London House Prices are falling on one measure and also rising!

This morning has seen Rightmove update us on the UK property market and in response we have learnt where Bloomberg journalists live.

London house prices fell the most since the beginning of the year in June as the capital’s property market continued to lag behind the rest of the country.

The price of property coming to market in London dropped by 0.9 percent, bringing the average price to 631,737 pounds ($838,000), property-website operator Rightmove said in a report Monday. Values fell 1 percent from a year earlier, marking the 10th negative month in a row.

The rest of the country only gets a brief look in.

Nationally, prices grew 0.4 percent on the month and 1.7 percent on an annual basis.

Then it is time to get back to the heart of the matter.

In London, “new-to-the-market sellers recognize that the traditionally busier spring selling season is drawing to a close,” said Rightmove Director Miles Shipside.

Oh and as it is Bloomberg there is a consistent scapegoat for pretty much all seasons.

London’s property market has been hit particularly badly by uncertainty surrounding Britain’s impeding exit from the European Union.

Actually we get a reminder of what Rightmove really say from property industry eye.

New asking prices have bounced up to another record, averaging £309,439.

This morning Rightmove said asking prices for properties new to the market are 0.4% up on last month, and 1.7% up on June last year.

The Rightmove data is not for the price at which property is sold it is what sellers are asking for the property or trying to get. In terms of a rising price by this measure then it is a northern thing as the stock available has declined.

From the west midlands northwards, stock has fallen away since a year ago, by between 2.2% and 10.4% in Scotland.

Stock has also dwindled in Wales, by 10.3%.

Whereas prices are under pressure from something of a wave of more housing stock coming onto the market in the south.

By contrast, the amount of available stock has shot up almost 25% on a year ago in the east of England; by 20% in the south-east; by 16.4% in London; 8.2% in the south-west; and by 4% in the east midlands.

Land of Confusion

I am using the Genesis lyric because if we move to LSL/Acadata we get told something very different about London house prices.

Despite the lack of movement in prices, there is one big change in the market this month: London and the South East are no longer a brake on the market. Taking into account these two regions, there was a 2.2% annual price growth – taking them out of the equation, the growth rate is lower – at 2.1 %. It reverses the trend of most of last year.

Although we have learnt from past experience to feel something of a chill when we read something like this.

This is partly due to a change in methodology, which better captures sales of new build properties. These tend to cost more than existing homes and have a particularly strong impact on the average price in London.

In fact the major impact from this is on flats in London.

This was particularly pronounced for flats, where new build flats sold at an average premium of almost
a third (32.3%). They also made up a substantial proportion of sales of all flats, accounting for more than a quarter (26.4%), whereas new builds accounted for just 2.4% of sales of detached properties.

Once you have done that you get this.

The revised figures in London, taking into account new build properties, show annual growth of 2.9%, the lowest since March 2012. Prices also fell on a monthly basis, down 0.3%, taking the average house price in the capital to £636,947.

In case you are no aware the issue of how to treat new builds is a difficult one and is one where the official Office for National Statistics series has had trouble too. Obviously a brand new property cannot have a price rise per se but you can calculate an index based on say quantity like size or number of bedrooms. Much more difficult and perhaps impossible is to allow for the quality of the property.

Also treating London as one market gets a bit of a critique from reality below.

A number of London boroughs are recording big falls over the 12 months to April 2018. They include the City of London (down 24.9%, albeit on a small number of sales), Southwark, down 19.1% (largely as a result of high value properties sold the year before); and Wandsworth, down 13.1%. Growth has been more modest, with only Kensington and Chelsea, the most expensive borough, recording double-digit growth, up 10.4% to £2.17 million. The next highest increase over the year was Lambeth, where prices increased 5.8%.

The issue at this level is that you are down to a small number of sales in some cases leading to large swings. For obvious reasons people like to view the data for Kensington and Chelsea but if it is based on only a handful of sales it is to say the least problematic. Although sometimes just one sale can be crystal clear at least for it.

For those wondering if the previous owners had overpaid back in 2013 I did ask.

Number Crunching

Moving on here is some Monday morning humour from the British Chambers of Commerce.

The British Chambers of Commerce (BCC) has today (Monday) slightly downgraded its growth expectations for the UK economy, forecasting GDP growth for 2018 at 1.3% (from 1.4%) which, if realised, will be the weakest calendar year growth since 2009, when the economy was in the throes of the global financial crisis. The BCC has also downgraded its GDP growth forecast for 2019 from 1.5% to 1.4%.

Yes they think they can forecast GDP growth to 0.1%!

Next come courtesy of those suffering from a type of amnesia.

Households could be left up to £1,000 a year worse off because of Brexit trade barriers, a report will suggest.

Global consultancy firm Oliver Wyman will say that under the most negative scenario of high import tariffs and high regulatory barriers the cost to the economy could total £27bn.

The problem here is the authors so with the help of FT Alphaville let me show you how their crystal ball has worked out in the past.

It has long been known that consulting firm Oliver Wyman crowned Anglo Irish the world’s best bank in 2006 — just when Anglo was actually… well, you know the story.

Sadly, the report that bestowed this fateful distinction has (quite unaccountably!) vanished from the Oliver Wyman corporate site.

Or this.

North American Investment Bank – Bear Stearns (SPI 230) is the best-performing company in this year’s most improved sector, investment banking.

Comment

After a barrage of contradictory numbers let us step back and take stock. We see that the background for UK house prices is not what it was. For example the Term Funding Scheme of the Bank of England ended in February and whilst it still represents some £126.6 billion of cheap liquidity for the banks it is now gently declining. Other factors such as a 0.5% Bank Rate and £435 billion of QE have been at play in raising prices but that has worn off now. Perhaps we are still seeing the influence of the Help To Buy scheme in the North but unless prices fall more in London many are still above its cap of £600,000.

A welcome development is that house price growth seems to have fallen back in line with wage growth although of course the official numbers still disagree (3.9%). Even that development has the issue of course that it does not help with prices being much too high in many parts of the country. As to detail all we can honestly say is that house price inflation has fallen and some parts of London especially in the centre are seeing falls.

Moving onto my new measure which refers to a block of around 80 flats near the US Embassy in Nine Elms there was an improvement this week, There were signs of life (open windows etc) in 12 as opposed to 8.

 

 

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The Bank of England faces quite a dilemma

At the moment the minds of the Bank of England must be getting more befuddled than usual as jet lag adds to the usual problems. Once they get back from Australia ( Haldane and Broadbent) and Canada ( Governor Carney) no doubt they will set aside time to read Governor Carney’s latest speech on climate change. That is assuming the forward guidance of their various pilots is working much better than theirs as otherwise a few more flights will be required to get home. So let us open with some relatively rare good news for them. From the BBC.

Reaction Engines Limited (REL), the UK company developing a revolutionary aerospace engine, has announced investments from both Boeing and Rolls-Royce.

REL, based at Culham in Oxfordshire, is working on a propulsion system that is part jet engine, part rocket engine.

At the moment the sums are small but it is a reminder that space technology has been a success story for the UK economy over the past couple of years. It has been getting more and more mentions in the official statistics.

Ben Broadbent

Deputy Governor Broadbent has given a speech at the Reserve Bank of Australia this morning. Tucked away in it is something of a gem even for our absent-minded professor.

I discovered when writing the talk that my former colleague Paul Tucker made very similar arguments regarding accountability back in 2011.

The last thing any sensible person would do is equate former Bank of England Deputy Governor Paul Tucker with accountability. Many of you will remember the saga but for those that do not here is the Guardian from back then.

Paul Tucker, the former deputy governor of the Bank of England, is among several figures from the world of finance to receive a knighthood in the New Year honours list, despite claims that he was involved in the Libor interest-rate fixing scandal.

What has concerned our bureaucrat is what concerns bureaucrats the most everywhere which is a challenged to the bureaucratic empire.

Some have argued that, because there are significant interactions between the two, monetary and macroprudential policy should be housed not just in the same institution, but in the same policymaking committee
within the central bank. The distinct MPC and FPC should become a single “FMPC”.

Okay why not ?

The risk is that a single committee would pay
too much attention to its more verifiable objectives – the cyclical stabilisation of inflation and growth, currently
allocated in the main to the monetary policymaker – and too little to financial stability.

Yet he seems to forget this later as he remembers his boss is on both committees so we get this.

Even if the two hands are separate, it is important that the one should know what the other
is doing, and in that respect it helps that some people sit on both committees.

Indeed they do some things together.

Many economic
issues are relevant for both and, in the Bank of England, the MPC and FPC regularly receive joint briefings
on such matters.

Poor old Ben then trips over his own feet with this as an increasing number think that what he fears is the current state of play.

I think there would be risks in asking the central bank to meet a wide range of objectives with no distinctive accounting for the use of its various tools.

The housing market

Those at the Bank of England who have trumpeted wealth effects from higher house prices will be troubled by this from Estate Agents Today.

Prices are flat nationally but there are major regional variations with London seeing the sharpest fall in prices, according to the surveyors.

Respondents in the South East of England, East Anglia and the North East of England also reported prices to be falling, but to a lesser extent than in London.

Prices increased elsewhere in the UK in the last three months.

Will they now be so keen to try to push mortgage interest-rates higher and thus drive away the claimed wealth effects? Whereas at the moment the situation according to the credit conditions survey of the Bank of England reminds us that its previous policies are still having an effect.

A narrowing of spreads reflects an increase in the level of
competition in the mortgage market. In recent discussions, the major UK lenders noted that competition remains very strong.

Can anybody please tell me where the £127 billion of funding given to the banks by the Term Funding Scheme may have gone? It does not seem to have gone here.

The perceived availability of credit to small businesses decreased slightly in 2018 Q1, according to respondents to the Federation of Small Businesses’ (FSB) Voice of Small Business Index.

Also if we return to the argument provided by Ben Broadbent that a separate FPC is vital I wonder what he and they think of where the biggest impact of their TFS has been.

 competition remains very strong
and since November has increased in the higher LTV market,………..Consistent with this, the difference
between quoted rates on two-year fixed rate 90% and 75%
LTV mortgages has narrowed from 90 basis points in August to 69 basis points in March. ( LTV = Loan To Value).

As I understand it this is officially called vigilance these days.

Consumer Credit

Another example of “vigilance” can be provided here from today’s survey. You may recall that the Bank of England has taken something of a journey on this subject after Governor Carney told us this in February 2017.

This is not a debt-fuelled consumer expansion
that we’re dealing with.

Now the survey tells us this.

There has been a modest tightening in the availability of
consumer credit over the past year.

This is a reining back from the promises of a reduction that we saw in the survey for the third and fourth quarters of last year which they are no doubt hoping we have forgotten. Of course we see a sign of the Term Funding Scheme at play yet again.

Lending spreads have tightened in recent months as interest rates remained broadly unchanged following the rise in Bank Rate.

This provides two problems for the Bank of England. Firstly it has boosted consumer credit with its “Sledgehammer” policies and now we will have to face the consequences. Next is a confirmation of the earliest theme of this blog which is that Bank Rate has very little and sometimes nothing to do with the interest-rates charged in this area. In effect therefore it is somewhat impotent.

 

Comment

Yet again our absent-minded professor has been somewhat forgetful. For example his own move from being an “external” member to an internal one at the Bank of England was clearly beneficial for him but was bad for the idea of external members bringing fresh ideas and dare I say it independence to the Bank. Now that Rubicon has been crossed they too may now be hoping for promotion and monetary gain and hence influenced in the same way their appointment was an attempt to avoid.

Also the empire building of the current Governor who has overseen inflation in the number of Deputy Governors such as Ben is clearly something that cannot be challenged within the Bank. For example I am no great fan of macro prudential policy as when it was used in the past it failed and I notice the fanfare in favour has gone much quieter as reality has replaced hype.

Moving to the interest-rate issue that presently seems to be the topic du jour every day the Bank of England is facing something of a crisis as its forward guidance has put it between a rock and a hard place. The rock is the increases seen and expected in US interest-rates and the hard place is the trajectory of the UK economy.

Nigeria

The honesty is admirable but it is hard not to smile as you read why Nigeria released its inflation data an hour early today. The Hat Tip is to @LiveSquawk

It will be shortly. I published one hour earlier by accident. Forgot Watch still on London time so I released 8am instead of 9am as published 😊😊. Probably need a break/holiday. My apologies

 

 

Are London house prices set for more falls?

This morning has brought news on the state of play concerning UK house prices although I think the Guardian has tripped over its own feet a little in an attempt to slay several dragons at once.

House prices in parts of London that were once at the epicentre of the UK property boom have fallen as much as 15% over the past year in fresh evidence of the impact of the EU referendum.

Actually if you then read the article no evidence of it being caused by the EU referendum is given but in the article linked to by it from December we are pointed towards one rather likely cause as Russell Galley of the Halifax tells us this.

“As a result of the rapid price growth in the capital, house prices in relation to average earnings are still very high in London; at 8.8 times annual average earnings they are close to the historical high of 9.”

I do like the “additionally” in the sentence below, what could it be about the house price to earnings ratio that causes this?

Additionally, mortgage affordability in London is worse than its long-run average, the only region in the UK where this is so.

As we progress on we discover that the peak or nadir of the falls depending on your perspective is rather close to home for me.

Figures from Your Move, one of the UK’s biggest estate agency chains, reveal that the average home in Wandsworth – which includes much of Clapham, Balham and Putney – fell by more than £100,000 in value over the last 12 months………..Homes in the London borough of Wandsworth were fetching an average of £805,000 in January 2017 but this has now fallen to £685,000.

There have been falls elsewhere too.

Other London boroughs are also showing steep price falls. In Southwark, south London, the average price has dropped from £666,000 to £585,000 in 12 months, while prices have pegged back in Islington, north London, from £750,000 to £684,000.

At this point with Wandsworth and Southwark on the list I am starting to feel a little surrounded although a common denominator is beginning to appear.

Wandsworth and Southwark are home to huge speculative property developments facing on to the River Thames – including the Battersea Power Station development – but the market for £1m-plus one-bed properties has shrivelled in recent years.

The scale of this was explained in the Times just under a fortnight ago.

The new neighbourhood — Europe’s biggest regeneration zone, with 39 development sites across 561 acres — will contain 20,000 homes as well as cultural, retail and business facilities. It is set to be completed by 2022. A £1.2 billion Northern Line Tube extension will create two new stations, Nine Elms and Battersea Power Station, to open in 2020.

Or if you prefer in in picture form, here is a part of it which is yet to come.

If you cycle through it as you now can you get an idea of the scale that somehow cycling past does not quite give, If we return to the economic consequences of this we see that the existing lack of affordability in central London combined with the surge in supply is something that can explain the recent price falls. It was always going to require quite an influx of wealthy people to populate the area and of course that would be in addition to the many who have arrived in recent times. A sort of “overshooting” I think in assuming that a trend would not end. If we wish to help the Guardian out we could suggest that the EU Referendum has probably deterred some although it does not actually make that case and curiously I have seen one or two bits of evidence that more in fact have arrived ahead of possible changes. So something along the lines of what happened with Hong Kong a couple of decades ago.

Looking wider

If we do we get something much more sober. Here is LSL Acadata which produced the report.

Prices in London fell again in January, down £4,662 or 0.8%, leaving average prices in the capital at £593,396. That’s down 2.6% annually, the biggest decline since August 2009.

So we have gone from the 15% click bait to a reality more like 2.6%, However as we have often discussed this is significant as the UK establishment pretty much lifted heaven and earth to stop a significant house price fall post credit crunch. I remember prices falling in my locale and wondering of those selling were making a wise decision and that buyers would regret it? Instead of course we got the UK establishment house price put option as interest-rates were cut to 0.5% where they remain, QE and when they were not enough more QE the Funding for Lending Scheme and then more QE as well as the Term Funding Scheme. The latter has now finished albeit a stock of £127 billion remains as we await the next move.

Before we move on there was another hint in the data that affordability is the main player here.

The cheaper boroughs have fared better. More than half have seen price rises over the year, led by 4.5% growth in Bexley, which, with an average price of £363,082, still has the cheapest property in the capital outside Barking and Dagenham (£300,627).

Up up and away

We get reminded that the UK is in fact a collection of different house markets which are connected but sometimes weakly.

That’s now led by 4.6% annual growth in the North West, one of four regions to see new peak prices in January (along with the East Midlands, the South West and Wales).
Just eight months ago, the region was trailing every other region bar one. Now, it’s seeing strong growth in every part of the market: at the bottom, Blackburn with Darwen has seen the biggest increase in prices in the country, up 16.4% annually. At the top, Warrington is also seeing double digit growth, with prices up 10.3%.

Comment

We find on today’s journey that the trends for UK house prices remain in place as we see substantial falls in the new developments in central London and helping make the average price fall there too. This means that the UK picture is according to LSL Acadata as shown below.

Including this February, we are now in the ninth month where the annual rate of house price growth has continued to slow. It now stands at 0.6% when including London and the South East, or at 2.5% when excluding these two regions.

This represents quite a change from the 9% of February 2016 and the change has mostly been seen in London. This particular series makes a lot of effort to be comprehensive but like all efforts has its challenges and estimations.

We have subsequently recalculated all our various house price series on the basis of the new weightings, which has had the effect of decreasing the average house price in December 2017 by £6,340.

So did the average house price from this series go above £300,000 or not? I will let you decide.

One consequence of the new weightings is that the average price of a home in England & Wales has fallen below the £300,000 threshold, which we reported as having been breached during 2017.

As we mull what is or is not Fake News there was this in the Evening Standard?

Millennials, criticised by baby boomers for buying avocado on toast instead of houses….

Meanwhile eyes turn to the Bank of England as we wonder how it will respond as house prices in London fall? Perhaps its Governor Mark Carney is already thinking that June 2019 cannot come fast enough.

 

 

 

 

 

The Bank of England has a credit problem

This morning has opened with news that the winter chill affecting the UK has blown down Threadneedle Street and into the office of Governor Mark Carney at the Bank of England.

House prices fell by 0.3% over the month, after
taking account of seasonal factors…..“Month-to-month changes can be volatile, but the slowdown is consistent with signs of softening in the household sector in recent months.”

That was from the Nationwide Building Society – as ever care is needed as it is only Nationwide customers – and it backed it up by saying that the outlook was also not so good.

Similarly, mortgage approvals declined to their weakest
level for three years in December, at just 61,000. Activity
around the year-end can often be volatile, but the weak
reading comes off the back of subdued activity in October
and November (approvals were around 65,000 per month
compared to an average of 67,000 over the previous 12
months). Surveyors report that new buyer enquiries have
remained soft in recent months

So at this point Governor Carney will be miserably observing weaker business for the “precious” and a monthly house price fall. If he is cold prospects may not be so good. From the Guardian.

National Grid has issued a warning that the UK will not have enough gas to meet demand on Thursday, as temperatures plummeted and imports were hit by outages.

Good to see that there has been plenty of forward planning on this front.

The crunch is also the UK’s first major energy security test since the country’s biggest gas storage facility was closed by Centrica last year. The Rough site in the North Sea had accounted for 70% of the UK’s gas storage.

Forward guidance anyone?

Three cheers from Governor Carney

However there was something of a warm fire in the Governor’s office today as he observed this from his own data.

Mortgage approvals increased in January for both house purchase and remortgaging, to 67,478 and
49,242 respectively.

The plan that started back in the summer of 2012 with the Funding for Lending Scheme continues.

Annual growth in secured lending was unchanged at 3.3% in January , with net lending at £3.4 billion.

In essence the plan was a type of credit easing where feeding cheap cash to the banks was designed to boost the UK economy via turning net mortgage lending from negative to positive. It took around a year to work but as mortgage rates fell ( initially by around 1% and later by more) net mortgage lending turned positive and has remained so. The Governor’s office will feel ever warmer as he observes this from the Nationwide.

net property wealth is the second largest store of household wealth after private pension wealth and amounted to c.£4.6 trillion over the July 2014 to June 2016 period – equivalent to around two and a half times UK output in 2016.

Any Bank of England economist looking for career advancement only has to write about these wealth effects feeding into the economy. Should he or she want solitude then all they have to do is point out the madness in using marginal prices especially at lower volumes to value a stock of housing. Then before you can cry “Oh Canada” they will be dispatched to a dark damp dungeon where the Bank of England cake trolley never arrives.

Overheating

After the speech from Chair Powell on Tuesday this has become something of a theme and there is a clear example of it in the UK unsecured credit data.

The annual growth rate for consumer credit has slowed over the past year to 9.3%, driven by other
loans and advances.

This is where we get a lesson in number crunching from the Bank of England as this is represented as slowing whereas say wage growth is always on its way to a surge. In reality consumer credit has been on something of a tear and the monthly growth of around £1.4 billion has been fairly consistent whereas wage growth has so far gone nowhere. Or to put it another way the economy is growing at around 2% so there has been a 7/8% excess for quite some time now. One area which was driving this seems now to be a fading force.

The UK new car market declined in the first month of the year, according to figures released today by the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT). 163,615 cars were driven off forecourts in January, a -6.3% fall compared with the same month in 2017.

This fading has been reflected in the UK Finance and Leasing Association figures.

 New business in December 2017 fell 2% by value and 5% by volume compared with the same month in 2016.

Yet unsecured lending has continued on its not so merry path and has now risen to £207.5 billion.

Business Lending

This was the main aim of the Bank of England especially for the smaller business sector, at least that is what we were told. Indeed  the scheme was modified we were told to improve that success. How is that going?

Lending to non-financial businesses fell by £1.6 billion in January . Loans to small-and-medium
sized enterprises fell by £0.7 billion, the largest decline since December 2014.

If we look for some perspective we see that three of the last four months have seen credit contractions and the six month average is -£100 million. So the Bank of England arrow if I may put this in Abenomics terms missed the smaller businesses target completely but scored a bullseye in consumer credit which is still growing at 9.3% per annum. The latter is of course in spite of us being told that conditions were much tighter in the latter part of 2017.

Comment

Those who have followed the UK economy over the years and indeed decades will know that today’s data follows a familiar theme. An easing of monetary policy such as the credit easing of the FLS and now the Term Funding Scheme ( £115.4 billion) followed by the Bank Rate cut and Sledgehammer QE of August 2016 would be expected to have the following results. A rise in mortgage lending and then later a rise in unsecured lending it has been ever thus. This is because it is easy to do for the banks and it is an area in which they excel whereas business lending is both more complex and harder to do. Track records do matter as I recall my late father telling me (he had a plastering business) that when he really needed finance the banks took it away whereas at other times it was plentiful. Please remember that when we are told small businesses “do not want to borrow” it may be because they have much longer memories than the banks.

Oh and in case the Bank of England tries to tell us unsecured credit growth can be cut by a Bank Rate rise or two please remember that credit card debt costs around 18% per annum according to its data.

If we switch to the real economy then there is another area where the Bank of England is lost in a land of confusion. This is the impact of the post EU leave vote fall in the UK Pound £ which according to the PMI business survey this morning seems to have helped UK manufacturers.

the continued rise in export orders s and an uplift in new orders from the domestic market provided evidence that the
foundations for continued growth were still buoyant………New orders
showed the largest monthly gain since November
and are outpacing the rate of growth in output to
one of the greatest extents in more than a decade.

It is possible that we are seeing import substitution as well as export growth. It makes you wonder how well they would be doing if the banks supported them with more and better finance doesn’t it?

Me on Core Finance TV

http://www.corelondon.tv/feds-powell-needs-just-get/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can Britain solve its credit problems and debt addiction?

A long-standing feature of the UK economy has been a problem with credit. This has several features. A major one is our obsession with the housing market and the establishment view that the economy can best be boosted by pumping it up and claiming the higher house prices as higher wealth and evidence of economic well-being.

Figure 2 shows the value of land in 2016 is estimated to be £5.0 trillion, which is 51% of the total net worth of the UK. Land increased in value by £280 billion from 2015, a 5.9% increase. This is a notably smaller increase than in 2014 and 2015, when it increased by 15% and 10% respectively. Since the land underlying dwellings is a major contributor to the value of land, the House Price Index reflects this with house prices rising at a lower rate compared with 2014 and 2015.

So £5 trillion out of this.

The total net worth of the UK at the end of 2016 is estimated at £9.8 trillion, an increase of £803 billion from 2015 and the largest annual rise on record.

I hope you are all feeling much better off! If you are a home owner then this is rather likely to be the case.

The value of land has grown rapidly from 1995, increasing by 412% compared with an average increase of 211% in the assets overlying the land.

You may have noted the swerve here which is that we have switched from the value of houses to land which presumably sounds much more secure and safe. Also if we add the value of the houses back in then £1.77 trillion added to £5 trillion means the sector is £6.8 billion or so of UK national wealth and everything else is £3 billion. Even the most unobservant may start to wonder if that is a trifle unbalanced?!

Mortgage Debt

This is something which the Bank of England put a lot of effort into increasing back in the darker days of 2012 when there was talk of a “triple-dip” in the UK economy. As I pointed out above the traditional “remedy” is to do this to the housing market.

Pump it up when you don’t really need it.
Pump it up until you can feel it. ( Elvis Costello)

They were so keen on this that we got an official denial and the Funding for Lending Scheme was badged as something to boost small business lending something which has not gone well but more of that later. What it actually achieved was to boost net mortgage lending which then when positive and now is running at a net rate of around £3 billion per month. House prices were boosted across the UK although with widely varying impacts as London boomed but other areas struggled at least relatively. Thus we end up with a claimed asset value of £6.8 billion versus a mortgage debt of £1.37 billion. What could look safer?

The catch is that there are a litany of problems with this.

  1. The economy has been tilted towards the housing sector as we note Bank of England and government support ( Help To Buy) as well as ( capital gains) tax advantages. This has shifted resources to this sector.
  2. This would not look so good should house prices fall, what would the asset value and “wealth effects” be then?
  3. Those looking to enter the housing market or to trade up are not seeing a wealth increase but instead facing inflation. This is so worrying to the UK establishment they go to pretty much any effort to keep such inflation out of the official inflation numbers.

Accordingly we know that the Bank of England will be worried by this development at the beginning of the food chain for this area.

Mortgage approvals decreased in December (Table I), with falls for both house purchase and remortgaging approvals. House purchase approvals were the weakest since January 2015 and remortgaging approvals fell to 46,475, following strength in October and November. 

Unsecured Credit

This is something of an overflow area for UK credit. What I mean by this is that when the Bank of England gives the banks the green light to lend as evidenced by the Funding for Lending Scheme in the summer of 2012 or the Bank Rate cut and “Sledgehammer” QE of August 2016 this is the easiest area to expand. After all there is a flow of people into their branches or website wanting to borrow and saying yes is relatively simple. The tap gets turned on much more quickly than mortgage or business lending.

This how we found ourselves with unsecured credit running at an annual rate of around 10% per annum. The new feature this time around was the growth of borrowing for vehicle purchase via the growth of personal contract purchase and the like, so much so that very few people actually buy a car now.

 Over 86% of all private new car registrations in the UK were financed by FLA members.

Of course central bankers desperate to calm their fears about a possible recession were pleased at all the car buying but the ordinary person will be wondering what happens when the music stops? Actually according to the banking sector this is already taking place if you recall the survey the Bank of England published and of course the Financial Policy Committee is “vigilant”. This has led more than a few economists to tell us growth is over here. Meanwhile.

Consumer credit net lending was £1.5 billion in December, broadly in line with outturns during 2017 (Table J).  The annual growth rate ticked up to 9.5% in December. 

November was revised up from £1.4 billion to £1.5 billion as well. So we have growth of 9.5% with economic growth of around 2% and wages growth of a bit over 2%. What could go wrong?

The total for this category is now £207.1 billion.

Business Lending

Lending to smaller businesses was supposed to be the rationale for this and the official view was this.

The extension builds on the success of the FLS so far

The extension continued the rhetoric.

 to increase the incentive for banks to lend to small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) both this year and next;

How is that going?

Lending to non-financial businesses fell by £1.0 billion in December (Table M).  Loans to small-and-medium sized enterprises fell by £0.4bn, the largest decline since December 2014. 

Comment

There is a fair bit to consider here. But let me look at this from the point of the Bank of England. It opened the credit taps via credit easing in the summer of 2012 and added to it with the Term Funding Scheme in August 2016. This of course added to the Bank Rate cuts and QE bond buying. This was supposed to boost small business lending but in fact in spite of the economic growth we have had in recent years there has been very little of that. Indeed even the better numbers were below the economic growth rate and if anything new lending to smaller businesses is stagnant at best.

Meanwhile net mortgage lending was pushed into the positive zone and more latterly unsecured credit has been on quite a tear. So if the Bank of England was a centre forward taking a penalty kick it has not only missed the goal if we looked at the unsecured credit data it may even have cleared row Z and the stands. Or of course its true intentions were always different to what it has claimed.

 

 

 

UK house prices get ramped one more time

Yesterday we got the conformation we expected that the UK establishment cannot stop itself from meddling in the housing market with the intention of pushing house prices up. The various readings that the house price was turning highlighted by actual falls in the London area was always going to focus their minds. Thus the headline proposal in the Budget was this. From City-AM.

The government has used the Autumn Budget to abolish stamp duty for first-time buyers on purchases of up to £300,000.

First-time buyers will also receive a stamp duty holiday for the first £300,000 on purchases up to £500,000.

Launching the policy, the chancellor said 80 per cent of first-time buyers will pay no stamp duty as a result of the change.

Firstly let me wish those who are about to buy for the first time good luck with their windfall although not everybody sees it like that as this from the chief economics  correspondent of the Guardian Aditya Chakraborrty indicates.

Jack up your asking price to show him how stamp duty really works.

However sadly it will not end there as we know that such moves tend to boost house prices and of course this is the reason the policy is announced. For the government can claim it is helping first time buyers and boost house prices for property owners in a win double for it. If we think more deeply then poorer areas will see little benefit at all as the £125,000 limit for zero rate Stamp Duty was enough but areas with higher prices will see benefits and I note the way that the gains were given to those paying up to £500,000. That will benefit first time buyers in London ( albeit not some of central London) which makes me wonder if it is an attempt to stop or slow this? From the Evening Standard on London house prices.

Savills anticipates prices will fall 1.5 per cent in 2017 and a further two per cent in 2018, before stagnating in 2019

Things are usually really bad when an estate agent predicts price falls!

How much will house prices rise?

I put in a maximum public service effort yesterday on social media to point out that the first rule of OBR ( Office for Budget Responsibility) club is that the OBR is always wrong. Some seemed to learn but others parroted its claim that house prices will rise by 0.3%. So let us move on knowing that it will not be that as we mull that the gain can be up to £5000 so some prices will probably rise by that and of course some desperate to buy might leverage via a mortgage and be able to pay even more than that. There will be a small downwards effect above £500,000 as there is an extraordinary marginal tax rate where £1 costs £5000 on the other side.

Some however appear to be unaware of the record of the OBR and in this instance seemed as the TV series puts it Lost In Space.

You may note the large number of people who sent this one and wonder how many of them realise that Torsten now thinks it is between £160,000 and £190,000 although of course that may have changed by the time you read this. Does it qualify as fake news?

The BBC seems oblivious to the continual failures of the OBR too.

It also estimates that it will result in only an additional 3,500 first-time buyer purchases…….The policy will cost the Treasury £3.2bn over the next five years.

There is a further irony about this which is that Stamp Duty was one of the few areas where we seem able to raise tax rates and revenues. Partly of course due to the fact that housing benefits from capital gains tax exemptions for the main home.

Term Funding Scheme

Just a reminder that house prices will be pumped up by the extra £25 billion of this that the Bank of England requested on Monday and will therefore presumably supply before it ends in February. This works in several ways as you see banks get funds at or close to Bank Rate as opposed to going to savers which is both easier and cheaper than the 1.1% ( plus costs) they have to pay for new deposits from individuals according to the Bank of England. This means that the banks can mix between wider margins and lower mortgage rates than otherwise. The lower mortgage rates boost business volume compared to otherwise and of course via their impact on house prices improve the mortgage book of the banks.

Supply

There was a by now familiar refrain that we must build more houses which has been proclaimed by every Chancellor this century. From the BBC.

£44bn in overall government support for housing to meet target of building 300,000 new homes a year by the middle of the next decade.

I am sure you have already spotted that for housing demand it is jam today whereas for housing supply it is jam tomorrow! Indeed it is hard to avoid the thought that by the middle of the next decade the odds are that the current Chancellor will be long gone. Indeed according to Yes Prime Minster if you want to kick things into the long grass you announce an enquiry.

So I am establishing an urgent Review to look at the gap between planning permissions and housing starts.

It will be chaired by my Right Honourable Friend for West Dorset.

And will deliver an interim report in time for the Spring Statement next year.

Some care is needed as it takes time to plan and build houses and flats but we find yet again that demand and consequently house prices come first. On past track records the houses may not ever be built.

Universal Credit

It is clear that some of our poorest people have been affected by the clunky way that Universal Credit has been introduced. So I welcome the effort and money put forwards in the Budget to help with this and fixes if not all at least some of the problems.

Growth downgrade

The obvious cherry to pick for the headline writers has been the economic growth downgrade given to the UK. However this is based on the productivity forecasts of the OBR which have been well take a look for yourselves.

Oh and remember they were saying that UK borrowing will be higher this year than last? From the Budget Speech.

Today, the OBR confirm that we are on track to meet our fiscal rules:

Borrowing is forecast to be £49.9 billion this year; £8.4 billion lower than forecast at the Spring Budget.

Comment

So we received a giveaway Budget of which a lot of the giveaway was focused on the housing market. Again. Whilst some will initially gain the problem is that next time around the house prices that are being boosted will be even more unaffordable and thus more “Help” will be needed in a cycle which is so far endless. Existing home owners can continue to listen to some Hot Chocolate.

You win again

The problem is that for all the talk of rebalancing the UK economy we continue to lean towards the housing market. So whilst I welcome the efforts to boost productivity and technology they may find they are swimming against the tide. Still at least the extra maths teachers may help us in measuring productivity which may yet turn out to be the problem that never was. Also the technology issue needs to be in the right areas. I understand that one needs to provide stations to encourage use but my area has seen a considerable number of charging points for electric vehicles built in the last year or two but they are so rarely actually used.

As a last point welcome to the Ashes series of 2017 which seems to have had a fairly even start.

Core Finance TV

You can check my predictions against what happened.

http://www.corelondon.tv/uk-budget-preview-hammond-may-cash-play/

The UK Public finances have sometimes believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.

As we await the UK Budget which of course is showing all the signs of being a leaky vessel if not a sieve a lot is going on in the background. What I mean by this is that the goal posts are moving back and forth so much that the grounds(wo)man must be grateful they have wheels on them these days. Let me give you the first example which I mentioned last week. From the Financial Times.

Chancellor Philip Hammond is planning to shift the goalposts on the government’s borrowing limits in a move that will flatter the public finances and provide up to £5bn a year in additional public spending in the Budget on Wednesday. He will use a technical change in the accounting status of housing associations to reduce headline borrowing figures but will not make a corresponding change to his deficit targets in the Budget.

What the FT omitted to point out was the full-scale of the mess here. You see it was only a couple of years ago the housing associations were included in the national debt and now they are not. So overall we have not really gained anything it just looks like we have! Along the way the credibility of the numbers has been reduced again.

The danger for a Chancellor with an apparent windfall is that somebody spends it before he can and marathon man Mark Carney sprinted to the front of the queue to help his banking friends.

Consistent with this, I am requesting that you authorise an increase in the total size of the APF of £25bn to £585bn, in order to accommodate expected usage of the TFS by the end of the drawdown period.

What is happening here is that the Bank of England has got permission to increase the size of its bank subsidy called the Term Funding Scheme by another £25 billion to £140 billion. This is where banks get the ability to borrow from the Bank of England at or close to Bank Rate which is bad news for depositors as it means the banks are less interested in them. This has three consequences, Firstly as we are looking at the public finances today if this £25 billion is used then it raises the national debt by the same amount. Then there is an odd link because if things are going well why do we need to add an extra £40 billion ( there was an extra £15 billion in August) to this?

With the stronger economy and lending growth, TFS drawings reached a total of £91 bn at mid-November 2017.

We are in a pretty pickle if banks need subsidies in the good times. Sadly the mostly supine media are unlikely to ask this question or to wonder how all the downbeat forecasts and Brexit worries have suddenly morphed into a “stronger economy”. The next issue is where will the money turn up? It could be funds to give the car loans sector one last hurrah but as housing appears to be top of the list right now it seems more likely that the Chancellor would prefer another £25 billion to subsidise mortgage rates even further.

Rates on new and existing loans fell after the TFS was launched and have remained low by historical standards

If we move to Bank of England policy it has raised interest-rates on the wider economy but now plans to expand its subsidies to “the precious”. Frankly its opus operandi could not be much more transparent.

Number Crunching

Part one

Firstly there is the FT on the Office for Budget Responsibility or OBR.

But the mood has improved since then after the OBR made clear it would offset some of the “significant” productivity downgrade with more optimistic employment forecasts.

So much for being “independent” and please remember tomorrow when the media are treating its pronouncements with respect and grandeur which is that the first rule of OBR club is that it is always wrong. Unless of course wage growth and gilt yields actually are 5% right now.

Part two

Then there is the possible/probable Brexit bill which is being reported as rising from £20 billion to £40 billion by places which told us it would be either £60 billion or £100 billion. So is that up or down? You choose.

Part three

I am sad that what was once a proud national broadcaster has sunk to this but this is finance from the BBC.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/uk-politics-42059439/loadsamoney-norman-smith-on-the-brexit-divorce-bill

Today’s data

The news did not give any great reasons to be cheerful.

Public sector net borrowing (excluding public sector banks) increased by £0.5 billion to £8.0 billion in October 2017, compared with October 2016.

The driver here was increased debt costs as the interest bill rose from £4.8 billion last October to £6 billion this. As conventional Gilt yields are broadly similar then most if not all of this has been caused by higher inflation as measured by the Retail Prices Index. The actual amount varies as they pay on a lagged inflation basis which is not always the same but as a rule of thumb the measure has been ~2% per annum higher this year.

Looking beyond that there is a little more optimism to be seen as revenues are not to bad if we switch to the fiscal year to date numbers.

In the current financial year-to-date, central government received £394.3 billion in income, including £292.7 billion in taxes. This was around 4% more than in the same period in the previous financial year.

This means that we are doing a little better than last year.

Public sector net borrowing (excluding public sector banks) decreased by £4.1 billion to £38.5 billion in the current financial year-to-date (April 2017 to October 2017), compared with the same period in 2016; this is the lowest year-to-date net borrowing since 2007.

There has been a trend for a while for the numbers to be revised favourably as time passes so even including the debt interest rises we are edging forwards. As the inflation peak passes that will be less of an influence. The next major factor will be the self-assessment season in January and February when we will find out how much last years numbers were flattered by efforts to avoid the rise in dividend taxation.

National Debt

On the theme of moving goal posts we produce quite a lot of numbers on this front and here is the headline.

Public sector net debt (excluding public sector banks) was £1,790.4 billion at the end of October 2017, equivalent to 87.2% of gross domestic product (GDP), an increase of £147.8 billion (or 4.5 percentage points as a ratio of GDP) on October 2016.

Most of the rise in the last year can be attributed to Mark Carney and his colleagues at the Bank of England.

Of this £147.8 billion, £101.7 billion is attributable to debt accumulated within the Bank of England. Nearly all of it is in the Asset Purchase Facility, including £89.9 billion from the Term Funding Scheme (TFS).

By chance our headline number is quite close to international standards as Eurostat has our national debt at this.

general government gross debt was £1,720.0 billion at the end of March 2017, equivalent to 86.8% of gross domestic product (GDP); an increase of £68.1 billion on March 2016.

Comment

The accident of timing that brings our public finance data up to date a bit over 24 hours before the Budget gives us some perspective. Firstly if you recall some of the numbers from yesterday how wrong the OBR has been which never seems to bother the media along the lines of Alice through the looking-glass.

‘I could tell you my adventures–beginning from this morning,’ said Alice a little timidly: ‘but it’s no use going back to yesterday, because I was a different person then.’

Let me offer a policy prescription for the OBR

The mad Queen said, “Off with his head! Off with his head! Off with his head!” Well… that’s too bad… no more heads to cut.”

As to the Budget it would seem it is arriving with a housing obsession. Even the Governor of the Bank of England has got in on the act with yet another banking subsidy to reduce mortgage rates. The way we are told that was ending but in fact is being expanded feels like something out of Alice In Wonderland. Perhaps we will seem some more bribes in addition to the cheap railcards for millenials also.

As to the public finances if we skip the incompetent blunderings of the Bank of England which surely could have designed a scheme which did not raise the national debt we see a situation which is slowly improving. It is not impossible once the inflation peak passes that our debt to GDP ratio could fall but care is needed as you see the only question in the number crunching here is are there only 6?

Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.