UK GDP growth is services driven these days as manufacturing is in a depression

Today brings the UK into focus as we find out how it’s economy performed at the end of 2019. A cloudy perspective has been provided by the Euro area which showed 0.1% in the final quarter but sadly since then the news for it has deteriorated as the various production figures have been released.

Germany

WIESBADEN – In December 2019, production in industry was down by 3.5% on the previous month on a price, seasonally and calendar adjusted basis according to provisional data of the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis)

France

In December 2019, output decreased in the manufacturing industry (−2.6%, after −0.4%), as well as in the whole industry (−2.8%, after 0.0%).

Italy

In December 2019 the seasonally adjusted industrial production index decreased by 2.7% compared with the previous month. The change of the average of the last three months with respect to the previous three months was -1.4%.

Spain

The monthly variation of the Industrial Production Index stands at -1.4%, after adjusting for seasonal and calendar effects.

These were disappointing and were worse than the numbers likely to have gone into the GDP data. Most significant was Germany due both to the size of its production sector and also the size of the contraction. France caught people out as it had been doing better as had Spain. Italy sadly seems to be in quite a mire as its GDP was already 0.3% on the quarter. So the background is poor for the UK.

Today’s Data

With the background being not especially auspicious then this was okay in the circumstances.

UK gross domestic product (GDP) in volume terms was flat in Quarter 4 (Oct to Dec) 2019, following revised growth of 0.5% in Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2019.

In fact if we switch to the annual numbers then they were better than the Euro area.

When compared with the same quarter a year ago, UK GDP increased by 1.1% to Quarter 4 2019; down from a revised 1.2% in the previous period.

Marginal numbers because it grew by 1% on the same basis but we do learn a several things. Firstly for all the hype and debate the performances are within the margin of error. Next that UK economic growth in the two halves of 2019 looks the same. Finally that as I have argued all along the monthly GDP numbers are not a good idea as they are too erratic and prone to revisions which change them substantially.

Monthly gross domestic product (GDP) increased by 0.3% in December 2019, driven by growth in services. This followed a fall of 0.3% in November 2019.

Does anybody really believe that sequence is useful? I may find support from some of the economics organisations I have been debating with on twitter as their forecasts for today were based on the November number and were thus wrong-footed. Although of course they may have to deal with some calls from their clients first.

If we look into the detail we see that in fact our economic performance over the past two years has in fact been much more consistent than we might otherwise think.

GDP was estimated to have increased by 1.4% between 2018 and 2019 slightly above the 1.3% growth seen between 2017 and 2018.

Growth, just not very much of it or if we note the Bank of England “speed-limit” then if we allow for margins of error we could call it flat-out.

Switch to Services

Our long-running theme which is the opposite of the “rebalancing” of the now Baron King of Lothbury and the “march of the makers” of former Chancellor Osborne was right yet again.

Growth in the service sector slowed to 0.1% in Quarter 4 2019, while production output fell 0.8%.

So whilst there was not much growth it still pulled away from a contracting production sector and if we look further we see that the UK joined the Euro area in having a poor 2019 for manufacturing and production.

Production output fell by 1.3% in the 12 months to December 2019, compared with the 12 months to December 2018; this is the largest annual fall since 2012 and was led by manufacturing output, which fell by 1.5%.

Meanwhile a part of the services sector we have consistently noted did well again.

The services sector grew by 0.3% in the month of December 2019 after contracting by 0.4% in November 2019. The information and communication sector was the biggest positive contributor on the month, driven by motion pictures, with a number of blockbuster films being released in December (PDF, 192.50KB).

That is something literally under my nose as Battersea Park is used regularly for this.

Balance of Payments

There is an irony here because if we look internationally they do not balance as there are examples of countries both thinking they have a surplus with each other.

The numbers such as they are had shown signs of improvement but like the GDP data actually had a case of groundhog day.

The total trade deficit narrowed by £0.5 billion to £29.3 billion in 2019, with a £9.7 billion narrowing of the trade in goods deficit, largely offset by a £9.2 billion narrowing of the trade in services surplus.

The latter bit reminds me that I wrote to the Bean Commission about the fact that our knowledge of services trade is really poor and today’s release confirms this is still the case.

The trade in services surplus narrowed £5.1 billion in Quarter 4 2019 largely because of the inclusion of GDP balancing adjustments.

Let me explain this as it is different to what people are taught at school and in universities where net exports are part of GDP. The output version of GDP counts it up and then drives the expenditure version which includes trade and if they differ it is the trade and in particular services numbers in this instance which get altered. If they had more confidence in them they would not do that. This way round they become not far off useless in my opinion.

 

Gold and UK GDP

In the UK statisticians have a problem due to this.

For many countries the effect of gold on their trade figures is small, but the prominence of the industry in London means it can have a sizeable impact on the UK’s trade figures.

Rather confusingly the international standard means it affects trade but not GDP.

Firstly, imports and exports of gold are GDP-neutral. Most exports add to GDP, but not gold. This is because the sale of gold is counted as negative investment, and vice versa for imports and the purchase of gold. So, the trade in gold creates further problems for measuring investment.

So as well as the usual trade figures they intend to produce ones ignoring its impact.

Because a relatively small numbers of firms are involved in the gold trade, publishing detailed figures could be disclosive. However, within those limitations, we are now able to show our headline import and export figures with gold excluded.

A good idea I think as the impact on the UK economy is the various fees received not the movement of the gold itself, especially it we did not own it in the first place.

Oh and my influence seems to have even reached the Deputy National Statistician.

Gold, in addition to being a hit song by Spandau Ballet, is widely used as a store of value.

Comment

For all the hot air and hype generated the UK economic performance has in the past two years been remarkably similar. Actually the same is pretty much true of comparing us with the Euro area.As it happens 2020 looks as though we are now doing better but that has ebbed and flowed before.

Looking beneath this shows we continue to switch towards services and as I note the downwards revisions to net services trade I am left wondering two things. What if the services surveys are right and the switch to it is even larger than we are being told? Also it displays a lack of confidence in the services surveys to revise the numbers down on this scale. We know less than sometimes we think we do.

Meanwhile on a much less optimistic theme manufacturing has been in a decade long depression.

Manufacturing output in the UK remained 4.5% lower in Quarter 4 (Oct to Dec) 2019 than the pre-downturn peak in Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2008.

 

 

What are the economic prospects for the Euro area?

As we progress into 2020 there has been a flurry of information on the Euro area economy. However there has been quite a bit of dissatisfaction with the usual indicators so statistics offices have been looking  at alternatives and here is the German effort.

The Federal Office for Goods Transport (BAG) and the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) report that the mileage covered by trucks with four or more axles, which are subject to toll charges, on German motorways decreased a seasonally adjusted 0.6% in December 2019 compared with the previous month.

As a conceptual plan this can be added to the way that their colleagues in Italy are now analysing output on Twitter and therefore may now think world war three has begun. Returning to the numbers the German truck data reminds us that the Euro areas largest economy is struggling. That was reinforced this morning by some more conventional economic data.

Germany exported goods to the value of 112.9 billion euros and imported goods to the value of 94.6 billion euros in November 2019. Based on provisional data, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) also reports that German exports decreased by 2.9% and imports by 1.6% in November 2019 on the same month a year earlier. Compared with October 2019, exports were down 2.3% and imports 0.5% after calendar and seasonal adjustment.

We get a reminder that what was one if the causes of economic imbalance before the credit crunch has if anything grown as we note the size of Germany’s trade surplus.  It is something that each month provides support for the level of the Euro. Switching to economic trends we see that compared to a year before the larger export volume has fallen by more than import volume. This was even higher on a monthly basis as we note that the gap between the two widened. But both numbers indicate a contractionary influence on the German economy and hence GDP ( Gross Domestic Product).

Production

Today’s data opened with a flicker of positive news.

In November 2019, production in industry was up by 1.1% on the previous month on a price, seasonally and calendar adjusted basis according to provisional data of the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis). In October 2019, the corrected figure shows a decrease of 1.0% (primary -1.7%) from September 2019.

However this still meant this.

-2.6% on the same month a year earlier (price and calendar adjusted)

There is a particular significance in the upwards revision to October as some felt that the original numbers virtually guaranteed a contraction in GDP in the last quarter of 2019. In terms of a breakdown the better November figures relied on investment.

In November 2019, production in industry excluding energy and construction was up by 1.0%. Within industry, the production of capital goods increased by 2.4% and the production of consumer goods by 0.5%. The production of intermediate goods showed a decrease by 0.5%.

Only time will tell if the investment was wise. The orders data released yesterday was not especially hopeful.

Based on provisional data, the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) reports that price-adjusted new orders in manufacturing had decreased in November 2019 a seasonally and calendar adjusted 1.3% on the previous month.

Producing more into weaker orders has an obvious flaw and on an annual basis the situation was even worse.

-6.5% on the same month a year earlier (price and calendar adjusted)

Perhaps the investment was for the domestic economy as we look into the detail.

Domestic orders increased by 1.6% and foreign orders fell 3.1% in November 2019 on the previous month. New orders from the euro area were down 3.3%, new orders from other countries decreased 2.8% compared to October 2019.

But if we widen our outlook from Germany to the wider Euro area we see that it was the source of the strongest monthly slowing.

In a broad sweep orders for production rose from 2013 to December 2017 with the series peaking at 117.1 ( 2015=100) but we have been falling since and have now gone back to 2015 at 100.3.

The Labour Market

By contrast there is more to cheer from this area.

The euro area (EA19) seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate was 7.5% in November 2019, stable compared with
October 2019 and down from 7.9% in November 2018. This remains the lowest rate recorded in the euro area
since July 2008.

In terms of the broad trend the Euro area is now pretty much back to where it was before the credit crunch and is a long way from the peak of above 12% seen around 2013. But there are catches and nuances to this of which a major one is this.

In November 2019, the unemployment rate in the United States was 3.5%, down from 3.6% in October 2019 and
from 3.7% in November 2018.

That is quite a gap and whilst there may be issues around how the numbers are calculated that still leaves quite a gap. Also unemployment is a lagging indicator but it may be showing signs of turning.

Compared with October 2019, the number of persons unemployed increased by
34 000 in the EU28 and decreased by 10 000 in the euro area. Compared with November 2018, unemployment fell
by 768 000 in the EU28 and by 624 000 in the euro area.

The rate of decline has plainly slowed and if we look at Germany again we wait to see what the next move is.

Adjusted for seasonal and irregular effects, the number of unemployed remained unchanged from the previous month, standing at 1.36 million people as well. The adjusted unemployment rate was 3.1% in November, without any changes since May 2019.

Looking Ahead

There was some hope for 2020 reflected in the Markit PMI business surveys.

Business optimism about the year ahead has also improved
to its best since last May, suggesting the mood
among business has steadily improved in recent
months.

However the actual data was suggested a low base to start from.

Another month of subdued business activity in
December rounded off the eurozone’s worst quarter
since 2013. The PMI data suggest the euro area
will struggle to have grown by more than 0.1% in
the closing three months of 2019.

There is a nuance in that France continues to do better than Germany meaning that in their turf war France is in a relative ascendancy. In its monthly review the Italian statistics office has found some cheer for the year ahead.

The sectoral divide between falling industrial production and resilient turnover in services persists. However, business survey indicators convey first signals of optimism in manufacturing. Economic growth is projected to slightly increase its pace to moderate growth rates of 0.3% over the forecast horizon.

Comment

The problem for the ECB is that its monetary taps are pretty much fully open and money supply growth is fairly strong but as Markit puts it.

At face value, the weak performance is
disappointing given additional stimulus from the
ECB, with the drag from the ongoing plight of the
manufacturing sector a major concern.

It is having an impact but is not enough so far.

However, policymakers will be encouraged by the resilient
performance of the more domestically-focused
service sector, where growth accelerated in
December to its highest since August.

This brings us back to the opening theme of this year which has been central bankers both past and present singing along with the band Sweet.

Does anyone know the way, did we hear someone say
(We just haven’t got a clue what to do)
Does anyone know the way, there’s got to be a way
To blockbuster

Hence their move towards fiscal policy which is quite a cheek in the circumstances.

The conceptual issue is that all the intervention and central planning has left the Euro area struggling for any sustained economic growth and certainly slower growth than before. This is symbolised by Italy which remains a girlfriend in a coma.

The Composite Output Index* posted at 49.3 in December,
down from 49.6 in November, to signal a second consecutive fall in Italian private sector output. Moreover, the decline quickened to a marginal pace.

 

UK GDP growth is as flat as a pancake

Today brings us the last major set of UK economic data before the General Election on Thursday at least for those who vote in person. It is quite a set as we get trade, production, manufacturing and construction data but the headliners will be monthly and quarterly GDP. As the latter seem set to be close to and maybe below zero no doubt politicians will be throwing them around later. Let’s face it they have thrown all sorts of numbers around already in the campaign.

The UK Pound

This has been the economic factor which has changed the most recently although it has not got the attention it deserves in my opinion. At the time of writing the UK Pound £ is above US $1.31, 1.18 to the Euro and nearing 143 Yen. This means that the effective or trade-weighted index calculated by the Bank of England is at 81.1 which is about as good as it has been since the post EU leave vote fall ( there were similar levels in April of last year). This particular rally started on the 9th of August from just below 74 so it has been strong or if you prefer for perspective we opened the year at 76.4.

Thus using the old Bank of England rule of thumb we have seen the equivalent of more than a 1% rise in official interest-rates or Bank Rate in 2019 so far. This has produced two economic developments or at least contributed to them. The first is that inflation prospects look good and I mean by my definition not the Bank of England one. The CPI versions could head below 1% in the months to come and RPI towards 1.5%. The other is that it may have put a small brake on the UK economy and contributed to our weak growth trajectory although many producers are probably used to swings in the UK Pound by now.

Some good news

The trade figures will be helped by this from UK wind.

GB National Grid: #Wind is currently generating 13.01GW (33.08%) out of a total of 39.34GW

The catch is that of course we are reliant on the wind blowing for a reliable supply. Also that it is expensive especially in its offshore guise, as it it both outright expensive to add to the costs of a back-up.

GDP

As to growth well our official statisticians could not find any.

UK GDP was flat in the three months to October 2019.

If we look at the different sectors we see what has become a familiar pattern.

The services sector was the only positive contributor to gross domestic product (GDP) growth in the three months to October 2019, growing by 0.2%. Output in both the production and construction sectors contracted, by 0.7% and 0.3%, respectively. The weakness seen in construction was predominantly driven by a fall of 2.3% in October.

So services grew and production shrank with construction erratic but also overall lower. If you wish to go to another decimal place you can find a small smidgeon of growth as services pushed GDP up by 0.17%, production cost 0.1% and construction cost 0.02% leaving a net 0.05%. But that is spurious accuracy as that puts the numbers under too much pressure.

Services

There was something of note in the monthly series ( October).

Services also grew by 0.2% in October, with widespread growth in several industries. The most notable of these were real estate activities and professional, scientific and technical activities, which both contributed 0.06 percentage points to gross domestic product (GDP) growth. The latter was driven by strength in both architectural and engineering activities, and research and development.

Two things stand out from this. Firstly the quarterly growth was essentially October  and next that much of it was from real estate and architecture. Is Nine Elms booming again? But more seriously something is perhaps going on here that has not been picked up elsewhere.

Production

Here the news has been pretty gloomy all round although the energy part is good news in terms of better weather and less expense for consumers.

Total production output decreased by 0.7% for the three months to October 2019, compared with the three months to July 2019; this was led by manufacturing output, which fell by 0.7%, followed by falls in mining and quarrying (2.6%) and electricity and gas (1.0%).

This reminds us that these areas have been seeing a depression in the credit crunch era.

Production output in the UK remained 6.2% lower for the three months to October 2019 than the pre-downturn peak for the three months to March 2008……..Manufacturing output in the UK remained 3.5% lower for the three months to October 2019 than the pre-downturn peak for the three months to March 2008.

It was not so long ago that it looked like manufacturing was about to escape this but then the trade war happened.

There was a flicker in October alone but the impact of the swings in the pharmaceutical industry are usually much stronger than that.

The growth of 0.1% in total manufacturing output in October 2019, compared with September 2019, was mainly because of widespread strength, with 8 of the 13 subsectors displaying upward contributions. The largest of these came from the volatile pharmaceutical products subsector, which rose by 2.1%, following two consecutive periods of significant monthly weakness during August and September 2019.

Trade

The issue here is the uncertainty of the data which today has illustrated,

The total UK trade deficit (goods and services) widened £2.3 billion to £7.2 billion in the three months to October 2019, as imports grew faster than exports

That seems clear but then again maybe not.

Excluding unspecified goods (which includes non-monetary gold), the total trade deficit narrowed £4.3 billion to £2.9 billion in the three months to October 2019.

The oversea travel and tourism problems have still not be solved.

For earlier monthly releases of UK Trade
Statistics that have also been affected by this error, the versions on the website should be amended
to make clear to users that the errors led the Authority to suspend the National Statistics
designation on 14 November 2014.

Moving on there is also this.

In current prices, the trade in goods deficit widened £6.8 billion to £35.6 billion, largely driven by rising imports; the trade in services surplus widened £4.4 billion to £28.4 billion, largely driven by rising exports.

So there is hope for the UK services exports which seem to be doing well and I have long suspected have been under recorded. For example smaller businesses are likely to be missed out. The scale of this is simply unknown and as we have issues here this must feed into the wider GDP numbers which are so services driven.

So our trade problem is a case of definitely maybe.

Comment

We perhaps get the best perspective from the annual rate of GDP growth which is now 0.8% using the quarterly methodology. If we take out the spring blip that has been declining since the 2% of August 2018. There are some ying and yangs in the detail because of we start with the positive which is services growth ( 1.3%) it has been pulled higher by the information and communication category which is up by 5.4% and education which is up by 3%. But on the other side of the coin the depression in production and manufacturing has worsened as both have fallen by 1.5%. I have little faith in the construction numbers for reasons explained in the past but growth there has fallen to 0%.

There are lots of permutations for the General Election but yet another interest-rate cut by the Bank of England just got more likely. It meets next week. Also political spending plans are getting harder to afford in terms of economic growth,

 

 

 

Sadly a strong UK trade performance (for once) gets overlooked by the GDP release

Late on Friday the credit ratings agency Moodys offered its latest opinion on the state of play on the UK.

Leading ratings agency Moody’s has signalled it is poised to downgrade the credit rating on Britain’s government debt, warning that Brexit has triggered an “erosion in institutional strength” that threatens the UK’s financial credibility.

The ratings agency, which scores debt on the basis of how likely they are to default, changed the outlook on its Aa2 rating on the debt issued by the UK government from “stable” to “negative”.

That implies a cut to the actual rating could be coming imminently. ( Sky News)

Unfortunately for Sky News they went wrong with the first word in two respects. These days there is no such thing as a leading ratings agency and of course their operations are lagging and not leading. Also if it was going to be imminent they would have actually done it.

Indeed the crux of the matter was rather curious.

Moody’s said: “In the current political climate, Moody’s sees no meaningful pressure for debt-reducing fiscal policies.”

That was an odd statement because as I pointed out on social media the falls in bond yields have changed matters on this subject. The UK fifty-year Gilt yield closed the week at 1.23% whereas the Moodys report and some of the reporting seemed to be from an era where it was say 4% or 5% so if you like in one of the forecasts by the Office for Budget Responsibility or OBR.

Moody’s said Britain’s £1.8trn of public debt – more than 80% of annual economic output – risked rising again and the economy could be “more susceptible to shocks than previously assumed”.

Indeed Moodys seemed to be playing politics.

Moody’s said that “Brexit has been the catalyst for [an] erosion in institutional strength” which helped explain the change in outlook.

It said the main rationale for the change of view was firstly that “UK institutions have weakened as they have struggled to cope with the magnitude of policy challenges that they currently face, including those that relate to fiscal policy”.

What we do know is that fiscal policy is set to be looser like er France and well.

At Aa2, Britain is on the same level as France but below Germany’s AAA rating.

GDP Growth

The X-Factor in all of this is how the economy grows which is where today’s news comes in. It was hard not to have a wry smile at the Moodys report arriving just a say after the Bank of England had raised its growth estimate.

Bank staff’s estimate for GDP growth in 2019 Q3 as a whole had been revised up to 0.4%, from 0.2%
at the time of the Committee’s previous meeting. This was largely the result of an upward revision to estimates
of service sector output for June and July.

If we move to the actual numbers released this morning we were told this.

UK gross domestic product (GDP) in volume terms was estimated to have increased by 0.3% in Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2019. When compared with the same quarter a year ago, UK GDP increased by 1.0% in Quarter 3 2019; this is the slowest rate of quarter-on-year growth since Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2010.

So some growth but the annual number has been pulled lower by the contraction in the second quarter. Overall we are very similar to the Euro area where annual growth is 1.1% and quarterly 0.2%. The breakdown was familiar for the UK as well.

The service and construction sectors provided positive contributions to GDP growth, while output in the production sector was flat in Quarter 3 2019.

We got more detail here.

Manufacturing was flat in Quarter 3 2019, as was production. Services output increased by 0.4% in Quarter 3 2019, following the weakest quarterly figure in three years in the previous quarter. Construction output experienced a pickup following a weak Quarter 2, increasing by 0.6%.

Regular readers will know that I have long argued that we have in fact had a “march of the services” rather than a “march of the makers” and that the services sector is probably above 80% of the economy now. On a quarterly basis we saw this.

Information and communication was the largest contributing sector to growth in the latest quarter. It increased by 0.8% and contributed 0.08 percentage points.

On an annual basis we saw this.

In the three months to September 2019, services output increased by 1.4% compared with the three months ending September 2018; public sector dominated industries accounted for one-third of this growth.

Maybe a flicker of Brexit preparations there in the annual numbers. Also if you see a Luvvie today please be nice to them/

Long-term strength within the computer programming and the motion pictures industries are the main reasons for the sectors strong performance from Quarter 1 2015.

On the other side of the coin it was always going to be a difficult spell for manufacturing.

The 0.4% monthly decrease in manufacturing output was widespread with falls in 8 of the 13 subsectors; the largest downward contribution came from a 5.1% fall in basic pharmaceutical products.

The September numbers above do at least have the caveat that pharmaceutical products do not run to a monthly cycle and have wide swings. In fact if you will indulge me for a hundredth of s decimal point the UK fall in industrial production in September was the pharmaceutical industry.

I am afraid that there is no other way of describing this than calling it a depression.

Manufacturing output in the UK remained 3.2% lower in Quarter 3 (July to Sept) 2019 than the pre-downturn peak for Quarter 1 (Jan to Mar) 2008.

Comment

In terms of the Goldilocks the UK GDP story is of lukewarm porridge. We have some growth but not much as we edge forwards. The pattern is erratic on a quarterly basis ( 0.6%,-0.2%,0.3%) providing yet more evidence that the introduction of monthly GDP numbers was a mistake. If we switch to Moodys well we continue to be able to inflate our debt away.

Nominal GDP increased by 0.5% in Quarter 3 2019, down from 0.7% in Quarter 2 (Apr to June) 2019.

But as ever there are caveats and here is one from an area that did really rather well.

In Quarter 3 2019, the UK trade deficit narrowed to 1.2% of nominal GDP……..The narrowing of the trade deficit largely reflects strong export volume growth of 5.2% in Quarter 3 2019. Trade in goods exports grew 5.0%, reflecting increases in machinery and transport equipment and chemicals, while trade in services exports grew 5.3%; this was a result of “other business services”.

But this does not count as it goes in the expenditure and not the output version of GDP so we need to cross our fingers that it will be picked up there. When the numbers are tallied the income and expenditure versions are usually aligned with the output one which kind of begs the question of why have them?

Also there is this.

education, 68.9% public sector and 31.1% market sector

human health activities, 85.4% public sector and 14.6% market sector

residential care activities, 51.1% public sector and 48.9% market sector

social work activities without accommodation, 49.6% public sector and 50.4% market sector

Best of luck with really knowing what has gone on in those areas as government collides with the private-sector. There are plenty of issues here.

Finally there was this highlighted by the Bank of England.

The Committee discussed the recent Blue Book revisions to estimates of the household saving ratio. The
level of the saving ratio since the start of 2017 had been revised up by 1.4 percentage points on average to
reach just under 7% in 2019 Q2, primarily reflecting new HMRC data on self-employment income.

The truth is that we need a touch of humility as we know a fair bit less than we often think we do.

Podcast

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Worrying signs for the economy of France as the manufacturing downturn bites

Today has opened with some troubling news for the economy of France and the area driving this will not be a surprise. The official confidence survey series has produced this headline.

In October 2019, the business climate has deteriorated in the manufacturing industry

This is a sign that the problems we see in so much of the world have been hitting France and there has been a particularly rapid deterioration this month.

According to the business managers surveyed in October 2019, the business climate in industry has deteriorated compared to September. The composite indicator has lost three points to 99, moving just below its long term average (100).

If we look back at this series we see that it peaked at 113,5 back in February 2018 and is now at 99.4 so quite a decline which has now moved it below its long-term average, This matters as it is a long-running series and of course 100 for manufacturing means relative decline.

If we look for specific areas of weakness we find these.

In the manufacture of equipment goods, the business climate has lost three points and moved below its long-term average (97). In the in the electrical equipment and in the machinery and equipment branches, the balances of opinion have get worse, more sharply than in September, to stand significantly below their average.

And also these.

The business climate has deteriorated in almost all subsectors, particularly in chemicals where the deterioration is the most significant. In this subsector, as in basic metals, the business climate indicator stands largely below its long-term average.

Maybe a little surprisingly this area seems to be hanging in there.

In the manufacture of transport equipment, the business climate indicator has lost two points in October, after a stability in the previous month, and stands slightly below its long-term average.

That is in spite of this.

The climate indicator has decreased again in the automotive industry and has practically returned to the low point of July. The balance of opinion on general production prospects contributes the most sharply to this deterioration.

They do not say it but the motor industry has fallen to 91.

On the other side of the coin the computing and optical sector seems to be improving.

If we bring it all together then there are concerns for other economic measures from this.

Considering employment, the balances opinion on their past variation and perspectives have declined slightly. Both indicators stand however largely above their long-term average.

That does not seem set to last and for what it is worth ( it is volatile) there is also this.

The turning-point indicator has moved down into the area indicating an uncertain economic outlook.

For context the official output series has been telling us this.

In August 2019, output diminished in the manufacturing industry (−0.8%, after +0.4%)……..Over the last three months, output declined in manufacturing industry (−1.2%)……Manufacturing output of the last three months got worse compared to the same three months of 2018 (−0.8%),

That was something of a troika as all three ways of measuring the situation showed falls.

Is it spreading to other sectors?

So far the services sector is not only ignoring this it is doing rather well.

According to business managers surveyed in October 2019, the business climate in services is stable. At 106, it stands well above its long-term average (100).

The only real flicker is here.

More business managers than in July have reported demand difficulties only.

Construction is apparently continuing the boom which began in 2015.

According to the business managers in the building construction industry surveyed in October 2019, the business climate is stable. The composite indicator stands at 112, its highest level since May 2008, largely above its long-term average (100).

This brings me to the official forecast for economic growth from the beginning of the month.

However, the macroeconomic scenario for France remains virtually unchanged since the June 2019 Conjoncture in France report (with projected growth of +0.3% each quarter through to the end of the year, and +1.3% as an annual average in 2019.

The problems you see are all the fault of whatever is French for Johnny Foreigner.

The international economic environment is deteriorating, due to a combination of several factors: protectionist pressures, uncertainties surrounding Brexit, doubts about the orientation of economic policies in certain countries, etc. Growth forecasts for most of France’s economic partners are therefore revised downwards.

Indeed their statisticians seem to abandon European unity and indulge in some trolling.

These international shocks have had a more negative impact on economic activity in Germany than in France. Indeed, growth in Germany stagnated in the spring (–0.1% after +0.4%), with the weakening of international trade and the slowdown in corporate investment hitting industry much harder than services.

If only German had a word for that. Meanwhile this bit just seems cruel.

Italian economic growth has remained almost non-existent for more than a year (0.0% in Q2 after +0.1% in Q1).

Monetary Policy

Here we go.

the European Central Bank (ECB) extended its highly accommodating monetary policy in September, among other things by lowering the deposit rate and resuming its bond purchases as of November 2019 for a total of €20 billion per month.

I like the way they have cottoned onto my idea that markets mostly respond to QE before it happens and sometimes quite a bit before.

As a result, Eurozone sovereign yields entered negative territory (in the spring for the German ten-year yield and in the summer for the French yield).

Fiscal Policy

There is a clue above that there have been ch-ch-changes. That is represented by the ten-year yield in France being -0.1% as I type this. Borrowing is not a complete freebie as the thirty-year yield is 0.7% but ECB policy ( 420 billion Euros of French government bonds and about to rise) means France can borrow very cheaply.

France is taking more of an advantage of this than my country the UK because it borrowed at an annual rate of 3,5% of GDP in the first quarter of the year and 3.4% in the second. Contrary to much of the official rhetoric we see rises of the order of 1% of GDP here so we can see how domestic demand in the economy has been “resilient”. It is also presumably a response to the Gilet Jaunes issue.

France in debt terns is quite tight on a big figure change and Japan excepted the big figure change as the debt to GDP ratio was 99.6% at the end of June. It will be under pressure from the extra borrowing and thus very dependent on economic growth remaining to stay under 100%.

The number being like that explains why the Governor of the Bank of France diverted us somewhat when he was in New York a week ago.

The euro area has a lower level of public debt (85%) than in the United-States (104 %) or the UK (87%),

Actually the UK is in fact below 85% so it was not his finest hour.

Comment

Today’s journey brings us two main themes. The first is that the French economy has been boosted by some extra government spending. This is in stark contrast to Germany which is running a fiscal surplus. But the ~1% of GDP increase seems to have got a little lost in translation as economic growth has only been ~0.6% so far. However it is a case for counter cyclical fiscal policy as otherwise the French economy may have contracted.

Now we see signs of a downwards turn in the already weakened manufacturing sector which poses a problem with fiscal policy already pushing the boundaries of the Maastricht rules. Also if we look deeper I find this deeply troubling from the Governor of the Bank of France.

Despite this gloomy context, the French economy is resilient, with growth at 1.3% close to its potential.

This is a reference to what is the new central banking standard of annual GDP growth having something of a speed limiter at 1.5%. Let me give you two problems with it. Firstly they seem to get a free pass as to their role in this as one of the biggest changes has been their own actions. Secondly it ignores countries like Spain which may now be slower but have in recent times done much better than this.

 

 

 

 

The UK Services sector is the shining star of the economy and GDP

Today brings us a whole raft of data on the UK economy or what out official statisticians call a theme day. Actually we get too much in one burst with the trade data usually being ignored which may well be a Sir Humphrey Appleby style plan. But before we get to that we can look at the economy from the viewpoint of the Bank of England.

Turning to prices, the headline price balance sees a flat trend in house price inflation. However, there is once again a mixed picture across the UK with negative momentum in London and the South East, and solid gains in Northern Ireland, Scotland and the North West.

Looking ahead, price expectations for the coming three months stand at -16% pointing to a modest decline on a UK-wide basis. However, the twelve-month outlook points to a turnaround, with +18% more respondents expecting prices to rise (rather than fall) over the coming year.

That is from the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors or RICS. As you can see there are no “wealth effects” to be found presently unless they can somehow only draw Governor Carney’s attention to the North or Scotland and Northern Ireland.

A little innovation will be required to present this as good news.

 In keeping with this, newly agreed sales fell, with a net balance of -27% (from -11% previously), with activity reportedly slipping in virtually all parts of the UK. As far as the near-term outlook is concerned, sales expectations stand at -9%, suggesting sales will remain subdued in the coming three months………This will not only be a direct hit on the housing market itself but could have ramifications for the wider economy as the normal spend on furniture, fittings and appliances that typically accompanies a house move is also put on hold.

One possibility for the morning staffer presenting such information to an irascible Governor is to appeal to his plan to be a fearless climate change champion and say it is in line with this.

The TCFD provides the necessary foundation for the financial sector’s role in the transition to net zero that
our planet needs and our citizens demand.

He is indeed so enthusiastic about this that he has flown to Tokyo to point this out. This contrasts the highly important nature of his flights as to the extremely unimportant climate change causing flights of plebs like us.

This backs up what the Halifax told us on Monday and the emphasis is mine because the date is pretty much when the effect of the Funding for Lending Scheme arrived,

“Annual house price growth slowed somewhat in September, rising by just 1.1% over the last year. Whilst
this is lowest level of growth since April 2013, it remains in keeping with the predominantly flat trend we’ve
seen in recent months.”

UK GDP

This brought some welcome news.

UK GDP grew by 0.3% in the three months to August 2019.  Rolling three-month GDP growth increased for the second consecutive month after falling in Quarter 2 2019.

It is put in neutral terms but the UK moved away from recession in this period although in monthly terms it did so in a slightly odd fashion.

Monthly gross domestic product (GDP) growth was negative 0.1% in August 2019, following growth in both June and July 2019…….Overall, revisions to monthly GDP growth were small. However, both June and July 2019 have been revised up by 0.1 percentage points, giving extra strength to the most recent rolling three-month estimate.

As you can see we had a dip in August ( assuming that is not revised higher over time) but that was more than offset by upwards revisions in both June and July. For those of you wondering if the June figure affects the second quarter contraction of -0.2% the answer is not so far although it must have an impact if we move another decimal place.

The shift to Services

I have long argued that the services sector must now be over four-fifths of the UK economy and it seems the Office for National Statistics is picking this up.

The main contributor to gross domestic product (GDP) growth in the three months to August 2019 was the services sector, which grew by 0.4%. This was driven by widespread strength across the services industries in June and July, following a period of largely flat growth in the previous three months. Meanwhile, the production sector fell by 0.4% in the same period, while construction output grew by 0.1%.

For newer readers this has been the trend for years and indeed decades or as Talking Heads put it.

Same as it ever was
Same as it ever was
Same as it ever was
Same as it ever was
Same as it ever was
Same as it ever was
Same as it ever was
Same as it ever was

This means somewhat ironically that the UK may well do relatively well in the manufacturing recession that we are seeing in much of the world. The irony is that we have often wanted to be more like Germany with its success in this area but for now out more services based model works better. This does not mean that the manufacturing sector we have is avoiding the chill winds blowing.

Rolling three-month growth in the production sector was negative 0.4% in August 2019, with growth in manufacturing at negative 1.1%.

There were widespread falls across manufacturing, offset partially by the manufacture of transport equipment, which is still seeing a bounce back from the weakness in April 2019 as a result of car production plants bringing forward their summer shutdowns.

There is another example of same as it ever was if we look at the detail of the services growth.

However, the sub-industry that had the largest contribution to gross domestic product (GDP) growth was motion pictures (including TV and music), which has been one of the best performing sectors over the last year, growing at a notably faster rate than services as a whole.

So if you pass a Luvvie today please be nice to them as they are doing a sterling job.

August

It looks as though there was something we have been noting for several years was behind the 0.1% GDP fall in August.

Within production, manufacturing fell by 0.7%. This was driven largely by a fall-back in the often volatile manufacture of pharmaceuticals, following strong growth in July.

It would seem that the production pattern is not monthly and thus is over recorded and  then under recorded. So that the  truth seems likely to be that we should take a bit off July and add it to August. More fundamentally it exposes one of the problems of producing a monthly GDP series.

Comment

As I look at the numbers I note that yet again we see to be reverting to the mean growth level of around ~0.3% per quarter that I suggested a couple of years ago. In the current circumstances that is pretty good although I note Torsten Bell of the Resolution Foundation calls it “Growth is really rubbish”. Mind you I note that he is retweeting something which describes the 0.3% rise in the quarterly or 3 monthly growth rate as a “small rebound” which speaks for itself.

The situation is that we should be grateful for our services sector which is keeping the UK out of a recession for now. So instead of the “march of the makers” promised by former Chancellor George Osborne we are seeing a “surge of the services”. This brings its own issues but at a time like this we should welcome any growth we can find. A particular success is the film and music industry and some of this is near to me as Battersea Park is regularly used these days. In a away this represents cycles as what has suited Germany (manufacturing) fades and we see something where the UK is strong (services) replacing it. How long that will last I do not know.

Meanwhile some of you may have followed my debate with former Bank of England policymaker Danny Blanchflower on social media. When I pointed out to him that today saw 2 more upwards revisions to UK GDP ( as opposed to his continual promises of downwards ones) he replied thus.

So what? Go and look at the supporting data

 

The Investing Channel

What can we expect next from the economy of France?

During the Euro area slow down France has mostly been able to avoid the limelight. This is because it has at least managed some economic growth at a time when Germany not always has. It may not be stellar growth but at least there has been some.

In Q2 2019, GDP in volume terms grew at the same pace as in the previous quarter: +0.3% (revised by +0.1% from the first estimate).

However  there are questions going forwards which plugs into the general Euro area problem which got a further nudge on Monday.

The IHS Markit Eurozone Composite PMI® fell to
50.4 in September according to the ‘flash’ estimate,
down from 51.9 in August to signal the weakest
expansion of output across manufacturing and
services since June 2013………The survey data indicate that GDP looks set to rise by just 0.1% in the third quarter, with momentum weakening as the quarter closed.

As you can see growth is fading and may now have stopped if the PMI is any guide and this was reflected in the words of the Governor of the Bank of France in Paris yesterday.

For the past ten years, there is little doubt that ECB monetary policy under Mario Draghi’s Presidency has made a decisive contribution not only to safeguarding the euro in 2012, but also to the significant recovery of the euro area since 2013. Over this period, more than 10 million jobs have been created. Our unconventional measures are estimated to add almost 2 percentage points of growth and of inflation between 2016 and 2020.

It is revealing that no mention is made of growth right now as he concentrates on what he considers to be past glories. He has rounded the numbers up too as they are 1.5% and 1.9% respectively. Let me give him credit for one thing though which is this although I would like him to say this to the wider public as well.

Since I am talking to an audience of researchers I should of course emphasise that such numbers are subject to uncertainty.

Also raising inflation in the current environment of weak wage growth is likely to make people worse and not better off.

France

The situation here was better than the Euro area average but still slowed.

At 51.3 in September, the IHS Markit Flash France
Composite Output Index fell from 52.9 in August,
and pointed to the softest expansion in private sector
activity for four months.

Actually manufacturing is doing okay in grim times with readings of 49.7 and 50.3 suggesting flatlining. The real fear here was that the larger services sector is now being sucked lower by it.

However, with services firms registering their
slowest rise in activity since May, fears of negative
spill over effects from the manufacturing sector are
coming to fruition. Any intensification of such effects
would likely dampen economic growth going
forward.

This leaves me mulling the record of Markit in France as several years ago it was criticised for being too pessimistic by the French government and more recently seems to have swung the other way.

What about fiscal policy?

This did get a mention in the speech by the Governor of the Bank of France yesterday.

Failing that, a second answer is for fiscal policy to step in. Fiscal stimulus from countries with fiscal space would both stimulate aggregate demand, and, with targeted, quality investment, increase long-term growth.

The problem with that argument is that even the French run IMF could not avoid pointing out this in July.

France’s public debt has been consistently rising over the last four decades, increasing by 80 percent of GDP since the 1980s to reach close to 100 percent of GDP at end-2018. This reflects the inability of successive governments to take full advantage of good times to reverse the spending increases undertaken during downturns.

Actually some of the IMF suggestions look rather chilling and perhaps in Orwellian language.

rationalizing spending on medical products and hospital services; improving the allocation of resources in education

Also and somewhat typically the IMF has missed one change in the situation which is that at present France is being paid to borrow. It’s ten-year yield went negative at the beginning of July and has mostly been there since. As I type this it is -0.32%. It still has to pay a little for longer terms ( the thirty-year is 0.48%) but as you can see not much.

So the situation is that France does have quite a lot of relatively expensive debt from the past but could borrow now very cheaply if it chose to do so.

Banks

Whilst he s referring to macroprudential policy it is hard not to have a wry smile at this from the Governor of the Bank of France.

 To start with, as of today, our toolkit is very much bank-centric.

Especially when he add this.

We are making some progress to extend macroprudential policy beyond the banking sector.

Returning to the banks they are just like elsewhere.

PARIS (Reuters) – Societe Generale (SOGN.PA) plans to cut 530 jobs in France by 2023, CGT union said in a statement.

Of course BNP Paribas has been taking some brokerage business and employees from Deutsche Bank although it has not be a complete success according to financemagnate.com.

Deutsche’s clients will receive letters explaining how the transfer will work. However, some of them have already moved to competitors such as Barclays, which has won roughly $20 billion in prime brokerage balances.

In a way the French banks have used Deutsche Bank as a shield. But many of the same questions are in existence here. How are they going to make sustained profits in a world of not much economic growth and negative interest-rates?

Unemployment

This is the real achilles heel of the French economy. From Insee

The ILO unemployment rate decreased by 0.2 points on average in Q2 2019, after a 0.1 points fall in the first quarter. It stood at 8.5% of the labour force in France (excluding Mayotte), 0.6 points below its Q2 2018 level and its lowest level since early 2009.

Whilst the falls are welcome it is the level of unemployment and the fact it is only now approaching the pre credit crunch levels which are the issue as well as this.

Over the quarter, the employment rate among the youth diminished (−0.3 points),

Whilst the unemployment rate for youth fell by 0.6% to 18.6% it is still high and the falling employment rate is not the best portent for the future.

Comment

So far the economy of France has managed to bumble on and unlike the UK and Germany avoided any quarterly contractions in economic output. If you look at this morning’s official survey then apparently the only way is up baby.

In September 2019, households’ confidence in the economic situation has increased for the ninth consecutive month. At 104, the synthetic index remains above its long-term average (100), reaching its highest level since January 2018.

Perhaps the fall in unemployment has helped and a small rise in real wages. The latter are hard to interpret as a change at the opening of the year distorted the numbers.

firms might pay a special bonus for purchasing power (PEPA) in the first quarter of 2019, to employees earning less than 3 times the minimal wage.

According to the official survey published yesterday businesses are becoming more optimistic too.

In September 2019, the business climate has gained one point, compared to August. The composite indicator, compiled from the answers of business managers in the main sectors, stands at 106, above its long-term mean (100)

So there you have it everything except for the official surveys points downwards. In their defence the official surveys have been around for a long time. So let me leave you with some trolling by the Bank of France monthly review.

French economic growth has settled into a fairly stable pace since mid-2018 of between 1.2% and 1.4% year-on-year . France has thus demonstrated greater resilience than other euro area economies, particularly Germany, where year-on-year growth only amounted to 0.4% in mid-2019. This growth rate should continue over the coming quarters: based on Banque de France business surveys published on 9 September, we expect quarter-on-quarter GDP growth in the third quarter of 2019 of 0.3%.

Rethinking The Dollar

I did an interview for this website. Apologies if you have any issues with the sound as the technology failed us a little and we had to switch from my laptop to my tablet.