UK unsecured lending continues to surge ahead

Today we get more information on just how loose Bank of England monetary policy is. But as it happens markets signalled the state of play yesterday. From the Financial Times.

The price of 10-year UK government debt rallied to its highest since October, as the general election build-up comes more clearly into investors’ view. The yield on benchmark 10-year gilts, which moves inversely to the price, dipped below 1 per cent on Tuesday to an intra-day low of 0.978 per cent, as investors sought the safety of government bonds after the long bank holiday weekend.

So if we want a strong Gilt market all we have to do is have more bank holidays, what a curious view? There are two much more relevant issues here of which the first is the easing on UK monetary conditions as the Gilt market has rallied since late January with the ten-year yield falling from 1.51% to around 1% now. The second is that it is in my experience rather extraordinary for the latest part of the rally to be taking place in an election campaign particularly one which veers between insipid and shambolic. The polls are in an even worse place as they suggest that the Conservatives may either lose their majority ( YouGov ) or win by 100 seats! Mind you after the 2015 debacle I can see why so many now simply ignore them.

Inflation

A consequence of easy monetary conditions is rising prices and we have seen another sign of what we have been expecting today already.

Grocery inflation hit 2.9 per cent in the 12 weeks to May 21, according to Kantar Worldpanel’s latest survey of the grocery sector, ahead of the official year-on-year inflation rate of 2.7 per cent. ( FT )

I doubt many consumers will be grateful for this nor will they agree with the central banking fraternity that by being “non-core” it can mostly be ignored. But they are doing their best to avoid it in an example of rationality.

in a sign that inflation is starting to affect consumers’ spending habits, cheaper products and discount retailers saw the biggest rises……Aldi and Lidl recorded their fastest growth rates since 2015, hitting a combined market share of 12 per cent. Across the sector, sales of supermarkets’ cheaper own-label products were 6 per cent higher than the same period last year,

Unsecured Credit

On the 29th of September last year I warned that the bank of England was playing with fire with its Bank Rate cut and other monetary policy easing. In particular I was worried about the growth of unsecured credit.

Consumer credit increased by £1.6 billion in August, broadly in line with the average over the previous six months. The three-month annualised and twelve-month growth rates were 10.4% and 10.3% respectively.

So how is that going now?

The flow of consumer credit was similar to its recent average in April, at £1.5 billion; the annual growth rate was broadly unchanged.

As you can see some months later the beat goes on. The only changed is that the Bank of England seems to have changed its policy about declaring the actual growth rate so shall we see if it has something to hide? If we check we see that the three-month annualised growth rate is 9.8% and the twelve-month growth rate is the same as last August at 10.3%.

So as the late Glenn Frey would say.

The heat is on, on the street
Inside your head, on every beat
And the beat’s so loud, deep inside
The pressure’s high, just to stay alive
‘Cause the heat is on

Just as a reminder the numbers were “improved” a few years ago on this basis.

The stock of student loans has doubled over the five years to 5 April 2012 to £47 billion, and now represents more than 20% of the stock of overall consumer credit. With student loans unlikely to be affected by the same factors that influence the other components of consumer credit, the Bank is proposing a new measure of consumer credit that excludes student loans……….This new measure of
consumer credit will be introduced in the August 2012 Bankstats release.

That is what we have now and as a comparison times were very different back then.

Consumer credit excluding student loans is estimated to have contracted by 0.4% in the year to June 2012.

Whereas student loans were expected to surge.

Government projections suggest that the outstanding balance of student loans will be more than £80 billion by 2017/18.

They were pretty much right about that but what does it mean for consumer credit? Well the total is much lower than it would be with student loans in it. For example I estimate that the current level of consumer credit of £198.4 billion would have nearly £100 billion added to it. As to the monthly net growth well the current £1.5 billion or so would be somewhere north of £2.5 billion and maybe at £3 billion. The reason why I estimating is that the numbers are over a year behind where we are.

Secured Credit

This will not be regarded as such a success by the Bank of England.

Net lending secured on dwellings in April was £2.7 billion, the lowest since April 2016 …. Approvals for house purchase and remortgaging loans fell further in April, to 64,645 and 40,575 respectively

Of course the Bank of England has made enormous efforts in this beginning four summers ago with the Funding for Lending Scheme. Those efforts pushed net mortgage lending back into positive territory and also contributed to the rise in UK house prices that has been seen over the same time period. Last August yet another bank subsidy scheme was launched and the Term Funding Scheme now amounts to £63 billion. However it seems to have given more of a push to unsecured lending than secured.

Of course Governor Carney also claims that car loans are secured lending ( no laughing please) and here is the latest data on it from the Finance and Leasing Association.

New figures released today by the Finance & Leasing Association (FLA) show that new business in the point of sale (POS) consumer new car finance market grew 13% by value and 5% by volume in March, compared with the same month in 2016.

That meant that £3.62 billion was borrowed in March using what is described as dealership finance.

Business lending

The various bank subsidy schemes have been badged as being a boost to business lending especially for smaller ones, but have not lived up to this.

Loans to small and medium-sized enterprises decreased by £0.3 billion ( in April)

Comment

The Bank of England claims that it is “vigilant” about unsecured lending in the UK but we know that the use of the word means that it is not. Or as it moves from initial denials to acceptance we see yet again a Yes Prime Minister style game in play.

James Hacker: All we get from the civil service is delaying tactics.

Sir Humphrey Appleby: Well, I wouldn’t call civil service delays “tactics”, Minister. That would be to mistake lethargy for strategy.

But it opened the monetary taps last August with its “Sledgehammer” expectations of which pushed the UK Pound lower and now we see unsecured credit continuing to surge and broad money growing at just over 7%. The old rule of thumb would give us an inflation rate of 5% if economic growth continues to be around 2%. In fact it is if we add in the trade deficit exactly the sort of thing that has seen boom turn to bust in the past.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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UK consumers leap out of their supposed grave yet again

Today we advance on the UK Retail Sales data which has various factors at play. Firstly the general theme is one of a fading of the growth we saw in 2016 as the growth in real wages also fades. On the subject of real wages I note that Sky News last night was comparing growth in March regular pay ( 2.1%) with April CPI inflation (2.7%) to presumably reinforce its point although of course there is a clear flaw there. Actually in March total pay growth (2.4%) was slightly higher than inflation ( 2.3%) as I pointed out yesterday but for some reason our official statistician’s use regular pay for real wages. I do wonder if they think Pound’s earned as bonuses are somehow marked in people’s pockets and bank accounts and treated differently.

Secondly there is the influence of the timing of Easter which was later this year and whether the seasonal adjustment allowed for that properly. The Confederation of British Industry or CBI certainly thinks that growth picked up.

59% of retailers said that sales volumes were up in April on a year ago, whilst 21% said they were down, giving a balance of +38%. This outperformed expectations (+16%), and was the highest balance since September 2015 (+49%)……37% of respondents expect sales volumes to increase next month, with 21% expecting a decrease, giving a balance of +16%

Indeed there was something rather familiar from last year so if it is the same let me say thank you ladies one more time. Your devotion to this area of the economy is hugely impressive.

Sales volumes grew strongly in clothing (+97% – the highest since September 2010), and grocers (+40%).

The details of this particular survey are as follows.

The survey of 112 firms, of which 57 were retailers, showed that the volume of sales grew at the fastest pace since September 2015 in the year to April, with orders placed on suppliers rising at the strongest rate for a year-and-a-half.

Today’s data

It would appear that my argument about problems with the seasonal adjustment concerning Easter gets another tick in its box.

In April 2017, the quantity bought in the retail industry increased by 2.3% compared with March 2017 and by 4.0% compared with April 2016.

This was a strong monthly performance and even got a little support in a way from my argument about the effect of inflation.

Average prices slowed slightly in April 2017, falling from 3.3% in March to 3.1% in April.

Slightly lower prices helping the performance? Maybe a bit and I also note that the measure of inflation in the retail sector seems to provide more backing for RPI data than CPI or CPIH.

If we look into the detail we see that they have a completely different view to the CBI.

Compared with March 2017, April 2017 has shown increases in the quantity bought and amount spent across all store types except department stores and textile, clothing and footwear stores.

I am not sure how a 97% rise for the CBI goes with an official data fall but there you have it! Meanwhile the march towards consuming online continues.

average weekly spending online was £1.0 billion; an increase of 19% compared with April 2016…….the amount spent online accounted for 15.6% of all retail spending, excluding automotive fuel, compared with 14% in April 2016.

Taking a perspective

If we look back we see that the figures for March which were so troubling at the time were revised from monthly growth of 1.7% to 2%. So they were not quite as bad, however even this month’s better performance is not so impressive on a quarterly basis.

The underlying pattern, as measured by the 3 month on 3 month estimate, showed a slight increase in April 2017 following a short period of contraction, increasing by 0.3%.

Thus it would be realistic to say that the surge of 2016 has gone and we are in a period  of little or marginal growth.

Looking Ahead

One area that is not going to be boosting Retail Sales is the buy to let industry if yesterday’s data from the Council of Mortgage Lenders is any guide.

Gross buy-to-let saw quarter-on-quarter decreases, down 2% by value and 1% by volume. Compared to the first quarter 2016, the number of loans decreased 39% and the amount borrowed decreased by 40%.

Of course that is comparing to the pre Stamp Duty increase peak but even the CML does not look especially optimistic.

The number of loans for buy-to-let house purchase advanced in March remained low compared to activity seen before the change on stamp duty on second properties introduced in April last year.

Also more general housing activity seems to have faded somewhat.

On a quarterly basis, house purchase activity was at its weakest for two years since the first quarter of 2015.

Although ever cheaper mortgage interest-rates did have an impact on existing borrowers.

By contrast, the number of remortgage loans advanced to borrowers was at its highest since the first quarter of 2009.

The only growth was seen in first time buyers which I have to say is not easy to explain.

Moving onto other factors I note that Markit’s latest survey has a two-way pull.

Higher living costs resulted in one of the sharpest falls in cash available to spend for two-and-a-half years in May. Survey respondents also indicated that their need for extra unsecured borrowing continued to rebound from the lows seen in 2016.

Of course regular readers of my work will realise that the UK has been on a bit of an unsecured borrowing binge recently. So perhaps more of the same is on its way. Somewhat oddly the surge in unsecured borrowing seems to have passed Markit’s economists by.

The survey measure which tracks people’s need to take on additional unsecured borrowing has rebounded so far this year, which marks an end to the steadily improved trend seen since late-2011

For newer readers the growth in UK unsecured credit has been of the order of 10% per annum for around a year now according to the Bank of England.

Car Finance

This seems to be continuing its rise and rise.

New figures released today by the Finance & Leasing Association (FLA) show that new business in the point of sale (POS) consumer new car finance market grew 13% by value and 5% by volume in March, compared with the same month in 2016. In Q1 2017, new business was up 10% by value and 3% by volume, compared with the same quarter in 2016.

Whilst we do not know that the cars bought were the same as last year there is a clear hint of higher inflation there than in the official figures if we look at the gap between value and volume. Also the word “bought” needs some review as these days we essentially lease or rent them.

The percentage of private new car sales financed by FLA members through the POS was 86.5% in the twelve months to March, unchanged compared with the same period to February.

The demand does however suggest that Gary Numan may have been prescient all those years ago.

Here in my car
I feel safest of all
I can lock all my doors
It’s the only way to live
In cars

Comment

Economics is a very contrary science if it is a science at all. We should welcome today’s better numbers for the UK and indeed they go with the business surveys which suggested an economic pick-up in April. Let us hope that continues. However we see yet more problems for our official statisticians as the seasonal adjustment for the timing of Easter misfires yet again. I am afraid that blaming that old staple the weather simply does not cut it. From the BBC.

Warmer weather helped retail sales to rise by more than expected last month, according to official data.

The actual picture is complex as growth fades and frankly after last year’s surge it had to at some point. The rise in inflation has reduced real wage growth although the situation is as ever in flux as in response to today’s numbers the UK Pound £ has pushed above US $1.30 which would help trim future inflation rises if we stay there. The ying to the upbeat yang is however that as so often in the past we look like we are borrowing on tick to spend.

If we move to financial markets this week has taught us one more time that crowded trades are the worst place to be as @NicTrades reminds us.

Reuters said this week biggest trade in the world was shorting VIX via leveraged ETFs millions selling vol at 7.8% VIX is now 16%

ETF stands for Exchange Traded fund.

 

 

 

 

How would the UK establishment respond to house price falls?

A major feature of the UK economic landscape in its recent boom phase has been that house prices have been rising. Indeed as the Funding for Lending Scheme (FLS) began in the summer of 2012 and set mortgages rates on a lower path ( estimated to be nearly 2% lower by the Bank of England) we saw around 6 months later a pick-up in both house prices and the economy. A sign of the house price boom was seen in yesterday evening’s London Standard.

A houseboat moored on the Thames in Chelsea has gone on the market for £2.25million, almost four times the price of the average London home. The 3,050sq ft luxury barge is being sold by estate agents Knight Frank, who describe it as “possibly the best houseboat available in London.”

I will be passing that way later so will take a look for myself, maybe I will even find out what the “climate-controlled heating system” is? It seems that with land so expensive the water as represented by the river Thames has got more popular.

The number of people living in floating homes in London has risen by 50 per cent in the past five years, with houseboats – which are exempt from stamp duty – being seen as a cheaper alternative to getting on the housing ladder.

Cheaper? Well that is of course relative to an ultra expensive area.

A three-bed house in the area would cost upwards of £6million, but the new owners will have to pay mooring and maintenance fees estimated at £27,000 a year.

The extremes of the London property situation were also highlighted.

Recently, a flat in Covent Garden was put on the market at £1.3m, making it what is thought to be Britain’s most expensive ex-council property….In contrast, a room rivalling Harry Potter’s cupboard under the stairs was on rent in London last week for £350 per month.

Perhaps another sign of things is this tweeted by Henry Pryor earlier.

Big day for who may join the FT100 group of companies today. Impressive performance, well done to all involved over the years.

He thinks that they have mostly taken business off other estate agents but it is hard to believe that they have not benefited from the house price boom. We can both agree that it has been a UK success story if not for exactly the same reasons.

The Nationwide Index

This morning has seen the house price update from the Nationwide Building Society.

UK house prices edged up 0.2% in May and, as a result, the annual rate of house price growth was little changed at 4.7%, compared with 4.9% in April.

If you read between the lines they are in fact rather nervous.

In the near term, it’s going to be difficult to gauge the underlying strength of activity in the housing market due to the volatility generated by the stamp duty changes which took effect from 1 April.

This is because of what happened before April Fools Day.

Indeed, the number of residential property transactions surged to an all-time high in March, some c11% higher than the pre-crisis peak as buyers of second homes sought to avoid the additional tax liabilities.

Indeed a report with an obvious temptation to upside bias is by its standards rather downbeat.

House purchase activity is likely to fall in the months ahead given the number of purchasers that brought forward transactions……..especially in the BTL sector, where other policy changes, such as the reduction in tax relief for landlords from 2017, are likely to exert an ongoing drag. ( BTL is Buy To Let).

Actually annual house price growth has gone 5.7%, 4.9% and now 4.7% on this measure which some but not the Nationwide might consider to be a trend.

The official view

This is of course to sing along with Depeche Mode about house prices.

You should be higher
I’ll take you higher

Any remaining doubts on this front were extinguished when Chancellor Osborne presented what he thought was a knock-out blow in the Brexit referendum debate. From the BBC.

A UK vote to leave the European Union would cause an “immediate economic shock” that could hold back growth in house prices, the chancellor has said. In the event of a vote for Brexit, by 2018, houses could be worth up to 18% less than if the UK voted to remain, George Osborne told the BBC.

Young people and first-time buyers – who are not necessarily the same group these days – are likely to positively welcome such a development! The Bank of England FLS inspired house price push has seen the house price to earnings ratio for them rise from 4.4 to 5.2 according to the Nationwide this morning. No wonder first time buyers need “Help to Buy”. As I have pointed out before they are also likely to be singing “Please, help me” from the famous Beatles hit.

We need to recall that such price earnings series are on favourable definitions for earnings (£39.300 per annum). But we can note that we are at 5.2 on this series very new to the supposedly unaffordable 5.4 of 2007 to which we were promised we would never return. London has in fact surged past its previous peak of 7.2 to 10.1. The word bubble is over used these days but what other word is appropriate to cover such a number?

Looking ahead

We got a clue this morning from the money and credit release from the Bank of England which needs to be accompanied by the sound of screeching brakes.

Lending secured on dwellings increased by £0.3 billion in April, compared to the average of £4.2 billion over the previous six months.

Which led to this is we look a little wider.

Total lending to individuals increased by £1.6 billion in April, compared to the average of £5.7 billion over the previous six months

Actually consumer or unsecured credit is in the midst of its own boom and ignored the mortgage slow down.

The three-month annualised and twelve-month growth rates were 10.4% and 9.6% respectively.

That leaves us with secured credit strangled but unsecured credit surging which flashes a warning light to say the least. Of course the Financial Policy Committee will be “vigilant” especially to the lunch menu and the cakes on the Bank of England tea trolley.

Actually the overall supply of credit to the UK economy had rather a grim April.

M4Lex is defined as M4 lending excluding intermediate OFCs. M4Lex decreased by £2.1 billion in April, compared to the average monthly increase of £10.4 billion over the previous six months.

Looking further ahead we can say that the outlook is for a slowing in mortgage growth.

The number of loan approvals for house purchase was 66,250 in April, compared to the average of 71,075 over the previous six months.

Comment

We are seeing a clear change in the UK house price situation as growth slows. What we do not know for certain yet is if this is temporary or in the new vernacular “skewing” or a permanent change. Should it be the latter then I expect a policy response most likely from the Bank of England. It could cut Bank Rate or undertake a reinforcement of schemes like the FLS one above to further reduce mortgage rates. The catch as we have learned from places like Sweden and Switzerland is that going to negative interest-rates only reduces mortgage rates for a while then they rise again as banks re-establish profit margins. So the establishment would really need to “Pump It Up” this time with all the associated dangers and risks. This of course would ignore the issue which I analysed yesterday where the retail sector has been boosted by lower prices rather than higher ones.

Meanwhile the FLS was supposed to boost business lending how is that going?

 Within this, loans to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) were broadly unchanged, compared to an average monthly increase of £0.2 billion over the previous six months. The twelve-month growth rate was 1.4%.

Three years down the road that is a very poor return when you consider that the growth rate may be just positive but the total is down a fair bit since then. The situation is in fact so bad the official response is to use a long word “counterfactual” . If we look to wider business lending and recall we have been in a 3 year economic boom well the numbers speak for themselves.

Loans to non-financial businesses decreased by £0.1 billion in April, compared to an average monthly increase of £0.9 billion over the previous six months. The twelve-month growth rate was 0.7%.

 

 

The UK Money Supply numbers show rising unsecured credit and falling business lending again

Today is a day for examining the state of play of the UK monetary system as we peruse data on both lending and the money supply. But before I get to that something significant has taken place earlier this morning. The cavalry from India has arrived as this from the Reserve Bank of India indicates.

it has been decided to:reduce the policy repo rate under the liquidity adjustment facility (LAF) by 25 basis points from 7.5 per cent to 7.25 per cent with immediate effect;

My first issue with this is the simple point that if the world economy is doing so well and is in a recovery why are so many places cutting interest-rates rates? It is almost as if they are afraid of something they are not telling us. Jeroen Blokland has put this on a map for us.

This is especially relevant in an article about UK monetary policy as the “Forward Guidance” from Mark Carney and the Bank of England is that an interest-rate rise or rises are on its/their way. If you deduct the from the countries in red on the map those who raised interest-rates because of currency falls you see that there is very little left and that the UK would be in danger of being as Brian Clough so memorably put it “in a class of one” if it raised Bank Rate. Is the UK economy that strong?

The other feature of this is that with RBI Governor Rajan India has a “Rock star” central banker just like the UK has with Mark Carney. Their “Rock star” has just cut interest-rates following a quarter where the official statistics tell us that the economy grew by 7.5% on a year before. Also I note that he thinks this of such a rate of economic growth.

Domestic economic activity remains moderate in Q1 of 2015-16.

Of course as the DnaIndia highlights there may be another issue.

Many economists suspect, however, that the government statisticians’ new way of counting GDP overstates how well India is doing.

Does anybody believe the new ways of counting Gross Domestic Product or GDP?

UK Money Supply

The UK measure of broad money supply used by the Bank of England is M4 excluding intermediate other financial corporations (OFCs). In case you are wondering about the number four we did have an M3 which became £M3 but ahem, it blew up. One of the factors back then was the way that building societies became banks for example with the word disintermediation to the fore. Returning to UK broad money it has been fairly stable for a while around the numbers below.

The three-month annualised and twelve-month growth rates were 4.0% and 4.2% respectively.

A rough rule of thumb is that this equals likely economic growth plus inflation. Currently that works much better if we use the Retail Price Index and economic growth rather than the Consumer Price Index. However for both measures we see that UK economic growth would be constrained by the pick-up in inflation which is likely with the oil price around $65 per barrel (Brent Crude). Actually if we put house prices into the CPI as I have long argued it would work really well right now but we would then have the problem that looking forwards the likely inflation pick-up (which began for example in Germany yesterday) would restrain economic growth. Perhaps that is what other central banks have been thinking as they have cut official interest-rates.

UK mortgage market

Interestingly it looks as though something is stirring again here.

The number of loan approvals for house purchase was 68,076 in April, compared to the average of 60,679 over the previous six months.

If we look for a driver of this it seems likely that the falls in mortgage interest-rates that we have been discussing are a factor here. The Bank of England has stopped driving them down so aggressively via its Funding for Lending Scheme but of course other factors such as the interest-rate cuts and monetary easing abroad have come into play. Thus we are also seeing a rise in remortgaging.

The number of approvals for remortgaging was 35,930, compared to the average of 32,308 over the previous six months.

Perhaps the overall background is a factor too. From This Is Money.

How to join the buy-to-let boom: Get started and pick the mortgage that’s right for you.

A recent report by economists showed that buy-to-let landlords have enjoyed incredible returns of nearly 1,400 per cent since 1996, beating all other investments.

If you put £1,000 into a rental property at the end of John Major’s government, it would have grown to £14,897 by last year, according to the research.

As the Outhere Brothers put it.

I say boom boom boom let me hear u say wayo
I say boom boom boom now everybody say wayo

Or as a current hit puts it.

Oh I think that I’ve found myself a cheerleader

With reports of “Irish Trophy Homes Are Back With the Property Bubble a Distant Memory on Bloomberg shall we misquote Prince and partly like its 2006/07?! What happened next?

Recently net mortgage lending has been stable at around £1.7/1.8 billion per month on average which compared to the past is low because whilst some have the tap open into the UK mortgage market another group are repaying as fast as they can. Repayments amounted to £15 billion in April as we mull two separate groups at play here.

Unsecured lending

The Financial Planning Committee set out to restrict the rules on risky mortgage lending via its Mortgage Market Review. Except that since in a predictable repetition of the past we seem to have got this.

Consumer credit increased by £1.2 billion in April, compared to the average monthly increase of £1.0 billion over the previous six months. The three-month annualised and twelve-month growth rates were 8.2% and 7.2% respectively.

Up until the Funding for Lending Scheme was introduced unsecured lending was falling in the UK but growth began again and as you can see recently it is picking-up with a vengeance.

Loans to businesses

The whole purpose of the Bank of England FLS these days is supposed to be to drive bank lending to businesses particularly smaller ones higher so let us see how it is doing.

Net lending – defined as gross lending minus repayments – to large businesses was -£1.6 billion in April. Net lending to SMEs was -£0.2 billion.

Loans to non-financial businesses decreased by £1.6 billion in April, compared to the average of £0.0 billion over the previous six months. The twelve-month growth rate was -0.4%. Within this, loans to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) decreased by £0.3 billion, compared to the average monthly decrease of £0.1 billion over the previous six months. The twelvemonth growth rate was -0.8%.

Hence the use of the word counterfactual which I note is not necessary when referring to mortgage growth or unsecured lending.

Comment

An analysis of the UK money supply and credit situation provides quite a bit of food for thought. As we look forwards and inflation rises back towards its target then we face the prospect that economic growth may slow. The situation is not helped by the fact that UK credit growth has been skewed towards the housing market and more latterly towards unsecured lending. Although of course it does allow bodies to claim that there is a bonanza now and even more of one just around the corner. From Legal and General yesterday.

has quantified the size and shape of the UK’s “Last Time Buyer” (LTB) market for the first time, and in doing so has identified 5.3m under-occupied homes in the UK, with 3.3m LTBs looking to downsize. The LTB market owns 7.7m spare bedrooms and a total of £820 billion of housing wealth, set to reach £1.2 trillion in 2020.

Wow! Can we mobilise this as after all we could pay off all the unsecured debt quite easily? Sadly life is not that easy and we have the issue of the fact that in spite of all the promises to the contrary there is little sign of credit growth for smaller businesses well apart from buy to let ones.

Where on this road does one see an interest-rate rise? A bit like a solution for Greece where we have been promised so many in the last week alone it seems to be a Mirage.