What is happening to US auto-loans?

One of the features of expansionary monetary policy has been that it misses some areas and concentrates in others. It reminds me of the word disintermediation which described a similar problem when central banks were trying to restrict the money supply rather than expand it with policies like QE ( Quantitative Easing) ,as the concept was the same albeit in a different direction. I have noted in the past the issue with auto-loans or loans for cars in the United States and am going to look at that in more detail as the situation is showing signs of bubbling under as we worry about it bubbling over.

What is the background?

Last November the Liberty Street Economics blog of the US New York Fed told us this.

The rise in auto loans has been fueled by high levels of originations across the spectrum of creditworthiness, including subprime loans, which are disproportionately originated by auto finance companies.

There was something of a warning tucked in there which was reinforced by this.

Originations of auto loans have continued at a brisk pace over the past few years, with 2016 shaping up to be the strongest of any year in our data, which begin in 1999……..the $1.135 trillion of outstanding auto loans by credit score and lender type, and we see that 75 percent of the outstanding subprime loans were originated by finance companies.

So there are various concerns which are the size of the market and its rate of growth which are highlighted by the way the finance companies seem to have taken over the subprime sector.

The data suggest some notable deterioration in the performance of subprime auto loans. This translates into a large number of households, with roughly six million individuals at least ninety days late on their auto loan payments.

The feeds into the theme of us “forgetting” how we got into the credit crunch or to put it another way the finance sector returning to past behaviours.

Last month it confirmed the 2016 rise.

auto debt (up $93 billion, or 8.7 percent)

Also there were some numbers to cheer any central banker’s heart.

As of December 31, 2016, total household indebtedness was $12.58 trillion, a $226 billion (1.8%) increase from the third quarter of 2016. Overall household debt remains just 0.8% below its 2008Q3 peak of $12.68 trillion, but is now 12.8% above the 2013Q2 trough.

I note that auto-loans began their recent rise in 2013 in terms of number of loans.

Used car prices

These are of course the asset in this market as the loans are backed by the cars. We live in a world where Bank of England Governor Mark Carney calls such loans “secured” and UK radio has adverts for buy-to-let cars. But earlier this month the US National Automobile Dealers Association released this.

NADA Used Car Guide’s seasonally adjusted used vehicle price index fell for the eighth straight month, declining 3.8% from January to 110.1. The drop was by far the worst recorded for any month since November 2008 as the result of a recession-related 5.6% tumble. February’s index figure was also 8% below February 2016’s 119.4 result and marked the index’s lowest level since September 2010.

As you can see prices have been falling for a while and looking at the chart of prices the rate of fall rather resembles that of 2008/09 with a difference which is that we start with prices having been in the low 120s rather than ~108. Last week we saw a warning from one of the companies involved and let me switch to Ed Harrison who has been on this case for a while.

Yesterday, Ally Financial warned that profits would underperform expectations. Now, they did not say that profits would fall or that they were taking credit writedowns. Neverthless, the warning is an important marker and should be of grave concern…………So with Ally, what we are seeing is that these problems have created enough discounting to induce a profit warning at one of the major auto finance companies. Ally is really the former GMAC, the engine of a huge amount of profit for General Motors, as are all of the finance arms of the automakers in the US. So what happens at Ally will definitely pass through to GM and the other carmakers unless the impact is arrested quickly.

There are various issues here but let us start with a clear difference with the housing market where prices have risen and thus boosted the asset value of the lenders books whereas here prices were pushed higher but are now falling. Also if we look we see that in another development familiar from the past the loans were bigger than the car value. Here is an offer I looked up from a company called DCU on what they call second chance auto loans.

Borrow up to 120% of Price – Qualified borrowers can finance up to 120% of NADA retail book value or 120% of the purchase price – whichever is less,

According to the St.Louis Fed yesterday the loans are a lot cheaper than they were.

The interest rate on a 48-month loan from a commercial bank for a new automobile purchase dropped from close to 8 percent prior to the Great Recession to an average of 4.3 percent since the second quarter of 2014.8 Meanwhile, auto finance company rates for new car loans averaged around 5 percent during this same period.

Also it points out this.

Softened underwriting standards have raised concerns regarding the risk associated with the robust growth in auto debt………..lenders have stretched repayment terms and offered higher advance rates, resulting in greater loan-to-value ratios.

In terms of its own region it is seeing this.

Serious delinquency rates among subprime borrowers in Little Rock and Memphis have now markedly increased during two years of an economic expansion.

Asset Backed Securities (ABS)

Yes they are on the scene as we look to see what is happening in a market that Mario Draghi of the ECB is very keen on. Barrons looked into it yesterday.

While delinquencies, liquidation rates and loss severities are higher across subprime ABS deals regardless of the ABS shelf, it appears that certain issuers are seeing larger increases than others. This analysis invites a few questions. Are the capital structures of deeper subprime lenders built to handle larger losses? Which structures, if any, are more likely to take principal losses in their rated debt tranches?

Comment

There are quite a few factors to consider here. Let us start with household debt which will soon pass the pre credit crunch peak. That needs to be compared to GDP ( Gross Domestic Product) which was 12% higher in 2016 than the previous peak of 2007. Regular readers will be aware of my concerns about GDP but for now let us just note that it has grown.

If we move to auto-loans there are a lot of flashing yellow lights. The trend towards subprime lending and the lending going “in-house” for the car lenders only adds to the moral hazards at play. Securitisation of the loans send a chill down the spine and now we see falling used car prices. Even worse the Financial Times has this morning told us not to panic!

Don’t panic about auto loans just yet — tax season isn’t over, after all

This is based on the fact that this year tax refunds have been particularly slow and therefore may well have influenced the February drop but of course not the ones before it. Also there is no panic here but there is a list that is gaining a growing number of ticks on it and this has just popped up under auto loans on Twitter.

Learn How to Get Fast Approved AutoLoans with No Credit Check Requirement in Texas ( @CarLoanBadCred )

Also this.

Gone are the days when you had to wait for getting bad credit auto loans. There are many online auto financing companies who offer competitive interest rates on these loans. Internet is quickly becoming the best place to get a blank check car loans with bad credit history

https://ezautofinance.net/how_to_get_a_blank_check_auto_loan_even_with_bad_credit.html

What could go wrong?

 

 

2017 is seeing the return of the inflation monster

As we nearly reach the third month of 2017 we find ourselves observing a situation where an old friend is back although of course it is more accurate to describe it as an enemy. This is the return of consumer inflation which was dormant for a couple of years as it was pushed lower by falls particularly in the price of crude oil but also by other commodity prices. That windfall for western economies boosted real wages and led to gains in retail sales in the UK, Spain and Ireland in particular. Of course it was a bad period yet again for mainstream economists who listened to the chattering in the  Ivory Towers about “deflation” as they sung along to “the end of the world as we know it” by REM. Thus we found all sorts of downward spirals described for economies which ignored the fact that the oil price would eventually find a bottom and also the fact that it ignored the evidence from Japan which has seen 0% inflation for quite some time.

A quite different song was playing on here as I pointed out that in many places inflation had remained in the service-sector. Not many countries are as inflation prone as my own the UK but it rarely saw service-sector inflation dip below 2% but the Euro area for example had it at 1.2% a year ago in February 2016 when the headline was -0.2%, Looking into the detail there was confirmation of the energy price effect as it pulled the index down by 0.8%. Once the oil price stopped falling the whole picture changed and let us take a moment to mull how negative interest-rates and QE ( Quantitative Easing) bond buying influenced that? They simply did not. Now we were expecting the rise to come but quite what the ordinary person must think after all the deflation paranoia from the “deflation nutters” I do not know.

Spain

January saw quite a rise in consumer inflation in Spain if we look at the annual number and according to this morning’s release it carried on this month. Via Google Translate.

The leading indicator of the CPI puts its annual variation at 3.0% In February, the same as in January
The annual rate of the leading indicator of the HICP is 3.0%.

Just for clarity it is the HICP version which is the European standard which is called CPI in the UK. It can be like alphabetti spaghetti at times as the same letters get rearranged. We do not get a lot of detail but we have been told that the impact of the rise in electricity prices faded which means something else took its place in the annual rate. Also we got some hints as to what is coming over the horizon from last week’s producer price data.

The annual rate of the General Industrial Price Index (IPRI) for the month of January is 7.5%, more than four and a half points higher than in December and the highest since July 2011.

It would appear that the rises in energy prices affected businesses as much as they did domestic consumers.

Energy, whose annual variation stands at 26.6%, more than 18 points above that of December and the highest since July 2008. In this evolution, Prices of Production, transportation and distribution of electrical energy and Oil Refining,
Compared to the declines recorded in January 2016.

In fact the rise seen is mostly a result of rising commodity prices as we see below.

Behavior is a consequence of the rise in prices of Product Manufacturing Basic iron and steel and ferroalloys and the production of basic chemicals, Nitrogen compounds, fertilizers, plastics and synthetic rubber in primary forms.

The Euro will have had a small impact too as it is a little over 3% lower versus the US Dollar than it was a year ago.

Belgium

The land of beer and chocolate has also been seeing something of an inflationary episode.

Belgium’s inflation rate based on the European harmonised index of consumer prices was running at 3.1% in January compared to 2.2% in December.

The drivers were mostly rather familiar.

The sub-indices with the largest upward effect on inflation were domestic heating oil, motor fuels, electricity, telecommunication and tobacco.

These two are the inflation outliers at this stage but the chart below shows a more general trend in the major economies of the Euro area.

The United States

In the middle of this month the US Bureau of Labor Statistics confirmed the trend.

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) increased 0.6 percent in January on a seasonally adjusted basis, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
reported today. Over the last 12 months, the all items index rose 2.5 percent before seasonal adjustment.

This poses some questions of its own in the way that it confirmed that the strong US Dollar had not in fact protected the US economy from inflation all that much. The detail was as you might expect.

The January increase was the largest seasonally adjusted all items increase since February 2013. A sharp rise in the gasoline index accounted for nearly half the increase,

Egypt

A currency plummet of the sort seen by the Egyptian Pound has led to this being reported by Arab News.

Inflation reached almost 30 percent in January, up 5 percent over the previous month, driven by the floatation of the Egyptian pound and slashing of fuel subsidies enacted by President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi in November.

Ouch although of course central bankers will say “move along now……nothing to see here” after observing that the major drivers are what they call non-core.

Food and drinks have seen some of the largest increases, costing nearly 40 percent more since the floatation, figures from the statistics agency show. Some meat prices have leaped nearly 50 percent.

Comment

There is much to consider here and inflation is indeed back in the style of Arnold Schwarzenegger. However some care is needed as it will be driven at first by the oil price and the annual effect of that will fade as 2017 progresses. What I mean by that is that if we look back to 2016 the price of Brent Crude oil fell below US $30 per barrel in mid-January and then rose so if the oil price remains around here then its inflationary impact will fade.

However even a burst of moderate inflation will pose problems as we look at real wages and real returns for savers. If we look at the Euro area with its -0.4% official ECB deposit rate and wide range of negative bond yields there is an obvious crunch coming. It poses a particular problem for those rushing to buy the German 2 year bond as with a yield of 0.94% then they are facing a real loss of around 5/6% if it is held to maturity. You must be pretty desperate and/or afraid to do that don’t you think?

Meanwhile so far Japan seems immune to this, of course there will eventually be an impact but it is a reminder of how different it really is from us.

UK National Statistician John Pullinger

Thank you to John and to the Royal Statistical Society for his speech on Friday on the planned changes to UK inflation measurement next month. Sadly it looks as if he intends to continue with the use of alternative facts in inflation measurement by the use of rents to measure owner-occupied housing costs. These rents have to be imputed because they do not actually  exist as opposed to house prices and mortgage costs which not only exist in the real world but are also widely understood.

Rising bond yields are feeding into the real economy

Once upon a time most people saw central banks as organisations which raised interest-rates to slow inflation and/or an economy and cut them to have the reverse effect. Such simple times! Well for those who were not actually working in bond markets anyway. The credit crunch changed things in various ways firstly because we saw so many interest-rate cuts ( approximately 700 I believe now) but also because central bankers ran out of road. What I mean by that is the advent of ZIRP or near 0% interest-rates was not enough for some who plunged into the icy cold waters of negative interest-rates. This has posed all sorts of problems of which one is credibility as for example Bank of England Governor Mark Carney told us the “lower bound” for UK Bank Rate was 0.5% then later cut to 0.25%!

If all that had worked we would not be where we are and we would not have seen central banks singing along with Huey Lewis and the News.

I want a new drug
One that won’t make me sick
One that won’t make me crash my car
Or make me feel three feet thick

This of course was QE (Quantitative Easing) style policies which became increasingly the policy option of choice for central banks because of a change. This is because the official interest-rate is a short-term one usually for overnight interest-rates so 24 hours if you like. As central banks mostly now meet 8 times a year you can consider it lasts for a month and a bit but in the interest-rate environment that changes little as you see there are a whole world of interest-rates unaffected by that. Pre credit crunch they mostly but not always moved with the official rate afterwards the effect faded. So central banks moved to affect them more directly as lowering longer-term interest-rates reduces the price of fixed-rate mortgages and business loans or at least it should. Also much less badged by central bankers buying sovereign bonds to do so makes government borrowing cheaper and therefore makes the “independent” central bank rather popular with politicians.

That was then and this is now

Whilst there is still a lot of QE going on we are seeing ch-ch-changes even in official policy as for example from the US Federal Reserve which has raised interest-rates twice and this morning this from China.

Chinese press reports that the PBoC have raised interest rate on one-year MLF loans by 10bps to 3.1% ( @SigmaSqwauk)

The Chinese bond market future fell a point to below 96 on the news which raised a wry smile at a bond market future below 100 ( which used to be very common) but indicated higher bond yields. These are becoming more common albeit with ebbs and flows and are on that road because of the return of inflation. So many countries got a reminder of this in December as we have noted as there were pick-ups in the level of annual inflation and projecting that forwards leaves current yields looking a bit less than thin. Or to put it another way all the central bank bond-buying has created a false market for sovereign and in other cases corporate bonds.

The UK

Back on the 14th of June last year I expressed my fears for the UK Gilt market.

There is much to consider as we note that inflation expectations and bond yields are two trains running in opposite directions on the same track.

In the meantime we have had the EU leave vote and an extra £60 billion of Bank of England QE of which we will see some £1 billion this afternoon. This drove the ten-year Gilt yield to near 0.5%. Hooray for the “Sledgehammer” of Andy Haldane and Mark Carney? Er no because in chart terms they have left UK taxpayers on an island that now looks far away as markets have concentrated more on thoughts like this one from the 14th of October last year.

Now if we add to this the extra 1.5% of annual inflation I expect as the impact of the lower UK Pound £ then even the new higher yields look rather crackpot.

In spite of the “Sledgehammer” which was designed by Bank of England lifer Andy Haldane the UK ten-year Gilt yield is at 1.44% so higher than it was before the EU leave vote whilst his ammunition locker is nearly empty. So he has driven the UK Gilt market like the Duke of York used to drill his men. I do hope he will be pressed on the economic effects of this and in the real world please not on his Ivory Tower spreadsheet.

The Grand old Duke of York he had ten thousand men
He marched them up to the top of the hill
And he marched them down again.
When they were up, they were up
And when they were down, they were down
And when they were only halfway up
They were neither up nor down.

If you look at inflation trends the Gilt yield remains too low. Oh and do not forget the £20 billion added to the National Debt  by the Term Funding Scheme of the Bank of England.

Euro area

In spite of all the efforts of Mario Draghi and his bond-buyers we have seen rising yields here too and falling prices. Even the perceived safe-haven of German bonds is feeling the winds of change.

in danger of taking out Dec spike highs in yield of 0.456% (10yr cash) ( @MontyLaw)

We of course gain some perspective but noting that even after price falls the yield feared is only 0.456%! However it is higher and as we look elsewhere in the Euro area we do start to see yield levels which are becoming material. Maybe not yet in Italy where the ten-year yield has risen to 2.06% but the 4% of Portugal will be a continuous itch for a country with such a high national debt to GDP (Gross Domestic Product) ratio. It has been around 4% for a while now which is an issue as these things take time to impact and I note this which is odd for a country that the IMF is supposed to have left.

WILL PARTICIPATE IN EUROGROUP DISCUSSION ON – BBG ( h/t @C_Barraud)

 

The US

The election of President Trump had an immediate effect on the US bond market as I pointed out at the time.

There has been a clear market adjustment to this which is that the 30 year ( long bond) yield has risen by 0.12% to 2.75%.

 

As I type this we get a clear idea of the trend this has been in play overall by noting that the long bond yield is now 3.06%.  We can now shift to an economic effect of this by noting that the US 30 year mortgage-rate is now 4.06% and has been rising since late September when in dipped into the low 3.3s%. So there will be a contractionary economic effect via higher mortgage and remortgage costs. There will be others too but this is the clearest cause and effect link and will be seen in other places around the world.

Japan

Here we have a slightly different situation as the Bank of Japan has promised to keep the ten-year yield around 0% so you can take today’s 0.07% as either success or failure. In general bond yields have nudged higher but the truth is that the Bank of Japan so dominates this market it is hard to say what it tells us apart from what The Tokyo Whale wants it too. Also the inflation situation is different as Japan remains at around 0%.

Comment

We find ourselves observing a changing landscape. Whilst not quite a return of the bond vigilantes the band does strike up an occasional tune. When it plays it is mostly humming along to the return of consumer inflation which of course has mostly be driven by the end of the fall in the crude oil price and indeed its rebound. What that has done is made inflation adjusted or real yields look very negative indeed. Whilst Ivory Tower spreadsheets may smile the problem is finding investors willing to buy this as we see markets at the wrong price and yield. Unless central banks are willing to buy bond markets in their entirety then yields will ebb and flow but the trend seems set to be higher and in some cases much higher. For example German bunds have “safe-haven” status but how does a yield of 0.44% for a ten-year bond go with a central bank expecting inflation to go above 2% as the Bundesbank informed us earlier this week?

The economic effects of this will be felt in mortgage,business and other borrowing rates. This will include governments many of whom have got used to cheap and indeed ultra-cheap credit.

 

 

 

The economic impact of a higher dollar and interest-rate rises

We are in the middle of a central bank 24 hours and of course last night the US Federal Reserve continued its recent habit of only raising interest-rates just before Christmas.

In view of realized and expected labor market conditions and inflation, the Committee decided to raise the target range for the federal funds rate to 1/2 to 3/4 percent. The stance of monetary policy remains accommodative,

On the face of it not much of a change and it is only to as they put it 3/4 percent. However in the modern era there is a significance in that it is in a world of ZIRP ( Zero Interest Rate Policy) and indeed NIRP where N = Negative. This has been highlighted this morning by one of the forerunners of the NIRP world which is the Swiss National Bank.

The Swiss National Bank (SNB) is maintaining its expansionary monetary policy. Interest on sight deposits at the SNB is to remain at –0.75% and the target range for the three-month Libor is unchanged at between –1.25% and –0.25%.

So we have another perspective which is that the spread between these two central banks is now 1.5% which is small in absolute terms but in these days is a lot. Also I note that an interest-rate of -0.75% is “expansionary” whereas one of 0.75% is merely “accommodative”. Oh and the SNB isn’t entirely convinced so we get yet more rhetoric from it.

At the same time, the SNB will remain active in the foreign exchange market as necessary, while taking the overall currency situation into consideration.

Already this morning a country which was previously expected to lower interest-rates has kept them unchanged as Norway remains at 0.5%. Although here there is also clearly an effect from the higher price of crude oil. Meanwhile later we will hear from the Bank of England which cut Bank Rate in August a move which I argued was unwise at the time and looks even worse now. No wonder Governor Mark Carney has moved onto discussing climate change rather than monetary policy or sledgehammers!

Bondpocalypse

It was only on Monday I was looking at the return of the bond vigilantes and overnight they have been active in some areas. For example the US ten-year Treasury Note yield has risen to 2.6%. It was only in early November that it was 1.78%. There have been effects in that period from the likely fiscal plans of President-Elect Trump and expectations for yesterday evening’s interest-rate rise but there was a further kicker. From the Guardian

But investors were caught out by surprisingly bullish comments from Fed chair Janet Yellen in the wake of the announcement and by projections showing that 11 of her 17 policy-making colleagues see borrowing costs rising another three times in 2017.

So not only was there an actual increase but the future path moved higher although to be more precise steeper as the Federal Reserve is really only projecting faster moves to a particular level. There is the obvious cautionary note that we were promised “3-5” interest-rate rises for 2016 by John Williams of the San Francisco Fed and got only one. But this time around the return of some inflationary pressure seems set to be on their minds.

This has seen the German 10 year yield rise back up to 0.36% in spite of the ongoing QE from the ECB. Whilst we are looking at this the “safe haven” problem they claimed to have fixed if getting worse as the two-year German yield is now -0.78%. Meanwhile the Bank of England has spent some £3 billion this week alone on a QE program described as a “sledgehammer” only for the UK Gilt ten-year yield to go back to 1.5% which is higher than when it came out of the tool cupboard. My Forward Guidance is for a sharp increase in inflation in the use of the word counterfactual.

Across the world in Japan there was plenty of work to do as the trend was against the recent promise of the Bank of Japan to keep its benchmark yield at 0%. I will explain later why they may have needed to sober up Governor Kuroda to authorise this but it must have been a busy day over there to keep it as low as 0.08%.

Dollar Hollar

If we look at the fact that the Japanese Yen has dropped sharply to 118 versus the US Dollar you will understand why the keys to the Sake cabinet at the Bank of Japan may have to have been taken off its Governor. All his Christmas wishes have come true in spite of the fact he is unlikely to celebrate it. From 115 to 118 in a manner described by Alicia Keys as “Fallin'” or by Status Quo as “Down Down” . It seems to have affected Prime Minister Abe so much he is going to join Vladimir Putin in a hot spring later.

Mario Draghi will be pleased also as the Euro slips below 1.05 versus the US Dollar as it and the UK Pound £ (1.253) get pushed lower but remain in station.

For the US itself then we see a further tightening of monetary policy via the US Dollar which has risen overall by about 1.5% since the interest-rate rise announcement. As it was expected it must be forecasts via the “dot plots” for 2017 that have changed things. Via this route monetary policy has an effect before it happens or in fact can have an impact even if it never happens something which has led to central bankers to get drunk on the implications. Care is needed though because for any real economic impact the changes and moves need to be sustained for a period.

Bank of England

This is left rather in disarray by this. If it was a schoolboy(girl) it would be in the corner wearing a dunces cap. This is the problem of having a Governor who is a “dedicated follower of fashion” when fashions change! Should the US Federal Reserve deliver on its interest-rate promises then Mark Carney will look very out of step as inflation rises above its target. Also his “sledgehammer” of QE is currently being swept aside in the UK Gilt market by worldwide trends. No wonder he is now opining on climate change and income inequality although those unfamiliar with him would do well to note his appalling record in any form of Forward Guidance. He has not be nicknamed the “unreliable boyfriend” only in jest.

Comment

As ever let us look at the impact on the real economy of this. In itself a 0.25% interest-rate rise should not have much impact but the effect via the US Dollar will be powerful. Let us start with the US economy as we have a benchmark from Fed Vice-Chair Fischer which I looked at on November 9th last year.

The New York Fed trade model suggests that a 10 percent appreciation of the U.S. dollar is associated with a 2.6 percent drop in real export values over the year. Consequently, the net export contribution to GDP growth over the year is 0.5 percentage point lower than it would have been without the appreciation and a cumulative 0.7 percentage point lower after two years

The Dollar Index has in fact risen from around 80 in July 2014 to 102.6 now so quite an effect will be taking place.

If we look abroad for an impact then the obvious place to look is Tokyo as the Bank of Japan gets what it wants with a plummeting Yen but also faces rising bond yields. It seems set to plough ahead regardless which poses worrying questions for Japanese workers and consumers as rising inflation seems set to impact on real wages.

Meanwhile out song for the day has to be this from Aloe Blacc.

I need a dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
hey hey
Well I need a dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
hey hey
And I said I need dollar dollar, a dollar is what I need
And if I share with you my story would you share your dollar with me

 

 

Is this the revenge of the bond vigilantes?

The latter part of 2016 has seen quite a change in the state of play in bond markets. If we look at my own country the UK we only have to look back to the middle of August to see a situation where the UK Gilt market surged to an all-time high. This was driven by what was called a “Sledgehammer” of monetary easing according to the Bank of England Chief Economist Andy Haldane.  This comprised not only £60 billion of Gilt purchases and £10 billion of corporate bond purchases but also promises of “more,more,more” later in the year. Not only was this a time of bond market highs it was also a time of what so far at least has been “peak QE” as central planners like our Andy flexed both their muscles (funded of course by a combination of the ability to create money and taxpayer backing) and their rhetoric.

However those who pushed the UK Gilt market to new highs following the Bank of England now face large losses as you see it has fallen heavily since. The ten-year Gilt yield which fell to 0.5% is now 1.5% as the Bank of England’s Forward Guidance looks ever more like General Custer at Little Big Horn with bond vigilantes replacing the Red Indians. Let me switch into price terms which will give you a clearer idea of the scale of what has taken place. There are always issues with any such measure but the UK Gilt which matures in 2030 can be considered as an average. Fresh with his central planning mandate Mark Carney paid 152.7 for it back in mid-August but last week he got a relative bargain at 138 and if today’s prices hold will be paying much less later this week.

This of course means that the Bank of England has made fairly solid losses on this round of QE as we wonder if that is the “Sledgehammer” referred to. So will anyone else who bought with them and I raise this as some may have been forced to buy in a type of “stop-loss” situation as we wait to see if the pain became too much for some pension funds and insurance companies. Such a situation would be a complete failure as we recall central banks are supposed to supervise and maintain free and fair markets which awkwardly involves stopping the very price and yield manipulation that QE relies on.

As we stand the overall Bank of England QE operation will be in profit but of course that has been partly driven by the new round of it! Anyway here is a picture of the Sledgehammer as it currently stands.

What has driven this?

The UK may well have been at least partially a driving force on the world scene in mid-summer but of course the recent player has been the Trump Truck on its journey to the White House. I recall pointing out on here on November 9th that this part of his acceptance speech meant that a new fiscal policy seemed on its way.

We are going to fix our inner cities and rebuild our highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, schools, hospitals.

It had an immediate impact.

There has been a clear market adjustment to this which is that the 30 year ( long bond) yield has risen by 0.12% to 2.75%.

We have of course more perspective now and this morning that yield has nudged 3.2%. Of course there is ebb and flow but also we have seen a clear trend.

Crude Oil

This has also been a player via its impact on expectations for inflation. This morning the announced deal between OPEC and non-OPEC countries saw the price of a barrel of Brent Crude Oil rising 5% to around US $57 per barrel. This compares to the recent nadir of around US $42 in early August. There are of course differences in taxation and so on but roughly I would expect this to raise annual consumer inflation by around 0.5%. This time around the effect seems set to be larger as we have so far replaced the price falls of the latter part of 2015 with rises in 2016. Of course the oil price will change between now and the end of 2016 but this gives an idea of the impact as we stand.

There has also been a general shift higher in commodities prices or to be more specific a surge in metals prices which has only partially been offset by the others. The CRB (Commodity Research Bureau) Index opened 2016 in the low 370s and is now 427.

US Federal Reserve

This has had an influence as well. It contributed to the bond market rally by the way its promises of “3-5” interest-rate rises were replaced by a reality of none so far. Now we face the prospect of this Wednesday’s  meeting thinking that they probably have to do one now to retain any credibility at all. Back on November 9th I wondered if they would and there are still grounds for that as we look at Trump inspired uncertainty and higher bond yields and US Dollar strength. However on the other side of the idea I note that @NicTrades suggesting they could perhaps do 0.5% this week. Far too logical I think!

But as we look back at nearly all of 2016 how much worse could the Forward Guidance of the US Federal Reserve have been?

The Ultras

No not the Italian football hooligans as I am thinking here of the trend that involved countries issuing ever longer dated debt. If we stay with Italy though Mark Jasayoko had some thoughts yesterday on Twitter.

Italy‘s 50year bond issued on Oct 5 is down 11.33% since. = 4yrs of coupons Dear bond bulls, enjoy holding on for the next half century.

Oh Well as Fleetwood Mac would say. There was also Austria with its 70 year bond which pretty much immediately fell and I note that this morning reports of a yield rise approaching 0.1%.  Those who gambled on the ECB coming to the rescue are left with the reality that such long-dated bonds are currently excluded from its QE. As for the 100 year bond issued by Ireland in March the price may well have halved since then.

Perhaps the outer limit of this can be found in Mexico which issued a 100 year Euro denominated bond in March 2015. Of course not even Donald Trump can put a wall around a bond but it puts a chill up your spine none the less.

As we look at the whole environment we see that taxpayers have done well here or more likely governments who will spend the “gains” and investors will have lost. Should the wild swings lead to casualties and bailouts the taxpayer picture will get more complex.

Comment

So we have seen a sort of revenge of the bond vigilantes although care is needed as a few months hardly replaces a bear market which in trend terms has lasted for around 3 decades. However there is a real economy effect here and let me highlight it from the United States.

Interest rates on U.S. fixed-rate mortgages rose to their highest levels in more than two years……..The Washington-based industry group said 30-year fixed-rate conforming mortgages averaged 4.27 percent, the highest level since October 2014……..The spike in 30-year mortgage rates, which have risen about 0.50 percentage point since the Nov. 8 election, has reduced refinancing activity.

That effect will be seen in many other countries and we will also see the cost of business loans rise. Also over time governments which have of course got used to ever cheaper borrowing seem set to find that the tie which was forever being loosened is now being tightened. How is the fiscal expansionism recommended by establishment bodies such as the IMF looking now?

 

 

What are the economic consequences of a Donald Trump victory?

This morning has seen an event which some will describe as a victory for anti-establishment hopes and others as the end of the world as we know it. The victory of Donald Trump adds to the UK vote to leave the European Union as events which only just before they happened were supposedly not far off unpossible. As an ex options trader my first thought is that the media and dare I say/write it experts understanding of probability has had a simply shocking 2016. One of the things I learned back in the day was that when you make investments you need to wipe you own wishes,wants and likes from you mind science fiction style and maximise objectivity. Also the era of “big data” is not going so well is it?

This has some economic consequences in itself as much of the media has damaged itself in 2016 by being so consistently wrong. How that combines with an age where we consume so much more news is not crystal clear but I expect the main organisations to lose viewers and readers and for newer forms to emerge. There will be one minor relief which is that the one track mind exhibited by the Financial Times this summer and autumn will be replaced by choosing whether to blame Brexit or Trump!

Let me also throw in an issue for the banking and financial centre. After all we have been told that the victory of New York as a banking centre or rather the banking centre was nailed on by the UK EU leave vote. Yet @madamebutcher points out this.

Suddenly, all the American bankers want to stay in London.

We could perhaps do an exchange where our bankers go there and theirs come here. This would mean that everyone would be simultaneously wrong and right!

Economic policy

Has there been an election campaign where there was so little emphasis on the economics? The one main hint along the way as we have discussed on here was that both candidates were likely to have some form of fiscal stimulus. However there were elements of other policies which will affect the economics of which the main one was the protectionist rhetoric and promises of Donald Trump. From the FT.

Mr Trump has campaigned on his pledge to build a wall on the Mexican border, called for a ban on Muslim immigration and the deportation of 11m unauthorised immigrants.

There was also this.

Mr Trump has opposed the proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership deal and called for fundamental changes to the Nafta pact with Mexico and Canada……He has also threatened to impose punitive 45 per cent tariffs on goods from China, stoking fears of a trade war.

And this.

Mr Trump has promised the biggest tax revolution since Ronald Reagan, pledging to cut taxes across the board. He says no American business would pay more than 15 per cent of their profits in tax, compared with a current maximum of 35 per cent. The top rate of tax would fall from 39.6 per cent as the Republican reduces the number of tax brackets.

So there was in fact a fair bit but it was covered by a smokescreen on other issues including the obvious personality clash. It was there but often a secondary element rather than primary. There was no “It’s the economy, stupid!” like the original Bill Clinton campaign.

Fiscal Policy

There was already an element of fiscal expansionism in the tax cutting plans highlighted above. For younger readers this is very similar to what Ronald Reagan promised and did as President and back then it went well. Advocates of Arther Laffer were pleased to see the economy strengthen and as it did so tax revenues do well too. Of course that was then and now is a post credit crunch world where many old relationships have broken, but it did look to have worked back then.

On the spending front there was this clear hint.

We are going to fix our inner cities and rebuild our highways, bridges, tunnels, airports, schools, hospitals. We’re going to rebuild our infrastructure, which will become, by the way, second to none, and we will put millions of our people to work as we rebuild it.

That is very reminiscent of the “New Deal” of F.D Roosevelt from back in the day or at least it feels like it. Of course we should apply some sort of filter to an acceptance speech likely to be given at a time of a combination of high emotion and much tiredness but some of that will need to be done now I think. It was also backed up by this.

I will harness the creative talents of our people and we will call upon the best and brightest to leverage their tremendous talent for the benefit of all. It is going to happen. We have a great economic plan. We will double our growth and have the strongest economy anywhere in the world.

We have quite an odd combination of free market promises on taxes and apparent central planning on infrastructure spending. There has been a clear market adjustment to this which is that the 30 year ( long bond) yield has risen by 0.12% to 2.75%.

What about monetary policy?

The US Federal Reserve has been on the wires and media outlets in the last week yet again promising us an interest-rate rise in December. If we apply logic then the apparent fiscal expansionism expressed by President-Elect Trump should make that even more likely. However there is in reality doubt on two fronts now. As fans of the economic effect of bond yields then a persistent rise ( remember this one is not even a day old) in the 30 year yield will make them less likely to rise. Next central bankers love to use uncertainty as an excuse and 2016 has provided quite a lot of that.

So whilst an interest-rate rise in December should be more likely I suspect it has become less likely now.

Other central banks

The Bank of Japan has been on the wires because the Yen has strengthened to 103 versus the US Dollar and the Nikkei dropped over 900 points to 16,251. But apart from it promising “bold action” for about the 1000th time it is quiet. However I suspect one thing will change which is the constant uses of Brexit as a scapegoat will mostly be replaced by the election of Donald Trump.

Comment

You may be wondering why I have not referred to financial markets more and that is simply because many of them have calmed down apart from those I have mentioned. There is of course one other. The Mexican Peso has fallen some 10% and at times more today as we wonder how much a wall can cost? I have a Mexican neighbour and wonder what to say to her?

Meanwhile fiscal expansionism may well lead to a change in US Federal Reserve policy. I have wondered in the past if future interest-rate increases could be combined with (even) more QE so are we now singing along to Sweet.

Does anybody know the way, did we hear someone say
(We just haven’t got a clue what to do)
Does anybody know the way, there’s got to be a way
To Blockbuster

Should you be feeling down today it could be worse as Newsweek has proven.

Central banks face up to Super Wednesday

One of the features of the times is the way that financial markets spend so much of their time front-running central banks. This creates quite an atmosphere today as they wait for the Bank of Japan early tomorrow UK time and then later in the day the US Federal Reserve. We have seen already an example of skittish trading as the Euro pushed above 1.12 versus the US Dollar for no apparent reason. Also it will be a nervous day in bond markets where the “tantrum” I wrote about on the 12th if this month is ongoing and of course has pushed markets in the opposite direction to all the central banking bond buying. The ten-year bond yield in Germany has nervous poked its head into positive territory albeit only at 0.02% as I type this and yet the ECB QE (Quantitative Easing) bond buying continues and across all the eligible Euro area nations (not Greece) it had reached some 1.034 trillion Euros as of the end of last week.

Bank of Japan

This faces quite a list of problems which adds to its conundrum as in many ways it is the central bank which has gone furthest. If you do a check list you go negative interest-rates, QE albeit called QQE, corporate bond purchases, commercial paper ( where it is as far as I recall alone)  as well as equities and commercial property via exchange traded funds.

Those wondering about the equity purchases might like to look back to my article on the Tokyo Whale as the Bank of Japan must own two-thirds of that market by now. Here is an update on this subject from Bloomberg last week.

The central bank is on course to become the No. 1 shareholder of 55 companies in Japan’s Nikkei 225 Stock Average by the end of 2017, according to estimates compiled by Bloomberg last month.

The Yen

This will be on the mind of the members of the Bank of Japan because it is not behaving as they would have hoped and expected. In the early days of Abenomics the Yen fell and against the US Dollar reached a nadir of just below 124 in early May 2015. The rally in the Yen began at the start of 2016 and has seen it move by 20 points from just below 122 to just below 102. Even worse for the Bank of Japan a fair bit of the strengthening followed this announcement in January,

The Bank will apply a negative interest rate of minus 0.1 percent to current accounts that financial institutions hold at the Bank. It will cut the interest rate further into negative territory if judged as necessary.

We saw that the application of negative interest-rates with the hint of more worked for 24 hours in Yen terms. It went on a wild ride where it weakened for about a day but then surged and has with the occasional halt and back track continued in the same direction until now.

So another Ivory Tower has come crashing down as more QE ( called QQE in Japan as QE has become discredited) and negative interest-rates have led to a stronger and not weaker Yen in 2016.

Inflation

This is a clear area where things are made awkward for Abenomics as the stronger Yen means that there will be downwards pressure on inflation as commodities and oil get cheaper. That makes it harder for the Bank of Japan to hit its target of consumer inflation rising at 2% per annum. Here is the latest data on the subject.

The consumer price index for Japan in July 2016 was 99.6 (2015=100), down 0.2% from the previous month, and down 0.4% over the year….  The consumer price index for Ku-area of Tokyo in August 2016 (preliminary) was 99.6 (2015=100), up 0.1% from the previous month, and down 0.5% over the year.

As you can see prices are falling again which collapses another row of Ivory Towers as expanding the monetary base on this scale should lead to inflation in their models.

Now we get to something awkward which is that the lower rather than higher inflation is achieving an Abenomics objective. It has given Japan some real wage growth but by a completely different route to the one envisaged. Under Abenomics higher inflation was supposed to be accompanied by some sort of wages fairy which would sprinkle magic dust on the numbers.

So by an unexpected route Japan is getting an economic boost. Accordingly I can only completely disagree by this from Gavyn Davies in the Financial Times.

As a result, the inflation credibility of the BoJ has sunk to a new low, and the policy board badly needs to restore confidence in the 2 per cent inflation target.

The economy

This is not going so well as Bank of Japan policymaker Funo told us last week.

Looking ahead, sluggishness is expected to remain in exports and production for some time, and the pace of economic recovery is likely to remain slow.

He was more specific later on the numbers.

the medians of the Policy Board members’ forecasts for the economic growth rate are 1.0 percent for fiscal 2016, 1.3 percent for fiscal 2017, and 0.9 percent for fiscal 2018, and the economy is expected to continue growing at a pace above its potential through the projection period.

Is he really saying that growth at such a low-level is above potential?Yes he is.

Japan’s potential growth rate, as estimated by the Bank, has declined to the range of 0.0-0.5 percent,

 

On a collective level we got news today on the population and ageing problem that Japan has. According to its Statistics Bureau the population fell by another 300,000 in the 6 months to the beginning of this month making it 126.6 million now. There are now 10.5 million people over 80 which only the “dismal science” would conclude is a bad thing.

Deposit Rates

Have raised the issue of people saving more when interest-rates get very low let me give you the Bank of Japan data on deposit rates. The ordinary depositor gets 0.002% and if you do a time deposit for a year you get 0.016% and for ten years between 0.2% and 0.3% per annum.

The Federal Reserve

It has been a dreadful year for Forward Guidance from the US central bank. The “three to five” interest-rate increases promised at the start of 2016 by John Williams of the San Francisco Fed have morphed into zero so far. As we approach the election changes will be less likely but not impossible. So it is now or after the election you would think. Except now relies on someone as cautious as Janet Yellen taking a risk. So I think we can expect yet more Open Mouth Operations and promises of future rises just like we have seen all year.

Comment

My job as an options trader in UK interest-rate markets used to involve predicting what central banks will do and whilst I had quite a few successes it is also true that sometimes it teaches you some humility. Let me remind you of another view of Japan which I have been pointing out on here in 2016. On an individual or per capita basis its performance is in fact okay and might point at us in the UK. So in my view it does not need all the monetary splashing around. Where the catch comes is the level of the national debt compared to output which in gross terms is very high (250% or so of GDP according to the IMF) and rising due to the fiscal deficit which does not fit well with a shrinking and aging population. Is it all about the debt then? Pretty much I think the idea that it will boost the economy is all Imagination.

It’s just an illusion, illusion, illusion

Illusion, illusion, illusion, illusion