Why I still expect UK house prices to fall

This morning has brought another example that to quote Todd Terry “there’s something going on” in the UK housing market. Of course there is an enormous amount of government and Bank of England support but even so we are seeing a curious development.

House prices rebound further to reach record
high, challenging affordability.

That is from the Halifax earlier who are the latest to report on this trend where the initial effect of the Covid-19 pandemic has been not only to raise recorded house prices, but to give the rate of growth quite a shove. Indeed prices rose by nearly as much this August on its own as in the year to last August.

“House prices continued to beat expectations in August, with prices again rising sharply, up by 1.6% on a
monthly basis. Annual growth now stands at 5.2%, its strongest level since late 2016, with the average
price of a property tipping over £245,000 for the first time on record.”

I would not spend to much time on the average price per see as each house price index has its own way of calculating that. But the push higher in prices is unmistakable as we look for the causes.

“A surge in market activity has driven up house prices through the post-lockdown summer period, fuelled
by the release of pent-up demand, a strong desire amongst some buyers to move to bigger properties, and
of course the temporary cut to stamp duty.”

I think maybe the stamp duty cut should come first, but the desire for larger properties is intriguing. That may well b a euphemism for wanting a garden which after the lock down is no surprise, but at these prices how is it being afforded? Wanting if one thing, be able to afford it is another.

Bank of England

It’s combination of interest-rate cuts. QE bond buying, and credit easing has led to this.

The mortgage market showed more signs of recovery in July, but remained weak in comparison to pre-Covid. On net, households borrowed an additional £2.7 billion secured on their homes. This was higher than the £2.4 billion in June but below the average of £4.2 billion in the six months to February 2020. The increase on the month reflected a slight increase in gross borrowing to £17.4 billion in July, below the pre-Covid February level of £23.7 billion and consistent with the recent weakness in mortgage approvals.

As you can see it has got things on the move but both gross and net levels of activity are lower and especially the gross one. That may well be a lock down feature as there are lags in the process.  But if the approvals numbers are any guide they are on their way

The number of mortgages approvals for house purchase continued recovering in July, reaching 66,300, up from 39,900 in June. Approvals are now 10% below the February level of 73,700 (Chart 3), but more than seven times higher than the trough of 9,300 in May.

Michael Saunders

It seems that the Monetary Policy Committee may have further plans for the housing market.

Looking forward, I suspect that risks lie on the side of a slower recovery over the next year or two
and a longer period of excess supply than the forecast in the August MPR. If these risks develop,
then some further monetary loosening may be needed in order to support the economy and prevent
a persistent undershoot of the 2% inflation target. ( MPR = Monetary Policy Report )

Seeing as interest-rates are already at their Lower Bound and we are seeing QE bond buying as for example there will be another £1.473 billion today. it does make you wonder what more he intends? Although in a more off the cuff moment he did say this.

Review of negative rates is not finished: Not theologically oppsed to neg rates. ( ForexFlow)

He seems genuinely confused and frankly if he and his colleagues were wrong in August they are likely to be wrong in September as well! Oh and is this an official denial?

But I wouldn’t get too carried away by this prospect of money-fuelled inflation pressures.

He did however get one thing right about the money supply.

In other words, the crisis has lifted the demand for money
– the amount of deposits that households and businesses would like to hold – as well as the rise in the
supply of money described above.

That is a mention of money demand which is more of an influence on broad money than supply a lot of the time. Sadly though he fumbled the ball here.

All this has been backed up by the BoE’s asset purchase programme, which (to the extent that bonds have
been bought from the non-bank private sector) acts directly to boost broad money growth.

It acts directly on narrow money growth and affects broad money growth via that.

Another credit crunch

Poor old Michael Saunders needs to get out a bit more as this shows.

And, thanks to the marked rise in their capital ratios during the last decade, banks have been much better
placed than previously to meet that demand for credit.

Meanwhile back in the real world there is this.

Barclays has lowered its loan to income multiples to a maximum of 4.49 times income.

This applies to all LTVs, loan sizes and income scenarios except for where an LTV is greater than 90 per cent and joint income of the household is equal to or below £50,000, and where the debt to income ratio is equal to or above 20 per cent.

In these two cases the income multiple has been lowered to 4 times salary. ( Mortgage Strategy)

There has been a reduction in supply of higher risk mortgages and such is it that one bank is making an offer for only 2 days to avoid being swamped with demand.

Accord Mortgages is relaunching it’s 90 per cent deals for first-time buyers for two days only next week. ( Mortgage Strategy)

Also according to Mortgage Strategy some mortgage rates saw a large weekly rise.

At 90 per cent LTV the rate flew upward by 32 basis points, taking the average rate from 3.22 per cent to 3.54 per cent…….Despite the overall average rate dropping for three-year fixes there was one large movement upwards within – at 90 per cent LTV the average rate grew from 3.26 per cent to 3.55 per cent.

Comment

If we start with the last section which is something of a credit crunch for low equity or if you prefer high risk mortgages then that is something which can turn the house price trend. I would imagine there will be some strongly worded letters being sent from the Governor of the Bank of England Andrew Bailey to the heads of the banks over this. But on present trends this and its likely accompaniment which is surveyors reducing estimated values will turn the market. Indeed even the Halifax is btacing itself for falls.

“Rising house prices contrast with the adverse impact of the pandemic on household earnings and with
most economic commentators believing that unemployment will continue to rise, we do expect greater
downward pressure on house prices in the medium-term.”

What can the Bank of England do? Short of actually buying houses for people there is really only one more thing. Cut interest-rates into negative territory and offer even more than the current £113 billion from the Term Funding Scheme ( to save the banks the inconvenience of needing those pesky depositors and savers). Then look on in “shock” as the money misses smaller businesses as it floods the mortgage market. But these days the extra push gets smaller because it keeps pulling the same lever.

Also can HM Treasury now put stamp duty back up without torpedoing the market?

Podcast

 

Another survey says UK House Prices are rising

This morning there will have been scenes at the Bank of England. Indeed there will have been jostling amongst the staff as they rush to be the one who presents the morning meeting. Whoever grabbed the gig will be facing a Governor who has a wide beaming smile as his mind anticipates raiding the well-stocked wine cellar later. Perhaps the cake trolley will be filled with everyone’s favourites as well. What will cause such happiness?

Sharp increase in July pushes house prices to
highest ever levels ( Halifax )

Unwitting passers-by may hear a murmur which sounds like “The Wealth Effects! The Wealth Effects!” because that is exactly what it is. This mentality has seeped its way through the UK establishment now as the Deputy National Statistician Jonathan Athow parroted such a line during a recent online conference on how he plans to neuter the Retail Price Index.

What are the numbers?

The Halifax reported quite a surge last month.

Following four months of decline, average house prices in July experienced their greatest month on month
increase this year, up 1.6% from June and comfortably offsetting losses in 2020. The average house price
in July is the highest it has ever been since the Halifax House Price Index began, 3.8% higher than a year
ago.

If we look at levels we get a context to the house price boom the UK has seen in recent decades as we note that an index set at 100 in 1992 was at 416.6 in July. Putting that another way the average price is now £241,604. Care is needed with such averages because they vary between different organisations quite a but partly because as you can see the numbers come in for some torture.

The standardised average price is calculated using the HPI’s mix adjusted methodology………The standardised index is seasonally adjusted using the U.S. Bureau of the Census X-11 moving-average method based on a rolling 84-month series. Each month, the seasonally adjusted figure for the same month a year ago and last month’s figure are subject to revision.

84 months!

Why?

As we switch to the question posed by Carly Simon we are told this.

The latest data adds to the emerging view that the market is experiencing a surprising spike post lockdown. As pent-up demand from the period of lockdown is released into a largely open housing market, a low supply of available homes is helping to exert upwards pressure on house prices. Supported by the government’s initiative of a significant cut in stamp duty, and evidence from households and agents
suggesting that confidence is currently growing, the immediate future for the housing market looks brighter
than many might have expected three months ago.

So we see that the Stamp Duty cut is in play so once the Chancellor has completed this morning’s round of media interviews he will receive a call from Governor Andrew Bailey to say “Well played sir!”. I have to confess that this bit has me a little bemused.

that confidence is currently growing

That is hard to square with the wave of job and pay cuts we are seeing.

Mortgages

We looked at the approvals data last week but there is also the data from the tax register.

Monthly property transactions data shows a rise in UK home sales in June. UK seasonally
adjusted residential transactions in June 2020 were 63,250 – up by 31.7% from May following the lifting
of COVID-19 lockdown measures. Quarter-on-quarter transactions were approximately 47% lower than
quarter one 2020. (Source: HMRC, seasonally-adjusted figures)

I find it odd that so many organisations continue with seasonal adjustment at a time when we are not acting as usual. But we have to suspect higher numbers again in July if we also note the trends below.

Results from the latest (June 2020) RICS Residential Market Survey point to a recovery emerging
across the market, with indicators on buyer demand, sales and new listings rallying following the
lockdown related falls. New buyer demand has moved to a net balance of +61% (compared to -7% and
-94% in April and May respectively). New instructions also rose firmly to a net balance of +42%
(compared with -22% in May). Newly agreed sales net balance has moved into positive territory for the
first time since February, with a net balance of +43% (from -34% in May)

Care is needed as that is a sentiment index with spin in play and maybe as much as the Pakistan cricket team which has picked two spinners.

If we switch to mortgage rates then the Bank of England tells us this.

The effective rates on new and outstanding mortgages were little changed in June. New mortgage rates were 1.77%, an increase of 3 basis points on the month, while the interest rate on the stock of mortgage loans was 2.16%, unchanged from May and 0.2 percentage points lower than in February.

As you can see the rate for new mortgages is quite a bit below that on the existing stock meaning that a combination of new draw downs and remortgaging is pulling the overall position lower.

Bringing this up to date we have a story of two halves where remortgages remain at extraordinary low levels but the first time buyer has to pay quite a bit more.

This week has seen several rate increases for mortgages, particularly at higher loan-to-values (LTV). Halifax, TSB, Skipton Building Society, Virgin Money and Nationwide Building Society all increased their rates during the week on 85% LTV mortgages. HSBC increased its rates on 90% LTV mortgages, but they remain among the top rates for those with a smaller mortgage deposit. ( Moneyfacts )

The organisations above may well be getting a phone call from Governor Bailey along these lines.

Whose side are you on, son?

Don’t you love your country?

Then how about getting with the program? Why don’t you jump on the team and come on in for the big win?

( Full Metal Jacket)

Indeed the whole Monetary Policy Committee seems to have mortgage rate news on speed dial.

The Committee discussed the various factors affecting the price of new mortgage lending.

They also took some time to applaud themselves.

But other factors had been pushing in the opposite direction, such that it was possible that, in the absence of the MPC’s policy action, mortgage rates would have risen somewhat at all LTV ratios.

Comment

So we see a rather surprising development which backs up what we looked at on the 29th of July from Zoopla. I think we are seeing a bit of delayed action or if you prefer something which is in fact in the ( often derided) rational expectations models where prices can rise to prepare for a larger fall.

Why? Well in the short term the efforts of the government looked at above and the Bank of England via its new Term Funding Scheme ( over £21 billion now) can work. So we have lower costs and continued pressure on mortgage rates, But as time passes the higher levels of unemployment and wages cuts have to come into play in my opinion.

Meanwhile at the upper end of New York.

Two years after selling a three-storey penthouse for $59 million, one of the most expensive sales in Manhattan at the time, the developer of a luxury building on the High Line in Manhattan has steeply discounted the remaining four apartments, with the price of one full-floor unit overlooking the elevated park dropping by more than 50%.

The units at The Getty Residences in Chelsea, designed by architect Peter Marino, had been on the market for the last three years.

The units range from a 3,312-square-foot, three-bedroom, 3 1/2-bathroom that had its price cut about 42% to $9.4 million to a 3,816-square-foot, three-bedroom, 3 1/2-bathroom apartment with a balcony dropping 43% to $13.8 million.  ( Forbes )

 

 

How far will UK house prices fall?

Sometimes you spot something that you cannot let pass and that has happened this morning. There is an interesting article in the Financial Times Alphaville section by a couple of portfolio manager’s at Man Group suggesting inflation is coming. So far so good with the only issue being they are a couple of months or so behind us on here. But there is a catch as I have replied.

Thank you for the article. However I do have an issue with this.

“We are unprepared for inflation and few of us alive have ever experienced what it’s like to trade in an inflationary environment”

Anyone who has bought a house in the UK and quite a few other places has learned to do this as prices rose so much.  It is simply that (supported by the FT economics editor)it was decided by the establishment to exclude such things from the inflation data. Then when forced to try to reflect it they use fantasy imputed rents which are never paid.

In the Euro area they continue to ignore this subject in their inflation measure CPI ( HICP) as even some ECB policy makers have noted recently.

So yes there has been inflation it is just that the major inflation indices have been designed to look away now.

This is an issue which I would shout from the rooftops if I could as it explains why so many feel that inflation indices do not reflect their own circumstances. As an example ECB policy maker Phillip Lane pointed out that when asked people thought that housing costs were 33% of their expenditure but that the Euro area consumer inflation measure (HICP) only counted 6% or so ( actual rents). This has different impacts as Italy has seen very little house price growth but the Netherlands had an annual rate of 8% in May compared to this.

In May, HICP-based prices of goods and services in the Netherlands were 1.1 percent up year-on-year, versus 1.0 percent in April.

Even Statistics Netherlands points it out.

Unlike the CPI, the HICP does not take into account the costs related to home ownership.

UK House Prices

After years and indeed decades of house price rises in the UK ( there were some falls in 2008/09 but the last major fall was 1990-92). We now face a situation which will send a chill down the spine of the Bank of England so let me hand you over to The Nationwide from earlier this week.

UK house prices fell by 1.4% in the month of June, after
taking account of seasonal effects, following a 1.7% fall in
May. On a seasonally adjusted basis, house prices in June
were 3.2% lower than in April.

That will cause scenes at the Bank of England and that is before we get to this.

Annual house price growth slowed to -0.1%, from 1.8% in
May. This is the first time that annual house price growth has been in negative territory since December 2012.

There is significance in that timing because that was the time the Funding for Lending Scheme was introduced. It was badged as being for smaller businesses for deflection but quickly saw mortgage rates fall around 0.9% by my calculations and later the effect went as high as 2% according to the Bank of England. By that route net mortgage lending went positive in the summer of 2013 and the house price carousel started to build again.

London

As a London boy ( lives in Battersea, born at Waterloo) this especially caught my eye in the Nationwide report.

Annual house price growth in London edged higher, with
prices up 2.1% in Q2. Average prices in the capital are now
just 3% below the all-time highs recorded in Q1 2017 and
55% above their 2007 levels (UK prices remain 19% higher
than their 2007 peak).

Not only do we get an idea of the scale of the house price move that our official statisticians have turned their blind eye too.But then we have the claim that there is annual house price growth in London. I am rather dubious based on this from Daniel Farey-Jones who has been looking at actual rents as shown below.

Bloomsbury, down 30% to £1,517………Belgravia, down 20% to £4,312…………Mayfair, down 31%

We are in the Des Res zone so let us have some examples from more “street” areas.

Elephant (& Castle), down 20%………Marylebone, down 20%……..Borough Market, down 33%…….Fitzrovia, down 25%……Clerkenwell, down 20%

I think we get the idea and there is even something for Gerry Rafferty fans.

Baker Street, down 28%
You used to think that it was so easy
You used to say that it was so easy
But you’re trying, you’re trying now
Another year and then you’d be happy
Just one more year and then you’d be happy
But you’re crying, you’re crying now.

These are to some extent anecdotes and there will be bias in the selection but even so there is a clear message which does not sit well with the Nationwide claim about house price rises in London. At a minimum some renters may be looking at selling. That of course has its own issues with as we noted with the Bank of England data on Monday.

The number of mortgage approvals for house purchase fell to a new series low in May, of 9,300 (Chart 5). This was, almost 90% below the February level (Chart 5) and around a third of their trough during the financial crisis in 2008.

The Bank of England

There have been several speeches this week and one from Jonathan Haskel was rather downbeat.

and in my view, risks skewed to the downside
concerning employment and more medium-term economic adjustments

That is a rather curious response to the data being better than he expected but remember he was called from an Ivory Tower. But for out house price purpose today there was this.

in March we also revived our term funding
scheme to reinforce the pass-through of lower interest rates by temporarily allowing banks access to loans from
the Bank of England at close to Bank Rate.

Ah “temporarily!” We know what that means. I have spared you the section on small business lending as I covered that earlier. The reality will be that this will turn up in the mortgage market. So we have a push me pull me situation with moves like this and on the other side banks restricting credit for more risky ( lower equity or if you prefer higher loan to value) mortgage lending.

Another policy maker Chief Economist Andy “loose cannon on the decks” Haldane put it like this.

This would take the Bank’s balance sheet to around 45% of (2019) UK GDP by the
year-end, more than double its previous high-water mark . It would take the Bank’s balance sheet
to almost double its highest-ever previous level relative to the Government’s net debt stock (Chart 17).

Comment

We see a familiar situation of economic circumstances pushing UK house prices lower with the Bank of England desperately trying to resist it. There are also other factors at play as we note this from the Jonathan Haskel speech.

Whilst the pandemic has caused hardship for many, I suspect there are at least some who, perhaps secretly, are
rather enjoying working from home………..On the employer side, for firms whose workers can largely work
from home, I’m sure many are now asking themselves: what’s the point of paying sky-high rents simply in order
to be located next door to another firm who is paying sky-high rents?

As to this bit many will be doubtful.

Coming to work however does have quite a bit of value.

Oh and here is one of the clearest cases I can think of covering “He would say that wouldn’t he?”

I want to join my colleagues
on the MPC in saying a few words about why quantitative easing (QE) is not a threat to central bank
independence.

Back to house prices there is a possible ace in the pack especially for London from this.

London (CNN)The United Kingdom said Wednesday it would offer a path to citizenship for eligible Hong Kong residents and condemned China’s new security law as a threat to the city’s freedom.

Apart from that I would expect house prices to shift around 10% lower as we wait to see what happens next.

 

Where next for UK house prices?

Today we are going to start by imagining we are central bankers so we will look at the main priority of the Bank of England  which is UK house prices. Therefore if you are going to have a musical accompaniment may I suggest this.

The only way is up, baby
For you and me now
The only way is up, baby
For you and me…  ( Yazz0(

In fact it fits the central banking mindset as you can see below. Even in economic hard times the only way is up.

Now we may not know, huh,
Where our next meal is coming from,
But with you by my side
I’ll face what is to come.

From the point of view of Threadneedle Street the suspension of the official UK house price index is useful too as it will allow the various ostriches to keep their head deep in the sand. This was illustrated in the Financial Stability Report issued on the 7th of May.

As a result, the fall in UK property prices incorporated in
the desktop stress test is less severe than that in the 2019 stress test.

Yes you do read that right, just as the UK economy looked on the edge of of substantial house price falls the Bank of England was modelling weaker ones!

Taking these two effects together, the FPC judges that a fall of 16% in UK residential property prices could be
consistent with the MPR scenario. After falling, prices are then assumed to rise gradually as economic activity in the
UK recovers and unemployment falls in the scenario.

Whether you are reassured that a group of people you have mostly never heard of forecast this I do not know, but in reality there are two main drivers. The desire for higher house prices which I will explain in the next section and protection of “My Precious! My Precious!” which underpins all this.

Given the loan to value distribution on banks’ mortgage books at the end of 2019, a 16% house price fall would not be likely to lead to very material losses in the event of default.

So the 16% was chosen to make the banks look safe or in central banking terms “resilient”

Research

I did say earlier that I would explain why central bankers are so keen on higher house prices, so here is the latest Bank Underground post from yesterday.

Our results also suggest that the behaviour of house prices affects how monetary policy feeds through. When house prices rise, homeowners feel wealthier and are more able to refinance their mortgages and release housing equity in order to spend money on other things. This can offset some of the dampening effects of an increase in interest rates. In contrast, when house prices fall, this channel means an increase in interest rates has a bigger contractionary effect on the economy, making monetary policy more potent.

Just in case you missed it.

Our findings also suggest that the overall impact of monetary policy partly depends on the behaviour of house prices, and might not be symmetric for interest rate rises and falls.

So even the supposedly independent Bank Underground blog shows that “you can take the boy out of the city but not the city out of the boy” aphorism works as we see it cannot avoid the obsession with house prices. The air of unreality is added to by this.

 we look at the response of non-durable, durable and total consumption in response to a 100bp increase in interest rates.

The last time we had that was in 2006/07 so I am a little unclear which evidence they have to model this and of course many will have been in their working lives without experiencing such a thing. Actually it gives us a reason why it is ever less likely to happen with the present crew in charge.

When the share of constrained households is large, interest rate rises have a larger absolute impact than interest rate cuts.

Oh and is that a confession that the interest-rate cuts have been ineffective. A bit late now with Bank Rate at 0.1%! I would also point out that I have been suggesting this for some years now and to be specific once interest-rates go below around 1.5%.

Reasons To Be Cheerful ( for a central banker )

Having used that title we need a part one,two and three.

1.The UK five-year Gilt yield has gone negative in the last week or so and yesterday the Bank of England set a new record when it paid -0.068% for a 2025 Gilt. As it has yet to ever sell a QE bond that means it locked in a loss. But more importantly for today’s analysis this is my proxy for UK fixed-rate mortgages. So we seem set to see more of this.

the average rate on two and five year fixed deals have fallen to lows not seen since Moneyfacts’ electronic records began in July 2007. The current average two year fixed mortgage rate stands at just 2.09% while the average rate for a five year fixed mortgage is 2.35%. ( Moneyfacts 11th May)

2. The institutional background for mortgage lending is strong. The new Term Funding Scheme which allows banks to access funding at a 0.1% Bank Rate has risen to £11.9 billion as of last week’s update. Also there is the £107.1 billion remaining in the previous Term Funding Scheme meaning the two add to a tidy sum even for these times. Plus in a sign that bank subsidies never quite disappear there is still £3 billion of the Funding for Lending Scheme kicking around. These schemes are proclaimed as being for small business lending but so far have always “leaked” into the mortgage market.

3. The market is now open. You might reasonably think that a time of fears over a virus spreading is not the one to invite people into your home but that is apparently less important than the housing market.  Curious that you can invite strangers in but not more than one family member or friend.

News

Zoopla pointed out this earlier.

Buyer demand across England spiked up by 88% after the market reopened, exceeding pre-lockdown levels in the week to 19th May; this jump in demand in England is temporary and expected to moderate in the coming weeks

Of course an 88% rise on not very much may not be many and the enthusiasm seemed to fade pretty quickly.

Some 60% of would-be home movers across Britain said they plan to go ahead with their property plans, according to a new survey by Zoopla, but 40% have put their plans on hold because of COVID-19 and the uncertain outlook.

Actually the last figure I would see as optimistic right now.

Harder measures of market activity are more subdued – new sales agreed in England have increased by 12% since the market reopened, rising from levels that are just a tenth of typical sales volumes at this time of year.

Finally I would suggest taking this with no just a pinch of salt but the full contents of your salt cellar.

The latest index results show annual price growth of +1.9%. This is a small reduction in the annual growth rate, from +2% in March.

Comment

So far we have been the very model of a modern central banker. Now let us leave the rarified air of its Ivory Tower and breathe some oxygen. Many of the components for a house price boom are in place but there are a multitude of catches. Firstly it is quite plain that many people have seen a fall in incomes and wages and this looks set to continue. I know the travel industry has been hit hard but British Airways is imposing a set of wage reductions.

Next we do not know how fully things will play out but a trend towards more home working and less commuting seems likely. So in some places there may be more demand ( adding an office) whereas in others it may fade away. On a personal level I pass the 600 flats being built at Battersea Roof Garden on one of my running routes and sometimes shop next to the circa 500 being built next to The Oval cricket ground. Plenty of supply but they will require overseas or foreign demand.

So the chain as Fleetwood Mac would put it may not be right.

You would never break the chain (Never break the chain)

We should finally see lower prices but as to the pattern things are still unclear. So let me leave you with something to send a chill down the spine of any central banker.

Chunky price cut for Kent estate reports
@PrimeResi as agent clips asking price from £8m to £5.95m (26%). (£) ( @HenryPryor)

Me on The Investing Channel

Unsecured credit and mortgage lending market will be the winners after the Bank of England move

Today has arrived with an event we have been expecting but the timing was a few days early. Those walking past the Bank of England building in Threadneedle Street early this morning may have got a warning from the opening of Stingray being played on the wi-fi stream.

Stand by for action!

Anything can happen in the next 30 minutes

Before the equity and Gilt markets opened it announced this.

At its special meeting ending on 10 March 2020, the Monetary Policy Committee (MPC) voted unanimously to reduce Bank Rate by 50 basis points to 0.25%. …..The reduction in Bank Rate will help to support business and consumer confidence at a difficult time, to bolster the cash flows of businesses and households, and to reduce the cost, and to improve the availability, of finance.

So we see that yesterday morning’s equity market falls put the Bank of England into a state of panic. We also see why the UK Pound £ was weak on the foreign exchanges late yesterday as the news seems to have leaked giving some an early wire. The “improvement” announced by Governor Carney of voting the night before should be scrapped. But as we look at the statement the “help to” suggests a lack of conviction and was followed by this.

When interest rates are low, it is likely to be difficult for some banks and building societies to reduce deposit rates much further, which in turn could limit their ability to cut their lending rates.  In order to mitigate these pressures and maximise the effectiveness of monetary policy, the TFSME will, over the next 12 months, offer four-year funding of at least 5% of participants’ stock of real economy lending at interest rates at, or very close to, Bank Rate. Additional funding will be available for banks that increase lending, especially to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Experience from the Term Funding Scheme launched in 2016 suggests that the TFSME could provide in excess of £100 billion in term funding.

Okay the first sentence covers a lot of ground. Firstly it implicitly agrees with our theme that banks struggle to reduce interest-rates for ordinary depositors as we approach 0%, we have seen this in places with negative interest-rates. That also means that there is an opportunity to give the banks known under the code phrase “The Precious! The Precious!” at the Bank of England yet another subsidy estimated at the order of £100 billion.

Term Funding Scheme

We have had one of these before as it was initially introduced the last time the Bank of England panicked back in August 2016. It too like its predecessor the Funding for Lending Scheme was badged as being for small and medium-sized businesses but the change of name to the acronym TFSME gives us the clearest clue as to its success. after all successes like Coca-Cola keep the same name whereas leaky nuclear reprocessing plants like Windscale get called Sellafield.

So let me go through the scheme firstly with the Bank of England rhetoric and secondly with what happened last time.

help reinforce the transmission of the reduction in Bank Rate to the real economy to ensure that businesses and households benefit from the MPC’s actions;

Mortgage rates fell to record lows providing yet another boost to house prices, building companies and estate agents.

provide participants with a cost-effective source of funding to support additional lending to the real economy, providing insurance against adverse conditions in bank funding markets;

Unsecured lending went through the roof going on a surge that has continued as can you think of anything else in the economy growing at 6% per annum? You do not need to take my word for it as the Bank of England cake trolley will not be going near whoever wrote this in the latest Money and Credit report.

The annual growth rate of consumer credit (credit used by consumers to buy goods and services) remained at 6.1% in January. The growth rate has been around this level since May 2019, having fallen steadily from a peak of 10.9% in late 2016.

Let me now give you the numbers for business borrowing. Now the FLS and the first TFS are now flowing anymore but the numbers are in fact better than hat we sometimes saw when they were.

Within this, the growth rate of borrowing from large businesses and SMEs fell to 0.9% and 0.5% respectively.

Oh and in line with the dictum that old soldiers never die they just fade away if you look at the Bank of England balance sheet the Term Funding Scheme still amounts to £107 billion.

Numbers bingo!

We can see this from two perspectives as a rather furious soon to be Governor of the Bank of England Andrew Bailey was given this to announce.

The release of the countercyclical capital buffer will support up to £190 billion of bank lending to businesses. That is equivalent to 13 times banks’ net lending to businesses in 2019.

Once I had stopped laughing at the ridiculousness of this number I had two main thoughts. Firstly I guess he had to announce something as he had been robbed of rewarding the government with an interest-rate cut later this month. But next remember how we keep being told how we have more secure and indeed “resilient” banks? That seems to have morphed into this.

To support further the ability of banks to supply the credit needed to bridge a potentially challenging period, the Financial Policy Committee (FPC) has reduced the UK countercyclical capital buffer rate to 0% of banks’ exposures to UK borrowers with immediate effect.  The rate had been 1% and had been due to reach 2% by December 2020.

So yet another disaster for Forward Guidance! It actively misleads…

Comment

After all the Forward Guidance from Bank of England Governor Mark Carney about higher interest-rates he is going to leave them lower ( 0.25%) than when he started ( 0.5%). That about sums up his term in office as those like the Financial Times who called him a “rock star” Governor hope we have shirt memories. Also I have had many debates on social media with supporters of the claims that the Bank of England is politically independent. After an interest-rate cut to record lows on UK Budget Day I suspect they will be very quiet today. After all even Yes Prime Minister did not go quite that far! Indeed the Governor confirmed it in his press conference.

“We have coordinated our moves with the Chancellor in the Budget”

Actually there was also a Dr.Who style vibe going on as we had two Governors at one press conference.

More fundamentally there is the issue that interest-rate cuts at these levels may even make things worse. I am afraid our central planners have little nous and imagination and go for grand public gestures rather than real action. After all if you are short on staff because they are quarantined due to the Corona Virus what use is 0.5% off your borrowing costs? The latter of course assumes the banks pass it on.

As to ammunition left well the present Governor has established the lower bound for them at 0.1% ( hoping we will forget he previously claimed it was 0.5% before cutting below it). Will that survive him? It is hard to say because the real issue here is not you or I ot even business it is “The Precious” who they fear cannot take lower rates. That is the real reason for all the Term Funding Schemes and the like. However Monday did bring a curiosity as the Bank of England bought a Gilt with a yield of -0.025% so maybe it is considering plunging below zero.

Meanwhile there was something else curious today and the PR office of the Bank of England in an unusual turn may be grateful to me for pointing it out, But this was the sort of thing that used to make it cut interest-rates.

Gross domestic product (GDP) showed no growth in January 2020……The economy continued to show no growth overall in the latest three months.

No-one but the most credulous ( Professors of economics and those hoping to or previously having worked at the Bank of England) will believe that was the cause but it is a curious turn of events.

Meanwhile let us look at the term of Mark Carney via some music. Remember when he mentioned Jake Bugg? Well he would hope we would think of today’s move as this.

But that’s what happens
When it’s you who’s standing in the path of a lightning bolt

Whereas most will be humming The Smiths.

Panic on the streets of London
Panic on the streets of Birmingham
I wonder to myself
Could life ever be sane again?

What can we expect next from UK house prices?

A feature of the credit crunch era has been the way that central banks have concentrated so much firepower on the housing market so that they can get house prices rising again. Of course they mostly hide under the euphemism of asset prices on this particular road. For them it is a win-win as it provides wealth effects and supports the banking sector via raising the value of its mortgage book. The increasingly poor first time buyer finds him or herself facing inflation via higher prices rather than wealth effects as we note the consumer inflation indices are constructed to avoid the whole issue.

This moves onto the issue of Forward Guidance which exists mostly in a fantasy world too. Let me give you an example from the Bank (of England) Underground Blog.

 It is reasonable to suppose that the more someone knows about a central bank and how it conducts policy, the more confidence they will have that the central bank will act to bring inflation back to target.

Really? To do so you have to ignore the two main periods in the credit crunch era when the Bank of England “looked through” inflation above target as real wages were hit hard. Yet they continue to churn out this sort of thing.

 And Haldane and McMahon, using the institutional knowledge score discussed above, show that for the UK, higher knowledge corresponds to greater satisfaction with the Bank, and inflation expectations closer to 2% at all horizons.

So according to the Bank of England you are none to bright if you disagree with them! I think it would have been better if Andy Haldane stuck to being a nosy parker about others Spotify play lists.

The area where the general public has I think grasped the nettle as regards central banking forward guidance is in the area of house prices. The Bank of England loudspeakers have been blaring out Yazz’s one hit.

The only way is up, baby
For you and me now
The only way is up, baby
For you and me now

Indeed even if things go wrong then we can apparently party on.

But if we should be evicted
Huh, from our homes
We’ll just move somewhere else
And still carry on

Where are we now?

If we switch to the current state of play we are in a situation where the new supply of moves to boost house prices have dried up. For example the Term Funding Scheme ended in February and after over four years of dithering the Bank of England raised Bank Rate to 0.75% in August. Combining this with the fall in real wages after the EU leave vote led to me expecting house prices to begin to fall but so far only in London has this happened. One factor in this has led to a blog from the National Institute of Economic and Social Research or NIESR last week.

The key point is that although the political turmoil was of great concern, the impact on bond prices followed a pattern we have seen before in which risk rises but expectations of a policy response militate against the risk.

The politics may be of great concern to the NIESR but the UK Gilt market has been driven by the intervention of the Bank of England. Not only has it already bought some £435 billion of it but its behaviour with the Sledgehammer QE of August 2016 has led to expectations of more of it in any setback. The irony is that good news may make the Gilt market fall because it makes extra QE less likely. The impact of this has been heightened by the way the Bank of England was apparently willing to pay pretty much any price for Gilts in the late summer of 2016. For the first time ever one section of the market saw negative yields as the market picked off the Bank of England’s buyers.

Mortgage Rates

This is where the Gilt yield meets an economic impact. If we think about mortgage rates then they are most driven by the five-year yield. On the day of the August Bank Rate it was 1.1% and of course according to the Bank of England the intelligent observer would be expecting further “limited and gradual rises” along the lines of its forward guidance. Yet it is 0.96% as I type this and the latest mortgage news seems to be following this. From Mortgage Strategy.

TSB has reduced interest rates by up to 0.35 per cent on mortgages for residential, home purchase and remortgage borrowers.

Changes applied include reductions of up to 0.35 per cent on five-year fixed deals up to 95 per cent LTV in its house purchase range; reductions of up to 0.25 per cent on two-year fixes up to 90 per cent LTV; and up to 0.30 per cent on five-year fixes up to 90 per cent LTV for remortgage borrowers.

That was from Friday and this was from Thursday.

Investec Private Bank has announced cuts to a series of its fixed and tracker mortgages.

Reductions total up to 0.50 per cent, and all within the 80 per cent – 85 per cent owner-occupier category.

Specifically, the variable rate mortgage has been cut by 0.50 per cent, the three-year fixed rate product by 0.10 per cent, the four-year by 0.15 per cent, and the five-year fixed rate by 0.20 per cent.

So the mortgage rates which had overall risen are in some cases on the way back down again. We will have to see how this plays out as Moneyfacts are still recording higher 2 year mortgage rates ( 2.51% now versus the low of 2.33% in January). I am placing an emphasis on fixed-rate mortgages because of the recent state of play.

The vast majority of new mortgage loans – 96% – are on fixed interest rates, typically for two or five years.

Currently half of all outstanding loans are on fixed rates, equating to about 4.7 million households.  ( BBC in August).

Lending

According to UK Finance which was the British Bankers Association in the same way that the leaky Windscale nuclear reprocessing plant became the leak-free Sellafield this is the state of play.

Gross mortgage lending across the residential market in October was £25.5bn, some 5.6 per cent higher than last October. The number of mortgages approved by the main high street banks in October was 4.1 per cent lower than last October; although approvals for house purchase were 3.6 per cent higher, remortgage approvals were 13.5 per cent lower and approvals for other secured borrowing were 1.3 per cent lower.

If they are right this seems to be a case of steady as she goes.

Comment

The situation so far is one of partial success for my view if the monthly update from Acadata is any guide.

House prices rebounded in October, up 0.4% – the first increase since February. The annual rate of price increases
continued to slow, however, dropping to just 1.0%.
Despite this, most regions continue to show growth, the exceptions being both the South East and North East, which show modest falls on an annual basis. The average price of a home in England and Wales is now £304,433, up from £301,367 last October.

So no national fall as hoped ( lower house prices would help first time buyers) but at east a slowing of the rise to below the rate of growth of both inflation and wages. There is also plenty of noise around as one official measure is still showing over 3% growth whilst the Rightmove asking prices survey shows falls. As ever the numbers are not easy to wade through as for example I have my doubts about this.

In London annual price growth has slowed substantially in the last month, falling to just 1.8%, yet there has still been an increase of £10,889 in the last twelve months with the average price in London now standing at £620,571.

The noose around house prices is complex as for example we have seen today in the trajectory of mortgage rates and reporting requires number-crunching as this from Politics Live in the Guardian shows.

GDP per head would fall by 3% a year, amounting to an average cost per person a year of £1,090 at today’s prices.

I would like to see an explanation of why it would fall 3% a year wouldn’t you? Much more likely the NIESR suggests a 3% fall in total and just for clarity it is against a rising trend. Of course if we saw falls as reported in the Guardian we would see the 18% drop in house prices suggested by some before the EU referendum whereas so far we have seen a slowing of the rises. But the outlook still looks cloudy for house prices and I still hope that first time buyers get some hope in terms of lower prices rather than help to borrow more.

Podcast

Was October a sign of the end of austerity for the UK Public Finances?

A feature of the past few months or so is that much of the economic data for the UK has been good, at least for these times. This was repeated by the CBI Industrial Trends Survey yesterday.

Manufacturing output growth picked up in the quarter to November, and firms saw overall order books rebound from a fall in October, according to the latest monthly CBI Industrial Trends Survey.

If we look into the detail we see this.

35% of businesses said the volume of output over the past three months was up, and 17% said it was down, giving a balance of +18%. This was above the historic average (+4%) and a slight pick-up from October (+13%).

So in spite of the ongoing problems for the car sector the manufacturing sector has been growing and above trend. Of course the trend for growth has not been much meaning that over the past few decades it has shrunk as a percentage of our economy but at least it is in a better phase and orders look solid too.

29% of manufacturers reported total order books to be above normal, and 19% said they were below normal, giving a balance of +10%. This was above the long-run average (-13%) and followed a weakening in October (-6%).17% of firms said their export order books were above normal, and 17% said they were below normal, giving a normal balance (0) – above the long-run average of -17%, and marginally higher than October (-4%).

I am not quite sure how to treat the export order books as that implies they were always shrinking, but anyway in relative terms we are doing better than usual. Speaking of exports overall take a look at this I spotted the other day.

Will I have to change the theme of trade deficits that I have run with for over twenty years now? It is way to early to say anything like that because any good month seems quite often to be followed by a reversal. But overall there has been an improving trend in there.

Bank of England

Yesterday several policymakers including Governor Carney were called to give evidence to the Treasury Select Committee. I would like to use the written evidence of Michael Saunders to illustrate their thinking, as it should in my view be questioned much more than it is.

With economic growth having been above potential for six or seven years, the spare capacity created by the recession has now probably been used up.

Hands up anybody who thinks that the past six or seven years have been “above potential”? Also if it has been this is quite a downgrade on the past as whilst I am far from a fan of extrapolating the previous boom we are way below its trends and need to understand why. Whereas the policies that have got us here from the Bank of England have apparently been a triumph. This swerve from central bankers from we saved you to the future is grim does not get challenged anything like enough. I would argue that the many of the problems have been created by their policies.

He is at it again here.

In turn, underlying pay growth (measured by private sector average weekly earnings excluding
bonuses) has picked up from 2-2½% a year ago to about 3% in June-August. This is close to a target consistent
pace, given the subdued trend in productivity growth.

As ever we see a central banker cherry-picking the data to get the answer he wants but let;s be fair. After all with their performances they are unlikely to be keen on bonuses! But there is a suggestion here that 3% wages growth is as good as it gets. Yet the same models which via their output gap theories suggest we can’t grow very fast are the same ones which previously told us that wage growth would be 5% plus if we had an employment situation like we do now.

Also the two statements below need challenging.

Under-employment has fallen markedly over recent years, with the net balance of desired extra working hours now around zero.

Okay so traditional output gap and full employment theory. But how does it go with this?

Overall, a U6-type  underemployment measure (which combines unemployment, IVPTs and the marginally attached) has fallen to 11.8% of the workforce in June-August from 12.6% a year ago.

It seems that there is quite a gap here as we recall that the level we have been guided to for the unemployment rate has dropped from 7% to 4.25% over the past five years, again with much less challenge than should have happened.

Oh and if you are struggling with currency trends Governor Carney provided his thoughts on the matter. From Bloomberg.

“There will be events that move sterling up and events that move sterling down,” he said. “That will likely continue for the next little while.”

The Public Finances

The picture here has been set fair and to some extent that continued today in the official figures.

Borrowing in the current financial year-to-date (YTD) was £26.7 billion: £11.2 billion less than in the same period in 2017; the lowest year-to-date for 13 years (since 2005).

As you can see this picked up the pace on the previous year, and FYE stands for Financial Year Ending.

Borrowing in the FYE March 2018 was £40.1 billion: £5.5 billion less than in FYE March 2017; the lowest financial year for 11 years (since FYE 2007).

So we need to borrow less than we did which means that in relative terms the debt issue is fading as the economy has been growing.

Debt at the end of October 2018 excluding Bank of England (mainly quantitative easing) was £1,598.5 billion (or 75.0% of GDP); a decrease of £33.6 billion (or a decrease of 4.0 percentage points) on October 2017.

Oh and as a technical point it is not mainly QE it is mainly the Term Funding Scheme and if we put the Bank of England back in the ratio is falling more slowly and is 84% of GDP.

The end of austerity?

October itself had an interesting kicker which will be immediately apparent below.

Central government receipts in October 2018 increased by 1.2% compared with October 2017, to £59.9 billion; while total expenditure increased by 7.7% to £65.4 billion.

I have looked into the numbers and if we look just at taxes growth seems to have remained at around 4%. The extremely complicated business as to how we account for interest on the Bank of England’s QE holdings seems to have subtracted about £1 billion which makes up the difference.

Moving to expenditure the explanation is about as clear as mud.

This month, much of the increase in spending was in the current account, with notable growth in both the expenditure on goods and services as well as net social benefits. Over the same period, interest payments on the government’s outstanding debt have increased; due largely to movements in the Retail Prices Index to which index-linked bonds are pegged.

So we spent more because we spent more. As to the index-linked debt we will have to monitor that as overall the numbers are down this financial year and with the oil price now at US $64 that will help.

As ever it is complicated as you see last October we thought we borrowed £8 billion but the figures ( as happens often) have improved.

Borrowing (Public sector net borrowing excluding public sector banks) in October 2018 was £8.8 billion, £1.6 billion more than in October 2017;

Comment

So the overall good economic news has led to a number higher than before for the UK fiscal deficit! It is a reminder that these numbers are erratic as back in July we were noting harsh austerity and now October says “spend,spend,spend.” Whilst there may be some flickers of change in for example the £700 million extra for the troubled local authority sector we need to see more before there is a clear change of direction.

One thing we can be sure of however is the first rule of OBR Club, where OBR stands for the Office of Budget Responsibility. When I checked last October’s it had around half the year’s data but apparently had learnt nothing.

The Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) forecast that public sector net borrowing (excluding public sector banks) will be £58.3 billion during the financial year ending March 2018, an increase of £12.5 billion on the outturn net borrowing in the financial year ending March 2017.

Up is always the new down for them. Well we should have realised October might be a dodgy month when the OBR released this on the 29th.

On 29 October 2018, the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) revised their official forecast of borrowing for the financial year ending (FYE) March 2019 down by £11.6 billion to £25.5 billion.

 

The Bank of England is now re-writing history about UK house prices

Yesterday saw the latest in a series of interviews on the Iain Dale show on LBC Radio by Ian McCafferty of the Bank of England. Actually it was the last by Ian as he is about to depart the Bank of England. Before I start I should point out that we were colleagues back in my time at Baring Securities which feels like a lifetime ago mostly because it is! His main claim to fame was declaring that the German Bundesbank would not do something at a meeting and then the door was opened by someone keen to tell the room some news which I am sure you have already guessed.

Moving forwards in time to yesterday Ian had more than a little trouble with the concept of full employment as he assured listeners that the UK was at full employment at the moment. This was really rather breathtaking as it showed a lack of understanding on two major levels. Firstly if we just stay with the unemployment rate those who read my update yesterday will be aware that Japan has seen an unemployment rate some 2% lower or nearly half ours. An odd thing to miss as our shared history involved specialising in Japanese economics and finance. Also it was a statement that on the face of it made no nod at all to the concept of underemployment where people have some work but not as much as they would like. So in his world both Japan and underemployment seemed not to exist.

Presumably Mr.McCafferty was trying to bolster the case for last week’s interest-rate rise in the UK which of course needs all the bolstering it can get but he ended up being challenged by the host Iain Dale. The response was a shift to claiming we are around the natural or equilibrium rate of unemployment but of course this led to another problem. On this road he ended up pointing out that the Bank of England has had more than a few of these but he did at least avoid a full confession that they started the game by signalling that a 7% unemployment rate was significant but now tell us that the equilibrium rate is 4.25%. Thus the reality is that they have chased the actual unemployment rate like a dog chases it tail although to be fair to dogs they usually tire of the game once the fun stops. Whereas should we live up to the song “Turning Japanese” the Bank of England will have chased the “equilibrium rate of unemployment” from if we are generous 6.5% to 2.5%.

House Prices

As you can imagine this subject came up and it was interesting to hear an explanation of UK house price rises omitting the role of the Bank of England. You might have thought that having gone to the effort of producing the bank subsidy called the Funding for Lending Scheme in the summer of 2012 and then produced research saying it had reduced mortgage rates by up to 2% that you might think it was a factor. This would be reinforced by the fact that it was in 2013 that house prices in the UK began to turn and head higher. There is also the Term Funding Scheme which began in August 2016 which amounted to some £127 billion of cheap liquidity ( 0.25% back then) for the banks which even the casual observer might think was associated with the record low mortgage interest-rates which were then seen.

This seems to be a new phase where the Bank of England sings along with Shaggy “It wasn’t me.” The absent-minded professor Ben Broadbent was on the case on the 23rd of July.

But it should be borne in mind when reading – as one often does – that QE has done little except boosted
prices of assets like shares and houses, or even led to a “boom” or “bubble” in those markets.

The research quoted was from colleagues of his who have voted for this QE and I am sure many of you would love to be judge and jury on your own actions! Later he tells us this about UK house prices.

But the latest figure is barely any higher than it was in the middle of the last decade.

So it is the same as the level that contributed to the crash? Not quite so good and whilst it may not be that much of an issue when your salary plus pension benefits total £356,000 many will note that real wages are 6% below their peak according to the official data.So house prices compared to wages are rather different.

Also there is this issue.

Broadly speaking I don’t think any of these things is true. It’s not new; it’s not exactly printing money; equity
and house prices are in real terms still comfortably below their pre-crisis levels; inequality hasn’t risen – nor,
according to the most detailed analysis available, did easier monetary policy have any net impact on it.

I guess he has never seen that bit in the film The Matrix where the Frenchman describes the role of cause and effect. Also on the subject of inequality I note that FT Alphaville has pointed out this.

In London and the South-East of England, this shift has been profound – real prices are nearly 30 per cent higher in London, and 10 per cent higher in the South-East and East.

Some house owners are indeed more equal than others it would appear. But this brings us back to Ian McCafferty who assured us on LBC that the ratio of house prices in London to the rest of the country “is now re-establishing itself at close to its more normal long-term level” . Is 30% higher the new “close to”?

Inevitably the issue of Brexit came up and sadly our intrepid policymaker seemed to struggle with both numbers and words in this regard. Here is the Reuters view on this.

“We are getting stories on (how) the numbers of French and German and other European bankers that are coming to London have fallen quite sharply over the last couple of years,” McCafferty said in a question-and-answer session on LBC radio.

You might think that he would know the numbers via contacting the banks rather than listening to “stories”. Also he had opened by saying there had been an “exodus” of such bankers which of course evokes the thought “movement of jah people” a la Bob Marley. The response from the host was that the number of bankers in the City had risen which then got the reply that the inflow had slowed which again is somewhat different to the initial claim. As this is an issue that is both polarised and political an independent ( his words not mine) should be ultra careful in this area rather than giving us vague rhetoric which falls apart at any challenge.

Oh and before we move on from housing there was this bit.

a number of those who are renting particularly those who work in the City.

Was he thinking of Governor Carney who of course got a £250,000 annual rent allowance?

Comment

There is much that is familiar here as we note that the Bank of England is looking to re-write history in its favour. There are two initial problems with this and the first is the moral hazard in you and your colleagues judging your own actions. On this road Napoleon could have written a counterfactual account of how his retreat from Moscow was a masterly example of the genre. Also there are clear contradictions in the story of which two are clear. The rise in asset prices seems able to boost the economy on the one hand but to have had no impact on inequality on the other. London house prices can have soared and become completely unaffordable in central London to all but the wealthiest and yet are close to normal long-term trends.

Only last week we were guided towards three interest-rate rises but now there seems only to be two.

Britain is “now at full employment” and so can expect “a couple more small interest rate rises” in the next two to three years to stop the economy from overheating, according to Bank of England policymaker Ian McCafferty. ( Daily Telegraph which failed to spot the full employment issue)

Maybe it is because they are only raising them so they can later cut them.

Higher interest rates will also give the Bank room to cut them once more if the economy hits a troubled spell in the years ahead.

 

What is happening to the UK housing market and house prices?

The last year of two has seen something of a change in the environment for UK house prices. The most major shift of all has come from the Bank of England which for the moment seems to have abandoned its policy where the music was “Pump it up” by Elvis Costello. This meant that when around 2012 it saw that even what was still considered an emergency Bank Rate of 0.5% plus its new adventure into Quantitative Easing was not enough to get house prices rising it introduced the Funding for Lending Scheme. This reduced mortgage rates by around 1% quite quickly and had a total impact that rose towards 2% on this measure according to Bank of England research. This meant that net mortgage lending improved and then went positive and the house price trend turned and then they rose.

The next barrage came in August 2016 with the “Sledgehammer QE” and the cut in Bank Rate to 0.25%. This was accompanied by the Term Funding Scheme (TFS) which was a way of making sure banks could access liquidity at the new lower Bank Rate and it rose to £127 billion. This was something of a dream ticket for the Bank of England as it boosted both the “precious” ( the banks) and house prices in one go,

However that was then as the Bank reversed the Bank Rate cut last November and the TFS ended this February. So whilst the background environment for house prices is favourable they have risen to reflect that and for once there are no new measures to keep the bubble inflated. Also we have seen real wages fall and then struggle in response to higher inflation.

Valuations

This morning has brought news about something which has not happened for a while now but is something which is destabilising for house prices. From the BBC.

There has been a “significant” rise in homes being valued at less than what buyers have agreed to pay, the UK’s largest mortgage advisers have said.

These “down valuations”, by lenders, can mean buyers having to pay thousands of pounds extra, up front, to avoid the sale collapsing.

Estate agents Emoov said it reflected surveyors predicting a financial crash.

UK Finance said lenders, which it represents, were right to ensure property values were realistic.

The organisation said borrowers also benefited from houses having an “independent valuation”.

Emoov are an interesting firm that have recently completed a crowdfunding program and perhaps want some publicity but for obvious reasons estate agents usually stay clear of this sort of thing. If we step back for a moment we note that whilst they are mostly in the background surveyors do play a role in price swings via their role in providing a base for mortgage valuations. They should know the local market and therefore have knowledge about relative valuations but absolute ones is a different kettle of fish. If they get nervous and start to be stricter with valuations then the situation can snowball though mortgage chains. As to the numbers the BBC had more.

Emoov, one of the UK’s largest digital estate agents, said one in five of its sales now resulted in a down valuation.

Two years ago, it was fewer than one in 20, it added.

This is the highest rate since the UK’s financial crash in 2008, according to agents from 10 mortgage adviser groups contacted by the Victoria Derbyshire programme.

There is a specific example quoted by the BBC.

Phil Broodbank, from Wirral, bought his house for £180,000 a few years ago and spent up to £25,000 renovating it.

When the time came to remortgage, a surveyor valued his house at £200,000 without visiting it in person – in what is known as a “drive by”.

This valuation was £20,000 lower than a local estate agent had valued the property.

One bonus is that “drive by” in the Wirral does not quite have the same menace as in Los Angeles. Also these have been taking place for quite some time now but there were fewer complaints when the bias was upwards. The response from UK Finance is fascinating.

“Although the valuation is carried out for the lender, borrowers also benefit from a realistic independent valuation as it could help them avoid paying over the odds for the property they are buying.”

How do they know it is “realistic” especially if it was a cursory observation from the road? Also as the valuation is for the lender there are always going to be more interested in downturns that rises as of course the bank is more explicitly vulnerable then. In case you are wonder who UK Finance are they took over the British Bankers Association.

Borrowing Limits

The Guardian pointed out over the weekend that some old “friends” seem to be back.

this week Clydesdale Bank said it will grant first-time buyers mortgages of 5.5 times a borrower’s income and lend up to £600,000 – and the buyer only needs a 5% deposit.

A little care is needed as this is for the moment only available to those classed as professionals by Clydesdale Bank who earn more than £40,000 a year. Also there is a theoretical limit in that according to Bank of England rules mortgage lenders are supposed to keep 85% or more of their business using a 4.5 times times a borrower’s income. But if history is any guide these things seem to spread sometimes like wildfire and this industry has a track record that even a world-class limbo dancer would be envious of in terms of slipping under rules and regulations.

This bit raised a wry smile.

But mortgage brokers said they were relaxed about Clydesdale’s new deal.

As it is a potential new source of business they are no doubt secretly pleased. Also I did smile at this from the replies.

 5.5 times of income is nothing unusual. In Australia this is very common and goes as high as 7 to 9 times. ( GlobalisationISGood )

This Australia?

Rising global interest rates are combining with bank caution on lending, via extreme vetting of loan applications in the wake of financial services Royal Commission revelations, to generate a mini-credit crunch.

That’s putting further pressure on house prices, whose falls are gathering pace. ( Business Insider )

What this really represents if we return to the UK is another sign that houses are unaffordable for the ordinary buyer. Another factor in the list is this.

While 25-year terms were the standard in the 1990s, 30 years is now the norm for new borrowers, with many lenders stretching to 35 years to make monthly payments more affordable. ( Guardian )

 

Comment

We do not know yet how the two forces described today will play out in the UK housing market but down valuations seem to be a stronger force. After all Clydesdale will only do a limited amount of its mortgages and fear is a powerful emotion. Mind you some still seem to be partying like its 2016.

The billionaire founder of Phones4u John Caudwell has claimed his Mayfair property development will be “the world’s most expensive and prestigious apartment block”.

The entrepreneur, who turned to property after selling his mobile phone company for £1.5bn in 2006, plans to convert a 1960s multi-storey car park in the heart of Mayfair into 30 luxurious flats.  ( City-AM).

As to hype well there is this.

“I see London as the epicentre of the world and I see Mayfair as the epicentre of London. Therefore, I see my building site as the epicentre of the world,” Caudwell told City A.M. “I can’t think of anywhere better for people to live.”

Meanwhile I am grateful to Henry Pryor for drawing my attention to this. From the Independent in August 2000.

Roger Bootle, who predicted the death of inflation five years ago, says Britain has seen the last of extreme gyrations in house prices…………Nationwide, Britain’s largest building society, reported yesterday that the price of the average home fell 0.2 per cent, or £319, to £81,133 between June and July.

As of this June it was £215,844.

 

 

 

UK house price growth continues to slow

Yesterday we looked at a house price bubble which is still being inflated whereas today we have a chance to look at one where much of the air has been taken out of the ball. Can a market return to some sort of stability or will it be a slower version of the rise and fall in one football match demonstrated by Maradona last night? Here is the view from the Nationwide Building Society.

Annual house price growth fell to its slowest pace for five
years in June. However, at 2% this was only modestly below the 2.4% recorded the previous month.

As you can see the air continues to seep out of the ball as we see another measure decline to around 2% reaching one of out thresholds on here. Or to put it another way finally house price growth is below wage growth. Of course that means that there is a long way to go to regain the lost ground but at least we are no longer losing it.

The Nationwide at first suggests it is expecting more of the same.

Indeed, annual house price growth has been confined to a
fairly narrow range of c2-3% over the past 12 months,
suggesting little change in the balance between demand and supply in the market over that period.
“There are few signs of an imminent change. Surveyors
continue to report subdued levels of new buyer enquiries,
while the supply of properties on the market remains more of a trickle than a torrent.

Although I note that later 1% is the new 2%

Overall, we continue to expect house prices to rise by
around 1% over the course of 2018.

Every measure of house prices has its strengths and weaknesses and the Nationwide one is limited to its customers and tends to have a bias towards the south but it is reasonably timely. Also there is always the issue of how you calculate an average price which varies considerably so really the best we can hope for is that the methodology is consistent. According to the Nationwide it was £215,444 in June.

The Land Registry is much more complete but is much further behind the times as what is put as April was probably from the turn of the year..

As of April 2018 the average house price in the UK is £226,906, and the index stands at 119.01. Property prices have risen by 1.2% compared to the previous month, and risen by 3.9% compared to the previous year.

As you can see the average price is rather different too.

Bank of England

It will be mulling this bit this morning.

Annual house price growth slows to a five-year low in June

This is because that covers the period in which its Funding for Lending Scheme ( replaced by the even more friendly Term Funding Scheme) was fully operative. When it started it reduced mortgage rates by around 1% and according to the Bank of England some mortgage rates fell by 2%. I think you can all figure out what impact that had on UK house prices!

Or to put it another way the house price falls of 2012 and early 2013 were quickly replaced by an annual rate of house price growth of 11.8% in June 2014 according to the Nationwide. So panic at the Bank of England changed to singing along with Jeff Lynne and ELO.

Sun is shinin’ in the sky
There ain’t a cloud in sight
It’s stopped rainin’ everybody’s in a play
And don’t you know
It’s a beautiful new day, hey hey

Some of them even stopped voting for more QE as it has mostly been forgotten that nearly a quorum wanted more of it as the economy was kicking through the gears.

Although some at the Bank of England will no doubt have their minds on other matters.

Simon Clarke MP said the figures had “disturbing echoes” of the MPs’ expenses scandal. “One of the most important aspects of the culture of any public institution is of course that it provides value for money to the taxpayer,” he added.

“In the last two-and-a-half years two members of the FPC, Mr Kohn and Mr Kashyap, have incurred £390,000 in travel expenses, which is simply a staggering sum.”  ( The Guardian).

Regular readers will recall I did question a similar situation regarding Kristin Forbes on the Monetary Policy Committee who commuted back and forth from the US. I do not know if she benefitted from the sort of largesse and excess demonstrated below though.

The pair are based in the US and Clarke said the £11,084.89 flight for Kashyap from Chicago to London would leave his constituents “gobsmacked”.

Kohn spent £8,000 on a flight from Washington to London and £469 on taxis as part of expenses for a single meeting.

As ever a sort of Sir Frank ( h/t Yes Prime Minister ) was brought forward to play a forward defensive stroke.

“Having seen these committees in action, and seen the contributions they’ve made, as high as their expenses have been, also staggering has been their contribution,”

I was hoping for some enlightenment as the their “staggering contribution” as I do not recall ever hearing of them. The man who thinks this also submitted this about his role as a bank CEO so I guess he might also believe in fairies and the earth being flat.

The key, I always found, was to begin the process by
considering life from the customer’s perspective and then to build products and services that responded to real needs – whilst taking utmost care to build the TCF principles into every operational step in the firm’s business model.

Oh and I have promoted Bradley Fried the chair of the Court to a knighthood although of course those of you reading this in a couple of years or so are likely to be observing his K.

Looking ahead

Yesterday’s mortgage data from UK Finance had a two-way swing. Let us start with the positive.

Estimated gross mortgage lending for the total market in May is £22.2bn, 8.8 per cent higher than a year earlier. The number of mortgage approvals by the main high street banks in May has also risen, increasing by 3 per cent compared to the same month a year earlier.

Except that the latter sentence was not so positive when broken down.

 As in April, increased approval numbers were driven by remortgaging, some 18 per cent more than a year earlier.  In contrast, approvals for house purchase were 3.8 per cent lower than the same period a year earlier.

In case you are wondering about who or what UK Finance represents it is the new name for the BBA. The title of British Bankers Association became so toxic that they decided to move on.

Comment

So the winds of change are blowing and not only at the O2 where the Scorpions played the weekend before last. The era of Bank of England policy moves to push asset price higher is over at least for now although of course the stock as opposed to the flow remains. If it stays like that we could see house prices for once grow at a similar rate to rents and wages but I doubt it because the Bank of England is a serial offender on this front.

And when the electricity
Starts to flow
The fuse that’s on my sanity
Got to blow
System addict
I never can get enough
System addict
Never can give it up ( Five Star and I mean the pop combo not Beppe Grillo)
In the shorter-term will Mark Carney fire things up again or spend his last year here thinking about his legacy and some Queen?
Because I’m easy come, easy go
A little high, little low
Anyway the wind blows, doesn’t really matter to me, to me