Oh Italia!

Sometimes events just seem to gather their own momentum in the way that a rolling stone gathers moss so let me take you straight to the Italian Prime Minister this morning.

Italy Dep PM Di Maio: Low Growth Views `Theater Of The Absurd’: Messaggero ( @LiveSquawk )

I have to confess that after the way that the Italian economy has struggled for the last couple of decades this brought the Doobie Brothers to mind.

What a fool believes he sees
No wise man has the power to reason away
What seems to be
Is always better than nothing
And nothing at all

Then the Italian statistics office produced something of a tour de force.

In December 2018 the seasonally adjusted industrial production index decreased by 0.8% compared with
the previous month. The percentage change of the average of the last three months with respect to the
previous three months was -1.1.

As you can see these numbers are in fact worse than being just weak as they show a monthly and a quarterly fall. But they are in fact much better than the next one which is really rather shocking.

The calendar adjusted industrial production index decreased by 5.5% compared with December 2017
(calendar working days being 19 versus 18 days in December 2017); for the whole year 2018 the
percentage change was +0.8 compared with 2017.
The unadjusted industrial production index decreased by 2.5% compared with December 2017.

Just for clarity output was 2.5% lower but as there was an extra working day this year then on a like for like basis it was some 5.5% lower. I would say that was a depressionary type number except of course Italy has been in a long-standing depression.

Digging deeper into the numbers we see that on a seasonally adjusted basis there was a rally in industrial production as the 100 of 2015 nearly made 110 in November 2017, but now it has fallen back to 103.9. But even that pales compared to the calendar adjusted index which is now at 93.3. So whilst the different indices can cause some confusion the overall picture is clear. We do not get a lot of detail on manufacturing except that on a seasonally adjusted basis output was 5.5% lower in December than a year ago.

The drop is such that we could see a downwards revision to the Italian GDP data for the fourth quarter of last year which was -0.2% as it is. Actually the annual number at 0.1% looks vulnerable and might make more impact if the annual rate of growth falls back to 0%. Production in a modern economy does not have the impact it once did and Italy’s statisticians were expecting a fall but not one on this scale.

Monthly Economic Report

After the above we advance on this with trepidation.

World economic deceleration has spilled over into Q4, particularly in the industrial sector, which has
experienced a broad-based loss of momentum in many economies and a further slowing in global trade growth.
In November, according to CPB data the merchandise World trade in volume decreased 1.6%.

So it is everyone else’s fault in a familiar refrain, what is Italian for Johnny Foreigner? This is rather amusingly immediately contradicted by the data.

In Italy, real GDP fell by 0.2% in Q4 2018, following a 0.1% drop in the previous quarter. The negative result is
mainly attributable to domestic demand while the contribution of net export was positive.

So in fact it was the domestic economy causing the slow down. This thought is added to by the trade data where the fall in exports is dwarfed by the fall in imports at least in November as we only have partial data for December.

As for foreign trade, in November 2018 seasonally-adjusted data, compared to October 2018, decreased both
for exports (-0.4%) and for imports (-2.2%). Exports drop for EU countries (-1.3%) and rose for non EU
countries (+0.6%). However, according to preliminary estimates in December also exports to non-EU
countries decreased by 5.0%.

Now let me give an example of how economics can be the dismal science. Because whilst in isolation the numbers below are welcome with falling output they suggest falling productivity.

In the same month, the labour market, employment stabilized and the unemployment rate decreased only
marginally.

The future looks none too bright either,

In January 2019, the consumer confidence improved while the composite business climate
indicator decreased further. The leading indicator experienced a sharp fall suggesting a
worsening of the Italian cyclical position in the coming months.

Indeed and thank you for @liukzilla for pointing this out the Italian version does hint at some possible downgrades, Via Google Translate.

The data of industrial production amplify the tendency to reduce the rhythms of
activity started in the first few months of 2018 (-1.1% the economic variation in T4).

Also a none too bright future.

Data on industry orders also showed a negative trend, with a decrease for both markets in the September-November quarter (-1.3% and -1.0% respectively on the market).
internal and foreign).

The Consumer

Yesterday’s data provided no cheer either.

In December 2018, both value and volume of retail trade contracted by 0.7% when compared with the previous month. Year-on-year growth rate fell by 0.6% in value terms, while the quantity sold decreased by 0.5%.

Although on a quarterly basis there was a little bit assuming you think the numbers are that accurate,

In the three months to December (Quarter 4), the value of retail trade rose by 0.1%, showing a slowdown
to growth in comparison with the previous quarter (+0.4%), while the volume remained unchanged at
+0.3%.

Actually there was never much of a recovery here as the index only briefing rose to 102 if we take 2015 as 100 and now is at 101.5 according to the chart provided. Odd because you might reasonably have expected all the monetary stimulus to have impacted on consumer spending.

Population

This is now declining in spite of a fair bit of immigration.

On 1 st January 2019, the population was estimated to be 60,391,000 and the decrease on the previous year was
around 90,000 units (-1.5 per thousand)………The net international migration amounted to +190 thousand, recording a slight increase on the previous year (+188
thousand). Both immigration (349 thousand) and emigration (160 thousand) increased (+1.7% and +3.1%
respecitvely).

Bond Markets

I have pointed out many times that Italian bond yields have risen for Italy in both absolute and relative terms. Let me present another perspective on this from the thirty-year bond it issued earlier this week.

Today Italy issued 8bln 30yr BTPs. Had it issued the same bond last April, it would have received around 1.3 bilion more cash from the market. ( @gusbaratta ).

Comment

This is quite a mess in a lovely country. Also the ironies abound as for example expanding fiscal policy into an economic decline was only recently rejected by the Euro area authorities. They also have just ended some of the monetary stimulus by ending monthly QE at what appears to be exactly the wrong time. So whilst the Italian government deserves some criticism so do the Euro area authorities. For example if the ECB has the powers it claims why is it not using them?

Of course I don’t want to speculate about what contingency would call for a specific instrument but if you look at the number of instruments we have in place now, we can conclude that it’s not true that the ECB has run out of fuel or has run out of instruments. We have all our toolbox still available. ( Mario Draghi )

But just when you might have thought it cannot get any worse it has.

Me on The Investing Channel

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Italy may be in a recession but more importantly its depression never ended

The last 24 hours have brought the economic problems and travails of Italy into a little sharper focus. More news has arrived this morning but before we get there I would like to take you back to early last October when the Italian government produced this.

Politics economy, reform action, good management of the PA and dialogue with businesses and citizens will therefore be directed towards achieving GDP growth of
at least 1.5 percent in 2019 and 1.6 percent in 2020, as indicated in new programmatic framework. On a longer horizon, Italy will have to grow faster than the rest of Europe, in order to recover the ground lost in the last
twenty years.

This was part of the presentation over the planned fiscal deficit increase and on the 26th of October I pointed out this.

If we look back we see that GDP growth has been on a quarterly basis 0.3% and then 0.2% so far this year and the Monthly Economic Report tells us this.

The leading indicator is going down slightly suggesting a moderate pace for the next months.

They mean moderate for Italy.So we could easily see 0% growth or even a contraction looking ahead as opposed some of the latest rhetoric suggesting 3%  per year is possible. Perhaps they meant in the next decade as you see that would be an improvement.

Political rhetoric suggesting 3% economic growth is a regular feature of fiscal debates because growth at that rate fixes most fiscal ills. The catch is that in line with the “Girlfriend in a Coma” theme Italy has struggled to maintain a growth rate above 1% for decades now. Also as we look back I recall pointing out that we have seen quarterly economic growth of 0.5% twice, 0.4% twice, then 0.3% twice in a clear trend. So we on here were doubtful to say the least about the fiscal forecasts and were already fearing a contraction.

Yesterday

All Italy’s troubles were not so far away as the statistics office produced this.

In the fourth quarter of 2018 the seasonally and calendar adjusted, chained volume measure of Gross
Domestic Product (GDP) decreased by 0.2 per cent with respect to the previous quarter and increased by
0.1 per cent over the same quarter of previous year.

Whilst much of the news concentrates on Italy now being in a recession the real truth is the way that growth of a mere 0.1% over the past year reminds us that it has never broken out of an ongoing depression. If we look at the chart provided we see that in 2008 GDP was a bit over 102 at 2010 prices but now it has fallen below 97. So a decade has passed in fact more like eleven years and the economy has shrunk. Also I see the Financial Times has caught onto a point I have been making for a while.

Brunello Rosa, chief executive of the consultancy Rosa and Roubini, has pointed out that, on a per capita basis, Italy’s real gross domestic product is lower than when the country adopted the euro in 1999. Over the same period Germany’s per capita real GDP has increased by more than 25 per cent, while even recession-ravaged Greece has performed better than Italy on the same basis.

On that basis Italy has been in a depression this century if not before. Indeed if you look at the detail it comes with something that challenges modern economic orthodoxy, so let me explain. In 1999 the Italian population was 56,909,000 whereas now it is just under 60.5 million. Much of the difference has been from net migration which we are so often told brings with it a list of benefits such as a more dynamic economic structure and higher economic growth. Except of course, sadly nothing like that has happened in Italy. As output has struggled it has been divided amongst a larger population and thus per head things have got worse.

Meanwhile this seems unlikely to help much.

Italy’s statistical institute will soon have a new president, the demographer Gian Carlo Blangiardo. He has recommended calculating life expectancy from conception – rather than birth – so as to include unborn babies. ()

Also population statistics in general have taken something of a knock this week.

Pretty interesting – New Zealand just found it has 45,000 fewer people than it thought. In a population of 4.9 million (maybe), that means economists might have to start revising things like productivity and GDP growth per capita. ( Tracy Alloway of Bloomberg).

Can I just say chapeau to whoever described it as Not So Crowded House.

The banks

I regularly point out the struggles of the Italian banks and say that this is a factor as they cannot be supporting the economy via business lending so thank you to the author of the Tweet below who has illustrated this.

As you can see whilst various Italian government’s have stuck their heads in the sand over the problems with so many of the Italian banks there has been a real cost in terms of supporting business and industry. This has become a vicious circle where businesses have also struggled creating more non-performing loans which weakens the banks as we see a doom loop in action.

What about now?

The GDP numbers gave us an idea of the areas involved on the contraction.

The quarter on quarter change is the result of a decrease of value added in agriculture, forestry and fishing
as well as in industry and a substantial stability in services. From the demand side, there is a negative
contribution by the domestic component (gross of change in inventories) and a positive one by the net
export component.

The latter part is a bit awkward for Prime Minister Conte who has taken the politically easy way out and blamed foreigners this morning. As to the industrial picture this morning;s PMI business survey suggests things got worse rather than better last month.

“January’s PMI data signalled another deterioration in Italian manufacturing conditions, with firms struggling in the face of a sixth consecutive monthly fall in new business. Decreases in output, purchasing activity and employment (the first in over four years) were recorded, marking a weak start to 2019.”

The spot number of 47.8 was another decline and is firmly in contraction territory.

Comment

This is as Elton John put it.

It’s sad, so sad (so sad)
It’s a sad, sad situation
And it’s getting more and more absurd

Italy has been in an economic depression for quite some time now but nothing ever seems to get done about it. Going back in time its political leadership were keen to lock it into monetary union with France and Germany but the hoped for convergence has merely led to yet more divergence.

One of the hopes is that the unofficial or what used to be called the black economy is helping out. I hope so in many ways but sadly even that is linked to the corruption problem which never seems to get sorted out either. Oh and whilst many blame the current government some of that is a cheap shot whilst it has had its faults so has pretty much every Italian government.

 

Podcast

Bank Carige. Monte dei Paschi and their impact on the economy of Italy

The Italian banks have certainly kept us busy in the credit crunch era. We have found ourselves observing a litany of cash calls, bad debts, crises, and official claims that there is no problem. Of the latter the worst was probably the claim by Prime Minister Matteo Renzi that equity investors in Monte Paschi dei Siena had a good investment whereas it was soon clear they had anything but. Actually it is back in the news but behind another regular feature which is Bank Carige which you may recall we were looking at this development on the eighth of this month.

Italy’s Banca Carige said on Friday it had raised 544.4 million euros ($645 million) following its recently concluded new share issue, topping minimum regulatory demands. ( Reuters)

Ordinarily on a cash call that would be it but we have learnt from experience that with banks and Italian banks especially these sort of cash calls are not get in what you can to keep the ship afloat for now not for good as it should be. So we should have been expecting this.

Italy’s Banca Carige (CRGI.MI) needs 200 million euros ($227 million) of fresh capital to clean its balance sheet from soured loans and to attract a potential buyer in the future, daily Il Sole 24Ore reported in Tuesday.

There never seems to be any accounting for what has just taken place as in that the prospectus for the recent share issue can hardly have told the truth. This is not just an Italian problem as in my opinion the RBS ( Royal Bank of Scotland ) cash call as its crisis built was a scandal it is just that Italy keeps having more of them. Also my country is hardly Mr(s) Speedy in bringing any such matters to court.

The first criminal trial of senior UK banking executives in the wake of the financial crisis is due to begin on Wednesday.

The case against four former executives has been filed by the Serious Fraud Office over Barclays’ £11.8bn rescue.

The bank avoided a UK bailout in 2008 by raising funds from Middle Eastern investors.

The executives are charged with conspiracy to commit fraud. All four have pleaded not guilty. ( BBC)

Returning to the Italian banks the essential problem has been highlighted with thanks to @DS_Pepperstone.

Deutsche Bank confirms that ROTE or Return on Tangible Equity is lower than the Cost of Equity at all Italian banks – That is they pay more for capital than they make from it. DBK says that fact is already reflected in the Italian bank’s share prices.

You might think that Deutsche Bank has a bit of a cheek saying that about other banks! But the point is that funds poured into Italian banks are a case of good money after bad and repeat.

What now?

Let us return to Reuters.

Italy is considering merging troubled banks Monte dei Paschi (BMPS.MI) and Banca Carige (CRGI.MI) with healthier rivals such as UBI Banca (UBI.MI) as it scrambles to avert a new banking crisis, sources familiar with the matter said.

Shareholders in UBI Banca may immediately be fans of the Pet Shop Boys.

What have I, what have I, what have I done to deserve this?
What have I, what have I, what have I done to deserve this?

It is not as if they have been having a good time of it as I note the share price of 2.3 Euros is down 43% over the past year. Looking back on my monthly chart it was over 20 Euros back in early 2007 which in the heavily depreciated world of bank shares I suppose is healthier in relative terms than the two other banks. But then almost anything is.

As we look for more detail there is yet another scandal in the offing.

Monte dei Paschi, rescued by the state in 2017, and Carige, recently put into special administration by the European Central Bank (ECB), are struggling with bad debts and the prospect of asset writedowns that would eat into their capital.

Their problems threaten to reignite a banking crisis that Rome thought it had ended two years ago and could further damage an economy already at risk of slipping back into recession.

That is the issue of Monte Paschi where the state took a 68% stake but the problems are on such a scale that even that has not fixed things as we wonder if anything has improved over the past two years? It sounds a little like the Novo Banco ( New Bank ) in Portugal that was supposed to be clean but ended up having to effectively wipe out some of its bonds.

Monte dei Paschi is still battling with high bad loan ratios and faces legal claims for over 1.5 billion euros, making it risky to take over without any support from the state.

This issue came back to prominence in the middle of this month when the European Central Bank (ECB) said it wanted banks to raise their covering of non-performing loans to 100% by 2027. It set three categories of bank and  think you have already guessed which category Monte Paschi was in.

As you can see the troubles just go on and on which moves me to the next issue. When states and central banks invest in banks it is a case of can kicking into a hopefully better future. But the economy of Italy hasn’t got much better and right now is heading in reverse again.

The economy

This week a review of the century has been produced by Eurostat and if you compare the European Union with Italy you see that the latter line for GDP growth is always below the former. It is this lack of economic growth that is a major driver in all of this. It started in 2001 where the EU grew by 2.2% and Italy by 1.8% but things have got worse as the weakest year relatively was 2012 where the EU economy shrank by 0.4% but Italy’s shrank by 2.8%.

Even the Bank of Italy has now been forced to admit that the future looks none to bright either.

The central projection for GDP growth is 0.6 per cent this year, 0.4 points lower than the previous projection. The downward revision was on account of three main considerations: new information pointing to a sharper cyclical slowdown in the last part of 2018, which reduced the carry-over effect on growth by 0.2 points; the cutback in firms’ investment plans, as confirmed by recent surveys; and the expected slowdown in global trade…… In the two years 2020-21, the central projection for growth is 0.9 and 1.0 per cent respectively.

The other issue which has tightened something of a noose around the necks of the Italian banks is higher funding costs. We can illustrate this by looking at the Italian bond ten-year yield of 2.73%. That is an improvement on the peaks we saw last year but Germany has one of 0.24% and the UK 1.33%.

Comment

There is an element of ennui here as the establishment playbook is used one more time. But there are costs such as the equity and bond capital which has been lost and even worse the way that the Italian banks have been unable to operate in their prime function. Yesterday’s credit standard survey from the ECB confirmed this if we recall who has the Non Performing Loan or NPL problem on the biggest scale.

 euro area banks reported that their NPL ratios had a tightening impact on their credit standards for loans to enterprises and housing loans over the past six months. Over the next six months, they expect a net tightening impact of their NPL ratio on credit standards across all loan categories. NPL ratios led to a tightening of euro area banks’ lending policies over the past six months in net terms mainly through banks’ access to market financing.

In the end that is the real problem as the Italian economy continues to weaken the banks and the Italian banks weaken the economy with a grip that shows no sign of loosening.

Moving wider I expect the ECB to help with liquidity ( another TLTRO) but if extra liquidity helped significantly we would not be here would we?

What will happen to Bank Carige of Italy?

One of the longest running themes of this site has been the ostrich like behaviour of Italy about its banks. The official view has been that a corner is just about to be turned on what keeps turning out to be a straight road. I still recall Prime Minster Renzi assuring investors that shares in the trouble Monte Paschi di Siena were a good purchase. Here is an example of this from him in Il Sole from January 2016 via Google Translate and the emphasis is mine.

“The recent turbulence around some Italian banks indicates that our credit system – solid and strong thanks to the extraordinarily high savings of Italian families – still needs consolidation, so that there are fewer but stronger banks (…) Today the bank it is healed, and investing is a bargain. On Mps has been knocked down speculation but it is a good deal, has gone through crazy vicissitudes but today is healed, it is a nice brand. Perhaps in this process that will last a few months must find partners because it must be with others “.

Since then the bank has seen the Italian state take a majority stake and the share price is a bit less than forty times lower than when Renzi made his statement. This has been a familiar theme of the crisis where investors have been encouraged to stump up more money for troubled banks with promises of a brighter future. But it kept turning out that the future was ever more troubled rather than bright as good money followed bad in being lost.

Even worse the whole sector was weakened by the way that other types of bailout were provided by the banking sector itself. For example via the Atlante or Atlas fund which saw banks investing to recapitalise other banks and to buy bad loans. Regular readers will recall that the establishment view was that the purchase of bad loans by this and other vehicles was something of a new dawn for the sector. The reality was that as things got worse there was Atlante 2 before the whole idea got forgotten. It is rude to point out that the subject of today Bank Carige was considered strong enough to put 20 million Euros into the first version of Atlante.

A deeper perspective can be provided by the fact that the Italian banking laws are called the “Draghi Laws” after the President of the European Central Bank Mario Draghi. In his new role he has undertaken three policies which have helped the Italian banks. They have been particularly large beneficiaries of his liquidity operations called TLTROs which have provided cheap ( the deposit rate is -0.4%) for banks. Then the QE programme boosted the price of Italian government bonds benefiting the Italian banks large holdings. Then more opaquely at least in terms of media analysis it bought covered bonds ( mortgage bonds) in three phases and still holds around 271 billion Euros of them.

The catch of this from Mario’s point of view is that liquidity is only a short-term solution and soon falls short when the real questions are about solvency. Even worse the way this umbrella shielded the banks from the rain meant that the promised reforms never happened and the path was made worse rather than better. Also if we think of this from the point of Italy and its economy we see that we have part of the reason for its ongoing economic lost decade style troubles. The banks have helped suck it lower. Also and hat tip to Merryn Somerset Webb for this a letter to the FT today has on another topic covered the issue really rather well.

ECB can’t solve problems because to attempt to do so would be to admit that problems exist.

Carige

If we go back to 2017 we see that as well as a worrying departure of board directors and the beginning of an attempted asset sale which was to include bad loans there was this in December.

Italy’s Banca Carige said on Friday it had raised 544.4 million euros ($645 million) following its recently concluded new share issue, topping minimum regulatory demands. ( Reuters)

There were various features to this of which the first is that existing shareholders took a right caning or as the Italian regulator put it.

The Banca Carige capital increase has characteristics of hyperdilution.

In return there was the implication that the ECB had approved this and a corner had been turned. Less than a year later this all went sour as the ECB decided that Bank Carige needed yet another rights issue in yet another example of the themes described above. This time in spite of statements to the contrary no-one seemed silly enough to believe the official promises and this rumbled on until the New Year when the ECB decided that the first business day of 2019 was an opportune moment to do this.

The mass resignation of Carige directors that followed has given the ECB an opportunity to be creative. The central bank has used its powers of early intervention to step in to stabilise the bank’s governance. It has appointed three special administrators, including Innocenzi, tasked with restoring capital requirements. ( Reuters)

If you want some gallows humour this was described as “temporary” when it was pretty much certain to be anything but as a major shareholder ( Malaclaza) decided it had lost enough. It was hardly likely to believe the ECB again.

The Italian Government

This found itself in between a rock and a hard place as the Five-Star movement has consistently opposed both bailouts and bail-ins. Yet the government of which it is a member took I am told only 8 minutes to decide this last night.

The decree, signed off on Monday after a surprise cabinet meeting, will allow the bank to benefit from state-backed guarantees for new bond issues and funding from the Bank of Italy.

The lender, which last year failed to secure shareholder backing for a capital increase, will also be able to request access to state-backed precautionary recapitalization, if needed.

So yet again in a choice between the interests of the people and the interests of “the precious” we see that the same old status quo continues to play.

Whatever you want
Whatever you like
Whatever you say
You pay your money
You take your choice
Whatever you need
Whatever you use
Whatever you win
Whatever you lose

One of my longest-running themes of this website gets another tick in the box and we even get some Italian style humour.

EU rules permit such a scheme only if the bank is solvent.

So solvent in fact that they can no longer find anyone willing to put their own money into it. Also seeing as Bank Carige cannot even see its own nose I doubt this will be a barrier for long.

According to a financial source close to the matter, Carige would only consider a request for precautionary recapitalization if new and unforeseen problems arose.

Comment

The issue here is that on a generic basis the events described above are so familiar now that even the use of phrases like groundhog day does not do the situation justice. There are always going to be problems because regulators invariably end up being captured by the industry they regulate and banking is perhaps the worst example of this. But changes were promised so long ago and yet the Italian taxpayer will find him/herself on the hook in addition to the 320 million Euro hybrid bond that the deposit protection fund bought late last year. Even worse they may end up backing this enough for someone else to be willing to take it over and profit from. Oh and so much for hybrid!

Meanwhile in a land far, far, away I see that the Financial Times has interviewed the head of the Euro area banking resolution body.

Speaking to the FT to mark three years since the SRB became fully operational at the start of 2016, Ms König said a page had been turned in how the bloc handled bank failures — not least after its first intervention, at Spain’s Banco Popular in 2017 — but that the system remained a work in progress.

There is no mention of Italy at all which is really rather breathtaking, although there may be an implied hint.

Making sure that bank crises could be contained without resorting to taxpayer help was “an ongoing challenge”, she said.

Some claim the lack of contagion is progress, but you see there is a clear flaw in that as the problems here were evident as long ago as 2014 so what is called the “smart money” will have gone long ago. In some ways this makes things worse because in another shocking failure of regulation Italian retail depositors were encouraged to buy bank bonds.

 

The world of negative interest-rates now has negative economic growth too

It was not that long ago that many of us “experts” in the interest-rate market felt that negative interest-rates could not be sustained. Back then the past Swiss example could be considered a tax – which remains a way of considering negative interest-rates – and the flicker in Japan was covered by it being Japan. Yesterday brought some fascinating news from the front line which has been in danger of being ignored in the current news flow.

Sweden’s GDP decreased by 0.2 percent in the third quarter of 2018, seasonally adjusted, compared with the second quarter of 2018. GDP increased by 1.6 percent, working-day adjusted, compared with the third quarter of 2017. ( Sweden Statistics).

Firstly let me reassure you that Sweden has no Brexit style plans. What it does have is negative interest-rates as this from the Riksbank shows.

Consequently, in line with the previous forecast, the Executive Board has decided to hold the repo rate unchanged at -0.50 per cent.

I bet they now regret opening their latest forward guidance report like this.

Since the Monetary Policy Report in September, economic developments have been largely as expected, both in Sweden and abroad.

In fact the Riksbank was expecting this.

The most recently published National Accounts paint a picture of  slightly weaker GDP growth in recent years. Nevertheless, the Riksbank deems that economic activity in Sweden has been and continues to be strong.

In fact it has been so nonplussed that it has already reached for the central banking playbook and wondered what is Swedish for Johnny Foreigner?

Riksbank Floden: Sees Increased Uncertainty In World Economy ( @LiveSquawk )

Those who have followed my analysis that central banks will delay moving out of extraordinary monetary policy and negative interest-rates and thus are in danger of being trapped, will have a wry smile at this.

The forecast for the repo rate is unchanged since
the monetary policy meeting in September and indicates that the repo rate will be raised by 0.25
percentage points either in December or in February. As with the first raise, monetary policy will also
subsequently be adjusted according to the prospects for inflation.

That’s the spirit! You keep interest-rates negative through a strong phase of economic growth then you raise them when you have a quarterly decline. Oh hang on. I am not being clever after the event here because a month or so before the Riksbank report on the 6th of September I pointed out this.

This is also true of Sweden because if we look at the narrow measure or M1 we see that an annual rate of growth of 10.5% in July 2017 was replaced with 6.3% this July. …..A similar but less volatile pattern can be seen from the broad money measure M3. That was growing at an annual rate of 8.3% in July 2015 as opposed to the 5.1% of this July.

Since then M1 has stabilised but M3 has fallen further and was 4.5% in October. In fact if you were looking for an area it might effect then it would be domestic consumption so lets take a look.

Household consumption expenditures decreased by 1.0 percent and government consumption expenditures remained unchanged, seasonally adjusted, compared with the previous quarter ( Sweden Statistics).

Time for page 2 of the central banking play book.

Riksbank’s Floden: Recent Data Since Latest Policy Meeting Have Been Disappointing -But There Were Some Temporary Effects In 3Q GDP Data,

Something else caught my eye and it was this.

 Exports grew by 0.3 percent and imports declined by 0.6 percent.

So foreign demand flattered the numbers in a rebuttal to the central banking play book. But if we look at the overall pattern then economics 101 has yet more to think about.

J curve R.I.P. (?) – In Sweden, 2018 is heading for the worst trade year ever. The Oct deficit was SEK8.4bn. One observation: J curve effect does not work and thus the exchange rate channel (on real economy) is partially broken.   ( Stefan Mullin)

So let’s see you have negative interest-rates to boost domestic demand which is falling and you look to drive the currency lower which does not seem to be helping trade. Oh and you plan to raise interest-rates into a monetary decline. What could go wrong?

As it is the end of the week let us have some humour albeit of the gallows variety from Forex Crunch yesterday.

Analysts at TD Securities suggest that their nowcast models point to a 0.6% q/q gain to Sweden’s GDP (mkt: 0.2% q/q on a wide range of estimates), which if materialised would leave TD (and likely the Riksbank) comfortable with a December rate hike

Switzerland

Let us start with a response from Nikolay Markov of Pictet Asset Management.

GDP growth plunged to its lowest pace since the introduction of negative rates in Q1 2015. There is no reason to panic as this is a temporary drop:

There are few things more likely to cause a panic than being told there is no reason for it. I also note he was not so kind to the Swedes. Let us investigate using Swiss Statistics.

Switzerland’s GDP fell by 0.2% in the 3rd quarter of 2018, after climbing by 0.7% in the previous quarter. The strong, continuous growth phase enjoyed by the Swiss economy for one and a half years was suddenly interrupted.

The change has seen annual growth dip from 3.5% to 2.4% so different to Sweden although there has been a fall in the growth of domestic consumption. Quite what a central bank with an interest-rate of -0.75% can do about falling domestic consumption is a moot point. A driver of the decline is a familiar one.

Value added in manufacturing dipped slightly (−0.6%);  Total exports of goods (−4.2%) also contracted substantially.

The official view is that is just a blip but it does require watching as I note this area still seems to be troubled as this from earlier shows.

How cold is ‘s auto market? Passenger car sales down 28% in first 3 weeks of Nov. Whole year drop “inevitable”. Car dealers’ inventory climbing and many of them making losses. Authority said bringing back purchase tax cut will not help much. ( @YuanTalks )

Just as a reminder the Swiss National Bank holds some 778.05 billion Swiss Francs of foreign currency investments as a result of its interventions to reduce the exchange-rate of the Swissy.

Comment

These developments add to those at some other members of the negative interest-rates club or what is called NIRP.

German economic growth has stalled. As the Federal Statistical Office (Destatis) already reported in its first release of 14 November 2018, the gross domestic product (GDP) in the third quarter of 2018 was by 0.2% lower – upon price, seasonal and calendar adjustment – than in the second quarter of 2018.

And another part of discovering Japan.

Japan’s economy shrank in the third quarter as natural disasters hit spending and disrupted exports.

The economy contracted by an annualised 1.2% between July and September, preliminary figures showed. ( BBC )

As you can see we go to part three of the play book as the poor old weather takes another pounding. Quite what this has done to IMF News I am not sure as imagine how it would report such numbers for the UK?

has had an extended period of strong economic growth—GDP expected to rise by 1.1% in 2018.

 

Perhaps it has been discombobulated by a period when expansionary monetary policy has not only crunched to a halt but gone into reverse at least for a bit. But imagine you are a central banker right now wondering of this may go on and you will be starting it with interest-rates already negative. Or to use the old City phrase, how are you left?

Oh and hot off this morning’s press there is also this.

In the third quarter of 2018 the seasonally and calendar adjusted, chained volume measure of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) decreased by 0.1 per cent to the previous quarter and increased by 0.7 per cent in comparison with the third quarter of 2017. ( Italy Statistics)

Japan

There as been a development in something predicted by us on here quite some time ago. So without further ado let me hand you over to The Japan Times.

Japan is considering transforming a helicopter destroyer into an aircraft carrier that can accommodate fighter jets, a government source said Tuesday,

 

 

 

 

The challenge for the ECB remains Italy and its banks

This week has seen something of an expected shifting of the sands from the European Central Bank ( ECB) about the economic prospects for the Euro area. On Monday its President Mario Draghi told the European Parliament this.

The data that have become available since my last visit in September have been somewhat weaker than expected. Euro area GDP grew by 0.2% in the third quarter. This follows growth of 0.4% in both the first and second quarter of 2018. The loss in growth momentum mainly reflects weaker trade growth, but also some country and sector-specific factors.

What he did not say was that back in 2017 quarterly growth had risen to 0.7% for a time. Back then the situation was a happy one for Mario and his colleagues as their extraordinary monetary policies looked like they were bearing some fruit. However the challenge was always what happens when they begin to close the tap? Let me illustrate things by looking again at his speech.

The unemployment rate declined to 8.1% in September 2018, which is the lowest level observed since late 2008, and employment continued to increase in the third quarter…….. Wages are rising as labour markets continue to improve and labour supply shortages become increasingly binding in some countries.

There is a ying and yang here because whilst we should all welcome the improvement in the unemployment rate, we would expect the falls to slow and maybe stop in line with the reduced economic growth rate. So is around 8% it for the unemployment rate even after negative interest-rates ( still -0.4%) and a balance sheet now over 4.6 trillion Euros? That seems implied to some extent in talk of “labour supply shortages” when the unemployment rate is around double that of the US and UK and treble that of Japan. This returns us to the fear that the long-term unemployment in some of the Euro area is effectively permanent something we looked at during the crisis. In another form another ECB policymaker has suggested that.

I will focus my remarks today on the economies of central, eastern and south-eastern Europe (CESEE), covering both those that are already part of the European Union (EU) and those that are EU candidate countries or potential candidates………..Clearly, for most countries, convergence towards the EU-28 average has practically stalled since the outbreak of the financial crisis in 2008

Care is needed as only some of these countries are in the Euro but of course some of the others should be converging due to the application process. Even Benoit Coeure admits this.

And if there is no credible prospect of lower-income countries catching up soon, there is a risk that people living in those countries begin questioning the very benefits of membership of the EU or the currency union.

I have a couple of thoughts for you. Firstly Lithuania has done relatively well but the fact I have friends from there highlights how many are in London leading to the thought that how much has that development aided its economy? You may need to probe a little as due to the fact it was part of Russia back in the day some prefer to say they are Russian. Also the data reminds us of how poor that area that was once called Yugoslavia remains. It is hardly going to be helped by the development described below by Balkan Insight.

At the fifth joint meeting of the governments of Albania and Kosovo in Peja, in Kosovo, the Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama backed the decision of the Kosovo government to raise the tax on imports from Serbia and Bosnia from 10 to 100 per cent.

Banks

Here the ECB is conflicted. Like all central banks its priority is “the precious” otherwise known as the banks. Yet it is part of the operation to apply pressure on Italy and take a look at this development.

As this is very significant let us break it down and yes in the world of negative interest-rates and expanded central bank balance sheets Unicredit has just paid an eye-watering 7.83% on some bonds. Just the 6.83% higher than at the opening of 2018 and imagine if you held similar bonds with it. Ouch! Of that there is an element driven by changes in Italy’s situation but the additional part added by Unicredit seems to be around 3.5%.

If we look back I recall describing Unicredit as a zombie bank on Sky News around 7 years ago. The official view in more recent times is that it has been a success story in the way it has dealt with non performing loans and the like. Although of course success is a relative term with a share price of 11.5 Euros as opposed to the previous peak of more like 370 Euros. Now it is paying nearly 8% for its debt we need not only to question even that heavily depreciated share price and it gives a pretty dreadful implied view for the weaker Italian banks such as Monte Paschi which Johannes mentions. Also those non-performing loans which were packaged up and sold at what we were told “great deals” whereas now they look dreadful, well on the long side anyway.

Perhaps this was what the Bank of Italy meant by this.

The fall in prices for Italian government securities has caused a reduction in capital reserves and
liquidity and an increase in the cost of wholesale funding. The sharp decline in bank share prices has resulted
in a marked increase in the cost of equity. Should the tensions on the sovereign debt market be protracted, the
repercussions for banks could be significant, especially for some small and medium-sized banks.

Comment

We can bring things right up to date with this morning’s money supply data.

Annual growth rate of narrower monetary aggregate M1, comprising currency in circulation and overnight deposits, stood at 6.8% in October, unchanged from previous month.

So we are holding station to some extent although in real terms we are slightly lower as inflation has picked up to 2.2%. Thus the near-term outlook remains weak and we can expect a similar fourth quarter to the third. Actually I would not be surprised if it was slightly better but still weak..

Looking around a couple of years ahead the position is slightly better although we do not know yet how much of this well be inflation as opposed to growth.

Annual growth rate of broad monetary aggregate M3 increased to 3.9% in October 2018 from 3.6% in September (revised from 3.5%).

On the other side of the coin credit flows to businesses seem to have tightened.

Annual growth rate of adjusted loans to non-financial corporations decreased to 3.9% in October from 4.3% in September

Personally I think that the latter number is a lagging indicator but the ECB has trumpeted it as more of a leading one so let’s see.

The external factor which is currently in play is the lower oil price which will soon begin to give a boost and will reduce inflation if it remains near US $60 for the Brent Crude benchmark. But none the less the midnight oil will be burning at the ECB as it mulls the possibility that all that balance sheet expansion and negative interest-rates gave economic activity such a welcome but relatively small boost. Also it will be on action stations about the Italian banking sector. For myself I fear what this new squeeze on Italian banks will do to the lending to the wider economy which of course had ground to a halt as it is.

 

The Italian crisis continues to deepen

Sometimes financial life comes at your quickly and at others it feels like it takes an age. The current Italian crisis has managed in typically Italian style to have covered nearly all bases as we note the main driver simply being lack of economic growth meaning on a per head basis economic output is lower than when the Euro began, But if we move to the current there was a development yesterday, and context can be provided by statements from the new government that economic growth of 3% per annum is possible. From Italian statistics.

In 2018, GDP is expected to increase by 1.1 percent in real terms.The domestic demand will provide a contribution of 1.3 percentage points while foreign demand will account for a negative 0.2 percentage point and inventories will provide a null contribution. In 2019, GDP is estimated to increase by 1.3 percent in real terms driven by the contribution of domestic demand (1.3 percentage points)
associated to a null contribution of the foreign demand and inventories.

The initial response was surprise that Istat had held the previous forecast at 1.4% for so long. After all the Italian economy had been slowing for a while in quarterly terms from the peak of 0.5% and as it had been following a Noah’s Ark two-by-two style policy might have been expected to be 0.2% this time around, Except of course it was 0% reducing the annual rate to 0.8% which is below the current forecast.

If we look at the detail we see that such as it is there seems to be a reliance on consumption.

In 2018, exports will increase by 1.6 percent and imports will grow by 2.6 percent, both are expected
to accelerate in 2019 (3.2% and 3.5% respectively). Residential households consumption expenditure
is expected to grow by 0.9 percent in 2018 accelerating in 2019 (1.2%). The stabilisation in employment and the wages increase will support households purchasing power. Investment are expected to progressively decelerate both in 2018 (+3.9) and in 2019 (+3.2%).

In itself the trade decline is not a big deal as Italy has a strong trade position but it does subtract from GDP. It also poses a question for the Euro area “internal devaluation” model. Also it is hard not to question where that investment is going? After all in collective terms the economy is not growing. So we are left with domestic consumption relying on this.

Labour market conditions will improve over the forecasting period. Employment growth is expected to stabilise at 0,9 percent in 2018 and in 2019. At the same time, the rate of unemployment will decrease at 10.5 percent in the current year and at 10.2 percent in 2019.

Will the labour market continue to improve with economic growth slowing and maybe stopping completely? Frankly the only reason to forecast a better 2019 is the planned fiscal stimulus which of course is where the whole issue comes in.

Along the way we can get a new perspective from the fact that if we put 2010 at 100 the Italian economy peaked above 102 in early 2008 and has now recovered to just above 97.

Excessive Deficit Procedure

In essence the Euro area is stalling on the application of the EDP as it is hoping there might be a change of tack. Also I would imagine that it does not want to prod the Italian crisis with Brexit also up in the air. But there is something quite revealing in yesterday’s documentation from the European Commission.

Italy made a sizeable fiscal effort between 2010 and 2013, raising the primary surplus to over 2% of GDP and exiting the excessive deficit procedure in 2013 by keeping its headline deficit at a level not above 3% of GDP as of 2012 (down from more than 5% in 2009).

The reality if we look at the pattern of GDP was that returning to 2010 as our benchmark Italian GDP which was recovering from the initial credit crunch shock and rallying from ~94 to ~97 turned south from early 2011 and fell to below 93. Back then the EC and its acolytes were claiming that this was an expansionary fiscal contraction whereas if we allow for the lags it hit the Italian economy hard. There have been various mea culpas ( IMF mostly) and redactions of history since. But not only did Italy struggle to recover as even now we are only back to the 97 level where in GDP terms it started from of course it was then benefiting from both fiscal and monetary policy. Or as Mario Draghi likes to put it.

an ongoing broad-based economic expansion

If we look back to my article from the 26th of October Italy is now being told that fiscal policy cannot help and may make things worse too. So Italians may reasonably be annoyed and sing along with All Time Low.

‘Cause I’m damned if I do ya, damned if I don’t

Things that will not improve their humour is that it is the same Olivier Blanchard pushing this who was in the van of arguing that a fiscal contraction would boost the economy. Also that Euro area rhetoric is making the situation of their bond market worse.

Bond Market

Back on the 2nd of October I noted that the benchmark ten-year yield for Italy had risen to 3.4% but that such things took time to have an impact on the real as opposed to financial economy. Well it is 3.47% as I type this and I note that @liukzilla calculated that this phase of higher yields will cost Italy around 6.6 billion Euros in higher debt costs. Care is needed as it is not something to pay now but say over the next ten years as interest is paid. But a rising problem.

The new government suggested that retail investors might surge into the market but they have bought less than one billion Euro’s of this week’s offer which is at best a damp squib. Of course there are the banks…

Italian banks

Did somebody mention the banks? They are of course stuffed full of Italian government bonds and you can see the state of play courtesy of @LiveSquawk.

Italy’s 5 Star Movement Has Proposed Measures To Allow Unlisted Banks And Insurers Not To Mark To Market Gvt Bonds – RTRS Sources.

Yes that bad. But the circus for banks carries on regardless it would appear as we move to Reuters.

Carige said Italian banks had guaranteed they would buy bonds worth 320 million euros, with a further 80 million euros earmarked for private investors, possibly including existing shareholders.

So the tin can gets another kick as we note that this weakens the other banks which participate.

Comment

Let me add another dimension provided courtesy of the Financial Times Magazine and let us first set the scene.

Mafia syndicates in Italy have an estimated annual turnover of €150bn, according to a report by the anti-Mafia parliamentary committee in 2017.

They have moved into agriculture as it seems like easy money and the economic crisis gave them an opportunity as whilst conventional business struggled they had cash.

With margins as high as 700 per cent, profits from olive oil, for example, can be higher than those from cocaine — and with far less risk.

Also it gives you clean money to which Michael Corleone would nod approvingly. Here is one route.

A Mafia family could claim about €1m a year in EU subsidies on 1,000 hectares, while leasing it for as little as €37,000. “With profit margins as high as 2,000 per cent, with no risk, why sell drugs or carry out robberies when you can just wait for the cheque to arrive in the post?” he says by telephone from his home.

Here is an even more unpleasant one.

In February last year, 42 members of the Piromalli clan in Calabria were arrested and 40 farms seized in connection with the export of counterfeit oil to the US, sold as extra virgin, which retails for at least €7 a litre. A number of those arrested are now in prison awaiting trial. According to police, about 50 per cent of all extra-virgin olive oil sold in Italy is adulterated with cheap, poor-quality oil. Globally the proportion is even higher.

Makes me wonder about the bottle of olive oil in my kitchen and the “made in Italy” spaghetti. It is all nearly as bad as the video of Patrice Evra and the chicken or perhaps we should say salmonella.