The stability of the UK economy is quite remarkable

Today gives us another opportunity to take a look under the engine cover of the UK economy and to do so considering the stated position of the Bank of England.

If the economy continues on the track that it’s been on… we can expect interest rates would increase somewhat.

Those were the words of Bank of England Governor Mark Carney on the BBC’s Today programme on Radio Four last week. Listeners will have been wondering if it will be third time lucky for his “Forward Guidance” as he has tried this tack before? More tucked away at the end of last week was a consequence of the actions of Governor Carney and his colleagues in August 2016 when they cut Bank Rate to 0.25% added a “Sledgehammer” to the QE ( Quantitative Easing ) programme and added a soupcon of credit easing with the Term Funding Scheme. Please remember the implications of giving banks cheap funding as you read this from the BBC about the interview with Governor Carney.

“What we’re worried about is a pocket of risk – a risk in consumer debt, credit card debt, debt for cars, personal loans,” he told BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme.
He said banks had “not been as disciplined as they should be” in their underwriting standards and pricing of this debt.

How is that going?

This is the data up to the end of August from the Bank of England.

The annual growth rate of consumer credit remained at 9.8%, with a flow of £1.6 billion in August.

As you can see this is a triumph for the “Sledgehammer QE” of Chief Economist Andy Haldane who wanted precisely this. Oh hang on sorry, it is now the result of unexpected behaviour by the banking system and is a worry for the Bank of England.

Also we see that monetary growth has picked up more generally.

Broad money increased by £16.6 billion in August (Table A), the highest flow since September 2016. Within this, flows for all sectors were positive (Tables B-D) with the largest contribution from non-intermediate other financial corporations (NIOFCs) (Table D).

The monthly numbers are very erratic but this was a surge but the overall picture remains one of strong unsecured credit growth and growth in the wider aggregates that may be picking up again. What is in doubt is the mix that this monetary growth will provide between economic growth and inflation but it suggests that if inflation is 3% economic growth will be 2%.

Remember when we were told that all of this was for smaller businesses or SMEs? Well lending to smaller businesses fell by £200 million in July and £100 million in August.

Business Surveys

Today saw the last of the PMI business surveys for the UK and it was a case of steady as she goes.

The headline seasonally adjusted IHS Markit/CIPS Services PMI® Business Activity Index posted 53.6 in September, up from an 11-month low of 53.2 in August. Looking at Q3 as a whole, growth has eased slightly since the previous quarter (the index averaged 54.3 in Q2, compared to 53.5 in Q3).

So the changes are much less that the likely error term. This was reflected in the overall picture described.

The three PMI surveys put the economy on course for another subdued 0.3% expansion in the third quarter, but the fourth quarter could see even slower growth.

Markit have a default setting of downbeat on the UK economy which is a switch of sorts as they used to treat France like that. But there is an interesting perspective in the detail of their report.

The rise in price pressures will pour further fuel on expectations that the Bank of England will soon follow-up on its increasingly hawkish rhetoric and hike interest rates. However, the decision is likely to be a difficult one, as the waning of the all-sector PMI in September pushes the surveys slightly further into territory that would normally be associated with the central bank loosening rather than tightening policy.

The inflation picture

We learnt more about this at midnight from the British Retail Consortium or BRC.

In September, Shop Prices reached the shallowest deflation level in the last four years of 0.1%, with prices falling just 0.1% compared to a 0.3% year-on-year decline in August. Non-Food price deflation accelerated to 1.5% in September, from 1.3% in August, although Non-Food prices are less deflationary than in September 2016, when they had fallen 2.1% year on year. Food prices increased in September to 2.2%, up from 1.3% in August.

So food prices are rising but other prices are falling as we seem set to shift from disinflation to inflation in the retail sector although the BRC gets itself into quite a mess on this subject.

Overall shop price deflation reached an all-time low in September with prices now teetering on the edge of inflation.

The food inflation is being driven by butter prices ( a worldwide issue presumably leading to happy days in New Zealand) and on a personal level I note that the rises in the price of broccoli we looked at a while back don’t seem to have reversed much if at all.

Government policy

We should find out more later about this. We are already expecting a boost to the Help To Buy scheme which has led to this.

3,858 first time buyers earning over £100k appear to have had Help2Buy…  ( @HenryPryor )

Also the mind boggles as to what the with a household income below £20,000 per annum were able to buy! Maybe it’s because I am a Londoner………

Also the new £10 billion will be an expansion on what has gone so far ( figures to June 2017).

The total value of these equity loans was £6.72 billion, with the value of the properties sold under the scheme totalling £32.37 billion.

Perhaps we will see more emphasis on social housing later as well.

Comment

Imagine you are an “unreliable boyfriend” what is the worst scenario? It is of course the sort of stability that the UK economy seems to be providing as it seems fairly likely that the first three-quarters will each provide GDP ( Gross Domestic Product) growth of 0.3%. Of course the unreliable boyfriend in question will be hoping we forget his Forward Guidance for what 2017 would be like and instead focusing on his heroic efforts which prevented that. The same heroic efforts he now hints he will reverse. As he spins like a top we are reminded that in monetary policy of a version of  the Bananarama critique.

It ain’t what you do it’s the way that you do it
It ain’t what you do it’s the way that you do it
It ain’t what you do it’s the way that you do it
And that’s what gets results

Putting UK interest-rates back where they were clearly suggests that they should never have been cut in the first place. Even worse an unsecured credit boom has been fed. Oh and even the ratings agencies are raising the issue of credibility.

S&P troll BOE

S&P: WE BELIEVE RECENT STATEMENTS BY BOE AND CARNEY ARE PRIMARILY AIMED AT PROPPING UP GBP TO REDUCE IMPORTED INF PRESSURES ( @stewhampton )

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