by a third, interest rates go up to 4%, unemployment up to 9%, and a full-blown recession.

You can see from that why rather than a rally the UK Pound £ has struggled rather than rallied.  Due to his strong personal views Governor Carney keeps finding himself enmeshed in the Brexit debate which given his views on the subject will always head towards talk of interest-rate cuts. He is of course entitled to his personal views but in his professional life he keeps tripping over his own feet as just after you have raised interest-rates this is not the time for it. He could simply have said that like everyone else he is waiting for developments and will respond if necessary when events change.

Oh and we have heard this sort of thing from Governor Carney before. How did it work out last time?

interest rates go up to 4%

 

Today’s News

This has added to the theme I posited yesterday about the interest-rate increase which can be put most simply as why now?

The latest survey marked two years of sustained
new business growth across the service sector
economy. However, the rate of expansion eased
since June and was softer than seen on average
over this period. ( Markit PMI )

This followed a solid manufacturing report and a strong construction one but of course the services sector is by far the largest. This added to the report from the Euro area.

If the headline index continues to track at its current
level, quarterly GDP growth over the third quarter as
a whole would be little-changed from the softer-than expected expansion of 0.3% signalled by official
Eurostat data for quarter two.

Whilst these surveys are by no mean perfect guides there does seem to be something going on here and as I pointed out yesterday it is consistent with the weaker trajectory for money supply growth.

The UK Pound £

This did get a mention in the Minutes.

The sterling effective exchange rate had depreciated slightly since the Committee’s previous meeting and was down 2.5% relative to the 15-day average incorporated in the May Report.

This is awkward on two fronts. Firstly the fall was at least partly caused by the way Governor Carney and his colleagues clearly hinted at an interest-rate rise back then but then got cold feet in the manner of an unreliable boyfriend. Next comes the realisation that all the furore over a 0.25% interest-rate rise mostly ignores the fact that monetary conditions have eased as the currency fall is equivalent to a ~0.6% cut.

R-Star

This appeared having been newly minted in the Bank of England Ivory Tower. Or at least newly minted in £ terms as the San Francisco Fed put it like this last year.

The “natural” rate of interest, or r-star (r*), is the inflation-adjusted, short-term interest rate that is consistent
with full use of economic resources and steady inflation near the Fed’s target level.

If anyone has a perfect definition of “full use of economic resources” then please send it to every Ivory Tower you can find as they need one. Actually the Bank of England has by its actions suggested it is near to here which is rather awkward when they want to claim it is somewhere above 2%. Actually I see no reason why there is only one and in fact it seems likely to be very unstable but in many ways David Goodman of Bloomberg has nailed it.

They don’t know their r* from their elbow

Comment

This is all something of a dog’s dinner and I mean that in the poetic sense because in reality dog’s in my family  always seem to be fed pretty well. We have monetary policy being delivered by someone who looks as though he does not really believe in it. Even the traditional support from ex Bank of England staff seems to be half-hearted this time around and remember that group usually behave as if The Stepford Wives is not only their favourite film but a role-model.

If this is the best that Mark Carney can do then the extension of his term of tenure by Chancellor Hammond can be summed up by Men At Work.

It’s a mistake, it’s a mistake
It’s a mistake, it’s a mistake

 

 

 

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