UK GDP growth is services driven these days as manufacturing is in a depression

Today brings the UK into focus as we find out how it’s economy performed at the end of 2019. A cloudy perspective has been provided by the Euro area which showed 0.1% in the final quarter but sadly since then the news for it has deteriorated as the various production figures have been released.

Germany

WIESBADEN – In December 2019, production in industry was down by 3.5% on the previous month on a price, seasonally and calendar adjusted basis according to provisional data of the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis)

France

In December 2019, output decreased in the manufacturing industry (−2.6%, after −0.4%), as well as in the whole industry (−2.8%, after 0.0%).

Italy

In December 2019 the seasonally adjusted industrial production index decreased by 2.7% compared with the previous month. The change of the average of the last three months with respect to the previous three months was -1.4%.

Spain

The monthly variation of the Industrial Production Index stands at -1.4%, after adjusting for seasonal and calendar effects.

These were disappointing and were worse than the numbers likely to have gone into the GDP data. Most significant was Germany due both to the size of its production sector and also the size of the contraction. France caught people out as it had been doing better as had Spain. Italy sadly seems to be in quite a mire as its GDP was already 0.3% on the quarter. So the background is poor for the UK.

Today’s Data

With the background being not especially auspicious then this was okay in the circumstances.

UK gross domestic product (GDP) in volume terms was flat in Quarter 4 (Oct to Dec) 2019, following revised growth of 0.5% in Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2019.

In fact if we switch to the annual numbers then they were better than the Euro area.

When compared with the same quarter a year ago, UK GDP increased by 1.1% to Quarter 4 2019; down from a revised 1.2% in the previous period.

Marginal numbers because it grew by 1% on the same basis but we do learn a several things. Firstly for all the hype and debate the performances are within the margin of error. Next that UK economic growth in the two halves of 2019 looks the same. Finally that as I have argued all along the monthly GDP numbers are not a good idea as they are too erratic and prone to revisions which change them substantially.

Monthly gross domestic product (GDP) increased by 0.3% in December 2019, driven by growth in services. This followed a fall of 0.3% in November 2019.

Does anybody really believe that sequence is useful? I may find support from some of the economics organisations I have been debating with on twitter as their forecasts for today were based on the November number and were thus wrong-footed. Although of course they may have to deal with some calls from their clients first.

If we look into the detail we see that in fact our economic performance over the past two years has in fact been much more consistent than we might otherwise think.

GDP was estimated to have increased by 1.4% between 2018 and 2019 slightly above the 1.3% growth seen between 2017 and 2018.

Growth, just not very much of it or if we note the Bank of England “speed-limit” then if we allow for margins of error we could call it flat-out.

Switch to Services

Our long-running theme which is the opposite of the “rebalancing” of the now Baron King of Lothbury and the “march of the makers” of former Chancellor Osborne was right yet again.

Growth in the service sector slowed to 0.1% in Quarter 4 2019, while production output fell 0.8%.

So whilst there was not much growth it still pulled away from a contracting production sector and if we look further we see that the UK joined the Euro area in having a poor 2019 for manufacturing and production.

Production output fell by 1.3% in the 12 months to December 2019, compared with the 12 months to December 2018; this is the largest annual fall since 2012 and was led by manufacturing output, which fell by 1.5%.

Meanwhile a part of the services sector we have consistently noted did well again.

The services sector grew by 0.3% in the month of December 2019 after contracting by 0.4% in November 2019. The information and communication sector was the biggest positive contributor on the month, driven by motion pictures, with a number of blockbuster films being released in December (PDF, 192.50KB).

That is something literally under my nose as Battersea Park is used regularly for this.

Balance of Payments

There is an irony here because if we look internationally they do not balance as there are examples of countries both thinking they have a surplus with each other.

The numbers such as they are had shown signs of improvement but like the GDP data actually had a case of groundhog day.

The total trade deficit narrowed by £0.5 billion to £29.3 billion in 2019, with a £9.7 billion narrowing of the trade in goods deficit, largely offset by a £9.2 billion narrowing of the trade in services surplus.

The latter bit reminds me that I wrote to the Bean Commission about the fact that our knowledge of services trade is really poor and today’s release confirms this is still the case.

The trade in services surplus narrowed £5.1 billion in Quarter 4 2019 largely because of the inclusion of GDP balancing adjustments.

Let me explain this as it is different to what people are taught at school and in universities where net exports are part of GDP. The output version of GDP counts it up and then drives the expenditure version which includes trade and if they differ it is the trade and in particular services numbers in this instance which get altered. If they had more confidence in them they would not do that. This way round they become not far off useless in my opinion.

 

Gold and UK GDP

In the UK statisticians have a problem due to this.

For many countries the effect of gold on their trade figures is small, but the prominence of the industry in London means it can have a sizeable impact on the UK’s trade figures.

Rather confusingly the international standard means it affects trade but not GDP.

Firstly, imports and exports of gold are GDP-neutral. Most exports add to GDP, but not gold. This is because the sale of gold is counted as negative investment, and vice versa for imports and the purchase of gold. So, the trade in gold creates further problems for measuring investment.

So as well as the usual trade figures they intend to produce ones ignoring its impact.

Because a relatively small numbers of firms are involved in the gold trade, publishing detailed figures could be disclosive. However, within those limitations, we are now able to show our headline import and export figures with gold excluded.

A good idea I think as the impact on the UK economy is the various fees received not the movement of the gold itself, especially it we did not own it in the first place.

Oh and my influence seems to have even reached the Deputy National Statistician.

Gold, in addition to being a hit song by Spandau Ballet, is widely used as a store of value.

Comment

For all the hot air and hype generated the UK economic performance has in the past two years been remarkably similar. Actually the same is pretty much true of comparing us with the Euro area.As it happens 2020 looks as though we are now doing better but that has ebbed and flowed before.

Looking beneath this shows we continue to switch towards services and as I note the downwards revisions to net services trade I am left wondering two things. What if the services surveys are right and the switch to it is even larger than we are being told? Also it displays a lack of confidence in the services surveys to revise the numbers down on this scale. We know less than sometimes we think we do.

Meanwhile on a much less optimistic theme manufacturing has been in a decade long depression.

Manufacturing output in the UK remained 4.5% lower in Quarter 4 (Oct to Dec) 2019 than the pre-downturn peak in Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2008.

 

 

What are the economic prospects for the Euro area?

As we progress into 2020 there has been a flurry of information on the Euro area economy. However there has been quite a bit of dissatisfaction with the usual indicators so statistics offices have been looking  at alternatives and here is the German effort.

The Federal Office for Goods Transport (BAG) and the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) report that the mileage covered by trucks with four or more axles, which are subject to toll charges, on German motorways decreased a seasonally adjusted 0.6% in December 2019 compared with the previous month.

As a conceptual plan this can be added to the way that their colleagues in Italy are now analysing output on Twitter and therefore may now think world war three has begun. Returning to the numbers the German truck data reminds us that the Euro areas largest economy is struggling. That was reinforced this morning by some more conventional economic data.

Germany exported goods to the value of 112.9 billion euros and imported goods to the value of 94.6 billion euros in November 2019. Based on provisional data, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that German exports decreased by 2.9% and imports by 1.6% in November 2019 on the same month a year earlier. Compared with October 2019, exports were down 2.3% and imports 0.5% after calendar and seasonal adjustment.

We get a reminder that what was one if the causes of economic imbalance before the credit crunch has if anything grown as we note the size of Germany’s trade surplus.  It is something that each month provides support for the level of the Euro. Switching to economic trends we see that compared to a year before the larger export volume has fallen by more than import volume. This was even higher on a monthly basis as we note that the gap between the two widened. But both numbers indicate a contractionary influence on the German economy and hence GDP ( Gross Domestic Product).

Production

Today’s data opened with a flicker of positive news.

In November 2019, production in industry was up by 1.1% on the previous month on a price, seasonally and calendar adjusted basis according to provisional data of the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis). In October 2019, the corrected figure shows a decrease of 1.0% (primary -1.7%) from September 2019.

However this still meant this.

-2.6% on the same month a year earlier (price and calendar adjusted)

There is a particular significance in the upwards revision to October as some felt that the original numbers virtually guaranteed a contraction in GDP in the last quarter of 2019. In terms of a breakdown the better November figures relied on investment.

In November 2019, production in industry excluding energy and construction was up by 1.0%. Within industry, the production of capital goods increased by 2.4% and the production of consumer goods by 0.5%. The production of intermediate goods showed a decrease by 0.5%.

Only time will tell if the investment was wise. The orders data released yesterday was not especially hopeful.

Based on provisional data, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) reports that price-adjusted new orders in manufacturing had decreased in November 2019 a seasonally and calendar adjusted 1.3% on the previous month.

Producing more into weaker orders has an obvious flaw and on an annual basis the situation was even worse.

-6.5% on the same month a year earlier (price and calendar adjusted)

Perhaps the investment was for the domestic economy as we look into the detail.

Domestic orders increased by 1.6% and foreign orders fell 3.1% in November 2019 on the previous month. New orders from the euro area were down 3.3%, new orders from other countries decreased 2.8% compared to October 2019.

But if we widen our outlook from Germany to the wider Euro area we see that it was the source of the strongest monthly slowing.

In a broad sweep orders for production rose from 2013 to December 2017 with the series peaking at 117.1 ( 2015=100) but we have been falling since and have now gone back to 2015 at 100.3.

The Labour Market

By contrast there is more to cheer from this area.

The euro area (EA19) seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate was 7.5% in November 2019, stable compared with
October 2019 and down from 7.9% in November 2018. This remains the lowest rate recorded in the euro area
since July 2008.

In terms of the broad trend the Euro area is now pretty much back to where it was before the credit crunch and is a long way from the peak of above 12% seen around 2013. But there are catches and nuances to this of which a major one is this.

In November 2019, the unemployment rate in the United States was 3.5%, down from 3.6% in October 2019 and
from 3.7% in November 2018.

That is quite a gap and whilst there may be issues around how the numbers are calculated that still leaves quite a gap. Also unemployment is a lagging indicator but it may be showing signs of turning.

Compared with October 2019, the number of persons unemployed increased by
34 000 in the EU28 and decreased by 10 000 in the euro area. Compared with November 2018, unemployment fell
by 768 000 in the EU28 and by 624 000 in the euro area.

The rate of decline has plainly slowed and if we look at Germany again we wait to see what the next move is.

Adjusted for seasonal and irregular effects, the number of unemployed remained unchanged from the previous month, standing at 1.36 million people as well. The adjusted unemployment rate was 3.1% in November, without any changes since May 2019.

Looking Ahead

There was some hope for 2020 reflected in the Markit PMI business surveys.

Business optimism about the year ahead has also improved
to its best since last May, suggesting the mood
among business has steadily improved in recent
months.

However the actual data was suggested a low base to start from.

Another month of subdued business activity in
December rounded off the eurozone’s worst quarter
since 2013. The PMI data suggest the euro area
will struggle to have grown by more than 0.1% in
the closing three months of 2019.

There is a nuance in that France continues to do better than Germany meaning that in their turf war France is in a relative ascendancy. In its monthly review the Italian statistics office has found some cheer for the year ahead.

The sectoral divide between falling industrial production and resilient turnover in services persists. However, business survey indicators convey first signals of optimism in manufacturing. Economic growth is projected to slightly increase its pace to moderate growth rates of 0.3% over the forecast horizon.

Comment

The problem for the ECB is that its monetary taps are pretty much fully open and money supply growth is fairly strong but as Markit puts it.

At face value, the weak performance is
disappointing given additional stimulus from the
ECB, with the drag from the ongoing plight of the
manufacturing sector a major concern.

It is having an impact but is not enough so far.

However, policymakers will be encouraged by the resilient
performance of the more domestically-focused
service sector, where growth accelerated in
December to its highest since August.

This brings us back to the opening theme of this year which has been central bankers both past and present singing along with the band Sweet.

Does anyone know the way, did we hear someone say
(We just haven’t got a clue what to do)
Does anyone know the way, there’s got to be a way
To blockbuster

Hence their move towards fiscal policy which is quite a cheek in the circumstances.

The conceptual issue is that all the intervention and central planning has left the Euro area struggling for any sustained economic growth and certainly slower growth than before. This is symbolised by Italy which remains a girlfriend in a coma.

The Composite Output Index* posted at 49.3 in December,
down from 49.6 in November, to signal a second consecutive fall in Italian private sector output. Moreover, the decline quickened to a marginal pace.

 

Andrew Bailey’s appointment as Governor shows yet again how accurate Yes Prime Minister was

The pace of events has picked up again as whilst there is much to consider about the likely UK public finances something else has caught the eye.

Today, 20 December 2019, the Chancellor has announced that Andrew Bailey will become the new Governor of the Bank of England from 16 March 2020. Her Majesty the Queen has approved the appointment.

In order to provide for a smooth transition, the current Governor, Mark Carney, has agreed to now complete his term on 15 March 2020.

Making the announcement the Chancellor said: “When we launched this process, we said we were looking for a leader of international standing with expertise across monetary, economic and regulatory matters. In Andrew Bailey that is who we have appointed.

Andrew was the stand-out candidate in a competitive field. He is the right person to lead the Bank as we forge a new future outside the EU and level-up opportunity across the country.

It is hard not to have a wry smile at Governor Carney getting yet another extension! I think we have predicted that before. As to Andrew Bailey I guess that the delay means he will be busy in his present role as head of the Financial Conduct Authority covering up yesterday’s scandal at the Bank of England before he can move over. A new definition of moral hazard straight out of the Yes Prime Minister play book. There is the issue of the scandals he has overlooked or been tardy dealing with in his time at the FCA but there is something even more bizarre which was in the Evening Standard in 2016 and thank you to Kellie Dawson for this.

I was interested in the story of Andrew Bailey, new Bank of England chief battling a bear. Turns out his WIFE battled the bear while he was on the phone. Rolls knowing eyes at all women everywhere.

Economic Growth

There was also some good news for the UK economy this morning.

UK gross domestic product (GDP) in volume terms was estimated to have increased by 0.4% in Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2019, revised upwards by 0.1 percentage points from the first quarterly estimate…..When compared with the same quarter a year ago, UK GDP increased by 1.1% to Quarter 3 2019; revised upwards by 0.1 percentage points from the previous estimate.

So still an anaemic rate of annual growth but at these levels every little helps. One of the ironies in the Brexit situation is that annual growth is very similar as the Euro area is at 1.2%. As to the UK detail there is this.

Services output increased by a revised 0.5% in Quarter 3 2019, following the weakest quarterly figure in three years in the previous quarter. Manufacturing grew by 0.1% in Quarter 3 2019, as did production output. Construction output experienced a pickup following a weak Quarter 2 (Apr to June), increasing by 1.2%

So the “march of the makers” has in fact turned out to be the opposite of the “rebalancing” promised by the former Bank of England Governor Baron King of Lothbury. As I regularly point out services are becoming an ever larger component of UK GDP.

Also for once there was good news from the trade position.

The current account deficit narrowed to 2.8% of GDP in Quarter 3 2019, its lowest share of GDP since early 2012,

That is obviously welcome but there is a fly in this particular ointment as they seem to be splashing around between trade and investment.

The latest figures mean that net trade is now estimated to have added 1.2 percentage points to GDP growth over this period compared with the almost flat contribution in the previous estimate.

Gross capital formation is now estimated to have subtracted 1.2 percentage points from GDP growth since Quarter 1 2018 compared with the negative contribution of 0.5 percentage points previously recorded.

Also UK business investment over the past year has been revised up from -0.6% to 0.5% which is quite a change and deserves an explanation.

Public Finances

There were some announcements about future government spending in the Queen’s Speech yesterday. From the BBC.

Schools in England are promised more funding, rising by £7.1bn by 2022-23, which the Institute for Fiscal Studies think tank says will reverse the budget cuts of the austerity years.

Also there was this about the NHS.

The five-year plan, which sees the budget grow by 3.4% a year to 2023, was unveiled last year and was included in the Tory election manifesto.

The proposal to help on business rates was more minor than badged so we are seeing something of a mild fiscal expansion that the Bank of England thinks will add 0.4% to GDP. So can we afford it?

Debt (public sector net debt excluding public sector banks, PSND ex) at the end of November 2019 was £1,808.8 billion (or 80.6% of gross domestic product (GDP)), an increase of £39.4 billion (or a decrease of 0.8 percentage points) on November 2018.

As you can see whilst the debt is rising in relative terms it is falling and if we take out the effect of Bank of England policy it looks better.

Debt at the end of November 2019 excluding the Bank of England (mainly quantitative easing) was £1,626.6 billion (or 72.5% of GDP); this is an increase of £46.9 billion (or a decrease of 0.2 percentage points) on November 2018.

I am not sure why they call in QE when it is mostly the Term Funding Scheme but as regular readers will be aware there seems to be a lack of understanding of this area amongst our official statisticians.

It also remains cheap for the UK to borrow with the benchmark ten-year Gilt yield at 0.82% and more relevantly the 50-year yield being 1.2%. We have seen lower levels but as I have seen yields as high as 15% we remain in a cheaper phase.

Current Fiscal Stimulus

The UK has been seeing a minor fiscal stimulus which has been confirmed again by this morning’s data.

Borrowing in the current financial year-to-date (April 2019 to November 2019) was £50.9 billion, £5.1 billion more than in the same period last year; this is the highest April-to-November borrowing for two years (since 2017), though April-to-November 2018 remains the lowest in such a period for 12 years (since 2007).

If we go the breakdown we see this.

In the latest financial year-to-date, central government receipts grew by 2.1% on the same period last year to £485.7 billion, including £356.5 billion in tax revenue.

Over the same period, central government spent £514.6 billion, an increase of 2.8%.

With the rate of inflation declining we are now seeing increases in public spending in real terms and they may well build up as we have not yet seen the full budget plans of the new government.

Care is needed however as the numbers have developed a habit of getting better over time.

PSNB ex in the financial year ending March 2019 has been revised down by £3.3 billion compared with figures presented in the previous bulletin (published on 21 November 2019) as a result of new data.

Comment

We are at times living an episode of Yes Prime Minister as proved by the appointment of the new Governor.

Doesn’t it surprise you? – Not with Sir Desmond Glazebrook as chairman.

 

– How on earth did he become chairman? He never has any original ideas, never takes a stand on principle.

 

As he doesn’t understand anything, he agrees with everybody and so people think he’s sound.

 

Is that why I’ve been invited to consult him about this governorship?

Sir Desmond would be called a “safe pair of hands” too and no doubt would also have run into all sorts of issues if he had been in charge of the FCA just like Andrew Bailey has. Favouring banks, looking the other way from scandals and that is before we get to the treatment of whistle blowers. I do not recall him ever saying much about monetary policy.

Also the timing has taken yesterday’s scandal at the Bank of England off the front pages again like something straight out of Yes Prime Minister. We will never know whether this announcement was driven by that. However should it continue to be so accurate we can expect this next.

If I can’t announce the appointment of Mr Clean as Governor –
Why not announce a cut in interest rates?
Oh, don’t be silly, I What? Announce a cut in interest rates The Bank couldn’t allow a political cut – particularly with Jameson.
It would with Desmond Glazebrook.
Now, if you appoint him Governor, he’ll cut Bartlett’s interest rates in the morning – you can announce both in your speech.
– How do you know?
He’s just told me.

UK GDP growth is as flat as a pancake

Today brings us the last major set of UK economic data before the General Election on Thursday at least for those who vote in person. It is quite a set as we get trade, production, manufacturing and construction data but the headliners will be monthly and quarterly GDP. As the latter seem set to be close to and maybe below zero no doubt politicians will be throwing them around later. Let’s face it they have thrown all sorts of numbers around already in the campaign.

The UK Pound

This has been the economic factor which has changed the most recently although it has not got the attention it deserves in my opinion. At the time of writing the UK Pound £ is above US $1.31, 1.18 to the Euro and nearing 143 Yen. This means that the effective or trade-weighted index calculated by the Bank of England is at 81.1 which is about as good as it has been since the post EU leave vote fall ( there were similar levels in April of last year). This particular rally started on the 9th of August from just below 74 so it has been strong or if you prefer for perspective we opened the year at 76.4.

Thus using the old Bank of England rule of thumb we have seen the equivalent of more than a 1% rise in official interest-rates or Bank Rate in 2019 so far. This has produced two economic developments or at least contributed to them. The first is that inflation prospects look good and I mean by my definition not the Bank of England one. The CPI versions could head below 1% in the months to come and RPI towards 1.5%. The other is that it may have put a small brake on the UK economy and contributed to our weak growth trajectory although many producers are probably used to swings in the UK Pound by now.

Some good news

The trade figures will be helped by this from UK wind.

GB National Grid: #Wind is currently generating 13.01GW (33.08%) out of a total of 39.34GW

The catch is that of course we are reliant on the wind blowing for a reliable supply. Also that it is expensive especially in its offshore guise, as it it both outright expensive to add to the costs of a back-up.

GDP

As to growth well our official statisticians could not find any.

UK GDP was flat in the three months to October 2019.

If we look at the different sectors we see what has become a familiar pattern.

The services sector was the only positive contributor to gross domestic product (GDP) growth in the three months to October 2019, growing by 0.2%. Output in both the production and construction sectors contracted, by 0.7% and 0.3%, respectively. The weakness seen in construction was predominantly driven by a fall of 2.3% in October.

So services grew and production shrank with construction erratic but also overall lower. If you wish to go to another decimal place you can find a small smidgeon of growth as services pushed GDP up by 0.17%, production cost 0.1% and construction cost 0.02% leaving a net 0.05%. But that is spurious accuracy as that puts the numbers under too much pressure.

Services

There was something of note in the monthly series ( October).

Services also grew by 0.2% in October, with widespread growth in several industries. The most notable of these were real estate activities and professional, scientific and technical activities, which both contributed 0.06 percentage points to gross domestic product (GDP) growth. The latter was driven by strength in both architectural and engineering activities, and research and development.

Two things stand out from this. Firstly the quarterly growth was essentially October  and next that much of it was from real estate and architecture. Is Nine Elms booming again? But more seriously something is perhaps going on here that has not been picked up elsewhere.

Production

Here the news has been pretty gloomy all round although the energy part is good news in terms of better weather and less expense for consumers.

Total production output decreased by 0.7% for the three months to October 2019, compared with the three months to July 2019; this was led by manufacturing output, which fell by 0.7%, followed by falls in mining and quarrying (2.6%) and electricity and gas (1.0%).

This reminds us that these areas have been seeing a depression in the credit crunch era.

Production output in the UK remained 6.2% lower for the three months to October 2019 than the pre-downturn peak for the three months to March 2008……..Manufacturing output in the UK remained 3.5% lower for the three months to October 2019 than the pre-downturn peak for the three months to March 2008.

It was not so long ago that it looked like manufacturing was about to escape this but then the trade war happened.

There was a flicker in October alone but the impact of the swings in the pharmaceutical industry are usually much stronger than that.

The growth of 0.1% in total manufacturing output in October 2019, compared with September 2019, was mainly because of widespread strength, with 8 of the 13 subsectors displaying upward contributions. The largest of these came from the volatile pharmaceutical products subsector, which rose by 2.1%, following two consecutive periods of significant monthly weakness during August and September 2019.

Trade

The issue here is the uncertainty of the data which today has illustrated,

The total UK trade deficit (goods and services) widened £2.3 billion to £7.2 billion in the three months to October 2019, as imports grew faster than exports

That seems clear but then again maybe not.

Excluding unspecified goods (which includes non-monetary gold), the total trade deficit narrowed £4.3 billion to £2.9 billion in the three months to October 2019.

The oversea travel and tourism problems have still not be solved.

For earlier monthly releases of UK Trade
Statistics that have also been affected by this error, the versions on the website should be amended
to make clear to users that the errors led the Authority to suspend the National Statistics
designation on 14 November 2014.

Moving on there is also this.

In current prices, the trade in goods deficit widened £6.8 billion to £35.6 billion, largely driven by rising imports; the trade in services surplus widened £4.4 billion to £28.4 billion, largely driven by rising exports.

So there is hope for the UK services exports which seem to be doing well and I have long suspected have been under recorded. For example smaller businesses are likely to be missed out. The scale of this is simply unknown and as we have issues here this must feed into the wider GDP numbers which are so services driven.

So our trade problem is a case of definitely maybe.

Comment

We perhaps get the best perspective from the annual rate of GDP growth which is now 0.8% using the quarterly methodology. If we take out the spring blip that has been declining since the 2% of August 2018. There are some ying and yangs in the detail because of we start with the positive which is services growth ( 1.3%) it has been pulled higher by the information and communication category which is up by 5.4% and education which is up by 3%. But on the other side of the coin the depression in production and manufacturing has worsened as both have fallen by 1.5%. I have little faith in the construction numbers for reasons explained in the past but growth there has fallen to 0%.

There are lots of permutations for the General Election but yet another interest-rate cut by the Bank of England just got more likely. It meets next week. Also political spending plans are getting harder to afford in terms of economic growth,

 

 

 

Greece GDP growth is a tactical success but a strategic disaster

Yesterday the Eurogroup made a statement lauding the economic progress made by Greece.

We welcome the confirmation by the institutions that Greece is projected to comfortably meet the primary surplus target of 3,5% of GDP for 2019. We also welcome the adoption of a budget for 2020, which is projected to ensure the achievement of the primary surplus target and which includes a package of growth-friendly measures aimed at reducing the tax burden on capital and labour. Greece has also made significant progress with broader structural reforms, notably in the area of the labour market, digital governance, investment licensing and the business environment.

Actually of course this is another form of punishment beating as we note that the depression ravaged Greek economy will find 3.5% of GDP subtracted from it each year. It is hard not to then laugh at the mention of “growth-friendly” measures. Moving to reform well this all started in the spring of 2010 so why is reform still needed? Indeed the next bit seems to suggest not much has been done at all.

 It will be crucial for Greece to maintain, and where necessary accelerate, reform momentum going forward, including through determined implementation of reforms on all levels. Against this background, we welcome that the Greek authorities reiterated their general commitment to continue the implementation of all key reforms adopted under the ESM programme, especially as regards the reduction of arrears to zero, recruitments in the public sector and privatisations.

Anyway they are going to give Greece some of the interest and profits they have taken off it back.

Subject to the completion of national procedures, the EWG and the EFSF Board of Directors are expected to approve the transfer of SMP-ANFA income equivalent amounts and the reduction to zero of the step-up interest margin on certain EFSF loans worth EUR 767 million in total.

What about the economy?

We have reached the stage I have long feared where any improvement is presented as a triumph. This ignores two things which is how bad matters got and how long it has taken to get here. Or to put it another way Christine Lagarde was right to describe it as “shock and awe” when she was French finance minister but in the opposite way to what she intended.

Manufacturing

This week’s PMI survey from Markit was quite upbeat.

November PMI® survey data signalled a quicker improvement in operating conditions across the Greek manufacturing sector. Overall growth was supported by sharper expansions in output and new orders. Stronger domestic and foreign client demand led to a faster rise in workforce numbers and a greater degree of business confidence.

The reading of 54.1 is really rather good at a time when many other countries are reporting declines although of course the bit below compares to a simply dreadful period.

The rate of overall growth was solid and among the sharpest seen over the last decade.

However there was some good news in a welcome area too.

In response to greater new order volumes, Greek
manufacturers expanded their workforce numbers at a steep pace that was the quickest for seven months.

Also there was some optimism for next year.

Our current forecasts point towards a faster expansion in industrial production in 2020, with the rate of growth expected to pick-up to 1.1% year-on-year.

Sadly though if we look at the previous declines even at such a rate before Maxine Nightingale would be happy.

We gotta get right back to where we started from

Retail Trade

If we switch to the official data we see that the recent news looks good.

The Overall Volume Index in retail trade (i.e. turnover in retail trade at constant prices) in September 2019, increased by 5.1%, compared with the corresponding index of September 2018, while, compared with the corresponding index of August 2019, decreased by 3.9%

So in annual terms strong growth which should be welcomed. But having followed the situation in Greece for some time I know that the retail sector collapsed in the crisis. So we need to look back and if we stay with September we see that the index ( 2015=100) was 144.5 in 2009 and 129.3 in 2010 whereas this year it was 107.3. In fact looking back the peak in September was in 2006 at 167.1 so as you can see here is an extraordinary depression which brings the recent growth into perspective.

Indeed the retail sector was one of the worst affected areas.

Trade

This is one way of measuring the competitiveness of an economy and of course is the area the International Monetary Fund used to prioritise before various French leaders thought they knew better. After such a long depression you might think the situation would be fixed but no.

The deficit of the Trade Balance, for the 9-month period from January to September 2019 amounted to 16,500.5 million euros (18,313.6 million dollars) in comparison with 15,390.6 million euros (18,139.7 million dollars) for the corresponding period of the year 2018, recording an increase, in euros, of 7.2%.

However there is a bright spot which we find by switching to the Bank of Greece.

A rise in the surplus of the services balance is due to an improvement primarily in the travel balance and secondarily in the transport and other services balance. Travel receipts and non-residents’ arrivals increased by 14% and 3.8% year-on-year respectively. In addition, transport (mainly sea transport) receipts rose by 5.5%.

Shipping and tourism are traditional Greek businesses and the impact of the services sector improves the situation quite a bit.

In the January-September 2019 period, the current account was almost balanced, while a €1.4 billion deficit was recorded in the same period of 2018. This development reflects mainly a rise in the services surplus and also an improvement in the primary and the secondary income accounts, which more than offset an increase in the deficit of the balance of goods.

In fact tourism has played an absolute blinder for both the trade position and the economy.

In January-September 2019, the balance of travel services showed a surplus of €14,032 million, up from a surplus of €12,507 million in the same period of 2018. This development is attributed to an increase, by 14.0% or €1,976 million, in travel receipts, which were only partly offset by travel payments, up by 28.0% or €450 million.

GDP

Today has brought the latest GDP data from Greek statistics.

The available seasonally adjusted data indicate that in the 3rd quarter of 2019 the Gross Domestic
Product (GDP) in volume terms increased by 0.6% in comparison with the 2nd quarter of 2019, while
in comparison with the 3rd quarter of 2018, it increased by 2.3%.

The story here is of export driven growth which provides some hope. The domestic economy shrank with consumption 0.4% lower and investment 5% lower on a quarterly basis whereas there was this on the external side.

Exports of goods and services increased by 4.5% in comparison with the 2nd quarter of 2019……….Imports of goods and services increased by 0.6% in comparison with the 2nd quarter of 2019.

Comment

At first it looks extraordinary that the Greek domestic economy could shrink on a quarterly basis but then of course we need to remind ourselves that the fiscal policy described at the beginning of this article is extraordinarily contractionary. So in essence the recovery seems to be depending rather a lot on the tourism industry. I also note that if we look at the Euro area data there is an unwelcome mention in the employment section.

The largest decreases were observed in Lithuania (-1.2%), Romania (-1.1%), Finland (-0.5%) and Greece (-0.3%).

Not what you would hope for in a recovery period.

Switching to an idea of the scale of the depression we see that in the latest quarter GDP was 49 billion Euros, compared to the previous peak in the spring of 2007 of 63.3 billion Euros ( 2010 prices). So more than 12 years later still nearly 23% lower. That is what you call a great depression and at the current rate of growth it will be quite some time before we get right back where Greece started from.

 

Italy faces yet more economic hard times

This morning has brought more signs of the economic malaise that is affecting Italy, a subject which just goes on and on and on. Here is the statistics office.

In 2019, GDP is expected to increase by 0.2 percent in real terms. The domestic demand will provide a contribution of 0.8 percentage points while foreign demand will account for a positive 0.2 percentage point and inventories will provide a negative contribution (-0.8 percentage points).

That is a reduction of 0.1% on the previous forecast. In one way I doubt their forecasts are accurate to 0.1% but then in another way counting 0.1% growth is their job in Italy. The breakdown is odd though. As the net foreign demand may be small but any growth is welcome at a time of a time war but with domestic demand growing why are inventories being chopped?

So annual economic growth has gone 1.7% in 2017 and 0.8% last year and will now be 0.2% if they are correct. They do manage a little optimism for next year.

In 2020, GDP is estimated to increase by 0.6 percent in real terms driven by the contribution of domestic demand (+0.7
percentage points) associated to a positive contribution of the foreign demand (+0.1 p.p.) and a negative contribution of inventories (-0.2 p.p.).

So the main change here is that the decline in inventories slows. If we switch to a positive we are reminded that Italy’s trade position looks pretty good for these times.

In 2019, exports will increase by 1.7 percent and imports will grow by 1.3 percent, both are expected
to slighty accelerate in 2020 (+1.8% and +1.7% respectively)

Looking at domestic demand it will be supported by wages growth and by this.

Labour market conditions will improve over the forecasting period but at moderate pace. Employment
growth is expected to stabilise at 0,7 percent in 2019 and in 2020. At the same time, the rate of
unemployment will decrease at 10.0 percent in the current year and at 9.9 percent in 2020.

They mean 10% this year and 9.9% next although there is a catch with that.

The number of unemployed persons declined (-1.7%, -44 thousand in the last month); the decrease was the result of a remarkable drop among men and a light increase for women, and involved all age groups, with the exception of over 50 aged people. The unemployment rate dropped to 9.7% (-0.2 percentage points), the youth rate decreased to 27.8% (-0.7 percentage points).

As you can see the unemployment rate was already below what it is supposed to be next year so I struggle to see how that is going to boost domestic demand. Perhaps they are hoping that employment will continue to rise.

In October 2019 the estimate of employed people increased (+0.2%, +46 thousand); the employment rate rose at 59.2% (+0.1 percentage points).

The Markit PMIs

There was very little cheer to be found in the latest private-sector business survey published earlier.

The Composite Output Index* posted at 49.6 in November,
down from 50.8 in October and signalling the first decline in Italian private sector output since May. Despite this, the rate of contraction was marginal.
Underpinning the latest downturn was a marked slowdown
in service sector activity growth during November, whilst
manufacturing output recorded its sixteenth consecutive
month of contraction. The latest decrease was sharp but
eased slightly from October.

I doubt anyone is surprised by the state of play in Italian manufacturing so the issue here is the apparent downturn in the service sector. This leads to fears about December and for the current quarter as a whole. Also the official trade optimism is not found here.

Meanwhile, export sales continue to fall.

Sadly there is little solace to be found if we look at the wider Euro area.

The final eurozone PMI for November came in
slightly ahead of the earlier flash estimate but still
indicates a near-stagnant economy. The survey
data are indicating GDP growth of just 0.1% in the
fourth quarter, with manufacturing continuing to act
as a major drag. Worryingly, the service sector is
also on course for its weakest quarterly expansion
for five years, hinting strongly that the slowdown
continues to spread.

Unicredit

We have looked regularly at the Italian banking sector and its tale of woe. But this is from what is often considered its strongest bank.

After cutting a fifth of its staff and shutting a quarter of its branches in mature markets in recent years, UniCredit said it would make a further 8,000 job cuts and close 500 branches under a new plan to 2023………UniCredit’s announcement triggered anger among unions in Italy, where 5,500 layoffs and up to 450 branch closures are expected given the relative size of the network compared with franchises in Germany, Austria and central and eastern Europe.

Back in January 2012 I described Unicredit as a zombie bank on the business programme on Sky News. It has spent much if not all of the intervening period proving me right. That is in spite of the fact that ECB QE has given it large profits on its holdings of Italian government bonds. Yet someone will apparently gain.

UniCredit promised 8 billion euros ($9 billion) in dividends and share buybacks on Tuesday in a bid to revive its sickly share price, although profit at Italy’s top bank will barely grow despite plans to shed 9% of its staff.

This is quite a mess as there are all sorts of issues with the share buyback era in my opinion.  In the unlikely event of me coming to power I might rule them ultra vires as I think the ordinary shareholder is being manipulated. Beneath this is a deeper point about lack of reform in the Italian banking sector and hence its inability to support the economy. This is of course a chicken and egg situation where a weak economy faces off with a weak banking sector.

Mind you this morning Moodys have taken the opposite view.

The outlook for Italy’s banking system has changed to stable from negative as problem loans will continue to fall, while banks’ funding conditions improve and their capital holds steady, Moody’s Investors Service said in a report published today.

“We expect Italian banks’ problem loans to fall in 2020 for a fifth consecutive year,” said Fabio Iannò, VP-Senior Credit Officer at Moody’s. “However, their problem loan ratio of around 8% remains more than double the European Union average of 3%, according to European Banking Authority data. We also take into account our forecast for weak yet positive Italian GDP growth, and our stable outlook on Italy’s sovereign rating.”

What could go wrong?

Comment

There is a familiar drumbeat and indeed bass line to all of this. In the midst of it I find it really rather amazing that Moodys can take UK banks from stable to negative whilst doing the reverse for Italian ones! As we look for perspective we see that the “Euro boom” and monetary easing by the ECB saw annual economic growth of a mere 1.7% in 2017 which has faded to more or less zero now. We are back once again to the “girlfriend in a coma” theme.

Italy has strengths in that it has a solid trade position and is a net saver yet somehow this never seems to reach the GDP data. Maybe the grey economy provides an answer but year after year it fails to be measured. Of course if politico are correct there is always plenty of trade and turnover here.

Italy’s new coalition government might not last the winter, with tensions reaching a peak this week over EU bailout reform……The 5Stars oppose the planned ESM reform because they say it would make it harder for highly indebted countries, like Italy, to access bailout funds without painful public-debt restructuring.

That reminds me about fiscal policy which is the new go to in the Euro area according to ECB President Christine Lagarde, well except for Italy and Greece.

 

 

 

Japan and Korea have chosen a bad time to fire up their own trade war

This is a story influenced by a brewing trade war but not the one that you might think. It is between Japan and Korea and the latest phase started in July when Japan imposed restrictions on trade with Korea for 3 chemicals. This gets more significant when you realise that they are crucial for smartphones ( displays on particular) and that according to CNBC Japan is responsible for 90% of the world’s supply of them. This affects quite of bit of Korean industry with Samsung being the headliner. Them Japan dropped Korea from its whitelist of trusted trading partners making trade more difficult before Korea did the same.

According to Bloomberg Citigroup have tried to downplay this today but I note these bits of it.

Meanwhile, boycotts in South Korea have led to a plunge in sales of Japanese consumer goods and a decrease in tourists to Japan, who may have decided to travel domestically instead, according to Citi………Last month, South Korean exports to Japan fell 14 percent, while imports from Japan slid 23 percent. South Korea’s trade ministry attributed the declines to industrial factors rather than trade actions.

Ah an official denial! We know what that means.

The issue has deep roots in the past and the Japanese occupation of the Korean peninsula a century ago as well as its later use of Korean “comfort women.” That explains the Korean issue with Japan and on the other side the Japanese consider themselves superior to Koreans and in my time there were quite open about it. Whilst he initially made moves to calm the situation there was always going to be an issue with a nationalistic politician like  Shinzo Abe running Japan.But let us move on noting that both countries will be experiencing an economic brake.

Japan Economic Growth

Let me hand you over to The Japan Times which gives us the position and some perspective.

In the third quarter the world’s third-largest economy grew an annualized 0.2 percent, slowing sharply from a revised 1.8 percent expansion in April to June, according to preliminary gross domestic product data released by the government Thursday.

It fell well short of a median market forecast for a 0.8 percent gain, and marked the weakest growth since a 2.0 percent contraction in the July-September period last year.

So over the past six months Japan has grown by 0.5% and we also get an idea of the erratic nature of economic growth there.This is partly due to the way that Japan does not conform to stereotype as it has struggled more than elsewhere to measure GDP. Partly due to last year’s third quarter drop. annual growth has picked up to 1.3% but that looks like being the peak.

Why? Well the 0.2% growth was driven by a 0.9% rise in domestic demand ( both numbers are annualised) just in time for the consumption tax to be raised. Actually private consumption was up 1.4% in the quarter suggesting that purchases were being made ahead of the rise.

At the end of last month this was reinforced by this.

The Consumer Confidence Index (seasonally adjusted series) in October 2019 was 36.2, up 0.6 points from the previous month.

Yes it was up but you see the number had fallen from around 44 at the opening of 2018 and these are the lowest readings since 2011.

Korea Economic Growth

Real gross domestic product (chained volume measure of GDP) grew by 0.4 percent in the third quarter of 2019 compared to the previous quarter……Real GDP (chained volume measure of GDP) increased by 2.0 percent year on
year in the third quarter of 2019.

In a broad sweep this means that economic growth has been slowing as it was 3.2% in 2017 and 2.7% in 2018. Rather unusually Korea saw strong export growth especially of we look at what was exported.

Exports increased by 4.1 percent, as exports of goods such as motor vehicles and semiconductors expanded. Imports were up by 0.9 percent, owing to increased imports of transportation equipment.

Also manufacturing grew.

Manufacturing rose by 2.1 percent, mainly due to an increase in computer, electronic and optical products.

However the economy has been slowing and if either of those reverse will slow even more quickly. Back on the 18th of October we noted this response.

The Monetary Policy Board of the Bank of Korea decided today to lower the Base Rate by 25 basis points, from 1.50% to 1.25%.

This was more of an external rather than an internal move as last week we learnt this.

During September 2019 Narrow Money (M1, seasonally adjusted, period-average) increased by 0.6% compared to the previous month.

So whilst it had been weak as annual growth was 3.3% in June it has risen since to 5% which is slightly above the average for 2018.

However they could cut on inflation grounds as this from Korea Statistics shows.

The Consumer Price Index was 105.46(2015=100) in October 2019. The index increased 0.2 percent from the preceding  month and was unchanged from the same month of the previous year.

According to the Bank of Korea the outlook is for more of the same.

 The Producer Price Index increased by 0.1% month-on-month in September 2019 – in year-on-year terms it decreased by 0.7%.

Exchange Rate

This is at 10.68 Won to the Yen as I type this and is up over 7% over the past year. So an additional factor in the situation will be that the Korean’s have been winning the currency war. This of course, will be annoying for Shinzo Abe who’s Abenomics programme set out to weaker the Japanese Yen. As we stand Korea has an official interest-rate some 1.35% higher so there is not a lot the Bank of Japan can do about this.

Comment

As we stand it initially looks as if Korea will be the relative winner here.

“Domestic demand had made up for some of the weakness in external demand, but we can’t count on this to continue,” said Taro Saito, executive research fellow at NLI Research Institute.

“A contraction in October-December GDP is a done deal. The economy may rebound early next year, but will lack momentum.” ( Japan Times)

But the argument it is in a stronger position weakens somewhat if we switch to its Gross National Income.

Real gross domestic income (GDI) increased by 0.1 percent compared to the previous quarter.

Over the past year it has gone on a quarterly basis -0.3%,0.2%,-0.7% and now 0.1%.

Korea is looking to use fiscal policy to stimulate its economy which sets it in the opposite direction to the consumption tax rise in Japan. But as they use a time of trouble to posture and scrap let us look at something that they share.

Korea’s potential output growth is expected to fall further in the long term, as the productive population declines in line with population aging and the low fertility rate……In addition, it is necessary to slow down the decline in labor supply resulting from population aging and the low birth rate, through policy efforts including encouraging women and young people to participate in economic activities and coping actively with the low birth rate. ( Bank of Korea Working Paper )

I wonder what the latter bit really means?

Meanwhile this is the last thing Japan needs right now.

(Reuters) – Japan’s Nissan Motor Co Ltd (7201.T) has said it is recalling 394,025 cars in the United States over a braking system defect, causing concerns that a brake fluid leak could potentially lead to a fire.

Podcast

 

 

Sadly a strong UK trade performance (for once) gets overlooked by the GDP release

Late on Friday the credit ratings agency Moodys offered its latest opinion on the state of play on the UK.

Leading ratings agency Moody’s has signalled it is poised to downgrade the credit rating on Britain’s government debt, warning that Brexit has triggered an “erosion in institutional strength” that threatens the UK’s financial credibility.

The ratings agency, which scores debt on the basis of how likely they are to default, changed the outlook on its Aa2 rating on the debt issued by the UK government from “stable” to “negative”.

That implies a cut to the actual rating could be coming imminently. ( Sky News)

Unfortunately for Sky News they went wrong with the first word in two respects. These days there is no such thing as a leading ratings agency and of course their operations are lagging and not leading. Also if it was going to be imminent they would have actually done it.

Indeed the crux of the matter was rather curious.

Moody’s said: “In the current political climate, Moody’s sees no meaningful pressure for debt-reducing fiscal policies.”

That was an odd statement because as I pointed out on social media the falls in bond yields have changed matters on this subject. The UK fifty-year Gilt yield closed the week at 1.23% whereas the Moodys report and some of the reporting seemed to be from an era where it was say 4% or 5% so if you like in one of the forecasts by the Office for Budget Responsibility or OBR.

Moody’s said Britain’s £1.8trn of public debt – more than 80% of annual economic output – risked rising again and the economy could be “more susceptible to shocks than previously assumed”.

Indeed Moodys seemed to be playing politics.

Moody’s said that “Brexit has been the catalyst for [an] erosion in institutional strength” which helped explain the change in outlook.

It said the main rationale for the change of view was firstly that “UK institutions have weakened as they have struggled to cope with the magnitude of policy challenges that they currently face, including those that relate to fiscal policy”.

What we do know is that fiscal policy is set to be looser like er France and well.

At Aa2, Britain is on the same level as France but below Germany’s AAA rating.

GDP Growth

The X-Factor in all of this is how the economy grows which is where today’s news comes in. It was hard not to have a wry smile at the Moodys report arriving just a say after the Bank of England had raised its growth estimate.

Bank staff’s estimate for GDP growth in 2019 Q3 as a whole had been revised up to 0.4%, from 0.2%
at the time of the Committee’s previous meeting. This was largely the result of an upward revision to estimates
of service sector output for June and July.

If we move to the actual numbers released this morning we were told this.

UK gross domestic product (GDP) in volume terms was estimated to have increased by 0.3% in Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2019. When compared with the same quarter a year ago, UK GDP increased by 1.0% in Quarter 3 2019; this is the slowest rate of quarter-on-year growth since Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2010.

So some growth but the annual number has been pulled lower by the contraction in the second quarter. Overall we are very similar to the Euro area where annual growth is 1.1% and quarterly 0.2%. The breakdown was familiar for the UK as well.

The service and construction sectors provided positive contributions to GDP growth, while output in the production sector was flat in Quarter 3 2019.

We got more detail here.

Manufacturing was flat in Quarter 3 2019, as was production. Services output increased by 0.4% in Quarter 3 2019, following the weakest quarterly figure in three years in the previous quarter. Construction output experienced a pickup following a weak Quarter 2, increasing by 0.6%.

Regular readers will know that I have long argued that we have in fact had a “march of the services” rather than a “march of the makers” and that the services sector is probably above 80% of the economy now. On a quarterly basis we saw this.

Information and communication was the largest contributing sector to growth in the latest quarter. It increased by 0.8% and contributed 0.08 percentage points.

On an annual basis we saw this.

In the three months to September 2019, services output increased by 1.4% compared with the three months ending September 2018; public sector dominated industries accounted for one-third of this growth.

Maybe a flicker of Brexit preparations there in the annual numbers. Also if you see a Luvvie today please be nice to them/

Long-term strength within the computer programming and the motion pictures industries are the main reasons for the sectors strong performance from Quarter 1 2015.

On the other side of the coin it was always going to be a difficult spell for manufacturing.

The 0.4% monthly decrease in manufacturing output was widespread with falls in 8 of the 13 subsectors; the largest downward contribution came from a 5.1% fall in basic pharmaceutical products.

The September numbers above do at least have the caveat that pharmaceutical products do not run to a monthly cycle and have wide swings. In fact if you will indulge me for a hundredth of s decimal point the UK fall in industrial production in September was the pharmaceutical industry.

I am afraid that there is no other way of describing this than calling it a depression.

Manufacturing output in the UK remained 3.2% lower in Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2019 than the pre-downturn peak for Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2008.

Comment

In terms of the Goldilocks the UK GDP story is of lukewarm porridge. We have some growth but not much as we edge forwards. The pattern is erratic on a quarterly basis ( 0.6%,-0.2%,0.3%) providing yet more evidence that the introduction of monthly GDP numbers was a mistake. If we switch to Moodys well we continue to be able to inflate our debt away.

Nominal GDP increased by 0.5% in Quarter 3 2019, down from 0.7% in Quarter 2 (Apr to June) 2019.

But as ever there are caveats and here is one from an area that did really rather well.

In Quarter 3 2019, the UK trade deficit narrowed to 1.2% of nominal GDP……..The narrowing of the trade deficit largely reflects strong export volume growth of 5.2% in Quarter 3 2019. Trade in goods exports grew 5.0%, reflecting increases in machinery and transport equipment and chemicals, while trade in services exports grew 5.3%; this was a result of “other business services”.

But this does not count as it goes in the expenditure and not the output version of GDP so we need to cross our fingers that it will be picked up there. When the numbers are tallied the income and expenditure versions are usually aligned with the output one which kind of begs the question of why have them?

Also there is this.

education, 68.9% public sector and 31.1% market sector

human health activities, 85.4% public sector and 14.6% market sector

residential care activities, 51.1% public sector and 48.9% market sector

social work activities without accommodation, 49.6% public sector and 50.4% market sector

Best of luck with really knowing what has gone on in those areas as government collides with the private-sector. There are plenty of issues here.

Finally there was this highlighted by the Bank of England.

The Committee discussed the recent Blue Book revisions to estimates of the household saving ratio. The
level of the saving ratio since the start of 2017 had been revised up by 1.4 percentage points on average to
reach just under 7% in 2019 Q2, primarily reflecting new HMRC data on self-employment income.

The truth is that we need a touch of humility as we know a fair bit less than we often think we do.

Podcast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The success story of Spain faces new as well as old challenges

Back in the Euro area crisis the Spanish economy looked in serious trouble. The housing boom and bust had fit the banking sector mostly via the cajas and the combination saw both unemployment and bond yields soar. It seems hard to believe now that the benchmark bond yield was of the order of 7% but it posed a risk of the bond vigilantes making Spain look insolvent. That was added to by an unemployment rate that peaked at just under 27%. The response was threefold as the ECB bought Spanish bonds under the Securities Markets Programme to reduce the cost of debt. There was also this.

In June 2012, the Spanish government made an official request for financial assistance for its banking system to the Eurogroup for a loan of up to €100 billion. It was designed to cover a capital shortfall identified in a number of Spanish banks, with an additional safety margin.

In December 2012 and January 2013, the ESM disbursed a total of €41.3 billion, in the form of ESM notes, to the Fondo de Restructuración Ordenada Bancaria (FROB), the bank recapitalisation fund of the Spanish government. ( ESM)

Finally there was the implementation of the “internal competitiveness” model and austerity.

What about now?

Things are very different as Spain has been in a good run. From last week.

Spanish GDP registers a growth of 0.4% in the third quarter of 2019 compared to to the previous quarter in terms of volume. This rate is similar to that recorded in the
second trimester.The interannual growth of GDP stands at 2.0%, similar to the previous quarter.

There are two ways of looking at this in the round. The first is that for an advanced economy that is a good growth rate for these times, and the second is that it will be especially welcome on the Euro area. Combining Spain with its neighbour France means that any minor contraction in Germany does not pull the whole area in negative economic growth.

However there is a catch for the ECB as Spain has slowed to this rate of economic growth and had thus exceeded the “speed limit” of 1.5% per annum for quite a while now. That will keep its Ivory Tower busy manipulating, excuse me analysing output gaps and the like. In fact once the dog days of the Euro area crisis were over Spain’s economy surged forwards with annual economic growth peaking at 4.2% in the latter part of 2015 and then in general terms slowing to where we are now. As to why the ESM explanation is below.

 Strong job creation followed the economic expansion, and employment has recovered by more than 2.5 million. Structural reforms have been paying off: competitiveness gains have supported economic rebalancing towards tradable sectors, and exports of goods and services have stabilised at historical highs (above 30% of GDP). The large and persistent current account deficit, which had reached 9.6% of GDP in 2007, has turned into a surplus averaging 1.5% of GDP in 2014-18.

Actually the IMF must be disappointed it did not join the party as turning around trade problems used to be its job before it came under French management. But Spain certainly rebounded in economic terms.and has been a strength of the Euro area.

Looking at the broader economy, Spain returned to economic growth in 2014 and continues to perform above the euro area average in that category

Over the past six months external trade has continued to boost the economy in spite of conditions being difficult.

On the other hand, the demand external presents a contribution of 0.2 points, eight tenths lower than the quarter past.

The impact of all this has improved the employment situation considerably.

In interannual terms, employment increases at a rate of 1.8%, rate seven tenths
lower than the second quarter, which represents an increase of 332 thousand jobs
( full time equivalents) in one year.

In terms of a broad picture GDP in Spain peaked at 104.4 in the latter part of 2007 then had a double-dip to 94.3 in the autumn of 2013 and now is at 110.9. So it has recovered and moved ahead albeit over the 12 years not made much net progress.

Problems?

According to the ESM the banks remain a major issue.

Several legacy problems also remain in the banking sector. These include larger and more persistent-than-expected losses of SAREB, which pose a contingent liability to the state. Banks have adequate capital buffers, but should further strengthen them towards the euro area average to withstand any future risks. In addition, the privatisation of Bankia and the reform of cajas need to be completed.

Of course banking reform has been just around the corner on a Roman road in so many places. Also the balance sheet of the Spanish banks has received what Arthur Daley of the TV series Minder would call a “nice little earner”.

Housing prices rise 1.2% compared to the previous quarter.The annual variation rate of the Housing Price Index has decreased 1.5 points to 5.3%,

Annual house price growth returned in the spring of 2014 which the banks will welcome. The index based in 2015 is now at 124.2.

However not all ECB policies are welcomed by the banks.

Finally, banks still face pressure on profitability due to the low interest rate environment, and potentially from a price correction in financial assets if the macro environment deteriorates. ( ESM )

An official deposit rate of -0.5% does that to banking profitability. I do not recall seeing signs of the Spanish banks passing this on in the way that Deutsche Bank announced yesterday but the heat is on. I see that the ESM is covering its bases should house prices fall again.

If we look at mortgage-rates then they are falling again as the Bank of Spain records them as 1.83% in September which looks as though it may be an all time low but we do not have the full data set.

Comment

The new phase of economic growth has brought better news on another problem area as the Bank of Spain reports.

Indeed, the non-financial private sector debt ratio
relative to GDP stood at 132%, 5 pp down on a year earlier and 4 pp below the euro area average.

The ratio of the national debt to GDP has fallen to this.

Also, in June 2019 the public debt/GDP ratio stood at 98.9%, a level still 13 pp higher than the euro area average.

 

and these days it is much cheaper to finance as the 7% yields of the Euro area crisis have been replaced by some negative yields and even the benchmark ten-year being a mere 0.31%.

On the other side of the coin first-time buyers will not welcome the new higher house prices and there are areas of trouble.

In this respect, consumer credit grew in June 2019 at a year-on-year rate of around 12%, and non-performing consumer loans at 26%, raising the NPL ratio slightly to 5.6% ( Bank of Spain)

What could go wrong?

Another signal is the way that the growth in employment has improved things considerably but Spain still has an unemployment rate that has only just nudged under 14%.So there is still much to do just as we fear the next downturn may be in play.

A fifth successive monthly deterioration in Spanish
manufacturing operating conditions was signalled in October as a challenging business climate negatively impacted on sales and output……At 46.8, down from 47.7 in September, the index also posted its lowest level for six-and-half years.   ( Markiteconomics )

 

Is Hong Kong in a recession or a depression now?

Some days an item of news just reaches out and grabs you and this morning it has come from the increasingly troubled Hong Kong. We knew that there would be economic consequences from the political protests there but maybe not this much.

The Census and Statistics Department (C&SD) released today (October 31) the advance estimates on Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for the third quarter of 2019.     According to the advance estimates, GDP decreased by 2.9% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, compared with the increase of 0.4% in the second quarter of 2019.

The commentary from a government spokesman confirmed various details.

marking the first year-on-year contraction for an individual quarter since the Great Recession of 2009, and also much weaker than the mild growth of 0.6% and 0.4% in the first and second quarters respectively. For the first three quarters as a whole, the economy contracted by 0.7% over a year earlier. On a seasonally adjusted quarter-to-quarter comparison, the fall in real GDP widened to 3.2% in the third quarter from 0.5% in the preceding quarter, indicating that the Hong Kong economy has entered a technical recession.

The concept of recession first switched to technical recession meaning a minor one ( say -0.1% or -0.2% GDP growth) but now seems to encompass what is a large fall. Time for Kylie again I guess.

I’m spinning around
Move outta my way

A clue to the change is the way that the year so far has fallen by 0.7% in GDP terms. If we look back we see that annual GDP growth of 3.8% slowed a little to 3% from 2017 to 18. But the quarterly numbers have been falling for a while. In annual terms GDP growth was 2.8% in the third quarter of 2018 but then only 1.2% in the last quarter and then going 0.6%, 0.4% and now -2.9% this year.

The Details

If we take the advice of Kylie and start breaking it down we see this.

Gross domestic fixed capital formation decreased significantly by 16.3% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, compared with the decrease of 10.8% in the second quarter.

Investment has taken quite a dive as this time last year it was increasing at an annual rate of 8.6%. Indeed the private-sector full stop took a fair hammering.

private consumption expenditure decreased by 3.5% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, as against the 1.3% growth in the second quarter.

The one bright spot was government expenditure.

     Government consumption expenditure measured in national accounts terms grew by 5.3% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 over a year earlier, after the increase of 4.0% in the second quarter.

Is it too cheeky to suggest that at least some of this will be police overtime? So far it is not increased unemployment payouts

     The number of unemployed persons (not seasonally adjusted) in July – September 2019 was 120 300, about the same as that in June – August 2019 (120 600). The number of underemployed persons in July – September 2019 was 41 500, also about the same as that in June – August 2019 (41 000).

The flickers of acknowledgement of the present troubles were in the employment not the unemployment numbers.

 Total employment decreased by around 8 200 from 3 863 600 in June – August 2019 to 3 855 400 in July – September 2019. Over the same period, the labour force also decreased by around 8 500 from 3 984 200 to 3 975 700.

Also does the labour force fall suggest some emigration?

However you spin it the commentary is grim.

As the weakening economic conditions dampened consumer sentiment, and large-scale demonstrations caused severe disruptions to the retail, catering and other consumption-related sectors, private consumption expenditure recorded its first year-on-year decline in more than ten years. The fall in overall investment expenditure steepened amid sagging economic confidence.

Trade

This added to the woes as you can see below.

Over the same period, total exports of goods measured in national accounts terms recorded a decrease of 7.0% in real terms from a year earlier, compared with the decrease of 5.4% in the second quarter. Imports of goods measured in national accounts terms fell by 11.1% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019, compared with the decline of 6.7% in the second quarter.

Ironically this looks like a boost to GDP from a tale of woe. This is because the fall in imports ( a boost to GDP) is larger than the fall in exports. This situation reverses somewhat in the services sector presumably mostly due to lower tourism revenue.

Exports of services dropped by 13.7% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019 from a year earlier, following the decline of 1.1% in the second quarter. Imports of services decreased by 3.8% in real terms in the third quarter of 2019, as against the increase of 1.3% in the second quarter.

Looking Ahead

That was then and this is now so what can we expect?

Looking ahead, with global economic growth expected to remain soft in the near term, Hong Kong’s exports are unlikely to show any visible improvement. Moreover, as the adverse impacts of the local social incidents have yet to show signs of abating, private consumption and investment sentiment will continue to be affected. The Hong Kong economy will still face notable downward pressures in the rest of the year.

If we look at the results from the latest official quarterly business survey and note what happened in the third quarter then we get a proper Halloween style chill down the spine.

 For all surveyed sectors taken together, the proportion of respondents expecting their business situation to be worse (32%) in Q4 2019 over Q3 2019 is significantly higher than that expecting it to be better (7%).  When compared with the results of the Q3 2019 survey round, the proportion of respondents expecting a worse business situation in Q4 2019 as compared with the preceding quarter has increased to 32%, against the corresponding proportion of 17% in Q3 2019.

According to the South China Morning Post then prospects for China continue to weaken.

The manufacturing purchasing managers’ index (PMI), released by the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) on Thursday, stood at 49.3 in October, down from 49.8  in September.  The non-manufacturing PMI – a gauge of sentiment in the services and construction sectors – came in at 52.8 in October, below analysts’ expectations for a 53.6 reading. The figure was also down from September’s 53.7, dropping to its lowest level since February 2016.

As to Japan there seems to be little hope as the Bank of Japan just seems lost at sea now.

As for the policy rates, the Bank expects short- and long-term interest rates to remain at their present or lower levels as long as it is necessary to pay close attention to the possibility that the momentum toward achieving the price stability target will be lost.

Comment

As you can see the situation in Hing Kong is clearly recessionary and the size of it combined with the fact that it looks set to continue means it is looks depressionary as well. There has been a monetary respone but this of course only represents maintenance of the US Dollar peg.

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA) announced today (Thursday) that the Base Rate was adjusted downward by 25 basis points to 2% with immediate effect according to a pre-set formula.  The decrease in the Base Rate follows the 25-basis point downward shift in the target range for the US federal funds rate on 30 October (US time).

As to the guide provided by the narrow money supply there is this.

The seasonally-adjusted Hong Kong dollar M1 decreased by 0.5% in September and by 3.4% from a year earlier, reflecting in part investment-related activities.

However you spin it people are switching from Hong Kong Dollars to other currencies.

The Investing Channel