UK wage growth shows the first sign of weakness for a while

Today brings the UK labour market into focus as we hope for more good news. However we have seen over the past day or so some reminders that the credit crunch era left long lasting scars for some. In isolation the UK has recovered well in terms of employment and getting people back to work but has done much less well overall in terms of what they are paid for it. In particular the Resolution Foundation has taken a look at one rather unfortunate group.

This report looks at the specific fortunes of the “crisis cohort” those who left education between 2008 and 2011. By analysing outcomes for those unfortunate enough to enter the labour market in the aftermath of the 2008-09 recession, this paper estimates how severe an impact
the downturn had on people who left education in its midst, and how long-lasting these effects were.

These individuals were of course guilty of nothing and were only involved via an accident of the timing of their birth. The Resolution Foundation discovered these effects.

We find that people starting their careers in the midst of a downturn experience a reduction in real hourly pay of around 6 per cent one year after leaving education, and that compared to people who left education in better economic conditions their wages do not recover for up to 6 years. For those with lower levels of education, the chance of being in work falls by over 20 per cent, while for graduates the chance of being in a low paying occupation rises.

The find something which resonates with past Bank of England research on this subject.

The chance of a graduate working in a lowpaid occupation rose by 30 per cent, and remained elevated a full seven
years later. Indeed, we find that people ‘trading down’ in terms of the occupations they enter after leaving education, coupled with pay restraint in mid-paid roles, are main drivers of poor pay outcomes for those entering
the labour market in a recession.

The issue I have with this is that we are looking at a period when being a graduate was not what it had been in the past due to the expansion of numbers in the Blair era. So that may well also have been in play but not fully considered. Whatever the cause there was a strong effect on wages.

This helps explain why the impact on pay was more enduring in the recent downturn. People’s hourly wages took 50 per cent longer to recover (to the rates of pay enjoyed by those leaving education outside the downturn).

Thus not only did wages fall they took longer to recover to levels seen by those lucky enough not to start work and graduate as the credit crunch hit. A clear issue for thos affected.

However we did get one thing right in the sense that pre credit crunch we wanted to be what was considered to be more Germanic. In this instance that meant more flexible wages ( as in potentially down) in return for a better employment trajectory.

On the other hand, youth unemployment did not rise as high as in the early 1990s, and came down much faster.

Many now seem to have forgotten that as it has turned out to be a success but at a price in terms of wages especially for those unlucky enough to be born at the wrong time. Although as this from BBC economics correspondent Andy Verity illustrates some are keener on lower unemployment than others.

The unemployment rate is now down to 3.8%. But is lower unemployment always a good thing? Not necessarily – if eg you’re a business and you can’t get the staff.

Today’s Data

The drumbeat of the UK data series for around the last seven years continues to beat out its tune.

Estimates for January to March 2019 show 32.70 million people aged 16 years and over in employment, 354,000 more than for a year earlier. This annual increase of 354,000 was due entirely to more people working full-time (up 372,000 on the year to reach 24.11 million). Part-time working showed a small fall of 18,000 on the year to reach 8.59 million……..The UK employment rate was estimated at 76.1%, higher than for a year earlier (75.6%) and the joint- highest figure on record.

The bass line was in tune as well.

For January to March 2019, an estimated 1.30 million people were unemployed, 119,000 fewer than for a year earlier and 914,000 fewer than for five years earlier…….

the estimated unemployment rate: for everyone was 3.8%; it has not been lower since October to December 1974 (for men was 3.9%; it has not been lower since March to May 1975, for women was 3.7%, the lowest since comparable records began in 1971)

As you can see the unemployment performance is a case of lets hear it for the girls.

Also as I regularly get asked here is the other category.

The UK economic inactivity rate was estimated at 20.8%, lower than for a year earlier (21.1%) and close to a record low.

Wages

Here there was a more nuanced version of better news.

Including bonuses, average weekly earnings for employees in Great Britain were estimated to have increased by 3.2%, before adjusting for inflation, and by 1.3%, after adjusting for inflation, compared with a year earlier.

If we put to one side for a moment the attempt to sugar coat the real wages numbers, there is a fading of nominal wage growth here. We should welcome the fact that the annual rate of growth is still above 3% but there is an issue as it has fallen back from 3.5%. Why? Well weekly wages peaked at £530 in January and fell to £529 in February and £528 in March. Various areas contributed to this as the annual rate of pay growth in finance fell from 5% to 1.8% over the same period and growth in the wholesaling,retail and hotel sector actually went negative ( -0.3%). This was due to weak and in some cases negative bonus payments ( I am not sure how that works…) being recorded so it is a case of what that space.

I did say I would return to real wage growth and let me present it in chart form to illustrate the issue.

Those who have had a hard time in the credit crunch provide yet another reason to make the case for an RPI style measure of inflation I think. It also shows that choosing your inflation measure is a genuinely big deal and something that establishment’s love to manipulate.

Comment

One of the ironies of the credit crunch era is that the economics establishment regularly gets worked up about things it wanted. Of course some of those reporting the situation are too young to remember that but not all. We see that we got the better employment situation we wanted but that especially for those who joined the job market at what turned out to be the wrong time real wages shifted onto a lower path from which they have yet to recover. Sadly the main response from government has been to try to change the numbers via the use of the fantasies involved in Imputed Rents which are never paid, rather than dealing with reality. Also the way that the self-employed are ignored in the wages data is becoming a bigger and bigger issue.

4.93 million self-employed people (15.1% of all people in employment), 180,000 more than a year earlier.

As to the current situation it may no longer be quite so Goldilocks as whilst employment growth continues we face the possibility that wage growth is slowing again. Perhaps in spite of its many fault as a measure it is related to this.

In contrast, output per worker in Quarter 1 2019 increased by 0.7% compared with the same quarter in the previous year.

If you want the full picture it is the difference between the two numbers here.

It indicates that in Quarter 1 2019, all three economic indicators were above their pre-downturn levels, with GDP being 12.7% higher while both hours and employment were equally 10.2% higher.

Putting all this another way it is yet another punch hammered home on output gap style theories which must now be in boxing terms on the canvas again. What happened to the three knockdowns and you are out rule?

 

 

 

 

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Can Portugal continue its economic success story?

Today is the anniversary of the oldest alliance in the world as England signed the Treaty of Windsor with Portugal back in 1386. So let us take the opportunity to peer under the bonnet of the Portuguese economy which has been seeing better times after the struggles created by the Euro area crisis of the early part of this decade. Back then it was illustrated by an unemployment rate and benchmark bond yield in the high teens in percentage terms. The Euro area crisis saw the economy shrink at an annual rate of over 4% for a while which not only saw unemployment soar but also questioned the solvency of the nation which is why bond yields went with it. The latter point was an issue because like Italy Portugal had built up a history of not being able to sustain economic growth beyond 1% per annum but was unfortunately able to participate in any declines.

What about more recently?

A recovery began in 2014 but it was only slow growth and 2015 saw a rise but it was not until the third quarter of 2016 that we saw a real change with annual GDP growth going above 2% to 2.3%. This welcome rally continued and the first half of 2017 saw annual GDP growth at 3.1%. After the rough times of the credit crunch followed quickly by the Euro area crisis Portugal badly needed this.

2017 was the peak year as the second half maintained an annual growth rate of 2.5% so Portugal for once was not only joining in with a period of Euro area growth it was exceeding it. The latter theme continued in 2018 with Portugal slowing but doing considerably better than the average, although the catch is that in the last half of 2018 this happened.

In comparison with the third quarter of 2018, GDP increased 0.4% in real terms (0.3% in the previous quarter)

 

This meant the annual rate slowed to 1.7% and it was accompanied by something familiar.

The contribution of net external demand to GDP year-on-year rate of change shifted from -0.3 percentage points in the third quarter to -1.6 percentage points, with a decrease in real terms of exports of goods. The positive contribution of domestic demand increased to 3.3 percentage points in the fourth quarter

 

This is familiar on two counts. Firstly Portugal has a long history of going to the IMF due to balance of trade problems. Next comes the fact that problems with exports were a theme of the latter part of 2018 and has me wondering if this is related to the automotive sector in Portugal which is around 4% of the economy? Through the better period that sector has been a success but now times have got much harder illustrated by the fact that for example car sales by the largest Chinese manufacturer SAIC fell 20% on a year ago in April.

Moving to the Euro area strategy of “internal devaluation” which essentially means lower real wages that collided at the end of 2018 with the world trade issues, which of course are in the news right now. Next comes the role of the European Central Bank summarised here by its President Mario Draghi.

 I’ll be briefer than I would like to be, but certainly especially in some parts of this period of time, QE has been the only driver of this recovery……..We view this as – but I don’t think I’m the only one to be the crucial driver of the recovery in the eurozone. At the time, by the way, when also other drivers were not really – especially in the first part, there was no other source of growth in the real economy.

If you take Mario at his word then QE and negative interest-rates were the driver of the recovery in Portugal. Thus the fading of growth should be no surprise as the monthly QE flow was tapered and then ended. Anyway that is Mario’s view and we should also note that he is hardly independent in this regard.

Unemployment

This is perhaps the clearest signal of better times.

In the 1st quarter of 2019, the unemployment rate stood at 6.8%, higher than the previous quarter value by
0.1 percentage points (pp) and lower than the year-on-year rate by 1.1 pp.

If we ignore for the moment the quarterly move we see that in comparison to the move above 17% ( 17.5%( in early 2013 things have got much better in this regard. Another way of putting it is that Portugal Statistics calculates a very broad measure including underemployment and thinks this.

Albeit of the quarterly increase in the 1st quarter of
2019, the unemployed population and the labour
underutilisation have displayed downwards trends since
the 1st quarter of 2013, having decreased in total
61.8% and 49.8%, respectively (corresponding to
573.2 thousand and 731.8 thousand people in each
case).

Looking Ahead

The Bank of Portugal tells us this.

The Portuguese economy is expected to continue to grow by 2021, although at a slightly slower pace than in the past few years. After a 2.1% increase in 2018, gross domestic product (GDP) is expected to grow by 1.7% in 2019 and 2020, and by 1.6% in 2021, drawing closer to potential growth.

Let us start with the good news within this.

Projected growth for economic activity in Portugal outpaces that projected by the European Central Bank for the euro area, which indicates slight progress in the Portuguese economy’s convergence towards average income levels in the euro area.

Mind you with the trade war issue continuing there has to be doubt over this bit.

The Portuguese economy should continue to benefit from a favourable economic and financial environment, including an average growth in external demand of 3.4% and the maintenance of favourable financing conditions for economic agents.

National Debt

This has led to another favourable situation for Portugal which is the change in trend for the Public Finances. The annual deficit was running at an annual rate of 7.2% of GDP as 2015 began but is now running at an annual rate of 0.5%. This means that the national debt has finally begun to fall in relative terms to 121.5% of GDP. So we again see how economic growth can improve matters in this area.

However an “Obrigado Mario” is due as the ECB QE programme has unequivocally helped matters here with Portugal now having a ten-year yield of a mere 1.1%.

Comment

Let me continue with the good news theme with this from the Bank of Portugal this morning.

In 2018 real GDP was 1.2% higher than in 2008……The unemployment rate stood at 7.0%, the lowest figure in Portugal since 2004…… Although slowing down, tourism exports increased by 7.5% in 2018 and, together with car exports, were at the root of market share gains for Portuguese exporters,

Now let me move to the issues as it sees it.

However, labour productivity, measured as gross value added (GVA) per worker, declined by 0.6%……… Portuguese GDP per capita in 2018 stood at 58% of GDP per capita in the euro area.

If we take those issues in reverse we see that in spite of the recent stronger phase the troubles of the past leave Portugal mulling what happened to the promises of economic convergence made by the Euro area founders. Also last year saw Romania overtake Portugal in terms of total output but not on an individual basis.

However that issue is driven by the first statistic in my opinion. It stands out in two respects, as it is a disappointment compared to the rate of economic growth and compares very unfavourably with what we were looking at for America yesterday. More deeply it is systemic to Portugal which has long struggled with such issues with the stereotype being of old industries and old practices.

Finally the central bank may be happy about this but first time buyers will not be.

In the 4th quarter of 2018, the year-on-year change of median price of dwellings sales in Portugal was +6.9%,
increasing from 932 €/m2
in the 4th quarter of 2017 to 996 €/m2
in the 4th quarter of 2018. Lisboa stood out from the
other cities with more than 100 thousand inhabitants as it scored the highest house price (3 010 €/m2
) and also the
highest growth compared to the same period in the previous year: +23.5%….. Apart from Lisboa, the cities of Porto (+23.3%), Amadora (+20.3%) and Braga (+18.3%)
observed significant variations too.

Plenty of wealth effects for it to claim but how much lower would real GDP growth be if owner-occupied housing costs were not ignored by the inflation measures used?

 

 

 

Italy exits recession but sadly continues its economic depression

Today brings Italy into focus as we find out how it did in the first three months of this year. The mood music has been okay ( 0.3% GDP growth in France) and really rather good ( 0.7% GDP growth in Spain) but we are of course looking at the country described in economic terms as a girlfriend in a coma. The situation has recently deteriorated yet again as highlighted below.

As you can see there has been quite a plunge which illustrates part of the girlfriend in a coma issue. This is that in any economic slow down Italy participates but in a period of growth it grows much less than its peers. So it has for the whole of this century been “slip-sliding away” as Paul Simon would say. Putting that into numbers in the better periods it struggles to grow at more than 1% per annum on average. An example of that has been provided by the last six years as if we look at the period from the beginning of 2013 to the end of 2018 we see that GDP growth was less than 5%. This means that the 402.8 billion Euros of quarterly economic output at the end of 2018 was still a long way short of a number that according to the chart nudged over 425 billion early in 2008. Putting it another way it has joined in with the drops including the Euro area crisis of 2010-12 but not shown anything like the same enthusiasm for the rallies.

Fiscal Problems

This was something of a headliner last autumn as the Italian government pressed the Euro area authorities for some more laxity on the annual deficit before mostly being forced back. But this is not really the problem as Italy has not been an over spender and let me highlight with the data.

The government deficit to GDP ratio decreased from 2.5% in 2016 to 2.4% in 2017. In 2018, the Government deficit to Gross Domestic Product ratio was 2.1%

The primary surplus as a percentage of GDP was 1.4% in 2017, unchanged with respect to 2016.

In 2015 the deficit was 2.6% so we can see that Italy had behaved according to Euro area rules by being below 3% on an annual basis and furthermore had been trimming it.

The catch is that with the low level of economic growth even that has led to this as Eurostat lists those who fail the Maastricht criteria.

Greece (181.1%), Italy (132.2%), Portugal (121.5%), Cyprus (102.5%), Belgium (102.0%), France (98.4%) and Spain (97.1%)

The total has risen from 2.173 trillion Euros at the end of 2015 to 2.32 trillion Euros at the end of last year. As it happens that is nearly exactly the same size as France and the catch is that the French national debt has been rising faster which creates its own worries. But the Italian problem is the way that its debt relates to the lack of economic growth which means that relatively it poses a bigger question.

The dog that has not barked has been the issue of debt costs which would have made all of this much worse if we lived in a bond vigilantes world. But instead the advent of Euro area QE from the ECB means that debt costs have fallen for Italy. In 2015 they cost 68.1 billion Euros or 4.1% of GDP as opposed to 65 billion Euros or 3.7% of GDP last year. Extraordinary really! How? Here you go.

Italian version. Excluding QE, Italy‘s public debt ratio is 110% of GDP. ( @fwred )

Also via cheaper borrowing costs which have risen over the past year  but were believe it or not negative at the short-end for a while. Back in the Euro area crisis I recall the benchmark ten-year yield reaching 7% which puts the current 2.63% into perspective.

I note that this issue reappears from time to time. From Lorenzo Codogno earlier.

My op-ed written with ⁦⁩ on “Italydebt restructuring would do enormous damage” published today in Italy’s business daily Il Sole 24 Ore.

In some ways Euro area membership might help. What I mean by that is if the Bank of Italy wrote off its holdings of Italian bonds then the Euro as a currency might not be affected all that much as it reflects the overall area and especially a fiscally conservative Germany.

On the other side of the coin there is something which is a hardy perennial.

Euro area banks sold domestic government bonds in March (-€13bn net). The total over the past 12-month is still positive (+€23bn) but that’s all due to Italy where banks have started to increase their sovereign exposure again over the past year or so. ( @fwred )

Perhaps they are hoping there will be another ECB inspired party along the lines of this described in Il Sole 24 Ore. The emphasis is mine.

Although these loans are tied to loans to the real economy, it is expected that there will be some flexibility in its implementation in such a way as to allow banks to use the funds to buy government bonds, earning money on the rate differential (“carry trade” in jargon) ). Only when the ECB publishes the details of the transaction in June will we know how generous the new Tltro will be.

Perhaps it will be a leaving gift from Mario Draghi to the banks he used to supervise meaning Grazie Mario may be a new theme. It makes me wonder if profits from what has been called “gentlemen of the spread” maybe the only profits Italian banks these days? Also let me apologise to female traders on behalf of the author of that phrase.

Labour Market

This has brought some welcome news today.

In March 2019, the number of employed people increased compared with February (+0.3%, +60 thousand); the employment rate rose to 58.9% (+0.2 percentage points)…..The number of unemployed persons fell by 3.5% (-96 thousand); the decline involved men and women and all age classes. The unemployment rate dropped to 10.2% (-0.4 percentage points), the youth rate decreased to 30.2% (-1.6 percentage points).

As a headline the rising employment rate and falling unemployment and especially youth unemployment rates are welcome. But sadly we only have to look back to February and recall the unemployment rate was published at 10.7% to see a sadly familiar issue. It is unreliable as January was revised down by 0.5% as was March last year but February last year was revised up by 0.9%.

There is also this highlighted a year ago by a paper for the Swiss National Bank.

An exception is Italy where productivity growth started to stagnate 25 years ago

Okay why?

We find that resource misallocation has played a sizeable role in slowing down Italian productivity growth. If misallocation had remained at its 1995 level, in 2013 Italy’s aggregate productivity would have been 18% higher than its actual level. Misallocation has mainly risen within
sectors than between them, increasing more in sectors where the world technological frontier has
expanded faster.

Comment

There was both good and nor so good news in the mid-morning release.

In the first quarter of 2019 it is estimated that the gross domestic product (GDP), expressed in chained values ​​with reference year 2010, adjusted for calendar effects and seasonally adjusted, increased by 0.2% compared to the previous quarter and by 0, 1% in tendential terms.

The good news is that Italy has recovered the ground lost in the second half of last year but the kicker is that it has grown by only 0.1% in a year, which is well within the margin of error. Or if you prefer it has escaped recession but remains stuck in a depression.

Another perspective is provided by the fact that this is the first time quarterly economic growth has risen since the end of 2016. As to the productivity problem I think that it is linked to the weakness of the banking sector which needs to look beyond punting Italian bonds as a modus operandi if Italy is to improve and escape its ongoing depression.

Italy looks set for another economic recession sadly

A feature of the last year or so has been something of an economic car crash unfolding in Italy and we have received two further perspectives on that subject this morning. Sadly neither is an April Fool although in these times they have become ever harder to spot. According to Markit times not only remain hard but have deteriorated in the manufacturing sector.

Manufacturing business conditions in Italy continued
to worsen in March as a sharp reduction in new orders
led to a further decline in output. Production fell for the
eighth consecutive month, whilst new orders contracted
at the fastest rate in nearly six years. Meanwhile, business
confidence dipped slightly from February, but was
nonetheless positive.

The reported fall in new orders was led from abroad.

Additionally, new business from abroad fell in March
at a rate just shy of December 2018’s near six-and-a-half year record.

This meant that the reading was as follows.

At 47.4, the reading was down from 47.7 in February
and signalled the sharpest monthly decline in the health of
the sector since May 2013.

Also the optimism reported frankly seems at odds with reality.

Optimism regarding the year ahead outlook for output was
sustained in March, but concerns over further contractions
in customer demand and a continuation of negative market
trends meant sentiment weakened from February.

Markit itself does not seem to hold out much hope for a quick rebound.

All in all, Italian manufacturing output looks set to decline
further in Q2, especially when looking at slowdowns in key
sources of external demand in neighbouring European
markets.

Employment

The situation here posed a question too this morning.

In February 2019, the number of employed people moderately declined compared with January (-0.1%,
-14 thousand); the employment rate decreased to 58.6% (-0.1 percentage points). The fall of employment
involved mainly people aged 35-49 years (-74 thousand), while people aged over 50 continued to go up
(+51 thousand).

There is an interesting age shift in the pattern which we are seeing across a wide range of countries. There are two main drivers here which are interrelated. The first is the demographic of an ageing population. The second is the rises in official retirement ages and in Italy perhaps the ongoing economic troubles leading to actual retirements being postponed.

If the manufacturing PMI is any guide the employment falls continued in March too.

As a result of the setbacks in output and new work,
employment in Italy’s manufacturing sector declined in
March.

Also as IPE pointed out last September that the retirement situation in Italy is typically complex.

By comparison, the statutory retirement age in 2019 will be 67. This keeps rising, as planned by law, to keep up with demographic projections. In reality, however, people on average retire at about the age of 62. This is the result of the complicated legislative framework, which effectively means every worker’s personal circumstances can contribute to bringing his retirement age forward.

Also the current government has plans to reduce the official retirement age.

Returning to the employment data we see that the situation is turning as previously there had been rises.

Employment rose by 0.5% (+113 thousand) compared with February 2018. The increase concerned men
and women, involving people aged 25-34 years (+21 thousand) and over 50 (+316 thousand).

Unemployment

There was something of a double whammy in the labour market in February.

In February, the number of unemployed persons rose by 1.2% (+34 thousand); the increase involved men
and women and persons aged over 35. The unemployment rate grow up to 10.7% (+0.1 percentage
points), while the youth rate slight decreased to 32.8% (-0.1 percentage points).

So both unemployment and the unemployment rate rose. There is also something of a swerve familiar to regular readers of my work which is that the unemployment rate in January was reported originally at 10.5%. However it is now reported as being up 0.1% at 10.7%. So the impression is given that it is 0.1% up when in fact it was worse in January and is now worse than that or if you like the rise is 0.2% against the original. The fall in youth unemployment is much more welcome but it is hard not to have a concern about the way that it is still 32.8%. In fact there are two concerns to my mind. Firstly that it too may start to rise as prospects weaken and secondly along the signs of the song from Ace.

How long has this been going on?
How long has this been going on?

There must be more than a few in the youth unemployment numbers who have been unemployed for years and must feel like giving up.

Over the past year the decline in unemployment now looks rather marginal.

On a yearly basis, the growth of employment was accompanied by the fall of unemployed persons (-1.4%,
-39 thousand) and inactive people aged 15-64 (-1.3%, -169 thousand).

Actually I can go further as the three-month average looked like it was heading to 10% and did make 10.25% if I stare hard at the chart. But the reality was that the response to the relative boom was already over and the unemployment rate was turning and then rising.

Two lost decades?

A research paper from Italy’s statisticians suggest two linked and thereby troubling trends especially for the south.

 Both qualifications of the latter manual type show, in the twenty years, a considerable increase in the stock of employees that exceeds the growth of the
employed people who carry out work with higher qualifications. Also on the positive side of the variations, there are clear territorial differences that have a
different impact on the employment balance for Italy and for the South, where the contribution to the medium-high and high qualification employment is less than one third of
the contribution given by this work to the employment of the Country.

This is a version of my “Good Italy: Bad Italy” theme where the south in particular has seen quite a deterioration in the quality of employment and in particular skilled manual work has been replaced by non-skilled.

Official economic surveys

As you can see these bring maybe a little hope as they give opposite results.

In March 2019, the consumer confidence index decreased from 112.4 to 111.2. All of its components worsened: the economic, the personal, the current and the future one (from 126.4 to 123.9, from 108.2 to 106.8, from 109.4 to 107.8 and from 116.9 to 115.9, respectively).

With regard to the business surveys, the business confidence index (IESI, Istat Economic Sentiment Indicator) bettered from 98.2 to 99.2.

The business sentiment gain came mostly from the services sector.

Comment

There was a time around six months ago that the Italian government was talking about economic growth of 2% and in some extreme cases 3% where yesterday we were told this. From Reuters.

 Italy can’t afford fiscal expansion at a time when its economic growth is heading to close to zero, Treasury Minister Giovanni Tria said on Sunday.

Tria said Italy was in a phase of economic slowdown and could not consider introducing restrictive measures. He was speaking at a conference in Florence, and his remarks were carried on Italian radio stations.

“Certainly we don’t have the room for expansionary measures,” he then added.

Actually the official data has shown it to have been at zero in the year to the last quarter of 2018 and we now fear that it is contracting.. Any decline this quarter will put Italy into yet another recession and the number-crunching is not favourable.

The carry-over annual GDP rate of change for 2019 is equal to -0.1%.

Meanwhile over to the banks National Resolution Fund and its 2018 accounts.

The main results of the annual accounts for the year ended 31 December 2018 are as follows:

  • Assets € 429,869,033;
  • Liabilities € 972,900,609;
  • Endowment fund (excluding the result for the year) € (484,918,684);
  • Net result for the period € (58,112,892);
  • Endowment fund at 31 December 2018 € (543,031,576).

The negative net result for the period is largely attributable to:

  • Interest expense € (31.4 million);
  • Allocations to the provisions for risks € (26.5 million).

How does a negative endowment fund work?

 

 

 

 

 

 

The UK labour market is booming Goldilocks style

Let me open by bringing you up to date with the latest attempt at monetary easing from the Bank of England. Yesterday it purchased some more UK Gilts as part of its ongoing Operation Twist effort.

As set out in the Minutes of the MPC’s meeting ending on 6 February 2019, the MPC has agreed to make £20.6 billion of gilt purchases, financed by central bank reserves, to reinvest the cash flows associated with the maturity on 7 March 2019 of a gilt owned by the Asset Purchase Facility (APF)……….The Bank intends to purchase evenly across the three gilt maturity sectors. The size of auctions will initially be £1,146mn for each maturity sector.

Yesterday was for short-dated Gilts ( 3 to 7 year maturity) and today will be for long-dated Gilts ( 15 years plus). Why is this extra QE? This is because you are exchanging a maturing Git for one with a longer maturity and thus means QE will be with us for even longer. Odd for an emergency response don’t you think?

Regular readers will be aware that I wrote a piece in City-AM in September 2013 suggesting the Bank of England should let maturing Gilts do just that. So by now we would have trimmed the total down a fair bit which would be logical over a period where we have seen economic growth which back then was solid, hence my suggestion. Whereas we face not only a situation where nothing has been done in the meantime but today’s purchase of long and perhaps ultra long Gilts ( last week some of the 2037 Gilt was purchased) returns us to the QE to Infinity theme.

This area has been profitable for the Bank of England via the structure of UK QE as it charges the asset protection fund Bank Rate. So mostly 0.5% but for a while 0.25% and presumably now 0.75%. In the end the money goes to HM Treasury but if you get yourself close the the flow of money as Goldman Sachs have proven you benefit and in the Bank of England’s case you can see this by counting the number of Deputy-Governors. Also its plan to reverse QE at some point continues in my opinion to be ill thought out but for now that is not fully pertinent as it has no intention of actually doing it!

UK Labour Market

In ordinary times the UK government would be putting on a party hat after seeing this.

The level of employment in the UK increased by 222,000 to a record high of 32.71 million in the three months to January 2019……..The employment rate of 76.1% was the highest since comparable records began in 1971.

As you can see a trend which began in 2012 still seems to be pushing forwards and poses a question as to what “full employment” actually means? Also let me use the construction series as an example of maybe the output data has been too low. From @NobleFrancis.

ONS Employment in UK construction in 2018 Q4 was 2.41 million, 2.8% higher than in 2018 Q3 & 3.2% higher than one year earlier.

To my question about the output data he replied.

Given the strength of the construction employment data, potentially we may see an upward revision to ONS construction output in Q4 although there can be odd quarters where the construction employment & output data go in different directions.

To give you the full picture @brickonomics points out that different areas of construction have very different labour utilisation so we go to a definitely maybe although that gets a further nudge from the wages data as you see the annual rate of growth went from 3.2% in October to 5.5% in December. So whilst this is not proof it is a strong suggestion of better output news to come.

Let us complete this section with the welcome news that unlike earlier stages of the recovery we are now creating mostly full-time work.

 This estimated annual increase of 473,000 was due mainly to more people working full-time (up 424,000 on the year to reach 24.12 million). Part-time working also contributed, with an increase of 49,000 on the year to reach 8.60 million.

Unemployment

Again the news was good.

The UK unemployment rate was estimated at 3.9%; it has not been lower since November 1974 to January 1975…..For November 2018 to January 2019, an estimated 1.34 million people were unemployed, 112,000 fewer than for a year earlier. There have not been fewer unemployed people in the UK since October to December 1975.

There have been periods recently where we have feared a rise in unemployment whereas in fact the situation has continued to get better. We again find the numbers at odds with the output data we have for the economy. But let us welcome good news that has persisted.

Wage Growth

This was a case of and then there were three today.

Excluding bonuses, average weekly earnings for employees in Great Britain were estimated to have increased by 3.4%, before adjusting for inflation, and by 1.4%, after adjusting for inflation, compared with a year earlier. Including bonuses, average weekly earnings for employees in Great Britain were estimated to have increased by 3.4%, before adjusting for inflation, and by 1.5%, after adjusting for inflation, compared with a year earlier.

The total wages number which they now call including bonuses had a good January when they rose by 3.7% which means we have gone 4%,3.4%,3.3% and now 3.7% on a monthly basis. For numbers which are erratic this does by its standards suggest a new higher trend. This is good news for the economy and also for the Bank of England which after seven years of trying has finally got a winning lottery ticket. I will let readers decide whether to award it another go or a tenner ( £10) .

As to real wage growth we now have some but sadly not as much as the official figures claim. This is because the inflation measure used called CPIH has some fantasy numbers based on Imputed Rents which are never paid which lower it and thereby raise official real wage growth. Thus if we use the January data it has real wage growth at 1.9% but using the RPI gives us a still good but lower 1.2%

Putting that another way you can see why there has been so much establishment effort led by Chris Giles of the Financial Times to scrap the RPI.

Comment

The UK labour market seems to have entered something of a Goldilocks phase where employment rises, unemployment falls and added to that familiar cocktail we have real wage growth. So we should enjoy it as economics nirvana’s are usually followed by a trip or a fall. As to the detail there remain issues about the numbers like the way that the self-employed are not included in the wages numbers. Also whilst I welcome the rise in full-time work the definition is weak as the respondent to the survey chooses.

Next let me just raise two issues for the Bank of England as it finally clutches a winning wages lottery ticket. It is expanding monetary policy into a labour market boom with its only defence the recent rise in the UK Pound £. Next its natural or as some would put it full (un)employment rate of 4.5% needs to be modified again as we recall when it was 7%.

Those of you who follow me on social media will know I do an occasional series on how the BBC economics correspondent only seems to cover bad news. Sometimes Dharshini David does it by reporting the good as bad.

eyebrows raised as jobs market figs “defy” Brexit Uncertainty BUT 1) hiring/firing tends to lag couple quarters behind activity 2)as per financial crisis, workers relatively cheap so firms may be “hoarding” workers 3)some jobs will have been created to aid with Brexit prep

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Has Portugal escaped its economic depression or not?

We have an opportunity today to look at the Euro area from two different but linked perspectives. The first continues from yesterday’s money supply analysis which tells us that the weaker economic phase looks set to continue overall. The next is that whilst I have pointed out in the past that in terms of economic growth in the Euro area Italy and Portugal have been like twins with it struggling to get above 1% per annum on any sustained basis Portugal has been doing better than that in recent times. Another difference is that whilst Italy has been in the bad boys/girls club Portugal is pretty much a model Euro area nation in terms of doing what it is told.

Looking back

The credit crunch hit Portugal with the annual fall in GDP peaking at 4.3%, however the economy bounced back quickly until the Euro area crisis hit. It was the latter which drove the “lost decade” and indeed depression seen in Portugal as annual GDP growth went negative again at the opening of 2011 and remained there until the last quarter of 2013. Not only that but the last three-quarters of 2012 all saw annual rate of fall in GDP exceeding 4%.

That means that the subsequent recovery had to dig its way out of quite a hole especially as it started slowly. Things picked up late in 2016 and 2017 was strong meaning as I pointed out on the 19th of November last year.

As to a full perspective the previous peak of 45.76 billion Euros for GDP was finally passed in the second quarter with its 45.88 billion.

The catch to the recent good news is that the annual rate of economic growth has been fading from the peak of 3.1% seen in the first half of 2017 with the latest numbers below.

The Portuguese Gross Domestic Product (GDP) increased by 1.7% in volume, in the fourth quarter of 2018 (2.1% in the previous quarter…..In comparison with the third quarter of 2018, GDP increased by 0.4% in real terms (0.3% in the previous quarter)

So if we take the second half of the year with ~0.7% GDP growth we can expect a further slowing. So was it to use the words of ECB President Mario Draghi all QE driven?

What changed?

If you look at the past history of Portugal which is littered with interventions by the IMF the issue has been one of balance of payments deficits. This was what the internal competitiveness model ( lower wages) was supposed to improve and there is evidence that it had some success.

The recovery period subsequent to 2013 was characterised by the continued increase in the weight of exports in GDP , a trend that extends to all components, with emphasis on tourism, which presented the greatest cumulative growth. ( Bank of Portugal)

The problem looking ahead is again illustrated by the Bank of Portugal.

chiefly due to a downward revision of export growth. This reflects a revision of the assumptions relating to developments in external demand and the incorporation of the most recent information.

This was added to in the latest national accounts.

Net external demand presented a more negative contribution to year-on-year GDP rate of change, reflecting a reduction in volume exports of goods.

In case you are wondering why this is such a big deal it is driven by this. From the Bank of Portugal a week ago.

The net external debt of Portugal, which is the result of the IIP mostly excluding capital instruments, gold bullion and financial derivatives, reached €179.5 billion in December 2018. Net external debt as a percentage of GDP declined by 2.2 percentage points from the end of 2017 to the end of 2018. Net external debt went from 91.7% to 89.5% during this period, as a result of an increase in GDP that more than offset the nominal increase in debt.

I cancel caution about the accuracy of all this but the principle of a large external debt holds. The issue with accuracy is shown below as  whilst a currency fall is a fact the holdings detailed are an estimate which is unlikely to be that accurate.

In the case of exchange rate changes, a depreciation of the kwanza resulted in a reduction in the value in euro of Angolan assets held by residents.

Returning to possible consequences one have been removed by Euro area membership as a currency collapse could happen but is a long way away if we note the current account surplus driven by Germany. Instead in the Euro area crisis we saw the benchmark ten-year bond yield rise into the high teens. That is a long way away now as the combination of a better economic growth phase and ECB QE means the ten-year yield is a mere 1.47%. Crazy really, but then so many bond yields are these days.

The undercut is that the whole position would likely be much better if Portugal had an external competitiveness measure or its own exchange rate as a new Escudo would be much lower than the Euro.

Car Production

This has been an area driving Portugal’s growth as highlighted by this earlier this month from The Portugal News.

Automotive production in Portugal increased by 68% in 2018 compared to the previous year, to a total of 294,000 vehicles, accentuating the upward trend started in 2017, the Automobile Association of Portugal (ACAP) announced today.

We know, however, that the world automotive market has slowed down and this has especially affected countries which export cars like Portugal. There have been individual changes but no great detail on the overall picture. All we have are the hints from this.

Industrial Production year-on-year change rate was -0.3%, in December (-3.1% in the previous month). Manufacturing
Industry year-on-year change rate was -0.6% (-5.2% in November).

House Prices

This has been “Boom!Boom!Boom!” to quote the black-eyed peas. From the Portugal resident.

There are signs that this may be particularly true of the Portugal real estate market, which, taking its cue from activity in Lisbon, is increasingly an investment of choice for international property investors and property development companies who are looking to take advantage of some of the best returns available in Europe.

If we switch from the hype to the numbers we are told this.

The Confidencial Imobiliário Residential Price Index reports that the cost of Portuguese property was up 15.6% in September 2018 when compared to the same period the previous year. Furthermore, it also reported year-on-year increases of over 10% for every month since July 2017.

I have pointed out before that the Golden Visa system has led to celebrities such as Madonna coming to Lisbon which will create some economic activity. But the Portuguese first-time buyer faces quite a bit of inflation.

Comment

There has been plenty of good news in the past couple of years from the Portuguese economy and let me add another dose just released by Portugal Statistics.

In December 2018, the unemployment rate was 6.6%, down 0.1 percentage points (pp) from the previous month’s level, the same value as in three months before, and down 1.3 pp from the same month of 2017.

Except it came with a troubling kicker which is in line with more recent events.

The provisional unemployment rate estimate for January 2019 was 6.7%, up 0.1 p.p. from the previous month’s level.

We do not yet know whether the last couple of years will be seen by historians as a turn for the better as we hope or just another phase in a long running depression as we fear. If the latter the pumping of house prices will look like something out of a dystopian science-fiction piece where the already wealthy gain but future buyers lose heavily.

Also if we look what the Doobie Brothers called a “long train running” there is this.

In 2018, there were 87,325 live births registered and 113,477 deaths in the national territory……….This resulted in the deterioration of the natural balance (-25,982), which remains negative for the tenth consecutive year.

Another lost decade?

 

UK real wages are finally growing but productivity dips

As we move onto the latest wages and employment data for the UK more bad news has affected the UK motor manufacturing sector. As Autocar points out.

The news that Honda is set to close its Swindon manufacturing plant in 2021 is a major shock, and a huge blow. To the UK car industry. To Swindon. And, most importantly, to the 3500 workers set to lose their jobs – and the thousands of others who work at firms that supply and service it.

Grim news indeed for those affected. Autocar continues with an explanation of why this is happening.

You have to consider the decline in demand for diesel too: Honda’s Swindon engine plant produced diesel engines. Then there’s the ever-growing rise in popularity of SUVs, which is harming sales of traditional cars such as the Civic – the only model made in Swindon.

And you can’t ignore global trade, such as Donald Trump’s threat to impose huge tariffs on cars imported from Europe into the US – such as the Civic. At the same time, the European Union and Japan recently agreed a trade deal that effectively removes tariffs on Japanese-built cars imported into Europe. That reduces Honda’s need to have a European manufacturing base.

So ironically being in the European Union has made the decision easier for Honda as we also wonder about the next bit.

Is Brexit uncertainty a factor? Almost certainly.

Also Honda itself is not doing so well.

There’s also Honda itself. The firm continues to struggle in Europe, with sales markedly down on a decade ago. Last year it sold just under 135,000 cars in the European market, a three per cent decline on 2017 – and around half its sales of a decade ago.

As a result, it has increasingly focused production in its home country in Japan, at the expense of factories elsewhere. The Swindon factory produced around 160,000 Civic models last year, but at its peak ten years ago its output was around 250,000. This is the latest in a pattern of decline.

So much of this is familiar and let me add another trend which is that Japan Inc seems to be taking things home. Moving to today’s theme we will see lower employment from the motoring manufacturing sector as time passes and therefore presumably lower wage growth.

The real wages trend

Any downturn poses a problem for wages based on this from today’s release.

£494 per week in constant 2015 prices, up from £490 per week for a year earlier, but £31 lower than the pre-downturn peak of £525 per week for February 2008.

As you can see we are still quite some distance from the previous peak and that involves using the lowest measure of inflation they can find ( CPIH) as under all other measures the situation is worse. Just as a reminder the Rental Equivalence ( Imputed Rent under another name ) pillar of CPIH that drags it lower was roundly rejected by the Economic Affairs Committee of the House of Lords only last month. We do learn however that the main changes are to be found in bonuses and the like because the fall in regular pay has been much smaller.

£464 per week in constant 2015 prices (that is, adjusted for price inflation), up from £459 per week for a year earlier, but £9 lower than the pre-downturn peak of £473 per week for August and September 2007 and for February, March and April 2008.

Another way of putting it is to add up the total loss which this in the Guardian tried to do at the end of last month.

Wages are still worth a third less in some parts of the country than a decade ago, according to a report.

Research by the Trades Union Congress (TUC) found that the average worker has lost £11,800 in real earnings since 2008.

Today’s news

Firstly the employment situation continues to be really good continuing a trend that has been going for around seven years now.

There were an estimated 32.60 million people in work, 167,000 more than for July to September 2018 and 444,000 more than for a year earlier. The employment rate (the proportion of people aged from 16 to 64 years who were in work) was estimated at 75.8%, higher than for a year earlier (75.2%) and the joint-highest since comparable estimates began in 1971.

This has fed through over time into the unemployment numbers in another welcome development.

There were an estimated 1.36 million unemployed people (people not in work but seeking and available to work), 14,000 fewer than for July to September 2018 and 100,000 fewer than for a year earlier……The unemployment rate (the number of unemployed people as a proportion of all employed and unemployed people) was estimated at 4.0%, it has not been lower since December 1974 to February 1975.

The rate of fall of unemployment has slowed but then we would expect that as the number itself shrinks. Also these numbers are consistent with the other way of looking at the quantity situation in the labour market.

Latest estimates show that between October to December 2017 and October to December 2018: hours worked in the UK increased by 1.5% to reach 1.04 billion hours…..the number of people in employment in the UK increased by 1.4% to reach 32.60 million.

The combination of all of these factors has finally fed into some better wages growth.

Latest estimates show that average weekly earnings for employees in Great Britain in nominal terms (that is, not adjusted for price inflation) increased by 3.4% both excluding and including bonuses compared with a year earlier.

How you look at that in real terms depends on your inflation measure and whilst the official number is 1.2% for real growth we find that it shrinks as we look at the others but all of them now show a significant amount of real wage growth. So we are at least beginning to climb that mountain which will take us back to where we were in late 2007.

Productivity

This is a much less positive area as we are left mulling this.

Output per hour – Office for National Statistics’ (ONS’) main measure of labour productivity – comparing this quarter with a year ago, decreased by 0.2% in the year to Quarter 4 (Oct to Dec) 2018. Output per worker decreased by 0.1% in the year to Quarter 4 (Oct to Dec) 2018.

Regular readers will be aware that I have my doubts about this number and in particular how they apply to the services sector which not only the dominant but an increasingly dominant part of the UK economy. Returning to what they tell us it is that the credit crunch saw a shift lower which unlike wages is not getting any better.

Comment

We find ourselves in something of a sweet spot for the UK labour market with wages and employment rising and unemployment falling. Even real wages are on the up and we should welcome that as we have been hoping for it for so long. The catch in today’s data is productivity and as it happens the monthly trend for wages which has gone 4% in October, 3.3% in November and 2.8% in December. That is pretty clear and is another way of putting weekly wages which were £527 in each month so no growth at all on that basis. The latter numbers tend to go in bursts so we await the next month.

As ever there is the caveat that the average earnings numbers ignore the self-employed who comprise some 14.8% of those in work.