What is going on with the banks of Italy?

Yesterday saw something of a familiar theme as we were told this by Fabrizio Pagani, the chief of staff at Italy’s Ministry of Economy and Finance.


You would be forgiven for thinking not only what again? But also experiencing some fatigue after being told it so often. Less than twelve hours later something else that is rather familiar turned up.


So they weren’t fixed for long it would seem! According to Bloomberg who had the interview we had another hostage to fortune as well from him.

“The story of Italian non-performing loans is over,” Pagani said.

He sounds so much like Finance Minster Padoan doesn’t he? In reality even those who are friendly to such ideas have doubts.

As you can see even Spain which was criticised for acting slowly in fact was 3/4 years ahead of Italy we note that the Italian problem got worse during this period. In fact Spain is in the process of repaying the ESM ( European Stability Mechanism) the money it borrowed for this.

Spain made the request for the repayment on 30 January 2018. One repayment will be for €2 billion, and is planned for 23 February 2018. The size of the second repayment will be €3 billion, and is scheduled for May 2018.

So in total this has happened.

Between December 2012 and February 2013, the ESM disbursed €41.3 billion to the Spanish government for the recapitalisation of the country’s banking sector……….Following the two repayments, Spain’s outstanding debt to the ESM will stand at €26.7 billion.

So Spain is exiting the procedure as Italy begins it and as is so usual Italy is doing it in its own way. For example in the tweet picture above the phrase bail in is used when in fact what it has done have had the features of bailouts as well. Also is this good or simply kicking the can somewhere else?

Investors also snapped up more than 100 billion euros ($123 billion) in non-performing Italian bank loans last year, which has helped reduce the level of net bad debt across the sector by more than a third.

Some may think that this may be more like vultures on their prey.

This month, Bob Diamond and Corrado Passera, the former bosses of Barclays Plc and Intesa Sanpaolo SpA, joined forces to shop for a lender to smaller Italian companies.

Monte Paschi

It too was in the news yesterday as Bloomberg told us this.

Fabrizio Pagani, the chief of staff at Italy’s Ministry of Economy and Finance, told Bloomberg News that Monte Paschi is in the picture for mergers after taking substantial steps to clean up its balance sheet since its rescue and introduce new management practices.

Who wants to merge with a zombie? I am reminded of what my late father used to tell me which is that more than a few takeovers and mergers only exist because the muddle the figures for a year or to. I can see why the Italian state might be keen as they did this.

A sale of Monte Paschi would cap a saga that saw Italy’s third-biggest bank, an icon of national finance, become engulfed by bad debts, criminal cases, and 6.7 billion euros in losses in the last two years. The government salvaged it as part of a 8.3 billion-euro recapitalization that strained ties between the country and the European Union over bailout rules.

Italy paid some 6.49 Euros a share as opposed to the 3.18 as I type this as we mull how the “substantial steps” have been ignored by the market which has more than halved the share price? We also learnt something from its bond issue in January. From the Financial Times.

Despite the low rating, the bond sale was three times subscribed and priced at a yield of just 5.375 per cent, confirming Monte Paschi’s ability to tap markets after its 2017 recapitalisation,

“Just 5.375%”? As in Europe these days that feels like riches beyond imagination! Especially if you note this.

The Italian government will provide a guarantee to the investment grade rated senior notes in this securitisation, which Monte Paschi will “retain” on its books.

I also thought that the bailout fund Atlante was pretty much out of cash.

It is able to derecognise the non-performing loans, however, because the riskier “mezzanine” and junior notes are being sold to the Italian Recovery Fund………..
While this fund — formerly known as Atlante — is private, it is part of a government-led initiative to clean up the Italian banking sector, and has far lower return targets than typical distressed debt buyers.

Anyway the share price reflects something rather different from the rhetoric as I note that according to Il Populista our old friend Finance Minister Padoan is on the case again.

The state will remain in Mps “for a few years”. Economy Minister Pier Carlo Padoan told the unions to add that “giving a number would be wrong and counterproductive for the markets”.

Giving wrong numbers has never bothered him before as I note this description of him which may be a quirk of Google translate.

The Minister of Economy, without shame,


Today has brought news that swings both ways for the Italian banks as we have got the data which determines the interest-rate for TLTRO II so it was not a surprise to see this.

The annual growth rate of adjusted loans to non-financial corporations increased to 3.4% in January, from 3.1% in December.

Of the new 24 billion Euros some 20 billion was for less than a year but presumably long enough to fulfil the ECB criteria with the Italian banks to the fore.

January net lending flows to the non-financial private sector were particularly strong in Germany and Italy (second largest in over 10 years). ( @fwred )

Yet so far they have gained little as the annual gain from this according to @fwred is 769 million Euros for the Spanish banks but 0 for the Italian ( Portuguese and Dutch) ones. Perhaps the last-minute dash will make a difference.

Veneto Banks

The collapse of Veneto Banca and Banca Popolare di Vicenza. last year led to many financial problems in the area. In banking terms this happened.

The two Veneto banks were wound down in June, with the state guaranteeing losses of up to €17bn, after the European Central Bank declared the lenders as failing. Intesa was handed as much as €4.8bn to help preserve its capital ratios from any adverse impact from the deal. ( FT)

Yet as this from IlFattoQuotidiano.it  in January shows the pain for many businesses and savers continues.

He finally gave up. But it took six hours of negotiation because the former Romanian bricklayer Marin Halarambie, 59, agreed to move his car from the entrance of the historic Veneto Banca headquarters in Montebelluna. Christmas Day had arrived to stage a very personal protest, as the bankruptcy of the bank cost him a loss of about 125 thousand euros.


This is a particularly Italian saga where official boasting about the lack of bank bailouts met a brick wall of bank collapses later. Even worse the problem deteriorated as they looked the other way. On this road equity investors suffered – who can forget Prime Minister Renzi telling people Monte Paschi was a good investment ? – and so did the savers who were encouraged to invest in the “safe” bank bonds.

Now the economic outlook is better we wait to see what happens next. But there is a clear distinction between my subject of yesterday the Netherlands and Italy and it is this. From January 11th.

According to preliminary estimates, in the third quarter of 2017: the House Price Index (see Italian IPAB) decreased by 0.5% compared with the previous quarter and by
0.8% in comparison to the same quarter of the previous year (it was -0.2% in the second quarter of 2017);

For all the machinations that have gone on Italy has so far been immune from the suggested cure seen so often elsewhere which is to make the banks mortgage assets look stronger via higher house prices. How very Italian! Still the winners here are Italian first time buyers if they can get a mortgage.

Last week Bank of Italy Deputy Governor Panetta gave a speech which in one way suggested he must know some incredibly pessimistic people.

During the financial crisis, Italy’s banking system proved much more resilient than expected by many observers.

But intriguingly he does agree with me that if the buyers of bad loans are getting a good deal this must weaken and not strengthen the banks?

A generalized sale of NPLs on the market would imply a large transfer of resources from banks to buyers.

No wonder Diamond Bob is on the case! Also this is yet again rather familiar.

While the secondary market for NPLs is showing signs of rapid growth, it is still opaque and relatively oligopolistic.


Simultaneous, blanket sales would further depress
market prices, magnifying the gap between the book and market values of NPLs. The result
for banks would be significant losses and reduced capital. This could have unintended effects
on individual banks as well as macroeconomic consequences through a contraction in credit
supply in countries where high NPL stocks are a concern for several banks.






The economy of Italy has yet to awaken from its “Girlfriend in a coma” past

The subject of Italy and its economy has been a regular feature on here as we have observed not only its troubled path in the credit crunch era but also they way that has struggled during its membership of the Euro. This will no doubt be an issue in next month’s election but the present period is one which should be a better phase for Italy. Firstly the Euro area economy is doing well overall and that should help the economy via improved exports.

Seasonally adjusted GDP rose by 0.6% in both the euro area (EA19) and in the EU28 during the fourth quarter of
2017, compared with the previous quarter……..Compared with the same quarter of the previous year, seasonally adjusted GDP rose by 2.7% in the euro area and
by 2.6% in the EU28 in the fourth quarter of 2017…….Over the whole year 2017, GDP grew by 2.5% in both zones.

The impact on the economy of Italy

If we switch now to the Italian economy we find that there has been a boost to the economy from the better economic environment. From the monthly economic report.

Italian exports keep increasing with a positive trend following world trade expansion…….Over the period September-November, foreign trade kept a positive trend
driven by the exports (+2.9%), while the imports increased at a lower pace (+0.6%).

However the breakdown was not as might be expected.

Sales to the non-EU area (+4.6%) contributed positively to the favorable trend in exports and more than the sales to the EU area (+1.5%). In 2017, trade with non-EU countries increased both exports (+8.2%) and imports (+10.8%).

So the export-led growth is stronger outside the Euro area than in it which is not what we might expect as we observe the way that the Euro has been strong as a currency. Effects in this area can be lagged so it is possible via factors such as the J-Curve that the new higher phase for the Euro has yet to kick in in terms of its impact on trade, so we will have to watch this space.


There was some good news on this front in December as the previous analysis had been this.

Taking the average values of September-November, shows that production decreased compared to the previous quarter (-0.2%, ). In the same period all the main industrial groupings recorded a decrease except durable consumer goods (+2.7% compared to the previous quarter).

As you can see that is not what might have been expected but last weeks’ data for December was more upbeat.

In December 2017 the seasonally adjusted industrial production index increased by 1.6% compared with the previous month. The percentage change of the average of the last three months with respect to the previous three months was +0.8.

This meant that the position for the year overall looked much better than the downbeat assessment above.

in the period January-December 2017 the percentage change was +3.0 compared with the same period of

If we move to the outlook for 2018 then the Markit business survey or PMI could not be much more upbeat.

Italy’s manufacturing sector enjoyed a strong start
to 2018, registering the highest growth in output
since early 2011 and one of the greatest rises in
new orders of the past 18 years.

In addition domestic demand was seen adding to the party.

but January data pointed to a growing contribution from within Italy itself.

This leads to hopes for improvement in one of the Achilles heels of the Italian economy.

The response from many manufacturers was to
bolster employment numbers, and January’s survey
indicated the second-strongest rise of employment
in the survey history.

Unemployment and the labour market

At first glance the latest data does not look entirely impressive.

In December 2017, 23.067 million persons were employed, -0.3% over November 2017. Unemployed were
2.791 million, -1.7% over the previous month.

There is a welcome fall in unemployment but employment which these days is often a leading indicator for the economy has dipped too.

Employment rate was 58.0%, -0.2 percentage points over the previous month, unemployment rate was
10.8% -0.1 percentage points over November 2017 and inactivity rate was 34.8%, +0.3 percentage points in
a month.

However if we look back we see that over the past year 173,000 more Italians have been employed and the level of unemployment has fallen by 273,000.  What we are still waiting for however is a clear drop in the unemployment rate which has been stuck around 11% for a while. We are told it has dropped to 10.8% but there has been a recent habit of revising the rate back up to 11% at a later date meaning we have been told more than a few times that it has fallen below it. Sadly much of the unemployment is concentrated at the younger end of the age spectrum.

Youth unemployment rate (aged 15-24) was 32.2%, -0.2 percentage points over the previous month.

So better than Greece but isn’t pretty much everywhere as we again wonder how many of these have never had a job and even more concerning, how many never will?

Sometimes we are told that higher unemployment rates are a consequence of better wages. But is we look at wages growth there does not seem to be much going on here.

The labor market outlook is characterized by the wage
moderation: in 2017 both the index of contractual wages per employee and that of hourly wages increased by +0.6% y-o-y.

On a nominal level that is a fair bit below even the UK but of course the main issue is in real or inflation adjusted terms.

In January 2018, according to preliminary estimates, the Italian consumer price index for the whole nation (NIC) increased by 0.2% on monthly basis and by 0.8% compared with January 2017 (it was +0.9% in December 2017).

So there was in fact a small fall in real wages in 2017 which we need to file away on two fronts. Firstly there is the apparent fact that better economic conditions in Italy are not being accompanied by real wage growth and in fact a small fall. Secondly we need to add that rather familiar message to our global database.

The banks

This is a long running story of how the banking sector carried on pretty much regardless after the credit crunch and built up a large store of non-performing assets or if you prefer bad loans. This has meant that many Italian banks are handicapped in terms of lending to help the economy and some have become zombified. From Bloomberg earlier.

Even after making reductions last year, Italian banks are still weighed down by more than 270 billion euros ($330 billion) of non-performing loans. Struggling households account for almost a fifth of that total, according to the Bank of Italy.

It is hard not to have a wry smile at a proposed solution.

The Bank of Italy says an improvement in the country’s real estate market is helping to reduce the risks for banks.

Whether that will do much good for what has become the symbol of the problem I doubt but here is the new cleaner bailed out Monte Paschi. From Bloomberg on Monday.

The bank, which is cutting about a fifth of its workforce, eliminating branches and plans to sell 28.6 billion euros of bad loans by 2021, posted 501.6 million-euro net loss in the last three months of the year.

How is the bailout going?

The shares were down 2.8 percent at 3.72 euros as of 9:55 a.m. The stock, which returned to trading Oct. 25 after an 10-month suspension, is now valued more than 43 percent below the 6.49 euros apiece paid by Italy for the rescue.

This morning it is 3.44 Euros so the beat goes on especially as we note that pre credit crunch and the various bailouts the equivalent price peak was over 8800.


This issue continues to be ongoing.

The population at 1st January 2018 is estimated to be 60,494,000; the decrease on the previous year was
around 100,000 units (-1.6 per thousand).

Driven by this.

The number of live births dropped to 464 thousand, 2% less than in 2016 and new minimun level ever.

We have seen on the news so often that there is considerable migration to Italy and if we look into the detail we see that not only is it so there is something tucked away in it.

The net international migration in 2017 amounted to +184 thousand, recording a consistent increase on the
previous year (+40 thousand).

Yet Italians themselves continued to leave in net terms as 45,000 returned but 112,000 left which is a little surprising in the circumstances. As to the demographics well here they are.

At 1 January 2018, 22.6% of the population was aged 65 or over, 64.1% was aged between 15 and 64, while
only 13.4% was under 15 years of age. The mean age of the population exceeded 45 years.

The theme is that the natural change has got worse over the past decade rising from pretty much zero to the 183,000 of 2017 but contrary to the news bulletins net immigration is lower as it approached half a million in 2007.


This morning has brought news which will be very familiar to readers of my work which is an Italian economy which seems to struggle to grow at more than around 1% per annum for any sustained period.

In the fourth quarter of 2017 the seasonally and calendar adjusted, chained volume measure of Gross
Domestic Product (GDP) increased by 0.3 per cent with respect to the third quarter of 2017 and by 1.6 per
cent in comparison with the fourth quarter of 2016.

As we note a negative official interest-rate ( -0.4%) and a large amount of balance sheet expansion from the European Central Bank the monetary taps could not be much more open. Italy’s government in particular benefits directly by being able to borrow very cheaply ( ten-year yield 2.05%) when you consider it has a national debt to annual GDP ratio of 134.1%. Thanks Mario!

Thus we return on Valentines Day to the “Girlfriend in a Coma” theme of Bill Emmott which is a shame as Italy is a lovely country. Can it change? Let us hope so and maybe the undeclared economy can be brought to task. Meanwhile if you want to take the Matrix style blue pill here is Bloomberg.

ITALY: GDP expanded by 0.3% in 4Q, a bit less than expected. Still, 2017 was the best growth year (+1.5%) since 2010. Shows how broad-based the euro-area recovery has become. A rising tide lifts all boats





Why have house prices in Italy continued to fall?

One of the features of these times is that economic policy is pretty much invariably house price friendly. Not only have central banks around the world slashed official interest-rates thereby reducing variable mortgage rates but many followed this up with Quantitative Easing bond buying which pushed fixed-rate mortgages (even) lower as well. If that was not enough some of the liquidity created by the QE era was invested in capital cities around the globe by investors looking to spread their risks. In addition we saw various credit easing programmes which were designed to refloat even zombie banks and get them back lending again. In my country this type of credit easing was called the Funding for Lending Scheme which did so by claiming to boost business lending but in reality boosted the mortgage market. Looked at like that we see policies which could not have been much more house price friendly.

If we switch to the Euro area we see that this went as far as the ECB declaring a negative deposit rate ( -0.4%) which it still has in spite of these better economic times and a balance sheet totaling 4.5 trillion Euros. This has led to house price recoveries and in particular in two of the countries which had symbolised a troubled housing market which were of course Ireland and Spain. But intriguingly one country has missed out as we were reminded of only yesterday.

The Italian Difference

Yesterday morning the official statistics body Istat told us this.

According to preliminary estimates, in the third quarter of 2017: the House Price Index (see Italian IPAB) decreased by 0.5% compared with the previous quarter and by
0.8% in comparison to the same quarter of the previous year (it was -0.2% in the second quarter of 2017);

The breakdown shows a small nudge higher for new properties that in aggregate is weaker than the fall in price for exisiting properties.

prices of new dwellings increased by 0.3% compared to the previous quarter and by 0.6% with respect to
the third quarter of 2016 (up from +0.3% observed in the second quarter); prices of existing dwellings
decreased by 0.7% compared to the previous quarter and by 1.3% with respect to the same quarter of the
previous year.

Property owners in Italy may be a little jealous of those in Amsterdam who have just seen a 13.5% rise in house prices in the past year.

A ( space) oddity

The situation gets more curious if we note that as discussed earlier the mortgage market has got more favourable. In terms of credit then there should be more around as at the aggregate level the ECB has expanded its balance sheet and we know that Italian banks took part in this at times on a large scale. Whilst the overall process has been an Italian style shambles there have (finally) been some bank bailouts or rather hybrid bailin/outs.

If we move from credit supply to price we see that mortgage rates have been falling in Italy. The website Statista tells us that the 3.68% of the opening of 2013 was replaced by 2.1% at the half-way point of 2017. The fall was not in a straight line but is a clear fall. Another way of putting this is to use the composite mortgage rate of the Bnak of Italy. When ECB President gave his “Whatever it takes ( to save the Euro speech)” in July 2012 it might also have been save Italian house prices as the mortgage rate fell from 3.95% then to 1.98% as of last November so in essence halved.

So if we apply the play book house prices should been rallying in Italy and maybe strongly.

House Price Slump

Reality is however very different as the data in fact shows annual falls. For example 4.4% in 2014 and 2.6% in 2015 and 0.8% in 2016. Indeed if we look for some perspective in the credit crunch era we see the Financial Times reporting this.

In real terms, Italy’s real house prices have been falling consistently since 2007 and are now 23 per cent lower — a drop that has brought the construction and property sectors to their knees.

If we look back to the credit crunch impact and then the Euro area crisis which then gave Italy a double-whammy hit then we see that lower house prices are covered by Radiohead.

No alarms and no surprises

Although existing property owners may be singing along to the next part of the lyric.

let me out of here

What is more surprising is the fact that the economic improvement has had such a different impact on house prices in Italy compared to its Euro area peers.

Italy was the only country in the EU where house prices contracted in the second quarter of last year, according to the latest figures from Eurostat, the EU statistics agency. In contrast, almost two-thirds of EU countries are reporting house price growth of more than 5 per cent. ( FT )

If we look at the house price index we see that as of the third quarter of last year it was at 98.6 compared to the 100 of 2015. So just as Mario Draghi and the ECB were “pumping up” monetary policy house prices in Italy were doing not much and if anything drifting lower. Looking further back we see that the index was 116.3 in 2010 so it has not been a good period of time for property owners in Italy and that does matter because of this.

and in a country where more than 72 per cent of households own their own home

I have to confess I was not previously aware of what a property owning nation Italy is.

The banks

We have looked many times at the troubled banking sector in Italy and we have seen from the numbers above that the property market and the banking sector have been clutching each other tightly in the credit crunch era. Maybe this is at least part of the reason why the Italian establishment has dithered so much over the banking bailouts required as it waited for a bottom which so far has not arrived. This has left the Italian banking sector with 173.1 billion Euros of bad loans sitting on their balance sheets.

Property now accounts for more corporate bad loans than any other sector: 42 per cent compared with 29 per cent in 2011………And for property-related lending the proportion of loans turning bad has been twice as high as in the manufacturing sector, weighing on banks’ €173bn of bad debts. ( FT)

So something of a death spiral as one zombie sector feeds off another as this reply to me indicates.

The trend is getting better for Italian house market but it is a vicious circle: banks’ sales of repossessed property is also contributing to the prolonged house price contraction. The number of real estate units sold via auction increased 25 % in the last 2 years ( @Raff_Perf )

As The Cranberries would say “Zombie, zombie,zombie”

Disposing of bad property loans has also been slower than for other sectors……… In contrast, banks continue to harbour hopes of greater recovery of secured loans to construction and real estate companies. As a result, this lending has remained in limbo for longer.

Another forward guidance fail?


One way of looking at Italy right now is of a property owning democracy which has had a sustained fall in house prices. This of course adds to the fact that on an individual basis economic output or GDP has fallen in the Euro area as output stagnated but the population rose meaning the net fall must now be around 5%. It is hard not to wonder if the “Whatever it takes” speech of Mario Draghi was not at least partly driven by rising mortgage rates in Italy ( pre his speech they went over 4%) and falling house prices in his home country. Along the way it is not only the banking sector which is affected.

Construction has almost halved from its pre-crisis level. ( FT)

That puts the UK’s construction problem I looked ta yesterday into perspective doesn’t it?

Looking ahead we see a better economic situation for Italy as it has returned to economic growth. What this has done if we look at annual house price numbers is slowed the decline but not yet caused any rises. In some ways this is welcome as first time buyers will no doubt be grateful that they have not seen the rises for example seen in much of my home country but if with all the monetary policy effort the results are what they are what happens when the next recession turns up?

Still if you want the bill pill Matrix style there is this from AURA who call themselves real estate experts.

“I would say it’s a mathematical fact: house prices cannot drop more than 30%. I believe that this drop of values is over and it’s now time to buy”. Stefano Rossini, Ceo for MutuiSuperket.it,

Perhaps he has never been to Ireland or more curiously Spain.

Me on Core Finance





Can the economy of Italy awake from its coma?

A pleasant feature of 2017 has been the way that the economy of Italy has at least seen a decent patch.  Although sadly the number this morning has been revised lower.

In the third quarter of 2017 the seasonally and calendar adjusted, chained volume measure of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) increased by 0.4 per cent with respect to the second quarter of 2017 and by 1.7 per cent in comparison with the third quarter of 2016

The improved economic outlook for the Euro area has pulled Italy with it although you may note that even with it the numbers are only a little better than the UK so far in annual terms and we of course are in a weaker patch or an economic disaster depending what you read. In fact if you look at annual growth Italy has been improving since the beginning of 2014 but for quite some time it was oh so slow such that the annual rate of growth did not reach 1% until the latter part of 2015 and it is only this year that it has pushed ahead a bit more. Back in 2014 there was a lot of proclaiming an Italian economic recovery whereas in fact the economy simply stopped shrinking.

Girlfriend in a coma

This means that in spite of the better news Italy looks set in 2017 to reach where it was in terms of economic output between 2003 and 2004. This girlfriend in a coma style result has been driven by two factors. First is the fact that the initial impact of the credit crunch was added to by the Euro area crisis such that annual economic output as measured by GDP fell by 8.5% between 2007 and 2014. The second is the weak recovery phase since then which has not boosted it much although of course it is now doing a little better.

If we look ahead a not dissimilar problem seems to emerge. From the Monthly Economic Outlook.

In 2017 GDP is expected to increase by 1.5 percent in real terms.The domestic demand will provide a
contribution of 1.5 percentage points while foreign demand will account for a negative 0.1 percentage
point conterbalaced by the contribution of inventories (0.1 pp). In 2018 GDP is estimated to increase
by 1.4 percent in real terms driven by the contribution of domestic demand (1.5 percentage points)
associated to a negative contribution of the foreign demand (-0.1 percentage points).

When ECB President Mario Draghi made his “everything it takes ( to save the Euro)” speech back in 2012 he might have hoped for a bit more economic zest from his home country.  Even now with the Euro area economy displaying something of a full head of steam Italy does not seem to be doing much better than its long-term average which is to grow at around 1% per annum. That is in the good times and as we noted earlier it gets hit hard in the bad times.

The girlfriend in a come theme builds up if we recall this from the 4th of July.

If we move to a measure which looks at the individual experience which is GDP per capita we see that it has fallen by around 5% over that time frame as the same output is divided by a population which has grown.

There will have been an improvement from the growth in the third quarter but we are still noting a fall in GDP per capita of over 4% in Italy in the Euro era. So more than a lost decade on that measure. As I have pointed out before Italy has seen positive migration which helps with future demographic issues but does not seem to have helped the economy much in the Euro area. For example net immigration was a bit under half a million in 2007 and whilst it has fallen presumably because of the economic difficulties it is still a factor.

During 2016, the international net migration grew by more than 10,000, reaching 144,000 (+8% compared to
2015). The immigration flow was equal to nearly 301,000 (+7% compared to 2015).

Putting it another way the population of Italy was 56.9 million when it joined the Euro and at the opening of 2017 it was 60.6 million. So more people mostly by immigration as the birth rate is falling have produced via little extra output according to the official statistics.

The labour market

If we switch to the labour market we see a reflection of the problem with output and GDP.

In October 2017, 23.082 million persons were employed, unchanged over September 2017. Unemployed
were 2.879 million, -0.1% over the previous month.

So only a small improvement but the pattern below begs more than a few questions.

Employment rate was 58.1%, unemployment rate was 11.1% and inactivity rate was 34.5%, all unchanged
over September 2017.

There are of course issues with a double-digit unemployment which has as part of its make-up an ongoing problem with youth unemployment.

Youth unemployment rate (aged 15-24) was 34.7%, -0.7 percentage points over the previous month

If UB40 did a song for youth unemployment in Italy it would have to be the one in three ( and a bit) not the one in ten

Also the employment rate is internationally low which is mostly reflected in a high inactivity rate. The unemployment rate in Italy is not far from where it was when it joined the Euro.

The banks

It was only last week I looked at the ongoing problems of the Italian banks and whilst they have had many self-inflicted problems it is also true that they have suffered from a weak Italian economy this century. So they have suffered something of a double whammy which means Banca Carige is trying to raise 560 million Euros with the state of play being this according to Ansa.

Out of the main basket Carige, closed the trading of rights to raise capital, it remains at 0.01 euros.

A share price of one Euro cent speaks rather eloquently for itself. If you go for the third capital increase in four years what do you expect?

National Debt

Italy is not especially fiscally profligate but the consequence of so many years of economic struggles means that the relative size of the national debt has grown. From it statistics office.

The government deficit to GDP ratio decreased from 2.6% in 2015 to 2.5% in 2016. The primary surplus as a percentage of GDP, equal to 1.5% in 2016, remained unchanged compared to 2015.

The government debt to GDP ratio was 132.0% at the end of 2016, up by 0.5 percentage points with respect to the end of 2015.

For those who recall the early days of the crisis in Greece the benchmark of a national debt to GDP ratio was set at 120% so as not to embarrass Italy (and Portugal). As you can see it misfired.

Italy has particular reason to be grateful for the QE bond buying of the ECB which has kept its debt costs low otherwise it would be in real trouble right now.

Although on the other side of the coin Italians are savers on a personal or household level.

The gross saving rate of Consumer households (defined as gross saving divided by gross disposable
income, the latter being adjusted for the change in the net equity of households in pension funds reserves)
was 7.5%, compared with 7.7% in the previous quarter and 9.0% in the second quarter of 2016.


The issue with the Italian economy is that the current improvement is only a thin veneer on the problems of the past. It may awake from the coma but then doesn’t seem to do that much before it goes back to sleep. The current economic forecasts seem to confirm more of the same as we fear what might happen in the next down turn.

One part of the economy that is doing much better is the manufacturing sector according to this morning’s survey released by Markit.

Italy’s manufacturing industry continued to soar in
November as strong external demand, especially
for capital goods, continued to underpin surging
levels of output in the sector.
“Capacity subsequently came under pressure, as
evidenced by the strongest recorded rise in
backlogs of the series history. Companies again
added to their staffing levels as a result.

Let us hope that this carries as we again wonder how much of the economic malaise suffered by Italy is caused by output switching to the unregistered sector.

Me on CoreTV Finance



The Italian banks and how they have contributed to a possible end to deposit protection

A regular feature of recent years has been the Italian banking saga where we are continually reassured that banks are fine and then it turns out that they are not. Many of the misrepresentations have come from Finance Minister Padoan who was in fine form in January according to Politico.

Italian Finance Minister Pier Carlo Padoan has defended the way his country dealt with its banking crisis, saying the government had “only spent €3 billion” on bailouts, in an interview with Die Welt published today.

“We are the EU country that has paid the least to save its banks,” Padoan said. Out of 600 banks, only eight “have problems,” he noted, saying the “system as a whole is not in crisis,” having “withstood the financial crisis.”

Apparently this is a mere bagatelle or the Italian equivalent.

Italy’s banking system is groaning under €360 billion in bad loans,

Such is his loose association with the truth he claimed this.

“I assure you, we have no interest in state intervention,” Padoan said

whilst doing this.

The government has set aside a €20-billion fund to save banks, and is expected to provide roughly €6.7 billion of that to prop up ailing Tuscan lender Monte dei Paschi di Siena.

Oh and he had one last go at what in modern parlance is called “misspeaking”.

Everything has been done “according to European guidelines,” the finance minister added, defending the use of bail-ins, whereby creditors and depositors take a loss on their holdings to help rescue a failing bank.

Actually what was about to come drove a Challenger tank through the rules and in my opinion has contributed to potentially ominous developments for bank depositors in the Euro area. At the moment deposits up to 100,000 Euros are covered unequivocally but on the 8th of this month the European Central Bank published an opinion piece including this and the emphasis is mine.

The general exception for covered deposits and claims
under investor compensation schemes should be replaced by limited discretionary exemptions to
be granted by the competent authority in order to retain a degree of flexibility. Under that approach,
the competent authority could, for example, allow depositors to withdraw a limited amount of
deposits on a daily basis consistent with the level of protection established under the Deposit
Guarantee Schemes Directive (DGSD)34,

That has echoes of the demonetisation shambles that took place in India a year or so ago with queues around the corner for the banks. Now let us take care as the deposit protection scheme still exists as I have seen plenty of places on social media claiming it does not but there are questions about it in the future as you can see. One of my themes is in play here as we note that the ECB is much more concerned about “the precious” than the rights and maybe losses of depositors.

The ECB cautions that prolonged periods during which depositors have no access to their deposits undermine confidence in the banking system and might ultimately create risks to financial stability.

You don’t say!

Monte Paschi

Top of the list as ever is the world’s oldest bank and in terms of the terminator it’s back. From Reuters on the 25th of October.

Shares in the bank opened on Wednesday at 4.10 euros, which became the reference price for the session, and then rose to as much as 5.26 euros, up 28 percent.

That price translates to a paper loss of 1.3 billion euros for Italian taxpayers, who are set to hold 68 percent of the Tuscan bank, which was central to public and private finances in Siena and the surrounding region.

Italy’s government paid 6.49 euros a share in August, when it pumped 3.85 billion euros into Monte dei Paschi, and is spending another 1.5 billion euros to shield some of the bank’s junior bondholders, whose debt was converted into equity.

Actually since then shareholders have had a rather familiar sinking feeling as the price as I type this is 3.95 Euros as I type this. Perhaps the former Prime Minister has suggested the shares are a good buy again as of course last time in an unfortunate mistranslation that actually meant good-bye. As I pointed out last week troubles are brewing around this issue. From Reuters.

A group of bondholders challenged Italy’s rescue of ailing bank Monte dei Paschi di Siena (MI:BMPS), suing the lender over the cancellation of their investments and calling for the bonds to be reinstated.

The Italian banking enquiry looked at the state of play yesterday and there are allegations of wrong doing pretty much everywhere as losses were hidden. Indeed Germany’s banking supervisor got dragged in as there are claims it kept back information on the derivatives contracts with Deutsche Bank.

Banca Carige

Next on the list there is this from Reuters this morning.

 Italy’s Banca Carige warned that its working capital is not sufficient to satisfy its own needs for the next 12 months, the lender said in he prospectus for its imminent capital increase.

Carige also said it had not yet received the final SREP assessment by the European Central Bank, adding it could not rule out a request by the authority for additional capital strengthening measures.

The bank secured backing from core shareholders and underwriters for a vital 560 million euro cash call in a last-minute agreement signed on Friday.


Here is IlSole from Sunday via Google Translate on this subject.

A 70% collapse in less than two weeks had not been taken into account by anyone in Sondrio. Yet that is what is happening in the title of Credito Valtellinese. The Lombard bank has seen its capitalization deflating from 280 million to 95 million in a dozen sessions. And triggering sales was the announcement of the same bank to raise a 700 million capital increase.

There are obvious issues in wanting an extra 700 million Euros when your value is 280 million let alone 95 million! Anyway the share price has seen better days as it has fallen by just under 6% to 1.38 Euros as I type this.

Banca Popolare di Bari.

In a former life I used to deal with quite a few Italian banks on behalf of Deutsche Bank and am straining my memory to recall if my trip to Bari included this one. Anyway times were seemingly much better than now if this letter quoted in i due punti in September is any guide.

An important letter sent by Federconsumatori Italia to the Minister of the Economy, to the Governor of Banca d’Italia and to the President of Consob ….
It reads on the Republic signing of Antonello Cassano ” The bank has ruined our lives, we want to go back our savings. ” It is a climate of anger and despair that one breathes in the headquarters of the Banca Popolare di Bari shareholder protection committee………Investigations by the Bari Public Prosecutor’s Office describe years of irregular management, loss accounts and abnormal loans. Heavy offenses challenged at the top of Bpb, by the association for delinquency and fraud until false statements in the prospectus.


There is much to consider here as this is happening at the wrong stage in the cycle as the Italian economy has improved ( 0.5% GDP growth in the third quarter) which should be supporting the banks. Some of the non performing loans will be improving. However contrary to the boasting of Finance Minister Padoan the low bailout figure for Italy was a form of denial as problems were hidden and then ignored meaning that they got worse. A factor in this has been Italy’s problem with the size of its national debt and an aversion to adding to it.So now we find ongoing troubles instead of improvement.

Also the ongoing crisis and subversion of Euro area rules has in my view contributed to the way that the ECB is now considering changes to deposit protection. There is an irony here as its President has a past deeply entwined with all this as not only was he Governor of the Bank of Italy but there is a clue in the way that the banking regulations are called the “Draghi Laws”! Here is how he sums up the current state of play.

The other trend is the growing resilience of the financial sector.

Just for clarity in officialese banks are always resilient up to the day they collapse. But Mario is bright enough to cover himself.

Clearly this trend hides some variation among banks, which is largely driven by differences in their business models.

Can anybody think of who he might mean?


What are the consequences of a parallel currency for Italy?

This week has seen the revival of talk about a subject which has done the rounds before. It would also appear that you cannot keep Silvio Berlusconi down as he was the person bringing it back into the news! Here is what was put forwards according to the Financial Times.

Berlusconi said the right-wing Lega Nord’s proposal of introducing the so-called ‘mini-BoT’ (short-term, interest-free, small-sized government securities, a sort of ‘IOUs’ to be used as internal currency to pay government suppliers, taxes, social security contributions, etc) would not be too far from his idea of a parallel currency.

There are quite a few issues here but let us stick to the obvious question which is could it happen? The FT again.

Berlusconi’s point then is that a parallel currency could be launched entirely legally within the constructs of European treaties, with the ECB potentially powerless to intervene once the decision has been taken.

Either way, regardless of whether Italy goes down the path of an explicit parallel currency or the introduction of small-sized Italian government securities, it’s clear the will to break up the euro’s monopoly in Italy is growing.

According to Citi’s analysts more than two thirds of Italian voters currently support parties with an anti-euro stance.

An interesting view although of course likely to cause something of an Italian turf war as the current President of the ECB Mario Draghi told us this in July 2012.

And so we view this, and I do not think we are unbiased observers, we think the euro is irreversible. And it’s not an empty word now, because I preceded saying exactly what actions have been made, are being made to make it irreversible.

Of course the speech went further with the by now famous phrase below.

Within our mandate, the ECB is ready to do whatever it takes to preserve the euro. And believe me, it will be enough.

So there would be an especial irony should it be that Mario’s home country ends up torpedoing the whole project. Perhaps that is why his speech this morning refers back to 2012.

Investors had begun pricing redenomination risk into sovereign debt and interbank markets, as they worried about the possible break-up of the euro area.

And reminds us of his “Jedi Mind Trick” from back then.

This is why we announced Outright Monetary Transactions (OMTs) as an instrument that can support our monetary policy. The idea was for the ECB to purchase the sovereign bonds of countries affected by panic-based redenomination risk.

This brings us back to this week where Italian bond yields rose in response to such risk but only to 2.1% for the ten-year as I type this. So some 5% lower than the time of the Euro crisis and those selling Italian bonds would most likely be selling them to the bond buyers of the ECB. So in that sense Mario has played something of a blinder here especially if we allow for the fact that going forwards the ECB may purchase such bonds disproportionately ( partly because it is running out of German bonds to buy).

Some care is needed as on the face of it there is only one winner which is the “whatever it takes” ECB. But take care because if we dive a little deeper there is the issue of the ECB being backed by 19 different treasuries including the Italian one. What if people started to believe it would no longer be one of them? What would the other treasuries think about owning lots of Italian government bonds ( 283.7 billion Euros)? It would make the discussions with the UK look like a tea party.

How did this begin?

In essence the parallel currency thoughts came out of this summarised by Roubini’s Economonitor in July 2014.

Since 2008, Italy’s industrial production has shrunk 25 per cent. In the last quarter of 2013, while exports reached back to almost the same level as in 2007, household consumption was down by about 8 per cent and investment by 26 per cent, with a capacity loss in manufacturing hovering around 15 per cent. Between 2007-2013 employment fell by more than a million, and the unemployment rate more than doubled (Banca d’Italia 2014a).

So we have the issue of Italian economic underperformance which regular readers will be well aware of. Not only was economic output below that below the credit crunch peak it went below the level of the year 2000. On an individual level the position was in fact even worse as the population has grown in the Euro area and I recall calculating that economic output ( GDP) per head was in fact 7% lower than in 2000.

What about now?

Whilst the specific numbers this morning were for France and Germany the Markit PMI business survey hinted at more growth for Italy.

The rest of the eurozone saw a slightly weaker increase in output during the month, albeit one that was still marked. A slower rise in services activity outweighed stronger growth of manufacturing output.

This adds to last weeks official release.

In the second quarter of 2017 the seasonally and calendar adjusted, chained volume measure of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) increased by 0.4 per cent with respect to the first quarter of 2017 and by 1.5 per cent in comparison with the second quarter of 2016.

So we find an irony in that the parallel currency has been revived when Italy is doing better economically. The catch is that if we move to the individual experience and look at GDP per inhabitant we see the underling issue. In 2007 GDP per individual was 28.699 Euros and in 2016 it was 25876 Euros in 2010 prices.


There is a fair bit to consider here and the first is that parallel currencies are usually not approved by the government and may even be restricted or made illegal. Usually it is the US Dollar being used due to a loss of faith in the national currency although in an irony some places could use the Euro. We saw an example of the US Dollar being used in Ukraine for example. So the crux of the matter in many ways would be what would be legal tender in Italy going forwards and as someone observed when we looked at Bitcoin can it be used to pay taxes? Presumably this time the answer to the latter would be yes.

Next comes the interrelated issues of capital flight and currency depreciation or devaluation. I think that it is clear that large sums would leave Italy which poses the issue of whether a 1:1 exchange-rate could be maintained and for how long? I see no mention for example of what the official interest-rate would be? Moving onto debts such as bank debt and Italian government bonds or BTPs in theory the ECB could insist on repayment in Euros but in practice we come to the famous quote from Joseph Stalin.

“How many divisions does the Pope of Rome have?”

In the end it comes down to the words fiat and and faith. The first is easy as the government can make a law but will people not only have faith but really believe? Also in a way it is something of a side show ( Bob) because both pre and during the Euro what Italy has needed is reform and of course neither has delivered it. Mario Draghi reminds us of this at every ECB press conference.





The economic problems of Italy continue

We have become familiar with the economic problems which have beset Italy this century. First membership of the Euro was not the economic nirvana promised by some as the economy ony grew by around 1% per annum in what were good years for others. Then not only did the credit crunch  hit but it was quickly followed by the Euro area crisis which hit Italy hard in spite of the fact that it did not have the housing boom and bust that affected some of its Euro area colleagues. It did however not miss out on a banking crisis which the Italian establishment ignored for as long as it could and is still doing its best to look away from even now. This all means that the economic output or GDP ( Gross Domestic Product) of Italy is now pretty much the same as it was when Italy joined the Euro. If we move to a measure which looks at the individual experience which is GDP per capita we see that it has fallen by around 5% over that time frame as the same output is divided by a population which has grown.

There is an irony in this as looking forwards Italy has a demographic problem via its ageing population but so far importing a solution to this has led to few if any economic benefits. That may well be why the issue has hit the headlines recently as Italy struggles to deal with the consequences of the humanitarian crisis unfolding in and around the Mediterranean Sea. But we have found oursleves so often looking at an Italian economy which in many ways has lived up or if you prefer down to the description of “Girlfriend in a Coma”.

Good Times

One thing which has changed in Italy’s favour is the economic outlook for the Euro area itself. It was only last week that the President of the ECB Mario Draghi reminded us of this.

If one looks at the percentage of all sectors in all euro area countries that currently have positive growth, the figure stood at 84% in the first quarter of 2017, well above its historical average of 74%. Around 6.4 million jobs have been created in the euro area since the recovery began…… since January 2015 – that is, following the announcement of the expanded asset purchase programme (APP) – GDP has grown by 3.6% in the euro area.

This was backed up yesterday by the private sector business surveys conducted by Markit.

The rate of expansion in the eurozone manufacturing
sector accelerated to its fastest in over six years in
June, reflecting improved performances across
Germany, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Ireland,
Greece and Austria.

Later they went even further.

At current levels, the PMI is indicative of factory output growing at an annual rate of some 5%, which in turn indicates the goods producing sector will have made a strong positive contribution to second quarter economic growth.

Good news indeed and if we look in more detail at the manufacturing detail for Italy it looks to be sharing some of this.

Italian manufacturers recorded a strong end to the
second quarter, with output growth picking up on
the back of robust export orders……Survey evidence indicated that higher demand from
abroad was a principal driving factor, with new
export orders rising at the fastest pace for over two
years in June.

Ah export-led growth? Economists have had that as a nirvana for years and indeed decades albeit that of course not everyone can have it. But the situation described set a hopeful theme for economic growth in the quarter just past.

The Italian manufacturing sector continued its
recent solid performance into June. At 55.2, the
PMI remained below April’s recent peak (56.2), but
its average over the second quarter as a whole was
the best seen in more than six years.

There were even signs of hope for what has become a perennial Italian problem.

New staff were taken on during the month to help
deal with the additional production requirements
that resulted from new orders. The rate of job
creation remained strong by historical standards
despite easing to the weakest seen since January.

The Unemployment Conundrum

Here we found disappointment as yesterday’s release struck a different beat to the good times message elsewhere.

Unemployed were 2.927 million, +1.5% over the previous month…….. unemployment rate was 11.3%, +0.2
percentage points over the previous month, and inactivity rate was 34.8%, unchanged over April 2017.
Youth unemployment rate (aged 15-24) was 37.0%, +1.8 percentage points over the previous month and
youth unemployment ratio in the same age group was 9.4%, +0.4 percentage points in a month.

The data for May saw a disappointing rise in unemployment and an especially disappointing one in youth unemployment. If these are better times then a grim message is being sent to the youth of Italy with more than one in three out of work and even worse the number rising. With inactivity unchanged this meant that employment also disappointed.

In May 2017, 22.923 million persons were employed, -0.2% over April 2017…….Employment rate was 57.7%, -0.1 percentage points over April 2017, unemployment rate was 11.3%.

The annual data does show a fall of 0.3% in the unemployment rate over the past year but that compares poorly with the 0.9% decline in the Euro area in total. Of the European Union states Italy now has the third worst unemployment rate as Croatia has seen quite an improvement and in fact has one even higher than that in Cyprus. If we move to youth unemployment then frankly it is hard to see how a country with 37% youth unemployment can share the same currency as one with 6.7%, Germany?

The banks

There are continuing issues here as I note that there are rumours of some of the problem loans of Monte Paschi being sold. The problem with that is we have been told this so many times before! Then last night we were told this.

italian regional lender banca carige approved a capital increase of 500 million euros and asset sales of 200 million euros ( h/t @lemasebachthani)

This added to this from the end of last month.

DBRS Ratings Limited (DBRS) has today placed the BBB ratings on the obbligazioni bancarie garantite (OBG; the Italian legislative covered bonds) issued under the EUR 5,000,000,000 Banca Carige S.p.A. Covered Bonds Programme (Carige OBG1 or the Programme), guaranteed by Carige Covered Bond S.r.l., Under Review with Negative Implications. There are currently 20 series of Carige OBG1 outstanding under the Programme with a nominal amount of EUR 3.08 billion.

Today has seen an example of never believe anything until it is officially denied in the Financial Times.

One of the eurozone’s senior banking supervisors has defended her institution’s role in handling the failure of two Italian lenders but said her watchdog needed new tools to protect taxpayers better from bank failures.


Let us hope that these are indeed better times for the Italian economy and its people. However whilst the background gives us hope that it will be running with the engine of a Ferrari fears remain if we look at the banks and the employment data that it may instead be using the engine of a Fiat. It is hard not be a little shocked by this from the Telegraph.

Italy’s chronic unemployment problem has been thrown into sharp relief after 85,000 people applied for 30 jobs at a bank – nearly 3,000 candidates for each post.

The 30 junior jobs come with an annual salary of euros 28,000 ($41,000). The work is not glamorous – one duty is feeding cash into machines that can distinguish bank notes that are counterfeit or so worn out they should no longer be in circulation.

The Bank of Italy whittled down the applicants to a short-list of 8,000, all of them first-class graduates with a solid academic record behind them.